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Sample records for cell inactivation rates

  1. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  2. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  3. Behavioral inspiratory inhibition: inactivated and activated respiratory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, J

    1989-11-01

    1. Eleven adult cats were trained to stop inspiration in response to a conditioning stimulus. The conditioning stimuli were presented at the onset of inspiration at intervals of approximately 20-30 s. Intratracheal pressures, diaphragmatic activity, and the extracellular activity of single medullary respiratory neurons were recorded while the animals performed this response. 2. Inactivation of the diaphragm to the conditioning stimuli occurred at latencies that varied from 40 to 110 ms and averaged 74 +/- 32 (SD) ms. 3. The subjects of this report are 38 inspiratory neurons that were inactivated and 19 cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally. These cells were located in the region of n. ambiguus and the ventrolateral n. of tractus solitarius. 4. The inspiratory cells that were inactivated behaviorally had the following characteristics: 1) Most had an augmenting inspiratory profile with (n = 14) or without (n = 9) postinspiratory activity. Other types were inspiratory throughout (n = 5), decrementing inspiratory (n = 3), tonic inspiratory (n = 4), early inspiratory (n = 2), and expiratory-inspiratory (n = 1). 2) Their mean discharge rate was 39 +/- 2.7 (SE) Hz. 3) The latency of their inactivation in response to the task averaged 81 +/- 4.9 (SE) ms, and 4) Their activity corresponded closely to breathing not only during the behavioral response but also during eupnea (eta 2 = 0.62 +/- 0.04, mean +/- SE) and respiratory acts such as sneezing, sniffing, meowing, and purring. 5. The cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally had the following characteristics. 1) As a group, they had discharge profiles related to every phase of the respiratory cycle. 2) They were recorded in the same region as, and often simultaneously with, respiratory cells that were inactivated. 3) Their activity patterns were highly variable such that the signal strength and consistency of the respiratory component of that activity were weak (eta 2

  4. Pathogen Inactivation of red cells: challenges and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen J. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Virus inactivation methods for blood have been explored as a means to further reduce the risk from tested agents and to decrease the risk of emerging or variant agents for whom no deferral or effective screening methods are available. Although inactivation methods promise to reduce transfusion-related infectious disease risk, these methods are not perfect. Most techniques for pathogen reduction will not kill bacterial spores, or inactivate bacterial endotoxin, prion protein, or certain non-enveloped viruses whose tightly packed capsid proteins prevent access of the virucidal agent to its nucleic acid target. In addition,various inactivation methods have been known to decrease blood cell yield, affect blood cell recovery or survival, and may pose risk to recipients or blood center workers. My presentation today will review two methods for pathogen inactivation of red cells.

  5. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  6. HIGH HEATING RATES AFFECTS GREATLY THE INACTIVATION RATE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Huertas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20ºC/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50ºC/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20ºC/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimates about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than ten times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7ºC/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing.

  7. An inactivated yellow fever 17DD vaccine cultivated in Vero cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata C; Silva, Andrea N M R; Souza, Marta Cristina O; Silva, Marlon V; Neves, Patrícia P C C; Silva, Andrea A M V; Matos, Denise D C S; Herrera, Miguel A O; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P; Caride, Elena

    2015-08-20

    Yellow fever is an acute infectious disease caused by prototype virus of the genus Flavivirus. It is endemic in Africa and South America where it represents a serious public health problem causing epidemics of hemorrhagic fever with mortality rates ranging from 20% to 50%. There is no available antiviral therapy and vaccination is the primary method of disease control. Although the attenuated vaccines for yellow fever show safety and efficacy it became necessary to develop a new yellow fever vaccine due to the occurrence of rare serious adverse events, which include visceral and neurotropic diseases. The new inactivated vaccine should be safer and effective as the existing attenuated one. In the present study, the immunogenicity of an inactivated 17DD vaccine in C57BL/6 mice was evaluated. The yellow fever virus was produced by cultivation of Vero cells in bioreactors, inactivated with β-propiolactone, and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (alum). Mice were inoculated with inactivated 17DD vaccine containing alum adjuvant and followed by intracerebral challenge with 17DD virus. The results showed that animals receiving 3 doses of the inactivated vaccine (2 μg/dose) with alum adjuvant had neutralizing antibody titers above the cut-off of PRNT50 (Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test). In addition, animals immunized with inactivated vaccine showed survival rate of 100% after the challenge as well as animals immunized with commercial attenuated 17DD vaccine.

  8. Pathogen inactivation of human serum facilitates its clinical use for islet cell culture and subsequent transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhle, Magnus U; Brandhorst, Daniel; Korsgren, Olle; Knutson, Folke

    2011-01-01

    Serum is regarded as an essential supplement to promote survival and growth of cells during culture. However, the potential risk of transmitting diseases disqualifies the use of serum for clinical cell therapy in most countries. Hence, most clinical cell therapy programs have replaced human serum with human serum albumin, which can result in inferior quality of released cell products. Photochemical treatment of different blood products utilizing Intercept® technology has been shown to inactivate a broad variety of pathogens of RNA and DNA origin. The present study assesses the feasibility of using pathogen-inactivated, blood group-compatible serum for use in human pancreatic islet culture. Isolated human islets were cultured at 37°C for 3-4 days in CMRL 1066 supplemented with 10% of either pathogen-inactivated or nontreated human serum. Islet quality assessment included glucose-stimulated insulin release (perifusion), ADP/ATP ratio, cytokine expression, and posttransplant function in diabetic nude mice. No differences were found between islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or control serum regarding stimulated insulin release, intracellular insulin content, and ADP/ATP ratio. Whether media was supplemented with treated or nontreated serum, islet expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, or tissue factor was not affected. The final diabetes-reversal rate of mice receiving islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or nontreated serum was 78% and 87%, respectively (NS). As reported here, pathogen-inactivated human serum does not affect viability or functional integrity of cultured human islets. The implementation of this technology for RNA- and DNA-based pathogen inactivation should enable reintroduction of human serum for clinical cell therapy.

  9. Comparison between conformational change and inactivation rates of aminoacylase during denaturation in urea solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪睿; 王希成; 张彤; 周海梦

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic method of the substrate reaction in the presence of mactivator previously described by Tsou has been applied to the determination of inactivation rates of aminoacylase during denaturation in urea solutions. The protective effect of substrate on the inactivation of aminoacylase by urea has been investigated. Simultaneously, the comparison between conformational change and inactivation rates of enzyme in the urea solutions of different concentrations has been studied. Results obtained show that the inactivation rate constants of the enzyme are larger than the rate constants of conformational changes. The present results show that the active site of metal enzyme-aminoacylase is also located in a limited and flexible region of the molecule that is more sensitive to denaturants than the enzyme as a whole.

  10. Inactivated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Maintain Immunomodulatory Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luk, Franka; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Korevaar, Sander S.; Roemeling, Marieke; Franquesa, Marcella; Strini, Tanja; van den Engel, Sandra; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Roy, Debashish; Dor, Frank J. M. F.; Horwitz, Edwin M.; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are studied as a cell therapeutic agent for treatment of various immune diseases. However, therapy with living culture-expanded cells comes with safety concerns. Furthermore, development of effective MSC immunotherapy is hampered by lack of knowledge of the mechanisms of

  11. Voltage dependence of rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation within a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of a Na+ channel occurs when the activation of the charged S4 segment of domain IV, with rate functions $\\alpha_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i}$, is followed by the binding of an intracellular hydrophobic motif which blocks conduction through the ion pore, with rate functions $\\gamma_{i}$ and $\\delta_{i}$. During a voltage clamp of the Na+ channel, the solution of the master equation for inactivation reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation when the binding of the inactivation motif is rate limiting ($\\alpha_{i} \\gg \\gamma_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i} \\gg \\delta_{i}$). The voltage dependence of the derived forward rate function for Na+ channel inactivation has an exponential dependence on the membrane potential for small depolarizations and approaches a constant value for larger depolarizations, whereas the voltage dependence of the backward rate function is exponential, and each rate has a similar form to the Hodgkin-Huxley empirical rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation in the squid axon.

  12. Cell inactivation by diverse ions along their tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P; Hromcikova, H; Kundrat, Pavel; Lokajicek, Milos; Hromcikova, Hana

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation of cell monolayers by monoenergetic ions has made it possible to establish survival curves at individual values of linear energy transfer. The two-step model of radiobiological mechanism proposed recently by Judas and Lokajicek (Judas L., Lokajicek M., 2001: Cell inactivation by ionizing particles and the shapes of survival curves. J. Theor. Biol. 210 (1), 15-21., doi:10.1006/jtbi.2001.2283) has then enabled to show that some significant deviations from the generally used linear-quadratic model should exist at higher values of linear energy transfer, which has been also demonstrated experimentally. However, the new model has been expressed in the form being applicable rightfully to low-dose parts of survival curves only. It has been now reformulated to be applicable in analyses of whole survival curves. Inactivation probabilities after different numbers of particles traversing cell nuclei (chromosomal systems) may be then derived from experimental data. Analyses of published data obtained in irrad...

  13. Inactivation cross section of yeast cells irradiated by heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain211a have been calculated as 1-hit detector based on the tracktheory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation ofradial dose distribution. In the calculations, characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42 Gy, and "radius"of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5μm which is about the sizeof nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement withexperimental cross sections. The results of the calculations are inagreement with the experimental data in high LET (linear energy transfer) including the thindown region.

  14. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu, Dongping [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, Ying [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Yue [School of Physics, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  15. Short-term inactivation rates of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria attached to metal oxide mineral surfaces: role of solution and surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadishad, Bahareh; Ghoshal, Subhasis; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-06-04

    Metal oxides such as ferric or aluminum oxides can play an important role in the retention of bacteria in granular aquatic environments; however, their role in bacterial inactivation is not well understood. Herein, we examined the role of water chemistry and surface chemistry on the short-term inactivation rates of three bacteria when adhered to surfaces. To evaluate the role of water chemistry on the inactivation of attached bacteria, the loss in membrane integrity of bacteria attached to an iron oxide (Fe2O3) surface was measured over a range of water ionic strengths of either monovalent or divalent salts in the absence of a growth substrate. The influence of surface chemistry on the inactivation of attached bacteria was examined by measuring the loss in membrane integrity of cells attached to three surfaces (SiO2, Fe2O3, and Al2O3) at a specific water chemistry (10 mM KCl). Bacteria were allowed to attach onto the SiO2 or metal oxide coated slides mounted in a parallel-plate flow cell, and their inactivation rate (loss in membrane integrity) was measured directly without removing the cells from the surface and without disturbing the system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed a high correlation between the amounts of C-metal or O-metal bonds and the corresponding bacterial inactivation rates for each surface. Finally, for all three surfaces, a consistent increase in inactivation rate was observed with the type of bacterium in the order: Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Escherichia coli D21f2.

  16. Inactivation cross sectiopn of yeast cells irradiated by heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGChunxiang; LUODaling

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain 211a have been calculated as 1-ht detector based on the track theory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation of radial dose distribution.In the calculations,characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42Gy,and “radius” of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5μm which is about the size of nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement with experimental cross sections.The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental data in igh LEF(linear energy transfer)including the thindown region.

  17. Primary targets in photochemical inactivation of cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kristian; Jones, Stuart G.; Prydz, Kristian; Moan, Johan

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of photoinactivation of NHIK 3025 cells in culture sensitized by tetrasulfonated phenylporphines (TPPS4) are described). Ultracentrifugation studies on postnuclear supernatants indicated that the intracellular distribution of TPPS4 resembles that of (beta) -N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase ((beta) -AGA), a lysosomal marker enzyme, and that the cytosolic content of TPPS4 is below the detection limit of the ultracentrifugation method. Upon light exposure more than 90% of TPPS4 was lost from the lysosomal fractions, due to lysosomal rupture. The content of TPPS4 in the postnuclear supernatants was reduced by 30 - 40% upon exposure to light. This is most likely due to binding of TPPS4 to the nuclei, which were removed from the cell extracts before ultracentrifugation, after photochemical treatment. The unpolymerized form of tubulin seems to be an important target for the photochemical inactivation of NHIK 3025 cells. Since TPPS4 is mainly localized in lysosomes it was assumed that a dose of light disrupting a substantial number of lysosomes followed by microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole would enhance the sensitivity of the cells to photoinactivation. This was confirmed by using a colony-forming assay. The increased phototoxic effect exerted by such a treatment regime could be explained by an enhanced sensitivity of tubulin to light. Another cytosolic constituent, lactate dehydrogenase, was not photoinactivated by TPPS4 and light.

  18. A rapidly inactivating Ca2(+)-dependent K+ current in pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, R Y; Behbehani, M M

    1990-01-01

    The membrane electrical properties of undifferentiated pheochromocytoma cells of the rat (PC12) were studied using both current- and voltage-clamp techniques with the use of low-resistance blunt-tipped micropipettes (patch electrodes). In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 2-3 microM), a spike-like wave form with a prominent after-hyperpolarization (AHP) was recorded following brief (less than 10 ms) depolarizing current pulses. The inorganic divalent cations, Cd2+ (0.5 mM), Mn2+ (4 mM), and 0 mM Ca2+/4 mM Mg2+ solution prolonged the duration, attenuated the AHP, slowed the rate of repolarization, and slightly enhanced the amplitude of this wave form. A rapidly inactivating outward current was recorded in over 70% of the cells under voltage-clamp conditions. This transient current was elicited at about -30 mV, and was blocked by tetraethylammonium (5 mM), inorganic divalent cations (Cd2+, 0.5 mM; Mn2+, 4 mM; Ba2+, 3 mM), and removal of Ca2+ (0 mM Ca2+/4 mM Mg2+) from the local perfusion medium. In addition, 4-aminopyridine (5 mM), which blocks the transient outward K+ current IA in a variety of excitable cells, did not have any appreciable effect on this rapidly inactivating current. Moreover, it was possible to elicit the current at a holding potential of -40 mV. The reversal potential of this current was -90 mV, and shifted positively when extracellular K+ concentrations were elevated. It is concluded that PC12 cells have a rapidly inactivating Ca2(+)-dependent K+ current. A possible explanation for the transient nature of this current may be the presence of an effective intracellular Ca2+ buffering (uptake or extrusion) system.

  19. Whole-cell inactivated leptospirosis vaccine: future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2013-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of worldwide distribution that is caused by pathogenic spirochete bacteria of the genus Leptospira. It is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal and contagious in a moist environment. Epidemiological studies indicate that infection is commonly associated with certain occupational workers such as farmers, sewage workers, veterinarians, and animal handlers. The annual incidence is estimated at 0.1-1 per 100,000 in temperate climates to 10-100 per 100,000 in the humid tropics. A disease incidence of more than 100 per 100,000 is encountered during outbreaks and in high-exposure risk groups. The 11 countries in South-East Asia (SEA) together have a population of more than 1.7 billion and a work force of about 770 million with more than 450 million people engaged in agriculture. Because of the large number of serovars and infection sources and the wide differences in conditions of transmission, the control of leptospirosis is complicated and will depend on local conditions. The available leptospirosis vaccines are mono- or polyvalent cellular suspensions. These cells are inactivated by chemical agents like formaldehyde and phenol, or by physical agents like heat. The vaccine confers protection for not longer than about one year, while there are cases that need revaccination six months later during epidemic periods.

  20. Radiation-induced cell inactivation as a cause for cancer promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, W. F.; Paretzke, H. G.

    In space research, estimates of health risks from high-LET radiation, as well as from mixed fields are needed. Features of several applications of the biologically based two step clonal expansion (TSCE) model on data with high-LET radiation, normally α-particles from radon and from Thorotrast, are reviewed. One conclusion is that radiation might not only influence the initiating event in carcinogenesis, but may also act as a promoter. A possible mechanism which gives a promoting action from cell inactivation is presented for the organs "lung", with a two-dimensional arrangement of the cells at risk, and for "liver" where the sensitive cells are distributed in all three dimensions. Inferences for dose-response curves at low doses and dose rates are drawn. For liver, the number and size of premalignant clones is estimated from the cancer data.

  1. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wen

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs. In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1 by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation.

  2. Incompatibility of lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine with liquid pentavalent whole-cell-pertussis-containing vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, H.; Have, Ten R.; Maas, van der L.; Kersten, G.F.A.; Amorij, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick injurie

  3. Use of integrated cell culture-PCR to evaluate the effectiveness of poliovirus inactivation by chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, F; Reynolds, K A; Gerba, C P; Pepper, I L

    2000-05-01

    Current standards, based on cell culture assay, indicate that poliovirus is inactivated by 0.5 mg of free chlorine per liter after 2 min; however, integrated cell culture-PCR detected viruses for up to 8 min of exposure to the same chlorine concentration, requiring 10 min for complete inactivation. Thus, the contact time for chlorine disinfection of poliovirus is up to five times greater than previously thought.

  4. X-inactivation and X-reactivation: epigenetic hallmarks of mammalian reproduction and pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Bernhard; Lee, Jeannie T; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2011-08-01

    X-chromosome inactivation is an epigenetic hallmark of mammalian development. Chromosome-wide regulation of the X-chromosome is essential in embryonic and germ cell development. In the male germline, the X-chromosome goes through meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and the chromosome-wide silencing is maintained from meiosis into spermatids before the transmission to female embryos. In early female mouse embryos, X-inactivation is imprinted to occur on the paternal X-chromosome, representing the epigenetic programs acquired in both parental germlines. Recent advances revealed that the inactive X-chromosome in both females and males can be dissected into two elements: repeat elements versus unique coding genes. The inactive paternal X in female preimplantation embryos is reactivated in the inner cell mass of blastocysts in order to subsequently allow the random form of X-inactivation in the female embryo, by which both Xs have an equal chance of being inactivated. X-chromosome reactivation is regulated by pluripotency factors and also occurs in early female germ cells and in pluripotent stem cells, where X-reactivation is a stringent marker of naive ground state pluripotency. Here we summarize recent progress in the study of X-inactivation and X-reactivation during mammalian reproduction and development as well as in pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Inactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinguish two calcium currents in mouse pancreatic B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, W.F.; Satin, L.S.; Cook, D.L. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium currents were studied in cultured adult mouse pancreatic B-cells using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. When calcium currents were elicited with 10-sec depolarizing command pulses, the time course of inactivation was well fit by the sum of two exponentials. The more rapidly-inactivating component had a time constant of 75 +/- 5 msec at 0 mV and displayed both calcium influx- and voltage-dependent inactivation, while the more slowly-inactivating component had a time constant of 2750 +/- 280 msec at 0 mV and inactivated primarily via voltage. The fast component was subject to greater steady-state inactivation at holding potentials between -100 and -40 mV and activated at a lower voltage threshold. This component was also significantly reduced by nimodipine (0.5 microM) when a holding potential of -100 mV was used, whereas the slow component was unaffected. In contrast, the slow component was greatly increased by replacing external calcium with barium, while the fast component was unchanged. Cadmium (1-10 microM) displayed a voltage-dependent block of calcium currents consistent with a greater effect on the high-threshold, more-slowly inactivating component. Taken together, the data suggest that cultured mouse B-cells, as with other insulin-secreting cells we have studied, possess at least two distinct calcium currents. The physiological significance of two calcium currents having distinct kinetic and steady-state inactivation characteristics for B-cell burst firing and insulin secretion is discussed.

  6. Living with an imperfect cell wall: compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierbaum Gabriele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. femAB mutants show a reduced growth rate and are hypersusceptible to virtually all antibiotics, including methicillin, making FemAB a potential target to restore β-lactam susceptibility in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Cis-complementation with wild type femAB only restores synthesis of the pentaglycine interpeptide and methicillin resistance, but the growth rate remains low. This study characterizes the adaptations that ensured survival of the cells after femAB inactivation. Results In addition to slow growth, the cis-complemented femAB mutant showed temperature sensitivity and a higher methicillin resistance than the wild type. Transcriptional profiling paired with reporter metabolite analysis revealed multiple changes in the global transcriptome. A number of transporters for sugars, glycerol, and glycine betaine, some of which could serve as osmoprotectants, were upregulated. Striking differences were found in the transcription of several genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and the arginine-deiminase pathway, an alternative for ATP production. In addition, microarray data indicated enhanced expression of virulence factors that correlated with premature expression of the global regulators sae, sarA, and agr. Conclusion Survival under conditions preventing normal cell wall formation triggered complex adaptations that incurred a fitness cost, showing the remarkable flexibility of S. aureus to circumvent cell wall damage. Potential FemAB inhibitors would have to be used in combination with other antibiotics to prevent selection of resistant survivors.

  7. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Satoshi H Namekawa

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR p...

  8. Syringotoxin pore formation and inactivation in human red blood cell and model bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsófia; Gróf, Pál; Schagina, Ludmila V; Gurnev, Philip A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Mátyus, Edit; Blaskó, Katalin

    2002-12-23

    The effect of syringotoxin (ST), a member of the cyclic lipodepsipeptides family (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae on the membrane permeability of human red blood cells (RBCs) and model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied and compared to that of two recently investigated CLPs, syringomycin E (SRE) and syringopeptin 22A (SP22A) [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1466 (2000) 79 and Bioelectrochemistry 52 (2000) 161]. The permeability-increasing effect of ST on RBCs was the least among the three CLPs. A time-dependent ST pore inactivation was observed on RBCs at 20 and 37 degrees C but not at 8 degrees C. From the kinetic model worked out parameters as permeability coefficient of RBC membrane for 86Rb(+) and pores mean lifetime were calculated. A shorter pores mean lifetime was calculated at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C, which gave us an explanation for the unusual slower rate of tracer efflux measured at 37 degrees C then that at 20 degrees C. The results obtained on BLM showed that the pore inactivation was due to a decrease in the number of pores but not to a change of their dwell time or conductance.

  9. Evaluation of the Factors that Control the Time-Dependent Inactivation Rate Coefficients of Bacteriophage MS2 and PRD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, R.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2004-12-01

    Batch experiments were conducted under both static and dynamic conditions to study the effects of temperature and the presence of sand on the inactivation process of viruses. The male--specific RNA coliphage, MS2, and the Salmonella typhimurium phage, PRD1, were used as model viruses for this study. Over 100 oven--baked borosilicate glass bottles with or without Monterey sand were filled with a low--ionic--strength phosphate buffered saline solution containing both bacteriophage and incubated at temperatures of 4o, 15o, or 25oC. The results of the batch experiments indicate that the inactivation process can be represented by a pseudo first-order expression with time--dependent rate coefficients. A combination of high temperature and the presence of sand appears to produce the greatest disruption to the surrounding protein coat of MS2. However, for PRD1, the lower activation energies derived from Arrhenius plots indicate a weaker dependence of the inactivation rate on temperature. Furthermore, the presence of an air--liquid--solid interface in the dynamic batch experiment containing sand produces the greatest damage to specific viral components of PRD1 that are required for infection. These results indicate the use of thermodynamic parameters based on the pseudo first--order inactivation expression allows better prediction of the inactivation of viruses in the environment.

  10. The kinetics of inactivation of spheroidal microbial cells by pulsed electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    The nature of non-exponential kinetics in microbial cells inactivation by pulsed electric fields (PEF) is discussed. It was demonstrated that possible mechanism of non-exponential kinetics can be related to orientational disorder in suspension of microbial cells of anisotropic form. A numerical studies of spheroidal cell suspensions was carried out. The most pronounced deviations from the exponential kinetics were observed for disordered suspensions of prolate spheroids at small electric field strength $E$ or at large aspect ratio $a$. For partially oriented suspensions, efficiency of inactivation enhances with increasing of order parameter and field strength. A possibility of the PEF-induced orientational ordering in microbial suspensions is discussed.

  11. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML.

  12. Inactivation of single-celled Ascaris suum eggs by low-pressure UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sarah A; Nelson, Kara L

    2006-03-01

    Intact and decorticated single-celled Ascaris suum eggs were exposed to UV radiation from low-pressure, germicidal lamps at fluences (doses) ranging from 0 to 8,000 J/m2 for intact eggs and from 0 to 500 J/m2 for decorticated eggs. With a UV fluence of 500 J/m2, 0.44-+/-0.20-log inactivation (mean+/-95% confidence interval) (63.7%) of intact eggs was observed, while a fluence of 4,000 J/m2 resulted in 2.23-+/-0.49-log inactivation (99.4%). (The maximum quantifiable inactivation was 2.5 log units.) Thus, according to the methods used here, Ascaris eggs are the most UV-resistant water-related pathogen identified to date. For the range of fluences recommended for disinfecting drinking water and wastewater (200 to 2,000 J/m2), from 0- to 1.5-log inactivation can be expected, although at typical fluences (less than 1,000 J/m2), the inactivation may be less than 1 log. When the eggs were decorticated (the outer egg shell layers were removed with sodium hypochlorite, leaving only the lipoprotein ascaroside layer) before exposure to UV, 1.80-+/-0.32-log reduction (98.4%) was achieved with a fluence of 500 J/m2, suggesting that the outer eggshell layers protected A. suum eggs from inactivation by UV radiation. This protection may have been due to UV absorption by proteins in the outer layers of the 3- to 4-microm-thick eggshell. Stirring alone (without UV exposure) also inactivated some of the Ascaris eggs (approximately 20% after 75 min), which complicated determination of the inactivation caused by UV radiation alone.

  13. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-10-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  14. Glucagon receptor inactivation leads to α-cell hyperplasia in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyu; Dean, E Danielle; Zhao, Liyuan; Nicholson, Wendell E; Powers, Alvin C; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-11-01

    Glucagon antagonism is a potential treatment for diabetes. One potential side effect is α-cell hyperplasia, which has been noted in several approaches to antagonize glucagon action. To investigate the molecular mechanism of the α-cell hyperplasia and to identify the responsible factor, we created a zebrafish model in which glucagon receptor (gcgr) signaling has been interrupted. The genetically and chemically tractable zebrafish, which provides a robust discovery platform, has two gcgr genes (gcgra and gcgrb) in its genome. Sequence, phylogenetic, and synteny analyses suggest that these are co-orthologs of the human GCGR. Similar to its mammalian counterparts, gcgra and gcgrb are mainly expressed in the liver. We inactivated the zebrafish gcgra and gcgrb using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) first individually and then both genes, and assessed the number of α-cells using an α-cell reporter line, Tg(gcga:GFP). Compared to WT fish at 7 days postfertilization, there were more α-cells in gcgra-/-, gcgrb-/-, and gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish and there was an increased rate of α-cell proliferation in the gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish. Glucagon levels were higher but free glucose levels were lower in gcgra-/-, gcgrb-/-, and gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish, similar to Gcgr-/- mice. These results indicate that the compensatory α-cell hyperplasia in response to interruption of glucagon signaling is conserved in zebrafish. The robust α-cell hyperplasia in gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- larvae provides a platform to screen for chemical and genetic suppressors, and ultimately to identify the stimulus of α-cell hyperplasia and its signaling mechanism.

  15. Cell-Type Specific Inactivation of Hippocampal CA1 Disrupts Location-Dependent Object Recognition in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettig, Jakob; Sun, Yanjun; Wood, Marcelo A.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2013-01-01

    The allatostatin receptor (AlstR)/ligand inactivation system enables potent regulation of neuronal circuit activity. To examine how different cell types participate in memory formation, we have used this system through Cre-directed, cell-type specific expression in mouse hippocampal CA1 in vivo and examined functional effects of inactivation of…

  16. Influence of high-pressure-low-temperature treatment on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Shen; G. Urrutia Benet; S. Brul; D. Knorr

    2005-01-01

    High pressure inactivation processes, especially at subzero temperatures, were performed on Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells at various pressure, temperature and time combinations. Whilst atmospheric pressure, lowering the temperature for various periods to as low as 45 -C was found to have minor

  17. Induction of Apoptosis by Luteolin Involving Akt Inactivation in Human 786-O Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chuan Ou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in the health-promoting effects of natural substances obtained from plants. Although luteolin has been identified as a potential therapeutic and preventive agent for cancer because of its potent cancer cell-killing activity, the molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. This study provides evidence of an alternative target for luteolin and sheds light on the mechanism of its physiological benefits. Treatment of 786-O renal cell carcinoma (RCC cells (as well as A498 and ACHN with luteolin caused cell apoptosis and death. This cytotoxicity was caused by the downregulation of Akt and resultant upregulation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (Ask1, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activities, probably via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A activation. In addition to being a concurrent substrate of caspases and event of cell death, heat shock protein-90 (HSP90 cleavage might also play a role in driving further cellular alterations and cell death, at least in part, involving an Akt-related mechanism. Due to the high expression of HSP90 and Akt-related molecules in RCC and other cancer cells, our findings suggest that PP2A activation might work in concert with HSP90 cleavage to inactivate Akt and lead to a vicious caspase-dependent apoptotic cycle in luteolin-treated 786-O cells.

  18. MAX inactivation is an early event in GIST development that regulates p16 and cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Wang, Yuexiang; Liang, Cher-wei; Bahri, Nacef; Quattrone, Anna; Doyle, Leona; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrian; Lauria, Alexandra; Zhu, Meijun; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Grunewald, Susanne; Hechtman, Jaclyn F.; Dufresne, Armelle; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Beadling, Carol; Sicinska, Ewa T.; van de Rijn, Matt; Demetri, George D.; Ladanyi, Marc; Corless, Christopher L.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Bauer, Sebastian; Fletcher, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    KIT, PDGFRA, NF1 and SDH mutations are alternate initiating events, fostering hyperplasia in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), and additional genetic alterations are required for progression to malignancy. The most frequent secondary alteration, demonstrated in ∼70% of GISTs, is chromosome 14q deletion. Here we report hemizygous or homozygous inactivating mutations of the chromosome 14q MAX gene in 16 of 76 GISTs (21%). We find MAX mutations in 17% and 50% of sporadic and NF1-syndromic GISTs, respectively, and we find loss of MAX protein expression in 48% and 90% of sporadic and NF1-syndromic GISTs, respectively, and in three of eight micro-GISTs, which are early GISTs. MAX genomic inactivation is associated with p16 silencing in the absence of p16 coding sequence deletion and MAX induction restores p16 expression and inhibits GIST proliferation. Hence, MAX inactivation is a common event in GIST progression, fostering cell cycle activity in early GISTs. PMID:28270683

  19. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-08-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR pathway recognizing DNA replication stress in the S phase. Additionally, it is likely to be distinct from the DDR pathway that recognizes meiosis-specific double-strand breaks. This review article extensively discusses the underlying mechanism of sex chromosome inactivation.

  20. Solar Radiation Disinfection of Drinking Water at Temperate Latitudes: Inactivation rates for an optimized reactor configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar radiation-driven inactivation of bacteria, virus and protozoan pathogen models was quantified in simulated drinking water at a temperate latitude (34°S). The water was seeded with Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium sporogenes spores, and P22 bacteriophage, each at ca 1 x 10...

  1. Human Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Model X Chromosome Dampening and X Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, Anna; Kim, Rachel; Chronis, Constantinos; Sabri, Shan; Bonora, Giancarlo; Theunissen, Thorold W; Kuoy, Edward; Langerman, Justin; Clark, Amander T; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Plath, Kathrin

    2017-01-05

    Naive human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be derived from primed hESCs or directly from blastocysts, but their X chromosome state has remained unresolved. Here, we show that the inactive X chromosome (Xi) of primed hESCs was reactivated in naive culture conditions. Like cells of the blastocyst, the resulting naive cells contained two active X chromosomes with XIST expression and chromosome-wide transcriptional dampening and initiated XIST-mediated X inactivation upon differentiation. Both establishment of and exit from the naive state (differentiation) happened via an XIST-negative XaXa intermediate. Together, these findings identify a cell culture system for functionally exploring the two X chromosome dosage compensation processes in early human development: X dampening and X inactivation. However, remaining differences between naive hESCs and embryonic cells related to mono-allelic XIST expression and non-random X inactivation highlight the need for further culture improvement. As the naive state resets Xi abnormalities seen in primed hESCs, it may provide cells better suited for downstream applications.

  2. Somatic inactivation of ATM in hematopoietic cells predisposes mice to cyclin D3 dependent T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lori A; Yang-Iott, Katherine; DeMicco, Amy; Bassing, Craig H

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a cancer of immature T cells that exhibits heterogeneity of oncogenic lesions, providing an obstacle for development of more effective and less toxic therapies. Inherited deficiency of ATM, a regulator of the cellular DNA damage response, predisposes young humans and mice to T-ALLs with clonal chromosome translocations. While acquired ATM mutation or deletion occurs in pediatric T-ALLs, the role of somatic ATM alterations in T-ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. We demonstrate here that somatic Atm inactivation in haematopoietic cells starting as these cells differentiate in utero predisposes mice to T-ALL at similar young ages and harboring analogous translocations as germline Atm-deficient mice. However, some T-ALLs from haematopoietic cell specific deletion of Atm were of more mature thymocytes, revealing that the developmental timing and celluar origin of Atm inactivation influences the phenotype of ATM-deficient T-ALLs. Although it has been hypothesized that ATM suppresses cancer by preventing deletion and inactivation of TP53, we find that Atm inhibits T-ALL independent of Tp53 deletion. Finally, we demonstrate that the Cyclin D3 protein that drives immature T cell proliferation is essential for transformation of Atm-deficient thymocytes. Our study establishes a pre-clinical model for pediatric T-ALLs with acquired ATM inactivation and identifies the cell cycle machinery as a therapeutic target for this aggressive childhood T-ALL subtype.

  3. Detailed analysis of the cell-inactivation mechanism by accelerated protons and light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrat, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2006-03-07

    A detailed study of the biological effects of diverse quality radiations, addressing their biophysical interpretation, is presented. Published survival data for V79 cells irradiated by monoenergetic protons, helium-3, carbon and oxygen ions and for CHO cells irradiated by carbon ions have been analysed using the probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation. Three different classes of DNA damage formed by traversing particles have been distinguished, namely severe single-track lesions which might lead to cell inactivation directly, less severe lesions where cell inactivation is caused by their combinations and lesions of negligible severity that can be repaired easily. Probabilities of single ions forming these lesions have been assessed in dependence on their linear energy transfer (LET) values. Damage induction probabilities increase with atomic number and LET. While combined lesions play a crucial role at lower LET values, single-track damage dominates in high-LET regions. The yields of single-track lethal lesions for protons have been compared with Monte Carlo estimates of complex DNA lesions, indicating that lethal events correlate well with complex DNA double-strand breaks. The decrease in the single-track damage probability for protons of LET above approximately 30 keV {mu}m{sup -1}, suggested by limited experimental evidence, is discussed, together with the consequent differences in the mechanisms of biological effects between protons and heavier ions. Applications of the results in hadrontherapy treatment planning are outlined.

  4. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the cells, response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  5. HDAC1 inactivation induces mitotic defect and caspase-independent autophagic cell death in liver cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jian Xie

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are known to play a central role in the regulation of several cellular properties interlinked with the development and progression of cancer. Recently, HDAC1 has been reported to be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but its biological roles in hepatocarcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated overexpression of HDAC1 in a subset of human HCCs and liver cancer cell lines. HDAC1 inactivation resulted in regression of tumor cell growth and activation of caspase-independent autophagic cell death, via LC3B-II activation pathway in Hep3B cells. In cell cycle regulation, HDAC1 inactivation selectively induced both p21(WAF1/Cip1 and p27(Kip1 expressions, and simultaneously suppressed the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK2. Consequently, HDAC1 inactivation led to the hypophosphorylation of pRb in G1/S transition, and thereby inactivated E2F/DP1 transcription activity. In addition, we demonstrated that HDAC1 suppresses p21(WAF1/Cip1 transcriptional activity through Sp1-binding sites in the p21(WAF1/Cip1 promoter. Furthermore, sustained suppression of HDAC1 attenuated in vitro colony formation and in vivo tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Taken together, we suggest the aberrant regulation of HDAC1 in HCC and its epigenetic regulation of gene transcription of autophagy and cell cycle components. Overexpression of HDAC1 may play a pivotal role through the systemic regulation of mitotic effectors in the development of HCC, providing a particularly relevant potential target in cancer therapy.

  6. Effects of Kupffer cell inactivation on graft survival and liver regeneration after partial liver transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang-Yu Luo; Shan-Fang Ma; Ji-Fu Qu; De-Hu Tian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) selectively in-activates Kupffer cells and protects against ischemia/reperfu-sion and endotoxin injury. However, the effect of Kupffer cell inactivation on liver regeneration after partial liver transplan-tation (PLTx) is not clear. This study was to investigate the role of GdCl3 pretreatment in graft function after PLTx, and to explore the potential mechanism involved in this process. METHODS: PLTx (30% partial liver transplantation) was per-formed using Kamada's cuff technique, without hepatic artery reconstruction. Rats were randomly divided into the control low-dose (5 mg/kg) and high-dose (10 mg/kg) GdCl3 groups. Liver injury was determined by the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, liver regen-eration by PCNA staining and BrdU uptake, apoptosis by TU-NEL assay. IL-6 and p-STAT3 levels were measured by ELISA and Western blotting. RESULTS: GdCl3 depleted Kupffer cells and decreased animal survival rates, but did not significantly affect alanine amino-transferase and aspartate aminotransferase (P>0.05). GdCl3 pretreatment induced apoptosis and inhibited IL-6 overex-pression and STAT3 phosphorylation after PLTx in graft tissues. CONCLUSION: Kupffer cells may contribute to the liver re-generation after PLTx through inhibition of apoptosis and activation of the IL-6/p-STAT3 signal pathway.

  7. Real time, in situ observation of the photocatalytic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingtao [School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Xiaoxin [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Qi, E-mail: qili@imr.ac.cn [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shang, Jian Ku [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    An in situ microscopy technique was developed to observe in real time the photocatalytic inactivation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) cells by palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (TiON/PdO) under visible light illumination. The technique was based on building a photocatalytic micro-reactor on the sample stage of a fluorescence/phase contrast microscopy capable of simultaneously providing the optical excitation to activate the photocatalyst in the micro-reactor and the illumination to acquire phase contrast images of the cells undergoing the photocatalytic inactivation process. Using TiON/PdO as an example, the technique revealed for the first time the vacuolar activities inside S. cerevisiae cells subjected to a visible light photocatalytic inactivation. The vacuoles responded to the photocatalytic attack by the first expansion of the vacuolar volume and then contraction, before the vacuole disappeared and the cell structure collapsed. Consistent with the aggregate behavior observed from the cell culture experiments, the transition in the vacuolar volume provided clear evidence that photocatalytic disinfection of S. cerevisiae cells started with an initiation period in which cells struggled to offset the photocatalytic damage and moved rapidly after the photocatalytic damage overwhelmed the defense mechanisms of the cells against oxidative attack. - Highlights: • Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxidephotocatalyst (TiON/PdO) • Effective visible-light photocatalytic disinfection of yeast cells by TiON/PdO • Real time, in situ observation technique was developed for photocatalytic disinfection. • The fluorescence/phase contrast microscope with a photocatalytic micro-reactor • Yeast cell disinfection happened before the cell structure collapsed.

  8. Tumor Suppressor Inactivation in the Pathogenesis of Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Nicot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor functions are essential to control cellular proliferation, to activate the apoptosis or senescence pathway to eliminate unwanted cells, to link DNA damage signals to cell cycle arrest checkpoints, to activate appropriate DNA repair pathways, and to prevent the loss of adhesion to inhibit initiation of metastases. Therefore, tumor suppressor genes are indispensable to maintaining genetic and genomic integrity. Consequently, inactivation of tumor suppressors by somatic mutations or epigenetic mechanisms is frequently associated with tumor initiation and development. In contrast, reactivation of tumor suppressor functions can effectively reverse the transformed phenotype and lead to cell cycle arrest or death of cancerous cells and be used as a therapeutic strategy. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disease associated with infection of CD4 T cells by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-I. HTLV-I-associated T-cell transformation is the result of a multistep oncogenic process in which the virus initially induces chronic T-cell proliferation and alters cellular pathways resulting in the accumulation of genetic defects and the deregulated growth of virally infected cells. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating the inactivation of tumor suppressors in the pathogenesis of HTLV-I.

  9. Psoralen/UV inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells for use in cytologic and immunologic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.J.; Klaniecki, J.; Hanson, C.V. (Oncogen Corporation, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A rapid procedure for the inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells using psoralen and ultraviolet (UV) light is described. Exposure of HIV-1-infected cells to 5 micrograms/ml psoralen followed by UV irradiation (320-380 nm) for 5 minutes yields cells that are noninfectious as assessed by extended infectivity assays. The psoralen/UV inactivation procedure described is effective with cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 and is unaffected by cell densities up to 12 x 10(6)/ml. At 5 micrograms/ml psoralen does little damage to cellular permeability as shown by the ability of treated cells to exclude trypan blue and propidium iodide. Psoralen/UV treatment of HIV-1-infected cells does not cause a significant decrease in the reactivity of HIV-1 core and envelope antigens or cellular antigens to monoclonal antibodies. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of these cells for flow cytometry studies and for cell surface labeling using the lactoperoxidase {sup 125}I iodination procedure.

  10. Highly efficient cell-type-specific gene inactivation reveals a key function for the Drosophila FUS homolog cabeza in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickenhaus, Marie; Wagner, Marina; Mallik, Moushami; Catinozzi, Marica; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-03-16

    To expand the rich genetic toolkit of Drosophila melanogaster, we evaluated whether introducing FRT or LoxP sites in endogenous genes could allow for cell-type-specific gene inactivation in both dividing and postmitotic cells by GAL4-driven expression of FLP or Cre recombinase. For proof of principle, conditional alleles were generated for cabeza (caz), the Drosophila homolog of human FUS, a gene implicated in the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Upon selective expression in neurons or muscle, both FLP and Cre mediated caz inactivation in all neurons or muscle cells, respectively. Neuron-selective caz inactivation resulted in failure of pharate adult flies to eclose from the pupal case, and adult escapers displayed motor performance defects and reduced life span. Due to Cre-toxicity, FLP/FRT is the preferred system for cell-type-specific gene inactivation, and this strategy outperforms RNAi-mediated knock-down. Furthermore, the GAL80 target system allowed for temporal control over gene inactivation, as induction of FLP expression from the adult stage onwards still inactivated caz in >99% of neurons. Remarkably, selective caz inactivation in adult neurons did not affect motor performance and life span, indicating that neuronal caz is required during development, but not for maintenance of adult neuronal function.

  11. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun [Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, Korea University Graduate School of Medicine, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chaeseung [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungho [Department of Life Science, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Dae Ryong [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-020 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Junseo, E-mail: ohjs@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, Korea University Graduate School of Medicine, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  12. Identification of antiviralrelevant genes in the cultured fish cells induced by UV-inactivated virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    UV-inactivated grass carp hemorrhage virus (GCHV) can induce high titer of interferon in cultured CAB (crucian carp (Carassius auratus L.) blastulae) cells, and thus defend host cells against the virus invasion. The mechanism is proposed that an antiviral state should be established in the host cells by activating expression of a set of antivi-ral-relevant genes. In this study, suppressive subtractive hy-bridization is applied to constructing a subtracted cDNA library with mRNAs isolated from UV-inactivated GCHV infected and mock-infected CAB cells. 272 differential cDNA fragments are identified by both PCR and dot blot from the subtractive cDNA library. Sequencing analysis reveals 69 genes, including 46 known gene homologues, and 23 unknown putative genes. The known genes include the genes involved in interferon signaling pathways, such as Stat1 and Jak1, the antiviral genes, such as Mx and Viperin, and a set of interferon-stimulated genes observed in mammalian cells. Most of the unknown putative genes contain AU-rich ele-ment in their sequences. Differential expressions of these genes are further confirmed by virtual Northern blot and RT-PCR. The data imply that UV-inactivated GCHV is not only able to induce production of interferon in the infected CAB cells, but also leads to the expression of a series of antiviral-relevant genes or immune-relevant genes, and therefore reveals that the signaling pathway of interferon system and antiviral mechanism in fish are similar to those in mammals.

  13. Importance of cell damage causing growth delay for high pressure inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanba, Masaru; Nomura, Kazuki; Nasuhara, Yusuke; Hayashi, Manabu; Kido, Miyuki; Hayashi, Mayumi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru; Hirayama, Masao; Ueno, Shigeaki; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-06-01

    A high pressure (HP) tolerant (barotolerant) mutant a2568D8 and a variably barotolerant mutant a1210H12 were generated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using ultra-violet mutagenesis. The two mutants, a barosensitive mutant a924E1 and the wild-type strain, were pressurized (225 MPa), and pressure inactivation behavior was analyzed. In the wild-type strain, a proportion of the growth-delayed cells were detected after exposure to HP. In a924E1, the proportion of growth-delayed cells significantly decreased compared with the wild-type. In a2568D8, the proportion of growth-delayed cells increased and the proportion of inactivated cells decreased compared with the wild-type. In a1210H12, the growth-delayed cells could not be detected within 120 s of exposure to HP. The proportion of growth-delayed cells, which incurred the damage, would affect the survival ratio by HP. These results suggested that cellular changes in barotolerance caused by mutations are remarkably affected by the ability to recover from cellular damage, which results in a growth delay.

  14. X-chromosome inactivation in monkey embryos and pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masahito; Ma, Hong; Sparman, Michelle L; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Ramsey, Cathy M; Woodward, Joy S; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith R; Wolff, Erin E; Jia, Yibing; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M

    2012-11-15

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in female mammals (XX) compensates for the reduced dosage of X-linked gene expression in males (XY). However, the inner cell mass (ICM) of mouse preimplantation blastocysts and their in vitro counterparts, pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), initially maintain two active X chromosomes (XaXa). Random X chromosome inactivation (XCI) takes place in the ICM lineage after implantation or upon differentiation of ESCs, resulting in mosaic tissues composed of two cell types carrying either maternal or paternal active X chromosomes. While the status of XCI in human embryos and ICMs remains unknown, majority of human female ESCs show non-random XCI. We demonstrate here that rhesus monkey ESCs also display monoallelic expression and methylation of X-linked genes in agreement with non-random XCI. However, XIST and other X-linked genes were expressed from both chromosomes in isolated female monkey ICMs indicating that ex vivo pluripotent cells retain XaXa. Intriguingly, the trophectoderm (TE) in preimplantation monkey blastocysts also expressed X-linked genes from both alleles suggesting that, unlike the mouse, primate TE lineage does not support imprinted paternal XCI. Our results provide insights into the species-specific nature of XCI in the primate system and reveal fundamental epigenetic differences between in vitro and ex vivo primate pluripotent cells.

  15. The Transient Inactivation of the Master Cell Cycle Phosphatase Cdc14 Causes Genomic Instability in Diploid Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Oliver; Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Petes, Thomas D.; Machín, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature found in cancer cells . Accordingly, many tumor suppressor genes identified in familiar cancer syndromes are involved in the maintenance of the stability of the genome during every cell division and are commonly referred to as caretakers. Inactivating mutations and epigenetic silencing of caretakers are thought to be the most important mechanisms that explain cancer-related genome instability. However, little is known of whether transient inactivation of caretaker proteins could trigger genome instability and, if so, what types of instability would occur. In this work, we show that a brief and reversible inactivation, during just one cell cycle, of the key phosphatase Cdc14 in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is enough to result in diploid cells with multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements and changes in ploidy. Interestingly, we observed that such transient loss yields a characteristic fingerprint whereby trisomies are often found in small-sized chromosomes, and gross chromosome rearrangements, often associated with concomitant loss of heterozygosity, are detected mainly on the ribosomal DNA-bearing chromosome XII. Taking into account the key role of Cdc14 in preventing anaphase bridges, resetting replication origins, and controlling spindle dynamics in a well-defined window within anaphase, we speculate that the transient loss of Cdc14 activity causes cells to go through a single mitotic catastrophe with irreversible consequences for the genome stability of the progeny. PMID:25971663

  16. PTEN loss represses glioblastoma tumor initiating cell differentiation via inactivation of Lgl1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gont, Alexander; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Parolin, Doris A; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Restall, Ian J; Soucie, Mathieu; Nicholas, Garth; Woulfe, John; Kassam, Amin; Da Silva, Vasco F; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive and incurable type of brain tumor. A subset of undifferentiated glioblastoma cells, known as glioblastoma tumor initiating cells (GTICs), has an essential role in the malignancy of this disease and also appears to mediate resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. GTICs retain the ability to differentiate into cells with reduced malignant potential, but the signaling pathways controlling differentiation are not fully understood at this time. PTEN loss is a very common in glioblastoma multiforme and leads to aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway. Increased signalling through this pathway leads to activation of multiple protein kinases, including atypical protein kinase C. In Drosophila, active atypical protein kinase C has been shown to promote the self-renewal of neuroblasts, inhibiting their differentiation along a neuronal lineage. This effect is mediated by atypical protein kinase c-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Lgl, a protein that was first characterized as a tumour suppressor in Drosophila. The effects of the atypical protein kinase C/Lgl pathway on the differentiation status of GTICs, and its potential link to PTEN loss, have not been assessed previously. Here we show that PTEN loss leads to the phosphorylation and inactivation of Lgl by atypical protein kinase C in glioblastoma cells. Re-expression of PTEN in GTICs promoted their differentiation along a neuronal lineage. This effect was also seen when atypical protein kinase C was knocked down using RNA interference, and when a non-phosphorylatable, constitutively active form of Lgl was expressed in GTICs. Thus PTEN loss, acting via atypical protein kinase C activation and Lgl inactivation, helps to maintain GTICs in an undifferentiated state.

  17. Glycolysis inhibition inactivates ABC transporters to restore drug sensitivity in malignant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Nakano

    Full Text Available Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABC transporter-expressing, RPMI8226 (ABCG2, KG-1 (ABCB1 and HepG2 cells (ABCB1 and ABCG2. Interestingly, although side population (SP cells isolated from RPMI8226 cells exhibited higher levels of glycolysis with an increased expression of genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, 3BrPA abolished Hoechst 33342 exclusion in SP cells. 3BrPA also disrupted clonogenic capacity in malignant cell lines including RPMI8226, KG-1, and HepG2. Furthermore, 3BrPA restored cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin and doxorubicin on KG-1 and RPMI8226 cells, and markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with doxorubicin in RPMI8226-implanted mice. These results collectively suggest that the inhibition of glycolysis is able to overcome drug resistance in ABC transporter-expressing malignant cells through the inactivation of ABC transporters and impairment of SP cells with enhanced glycolysis as well as clonogenic cells.

  18. SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan); Koya, Daisuke, E-mail: koya0516@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-{kappa}B activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans capsule protects cell from oxygen reactive species generated by antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R.; Kato, Ilka T.; Fuchs, Beth; Mylonakis, Eleytherios; Simões Ribeiro, Martha; Tegos, George

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) is based on the utilization of substances that can photosensitize biological tissues and are capable of being activated in the presence of light. Cryptococcus neoformans is an yeast surrounded by a capsule composed primarily of glucoronoxylomannan that plays an important role in its virulence. This yeast causes infection on skin, lungs and brain that can be associated with neurological sequelae and neurosurgical interventions, and its conventional treatment requires prolonged antifungal therapy, which presents important adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Cryptococcus neoformans capsule against reactive oxygen species generated by APDI. Cryptococcus neoformans KN99α, which is a strain able to produce capsule, and CAP59 that does not present capsule production were submitted to APDI using methylene blue (MB), rose bengal (RB), and pL-ce6 as photosensitizers (PS). Then microbial inactivation was evaluated by counting colony form units following APDI and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) illustrated localization as well as the preferential accumulation of PS into the fungal cells. C. neoformans KN99α was more resistant to APDI than CAP59 for all PSs tested. CLSM showed incorporation of MB and RB into the cytoplasm and a preferential uptake in mitochondria. A nuclear accumulation of MB was also observed. Contrarily, pL-ce6 appears accumulated in cell wall and cell membrane and minimal florescence was observed inside the fungal cells. In conclusion, the ability of C. neoformans to form capsule enhances survival following APDI.

  20. Nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in natural killer cells from obligate carriers of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengler, G.S.; Parolini, O.; Conley, M.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States) St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)); Allen, R.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States))

    1993-01-15

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, markedly reduced numbers of T cells, absent mitogen responses, decreased numbers of NK cells, and normal or elevated numbers of B cells. The abnormalities in the NK cell and B cell lineages could be attributed to dependence of these cell lineages on T cells or T cell-derived factors, or to expression of the XSCID gene defect in these cell lineages. In past experiments, the authors have examined X chromosome inactivation patterns in T cells and cultured B cells from female obligate carriers of XSCID and have found that both cell lineages demonstrate nonrandom X chromosome inactivation. This indicates that the gene defect is intrinsic to both of these cell lineages. In the present experiments, a polymerase chain reaction technique was used to evaluate X chromosome inactivation patterns in highly purified populations of freshly isolated NK cells, B cells, CD4[sup +] cells, and CD8[sup +] cells from three obligate carriers of XSCID. All four lymphoid cell populations from these three women exhibited exclusive use of a single X as the active X. In contrast, both X chromosomes were used as the active X in neutrophils and monocytes. These findings indicate that the XSCID gene is expressed in the NK cell lineage as well as in T cells and B cells. This observation makes it highly unlikely that the XSCID gene is involved in Ag receptor gene rearrangements. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Irreversible APC(Cdh1) Inactivation Underlies the Point of No Return for Cell-Cycle Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, Steven D; Chung, Mingyu; Jaimovich, Ariel; Spencer, Sabrina L; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-06-30

    Proliferating cells must cross a point of no return before they replicate their DNA and divide. This commitment decision plays a fundamental role in cancer and degenerative diseases and has been proposed to be mediated by phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Here, we show that inactivation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC(Cdh1)) has the necessary characteristics to be the point of no return for cell-cycle entry. Our study shows that APC(Cdh1) inactivation is a rapid, bistable switch initiated shortly before the start of DNA replication by cyclin E/Cdk2 and made irreversible by Emi1. Exposure to stress between Rb phosphorylation and APC(Cdh1) inactivation, but not after APC(Cdh1) inactivation, reverted cells to a mitogen-sensitive quiescent state, from which they can later re-enter the cell cycle. Thus, APC(Cdh1) inactivation is the commitment point when cells lose the ability to return to quiescence and decide to progress through the cell cycle.

  2. MEK1 inactivates Myt1 to regulate Golgi membrane fragmentation and mitotic entry in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Julien; Scarpa, Margherita; Ortega-Bellido, Maria; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    The pericentriolar stacks of Golgi cisternae are separated from each other in G2 and fragmented extensively during mitosis. MEK1 is required for Golgi fragmentation in G2 and for the entry of cells into mitosis. We now report that Myt1 mediates MEK1's effects on the Golgi complex. Knockdown of Myt1 by siRNA increased the efficiency of Golgi complex fragmentation by mitotic cytosol in permeabilized and intact HeLa cells. Myt1 knockdown eliminated the requirement of MEK1 in Golgi fragmentation and alleviated the delay in mitotic entry due to MEK1 inhibition. The phosphorylation of Myt1 by MEK1 requires another kinase but is independent of RSK, Plk, and CDK1. Altogether our findings reveal that Myt1 is inactivated by MEK1 mediated phosphorylation to fragment the Golgi complex in G2 and for the entry of cells into mitosis. It is known that Myt1 inactivation is required for CDK1 activation. Myt1 therefore is an important link by which MEK1 dependent fragmentation of the Golgi complex in G2 is connected to the CDK1 mediated breakdown of Golgi into tubules and vesicles in mitosis.

  3. Evaluation of enteric-coated tablets as a whole cell inactivated vaccine candidate against Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sonsire; Año, Gemma; Castaño, Jorge; Pino, Yadira; Uribarri, Evangelina; Riverón, Luis A; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Falero, Gustavo; Pérez, José L; Infante, Juan F; García, Luis G; Solís, Rosa L; Sierra, Gustavo; Talavera, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    A vaccine candidate against cholera was developed in the form of oral tablets to avoid difficulties during application exhibited by current whole cell inactivated cholera vaccines. In this study, enteric-coated tablets were used to improve the protection of the active compound from gastric acidity. Tablets containing heat-killed whole cells of Vibrio cholerae strain C7258 as the active pharmaceutical compound was enteric-coated with the polymer Kollicoat(®) MAE-100P, which protected them efficiently from acidity when a disintegration test was carried out. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibition test and Western blot assay revealed the presence of V. cholerae antigens as LPS, mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin (MSHA) and outer membrane protein U (Omp U) in enteric-coated tablets. Immunogenicity studies (ELISA and vibriocidal test) carried out by intraduodenal administration in rabbits showed that the coating process of tablets did not affect the immunogenicity of V. cholerae-inactivated cells. In addition, no differences were observed in the immune response elicited by enteric-coated or uncoated tablets, particularly because the animal model and immunization route used did not allow discriminating between acid resistances of both tablets formulations in vivo. Clinical studies with volunteers will be required to elucidate this aspect, but the results suggest the possibility of using enteric-coated tablets as a final pharmaceutical product for a cholera vaccine.

  4. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites.

  5. RB inactivation in keratin 18 positive thymic epithelial cells promotes non-cell autonomous T cell hyperproliferation in genetically engineered mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yurong; Sullivan, Teresa; Klarmann, Kimberly; Gilbert, Debra; O’Sullivan, T. Norene; Lu, Lucy; Wang, Sophie; Haines, Diana C.; Van Dyke, Terry; Keller, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC), as part of thymic stroma, provide essential growth factors/cytokines and self-antigens to support T cell development and selection. Deletion of Rb family proteins in adult thymic stroma leads to T cell hyperplasia in vivo. To determine whether deletion of Rb specifically in keratin (K) 18 positive TEC was sufficient for thymocyte hyperplasia, we conditionally inactivated Rb and its family members p107 and p130 in K18+ TEC in genetically engineered mice (TgK18GT121; K18 mice). We found that thymocyte hyperproliferation was induced in mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC, while normal T cell development was maintained; suggesting that inactivation of Rb specifically in K18+ TEC was sufficient and responsible for the phenotype. Transplantation of wild type bone marrow cells into mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC resulted in donor T lymphocyte hyperplasia confirming the non-cell autonomous requirement for Rb proteins in K18+ TEC in regulating T cell proliferation. Our data suggests that thymic epithelial cells play an important role in regulating lymphoid proliferation and thymus size. PMID:28158249

  6. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N; DiStasi, Matthew R; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1(+/-) neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1(+/-) mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1(+/-) mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease.

  7. Factors affecting the infectivity of tissues from pigs with classical swine fever: thermal inactivation rates and oral infectious dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Lucie; Haines, Felicity J; Everett, Helen E; Crudgington, Bentley; Johns, Helen L; Clifford, Derek; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2015-03-23

    Outbreaks of classical swine fever are often associated with ingestion of pig meat or products derived from infected pigs. Assessment of the disease risks associated with material of porcine origin requires knowledge on the likely amount of virus in the original material, how long the virus may remain viable within the resulting product and how much of that product would need to be ingested to result in infection. Using material from pigs infected with CSFV, we determined the viable virus concentrations in tissues that comprise the majority of pork products. Decimal reduction values (D values), the time required to reduce the viable virus load by 90% (or 1 log10), were determined at temperatures of relevance for chilling, cooking, composting and ambient storage. The rate of CSFV inactivation varied in different tissues. At lower temperatures, virus remained viable for substantially longer in muscle and serum compared to lymphoid and fat tissues. To enable estimation of the temperature dependence of inactivation, the temperature change required to change the D values by 90% (Z values) were determined as 13 °C, 14 °C, 12 °C and 10 °C for lymph node, fat, muscle and serum, respectively. The amount of virus required to infect 50% of pigs by ingestion was determined by feeding groups of animals with moderately and highly virulent CSFV. Interestingly, the virulent virus did not initiate infection at a lower dose than the moderately virulent strain. Although higher than for intranasal inoculation, the amount of virus required for infection via ingestion is present in only a few grams of tissue from infected animals.

  8. Ethanol Inactivated Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Maintain the Self-Renew and Proliferation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) inactivated by mitomycin C or irradiation were applied to support the self-renew and proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). To avoid the disadvangtages of mitomycin C and irradiation, here MEFs were treated by ethanol (ET). Our data showed that 10% ET-inactivated MEFs (eiMEFs) could well maintain the self-renew and proliferation of hESCs. hESCs grown on eiMEFs expressed stem cell markers of NANOG, octamer-binding protein 4 (OCT4...

  9. Inactivation of kanamycin, neomycin, and streptomycin by enzymes obtained in cells of Pseudomonas aeruginoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, O; Ogura, M; Tanaka, N; Umezawa, H

    1968-09-01

    Ten strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were disrupted and centrifuged. The supernatant fluids from centrifugation at 105,000 x g contained enzymes inactivating kanamycin, neomycin, and streptomycin in the presence of adenosine triphosphate. Kanamycin-inactivating enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulfate at 66% of saturated concentration, and the inactivated kanamycin was shown to be kanamycin-3'-phosphate in which the C-3 hydroxyl group of 6-amino-6-deoxy-d-glucose moiety was phosphorylated. This is identical with kanamycin inactivated by Escherichia coli carrying R factor. Streptomycin-inactivating enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulfate at 33% of saturated concentration.

  10. Salinomycin induces cell death via inactivation of Stat3 and downregulation of Skp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, K H; Kim, H; Bae, Y-K; Kim, K; Park, B-K; Lee, C-H; Kim, Y-N

    2013-06-27

    Salinomycin has been shown to control breast cancer stem cells, although the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects are not clear. Deregulation of cell cycle regulators play critical roles in tumorigenesis, and they have been considered as anticancer targets. In this study, we investigated salinomycin effect on cell cycle progression using OVCAR-8 ovarian cancer cell line and multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES and DXR cell lines that are derived from OVCAR-8. Parental OVCAR-8 cells are sensitive to several anticancer drugs, but NCI/ADR-RES and DXR cells are resistant to several anticancer drugs. However, salinomycin caused cell growth inhibition and apoptosis via cell cycle arrest at G1 in all three cell lines. Salinomycin inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activity and thus decreased expression of Stat3-target genes, including cyclin D1, Skp2, and survivin. Salinomycin induced degradation of Skp2 and thus accumulated p27Kip1. Knockdown of Skp2 further increased salinomycin-induced G1 arrest, but knockdown of p27Kip1 attenuated salinomycin effect on G1 arrest. Cdh1, an E3 ligase for Skp2, was shifted to nuclear fractions upon salinomycin treatment. Cdh1 knockdown by siRNA reversed salinomycin-induced Skp2 downregulation and p27Kip1 upregulation, indicating that salinomycin activates the APC(Cdh1)-Skp2-p27Kip1 pathway. Concomitantly, si-Cdh1 inhibited salinomycin-induced G1 arrest. Taken together, our data indicate that salinomycin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via downregulation or inactivation of cell cycle-associated oncogenes, such as Stat3, cyclin D1, and Skp2, regardless of multidrug resistance.

  11. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  12. Statin suppresses Hippo pathway-inactivated malignant mesothelioma cells and blocks the YAP/CD44 growth stimulatory axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Osada, Hirotaka; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Horio, Yoshitsugu; Hida, Toyoaki; Sekido, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-28

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) frequently exhibits Hippo signaling pathway inactivation (HPI) mainly due to NF2 and/or LATS2 mutations, which leads to the activation of YAP transcriptional co-activator. Here, we show antitumor effects of statin on MM cells with HPI, through the interplay of the mevalonate and Hippo signaling pathways. Statin attenuated proliferation and migration of MM cells harboring NF2 mutation by accelerating YAP phosphorylation/inactivation. CD44 expression was decreased by statin, in parallel with YAP phosphorylation/inactivation. Importantly, we discovered that YAP/TEAD activated CD44 transcription by binding to the CD44 promoter at TEAD-binding sites. On the other hand, CD44 regulated Merlin phosphorylation according to cell density and sequentially promoted YAP transcriptional co-activator, suggesting that CD44 plays two pivotal functional roles as an upstream suppressor of the Hippo pathway and one of downstream targets regulated by YAP/TEAD. Moreover, the YAP/CD44 axis conferred cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties in MM cells leading to chemoresistance, which was blocked by statin. Together, our findings suggest that YAP mediates CD44 up-regulation at the transcriptional level, conferring CSC-like properties in MM cells, and statin represents a potential therapeutic option against MM by inactivating YAP.

  13. Single-cell analyses of X Chromosome inactivation dynamics and pluripotency during differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Geng; Schell, John Paul; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Petropoulos, Sophie; Yilmaz, Marlene; Reinius, Björn; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Shi, Leming; Hedlund, Eva; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard; Deng, Qiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency, differentiation, and X Chromosome inactivation (XCI) are key aspects of embryonic development. However, the underlying relationship and mechanisms among these processes remain unclear. Here, we systematically dissected these features along developmental progression using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and single-cell RNA sequencing with allelic resolution. We found that mESCs grown in a ground state 2i condition displayed transcriptomic profiles diffused from preimplantation mouse embryonic cells, whereas EpiStem cells closely resembled the post-implantation epiblast. Sex-related gene expression varied greatly across distinct developmental states. We also identified novel markers that were highly enriched in each developmental state. Moreover, we revealed that several novel pathways, including PluriNetWork and Focal Adhesion, were responsible for the delayed progression of female EpiStem cells. Importantly, we “digitalized” XCI progression using allelic expression of active and inactive X Chromosomes and surprisingly found that XCI states exhibited profound variability in each developmental state, including the 2i condition. XCI progression was not tightly synchronized with loss of pluripotency and increase of differentiation at the single-cell level, although these processes were globally correlated. In addition, highly expressed genes, including core pluripotency factors, were in general biallelically expressed. Taken together, our study sheds light on the dynamics of XCI progression and the asynchronicity between pluripotency, differentiation, and XCI. PMID:27486082

  14. Variations of X chromosome inactivation occur in early passages of female human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Dvash

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is a dosage compensation mechanism essential for embryonic development and cell physiology. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs derived from inner cell mass (ICM of blastocyst stage embryos have been used as a model system to understand XCI initiation and maintenance. Previous studies of undifferentiated female hESCs at intermediate passages have shown three possible states of XCI; 1 cells in a pre-XCI state, 2 cells that already exhibit XCI, or 3 cells that never undergo XCI even upon differentiation. In this study, XCI status was assayed in ten female hESC lines between passage 5 and 15 to determine whether XCI variations occur in early passages of hESCs. Our results show that three different states of XCI already exist in the early passages of hESC. In addition, we observe one cell line with skewed XCI and preferential expression of X-linked genes from the paternal allele, while another cell line exhibits random XCI. Skewed XCI in undifferentiated hESCs may be due to clonal selection in culture instead of non-random XCI in ICM cells. We also found that XIST promoter methylation is correlated with silencing of XIST transcripts in early passages of hESCs, even in the pre-XCI state. In conclusion, XCI variations already take place in early passages of hESCs, which may be a consequence of in vitro culture selection during the derivation process. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out the possibility that XCI variations in hESCs may reflect heterogeneous XCI states in ICM cells that stochastically give rise to hESCs.

  15. T-cell receptor-induced JNK activation requires proteolytic inactivation of CYLD by MALT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jens; Driege, Yasmine; Bekaert, Tine; Demeyer, Annelies; Muyllaert, David; Van Damme, Petra; Gevaert, Kris; Beyaert, Rudi

    2011-05-04

    The paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) is central to lymphocyte activation and lymphomagenesis. MALT1 mediates antigen receptor signalling to NF-κB by acting as a scaffold protein. Furthermore, MALT1 has proteolytic activity that contributes to optimal NF-κB activation by cleaving the NF-κB inhibitor A20. Whether MALT1 protease activity is involved in other signalling pathways, and the identity of the relevant substrates, is unknown. Here, we show that T-cell receptors (TCR) activation, as well as overexpression of the oncogenic API2-MALT1 fusion protein, results in proteolytic inactivation of CYLD by MALT1, which is specifically required for c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and the inducible expression of a subset of genes. These results indicate a novel role for MALT1 proteolytic activity in TCR-induced JNK activation and reveal CYLD cleavage as the underlying mechanism.

  16. Extending Bragg peak of heavy ion beam and melanoma cell inactivation measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiQiang; WeiZeng-Quan; 等

    1998-01-01

    A rotating range modulator was designed and manufactured.which is applied to extend Bragg peak of heavy ion beam.Bragg curves of 75MeV/u 16O and 75MeV/u 12C ion beams through this range modulator were measured respectively and two evident spread-out Bragg peaks corresponding to the modulated beams above are shown.In addition,inactivation effect of the modulated 75MeV/u 16O ion beam at nine different penetration depths on melanoma cells(B16) was measured.Results indicate that lethal effects at the spread-out Bragg peak region are larger than at the plateau of the particle beam entrance.

  17. Safety and Immunogenicity of an Inactivated Whole Cell Plus Recombinant B Subunit (WC/RBS) Cholera Vaccine in Healthy Adult Peruvian Military Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-30

    AD-A260 586 IFB0 919931 MIPR NO: 92MM2532W TITLE: SAFETY AND IMMUNOGENICITY OF AN INACTIVATED WHOLE CELL PLUS RECOMBINANT B SUBUNIT (WCIRBS) COLERA ...NUMBERS Safety and Immunogenicity of an Inactivated Whole MIPR No. Cell Plus Recombinant B Subunit (WC/RBS) Colera 92MM2532 Vaccine in Healthy Adult

  18. Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro can rescue germinal center B cells with inactivated immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Sridhar; Bell, Andrew I; Pastor, Noelia Begue; Milner, Anne E; Drayson, Mark; Gordon, John; Rickinson, Alan B

    2005-12-15

    Immunoglobulin genotyping of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease has suggested that such lesions often arise from atypical post-germinal center B cells, in some cases carrying functionally inactivated immunoglobulin genes. To investigate whether EBV can rescue cells that are failed products of the somatic hypermutation process occurring in germinal centers (GCs), we isolated GC cells from tonsillar cell suspensions and exposed them to EBV in vitro. Screening more than 100 EBV-transformed cell lines of GC origin identified 6 lines lacking surface immunoglobulin, a phenotype never seen among lines derived from circulating naive or memory B cells. Furthermore, 3 of the 6 surface immunoglobulin-negative GC lines carried inactivating mutations in the immunoglobulin H (IgH) variable gene sequence. The ability of EBV to rescue aberrant products of the germinal center reaction in vitro strengthens the probability that a parallel activity contributes to EBV's lymphomagenic potential in vivo.

  19. Effect of cytochrome P450 and aldo-keto reductase inhibitors on progesterone inactivation in primary bovine hepatic cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, C O; Wilson, M E

    2010-10-01

    Progesterone is required for maintenance of pregnancy, and peripheral concentrations of progesterone are affected by both production and inactivation. Hepatic cytochrome P450 (EC 1.14.14.1) and aldo-keto reductase (EC 1.1.1.145-151) enzymes play a pivotal role in the first step of steroid inactivation, which involves the addition of hydroxyl groups to various sites of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene nucleus. The current objective was to discern the proportional involvement of hepatic progesterone inactivating enzymes on progesterone decay using specific enzyme inhibitors. Ticlopidine, diltiazem, curcumin, dicumarol, and naproxen were used because of their selective inhibition of cytochrome P450s, aldo-keto reductases, and glucuronosyltransferases. Liver biopsies were collected from 6 lactating Holstein dairy cows, and cells were dissociated using a nonperfusion technique. Confluent wells were preincubated for 4 h with enzyme inhibitor and then challenged with progesterone for 1 h. Cell viability was unaffected by inhibitor treatment and averaged 84±1%. In control wells, 50% of the progesterone had been inactivated after a 1-h challenge with 5 ng/mL of progesterone. Preincubation with curcumin, ticlopidine, or naproxen caused the greatest reduction in progesterone inactivation compared with controls and averaged 77, 39, or 37%, respectively. Hydroxylation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-nitrocatechol in intact cells was inhibited by approximately 65% after treatment with curcumin or ticlopidine. Glucuronidation of phenol red or 4-nitrocatechol in intact cells was inhibited by treatment with curcumin, dicumarol, or naproxen. In cytoplasmic preparations, aldo-keto reductase 1C activity was inhibited by curcumin, dicumarol, or naproxen treatment. Microsomal cytochrome P450 2C activity was inhibited by treatment with curcumin or ticlopidine, whereas cytochrome P450 3A activity was inhibited by treatment with curcumin or diltiazem. The contribution of cytochrome P450 2C and

  20. Mechanisms of Escherichia coli inactivation by several disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min; Kim, Jaeeun; Kim, Jee Yeon; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate dominant mechanisms of inactivation, i.e. surface attack versus intracellular attack, during application of common water disinfectants such as ozone, chlorine dioxide, free chlorine and UV irradiation. Escherichia coli was used as a representative microorganism. During cell inactivation, protein release, lipid peroxidation, cell permeability change, damage in intracellular enzyme and morphological change were comparatively examined. For the same level of cell inactivation by chemical disinfectants, cell surface damage was more pronounced with strong oxidant such as ozone while damage in inner cell components was more apparent with weaker oxidant such as free chlorine. Chlorine dioxide showed the inactivation mechanism between these two disinfectants. The results suggest that the mechanism of cell inactivation is primarily related to the reactivity of chemical disinfectant. In contrast to chemical disinfectants, cell inactivation by UV occurred without any changes measurable with the methods employed. Understanding the differences in inactivation mechanisms presented herein is critical to identify rate-limiting steps involved in the inactivation process as well as to develop more effective disinfection strategies.

  1. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M;

    2001-01-01

    -specific phosphorylation of BAD, which inactivates this proapoptotic molecule. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial-based p70S6K, which prevented phosphorylation of Ser-136 on BAD and blocked cell survival induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Moreover, IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of BAD Ser-136 was abolished...

  2. Inhibition of telomere recombination by inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 promotes cell longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Peng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB is one of the major damages that cause genome instability and cellular aging. The homologous recombination (HR-mediated repair of DSBs plays an essential role in assurance of genome stability and cell longevity. Telomeres resemble DSBs and are competent for HR. Here we show that in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomere recombination elicits genome instability and accelerates cellular aging. Inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 specifically inhibits telomere recombination, and significantly extends cell longevity in both telomerase-positive and pre-senescing telomerase-negative cells. Deletion of CGI121 in the short-lived yku80(tel mutant restores lifespan to cgi121Δ level, supporting the function of Cgi121 in telomeric single-stranded DNA generation and thus in promotion of telomere recombination. Strikingly, inhibition of telomere recombination is able to further slow down the aging process in long-lived fob1Δ cells, in which rDNA recombination is restrained. Our study indicates that HR activity at telomeres interferes with telomerase to pose a negative impact on cellular longevity.

  3. Insertional transformation of hematopoietic cells by self-inactivating lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlich, Ute; Navarro, Susana; Zychlinski, Daniela; Maetzig, Tobias; Knoess, Sabine; Brugman, Martijn H; Schambach, Axel; Charrier, Sabine; Galy, Anne; Thrasher, Adrian J; Bueren, Juan; Baum, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    Gene transfer vectors may cause clonal imbalance and even malignant cell transformation by insertional upregulation of proto-oncogenes. Lentiviral vectors (LV) with their preferred integration in transcribed genes are considered less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors (GV) with their preference for integration next to transcriptional start sites and regulatory gene regions. Using a sensitive cell culture assay and a series of self-inactivating (SIN) vectors, we found that the lentiviral insertion pattern was approximately threefold less likely than the gammaretroviral to trigger transformation of primary hematopoietic cells. However, lentivirally induced mutants also showed robust replating, in line with the selection for common insertion sites (CIS) in the first intron of the Evi1 proto-oncogene. This potent proto-oncogene thus represents a CIS for both GV and LV, despite major differences in their integration mechanisms. Altering the vectors' enhancer-promoter elements had a greater effect on safety than the retroviral insertion pattern. Clinical grade LV expressing the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein under control of its own promoter had no transforming potential. Mechanistic studies support the conclusion that enhancer-mediated gene activation is the major cause for insertional transformation of hematopoietic cells, opening rational strategies for risk prevention.

  4. Near-infrared laser photothermal therapy and photodynamic inactivation of cells by using gold nanoparticles and dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, George G.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Seliverstov, George A.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-09-01

    Light-induced inactivation of dynamic response of somatic frog nerve on electrical pulsed excitation was study ex vivo. The light-sensitive Indocianin Green has been used on photodynamic induced inactivation of the processes generation nerve pulses. Inactivation of consequence action potential of somatic frog nerve using excitation of electrical pulsed was achieved by irradiation with diode laser light in a IR spectral region (λ=810 nm, P~1W/cm2) in the case of Indocianin green. It was discovered that Indocianine green decrease of the amplitude compound action potential of the ensemble neurons. Experiments show effective destruction of cancer cells of ear, mouth and skin by local injection of plasmon resonant gold nanoshells and semiconductor laser (810 nm) irradiation. For destruction such tumors pulse duration was not less than 1microsecond and pulse separation 10 at average power density 1-3 W/sm2 and energy density 100-200 J/sm2

  5. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, C H; Russell, B J; Velez, J O; Laven, J J; Nicholson, W L; Bagarozzi, D A; Moon, J L; Bedi, K; Johnson, B W

    2014-11-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus.

  6. PRDM1/BLIMP1 is commonly inactivated in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Michela; Rinaldi, Andrea; Kwee, Ivo; Bonetti, Paola; Todaro, Maria; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Piva, Roberto; Rancoita, Paola M V; Matolcsy, András; Timar, Botond; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro Maria; Piris, Miguel A; Beà, Sílvia; Campo, Elias; Bhagat, Govind; Swerdlow, Steven H; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Young, Ken H; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Dummer, Reinhard; Pileri, Stefano; Zucca, Emanuele; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco

    2013-10-10

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a mature T-cell lymphoma that can present as a systemic or primary cutaneous disease. Systemic ALCL represents 2% to 5% of adult lymphoma but up to 30% of all pediatric cases. Two subtypes of systemic ALCL are currently recognized on the basis of the presence of a translocation involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase ALK gene. Despite considerable progress, several questions remain open regarding the pathogenesis of both ALCL subtypes. To investigate the molecular pathogenesis and to assess the relationship between the ALK(+) and ALK(-) ALCL subtypes, we performed a genome-wide DNA profiling using high-density, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays on a series of 64 cases and 7 cell lines. The commonest lesions were losses at 17p13 and at 6q21, encompassing the TP53 and PRDM1 genes, respectively. The latter gene, coding for BLIMP1, was inactivated by multiple mechanisms, more frequently, but not exclusively, in ALK(-)ALCL. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that that PRDM1 is a tumor suppressor gene in ALCL models, likely acting as an antiapoptotic agent. Losses of TP53 and/or PRDM1 were present in 52% of ALK(-)ALCL, and in 29% of all ALCL cases with a clinical implication.

  7. Development of a whole cell pneumococcal vaccine: BPL inactivation, cGMP production, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Viviane M; Dias, Waldely O; Campos, Ivana B; Liberman, Celia; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E; Silva, Eliane P; Cardoso, Celso P; Alderson, Mark; Robertson, George; Maisonneuve, Jean-François; Tate, Andrea; Anderson, Porter; Malley, Richard; Fratelli, Fernando; Leite, Luciana C C

    2014-02-19

    Pneumococcal infections impose a large burden of disease on the human population, mainly in developing countries, and the current pneumococcal vaccines offer serotype-specific protection, but do not cover all pathogenic strains, leaving populations vulnerable to disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes. The pneumococcal whole cell vaccine is a low-cost strategy based on non-capsular antigens common to all strains, inducing serotype-independent immunity. Therefore, we developed the process for the cGMP production of this cellular vaccine. Initially, three engineering runs and two cGMP runs were performed in 60-L bioreactors, demonstrating the consistency of the production process, as evaluated by the growth curves, glucose consumption and metabolite formation (lactate and acetate). Cell recovery by tangential filtration was 92 ± 13 %. We optimized the conditions for beta-propiolactone (BPL) inactivation of the bacterial suspensions, establishing a maximum cell density of OD600 between 27 and 30, with a BPL concentration of 1:4000 (v/v) at 150 rpm and 4 °C for 30 h. BPL was hydrolyzed by heating for 2h at 37 °C. The criteria and methods for quality control were defined using the engineering runs and the cGMP Lots passed all specifications. cGMP vaccine Lots displayed high potency, inducing between 80 and 90% survival in immunized mice when challenged with virulent pneumococci. Sera from mice immunized with the cGMP Lots recognized several pneumococcal proteins in the extract of encapsulated strains by Western blot. The cGMP whole cell antigen bulk and whole cell vaccine product lots were shown to be stable for up to 12 and 18 months, respectively, based upon survival assays following i.p. challenge. Our results show the consistency and stability of the cGMP whole cell pneumococcal vaccine lots and demonstrate the feasibility of production in a developing country setting.

  8. Transcriptional response of selected genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilm cells during inactivation by superheated steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Hyunjin

    2015-01-02

    Superheated steam (SHS), produced by the addition of heat to saturated steam (SS) at the same pressure, has great advantages over conventional heat sterilization due to its high temperature and accelerated drying rate. We previously demonstrated that treatment with SHS at 200°C for 10 sec inactivated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes biofilm cells on the surface of stainless steel to below the detection limit. However, bacteria withstanding heat stress become more resistant to other stress conditions, and may be more virulent when consumed by a host. Herein, we studied the transcriptional regulation of genes important for stress resistance and virulence in Salmonella biofilms after SHS treatments. Genes encoding heat shock proteins and general stress resistance proteins showed transcriptional surges after 1 sec of SHS treatment at 200°C, with parallel induction of stress-related regulator genes including rpoE, rpoS, and rpoH. Interestingly, Salmonella biofilm cells exposed to SHS showed decreased transcription of flagella and Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) genes required for motility and invasion of host cells, respectively, whereas increased transcription of SPI-2 genes, important for bacterial survival and replication inside host cells, was detected. When the transcriptional response was compared between cells treated with SHS (200°C) and SS (100°C), SHS caused immediate changes in gene expression by shorter treatments. Understanding the status of Salmonella virulence and stress resistance induced by SHS treatments is important for wider application of SHS in controlling Salmonella biofilm formation during food production.

  9. Reactive oxygen species in plasma against E. coli cells survival rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ren-Wu; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Zong, Zi-Chao; Li, Jun-Xiong; Yang, Zhou-Bin; Liu, Dong-Ping; Yang, Si-Ze

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the contrastive analysis of inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution with different disinfection methods. Compared with the hydrogen peroxide solution and the ozone gas, the atmospheric-pressure He plasma can completely kill the E. coli cells in the shortest time. The inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the C-O or C=O content of the inactivated E. coli cell surface by plasma is predominantly increased, indicating the quantity of oxygen-containing species in plasma is more than those of two other methods, and then the C-C or C-H bonds can be broken, leading to the etching of organic compounds. Analysis also indicates that plasma-generated species can play a crucial role in the inactivation process by their direct reactions or the decompositions of reactive species, such as ozone into OH radicals in water, then reacting with E. coli cells. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014J01025), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11275261), and the Funds from the Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, China.

  10. X-chromosome inactivation in Rett Syndrome human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron YL Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects girls due primarily to heterozygous mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2. Random X-chromosome inactivation (XCI results in cellular mosaicism in which some cells express wild-type MECP2 while other cells express mutant MECP2. The generation of patient-specific human induced Pluripotent Stem cells (hiPSCs facilitates the production of RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro to investigate disease mechanisms and identify novel drug treatments. The generation of RTT-hiPSCs has been reported by many laboratories, however, the XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs has been inconsistent. Some report RTT-hiPSCs retain the inactive X-chromosome (post-XCI of the founder somatic cell allowing isogenic RTT-hiPSCs that express only the wild-type or mutant MECP2 allele to be isolated from the same patient. Post-XCI RTT-hiPSCs-derived neurons retain this allele-specific expression pattern of wild-type or mutant MECP2. Conversely, others report RTT-hiPSCs in which the inactive X-chromosome of the founder somatic cell reactivates (pre-XCI upon reprogramming into RTT-hiPSCs. Pre-XCI RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons exhibit random XCI resulting in cellular mosaicism with respect to wild-type and mutant MECP2 expression. Here we review and attempt to interpret the inconsistencies in XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs generated to date by comparison to other pluripotent systems in vitro and in vivo and the methods used to analyze XCI. Finally, we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of post- and pre-XCI hiPSCs in the context of RTT, and other X-linked and autosomal disorders for translational medicine.

  11. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  12. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzichemi, M. [Physics Department, University of Milano - Bicocca (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 mus) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of approx 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  13. Inactivation of Lsd1 triggers senescence in trophoblast stem cells by induction of Sirt4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, Josefina; Willmann, Dominica; Kanouni, Toufike; Arrigoni, Laura; Li, Yan; Friedrich, Marcel; Schleicher, Michael; Wöhrle, Simon; Pearson, Mark; Kraut, Norbert; Méret, Michaël; Manke, Thomas; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Günther, Thomas

    2017-02-23

    Coordination of energy metabolism is essential for homeostasis of stem cells, whereas an imbalance in energy homeostasis causes disease and accelerated aging. Here we show that deletion or enzymatic inactivation of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) triggers senescence in trophoblast stem cells (TSCs). Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of TSCs following Lsd1 inhibition shows gene set enrichment of aging and metabolic pathways. Consistently, global metabolomic and phenotypic analyses disclose an unbalanced redox status, decreased glutamine anaplerosis and mitochondrial function. Loss of homeostasis is caused by increased expression of sirtuin 4 (Sirt4), a Lsd1-repressed direct target gene. Accordingly, Sirt4 overexpression in wild-type TSCs recapitulates the senescence phenotype initiated by Lsd1 deletion or inhibition. Inversely, absence of Lsd1 enzymatic activity concomitant with knockdown of Sirt4 reestablishes normal glutamine anaplerosis, redox balance and mitochondrial function. In conclusion, by repression of Sirt4, Lsd1 directs the epigenetic control of TSC immortality via maintenance of metabolic flexibility.

  14. On the origin of the deviation from the first order kinetics in inactivation of microbial cells by pulsed electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, N I

    2003-01-01

    A computer model was developed for estimation of the kinetics of microbial inactivation by pulsed electric field. The model is based on the electroporation theory of individual membrane damage, where spherical cell geometry and distribution of cell sizes are assumed. The variation of microbial cell sizes was assumed to follow a statistical probability distribution of the Gaussian type. Surviving kinetics was approximated by Weibull equation. The dependencies of two Weibull parameters (shape textit{n} and time $tau $, respectively) versus electric field intensity E and width of cell diameters distribution was studied.

  15. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : V. EFFECT OF ELECTROLYTES ON THE RATE OF INACTIVATION OF BACTERIOPHAGE BY ALCOHOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Korb, C

    1926-01-01

    Addition of neutral salts to the lytic filtrate results in an increased rate of inactivation of the latter when alcohol is added to it. This effect of salts is the more marked the higher the valency of the cation. Conversely, removal by dialysis of salts originally present in the lytic filtrate tends to render lytic agent less sensitive to alcohol. Restitution of the original salt content to the dialyzed filtrate tends to bring the sensitiveness to alcohol in the dialyzed filtrate to the level of the non-dialyzed control. It appears, therefore, that inactivation of the lytic agent by alcohol depends directly on the rate of precipitation of the coagulable constituents of the medium, and is not the result of a direct toxic action of alcohol on "bacteriophagum intestinale." Considered in association with our earlier findings, these results speak in favor of the chemical nature of the agent of transmissible lysis.

  16. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  17. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  18. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-05

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  19. Pharmacology and toxicology of an oral tablet whole cells inactivated cholera vaccine in Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Yulieé; Infante, Juan Francisco; Sifontes, Sergio; Díaz, Daiyana; Pérez, Viviana; Año, Gemma; Hernández, Tamara; Fernández, Sonsire; Castaño, Jorge Luis; Cedré, Bárbara; Oliva, Reynaldo; García, Luis; Solís, Rosa L; Talavera, Arturo

    2011-04-27

    Here we further investigate the pharmacological and toxicological properties of a cholera vaccine based on inactivated whole cells presented in either enteric coated (COA) or uncoated (U/C) tablet formulation from Vibrio cholerae C7258 strain. Tablets were dispersed in 2mL drinking water and administered orally to Sprague Dawley rats distributed in five groups (I COA7, II U/C7 immunized at 0, 7, 69days and III COA14, IV U/C14 immunized at 0, 14, 69days and V control group). Serum vibriocidal antibody response was measured after the administration of two doses with an interval of 7-14days. To further investigate the toxicological aspects a third dose was applied 10 weeks after the initial one. Animals were observed daily and water and food consumption was measured every other day. Periodic blood extractions were performed for hematology, biochemistry, and the titer of serum vibriocidal antibodies was determined. Anatomopathological analysis was performed at days 3 or 14 after the third dose. Results from clinical observations, as well as from water and food consumption and body weigh indicated no toxicity of the vaccine product. Meanwhile, no biological differences were found among different groups in hematological, hemo-chemistry, and anatomopathological studies. Moreover, enteric coated and uncoated tablets against human cholera were found to induce an immune response in rats.

  20. Inactivation of SAG E3 ubiquitin ligase blocks embryonic stem cell differentiation and sensitizes leukemia cells to retinoid acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Tan

    Full Text Available Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG, also known as RBX2 (RING box protein-2, is the RING component of SCF (SKP1, Cullin, and F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our previous studies have demonstrated that SAG is an anti-apoptotic protein and an attractive anti-cancer target. We also found recently that Sag knockout sensitized mouse embryonic stem cells (mES to radiation and blocked mES cells to undergo endothelial differentiation. Here, we reported that compared to wild-type mES cells, the Sag(-/- mES cells were much more sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (RA-induced suppression of cell proliferation and survival. While wild-type mES cells underwent differentiation upon exposure to RA, Sag(-/- mES cells were induced to death via apoptosis instead. The cell fate change, reflected by cellular stiffness, can be detected as early as 12 hrs post RA exposure by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy. We then extended this novel finding to RA differentiation therapy of leukemia, in which the resistance often develops, by testing our hypothesis that SAG inhibition would sensitize leukemia to RA. Indeed, we found a direct correlation between SAG overexpression and RA resistance in multiple leukemia lines. By using MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE, that inactivates SAG-SCF E3 ligase by blocking cullin neddylation, we were able to sensitize two otherwise resistant leukemia cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1 to RA. Mechanistically, RA sensitization by MLN4924 was mediated via enhanced apoptosis, likely through accumulation of pro-apoptotic proteins NOXA and c-JUN, two well-known substrates of SAG-SCF E3 ligase. Taken together, our study provides the proof-of-concept evidence for effective treatment of leukemia patients by RA-MLN4924 combination.

  1. Nonrandon X chromosome inactivation in B cells from carriers of X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, M.E.; Lavoie, A.; Briggs, C.; Brown, P.; Guerra, C.; Puck, J.M.

    1988-05-01

    X chromosome-linked sever combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by markedly reduced numbers of T cells, the absence of proliferative responses to mitogens, and hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells. To determine if the failure of the B cells to produce immunoglobulin might be due to expression of the XSCID gene defect in B-lineage cells as well as T cells, the authors analyzed patterns of X chromosome inactivation in B cells from nine obligate carriers of this disorder. A series of somatic cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X chromosome was produced from Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated B cells from each woman. To distinguish between the two X chromosome, the hybrids from each woman were analyzed using an X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism for which the woman in question was heterozygous. In all obligate carriers of XSCID, the B-cell hybrids demonstrated preferential use of a single X chromosome, the nonmutant X, as the active X. To determine if the small number of B-cell hybrids that contained the mutant X were derived from an immature subset of B cells, lymphocytes from three carriers were separated into surface IgM positive and surface IgM negative B cells prior to exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and production of B-cell hybrids. The results demonstrated normal random X chromosome inactivation in B-cell hybrids derived from the less mature surface IgM positive B cells. These results suggest that the XSCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as T cells and is required during B-cell maturation.

  2. Matrine inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human colon cancer LoVo cells by inactivating Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujun; Cheng, Binglin; Li, Hali; Xu, Wei; Zhai, Bo; Pan, Shangha; Wang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Sun, Xueying

    2014-01-01

    The present study has investigated the anti-tumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of matrine on human colon cancer LoVo cells. Matrine inhibited the proliferation of the cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. The concentration required for 50 % inhibition (IC50) was 1.15, 0.738, and 0.414 mg/ml, when cell were incubated with matrine for 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Matrine induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase by downregulating cyclin D1 and upregulating p27 and p21. Matrine induced cell apoptosis by reducing the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and increasing the activation of caspase-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Matrine displayed its anti-tumor activity by inactivating Akt, the upstream factor of the above proteins. Matrine significantly reduced the protein levels of pAkt, and increased the protein levels of other downstream factors, pBad and pGSK-3β. Specific inhibition of pAkt induced cell apoptosis, and synergized with matrine to inhibit the proliferation of LoVo cells; whereas activation of Akt neutralized the inhibitory effect of matrine on cell proliferation. The present study has demonstrated that matrine inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human colon cancer LoVo cells by inactivating Akt pathway, indicating matrine may be a potential anti-cancer agent for colon cancer.

  3. Poly(ethylene glycol-cholesterol inhibits L-type Ca2+ channel currents and augments voltage-dependent inactivation in A7r5 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikuo Ochi

    Full Text Available Cholesterol distributes at a high density in the membrane lipid raft and modulates ion channel currents. Poly(ethylene glycol cholesteryl ether (PEG-cholesterol is a nonionic amphipathic lipid consisting of lipophilic cholesterol and covalently bound hydrophilic PEG. PEG-cholesterol is used to formulate lipoplexes to transfect cultured cells, and liposomes for encapsulated drug delivery. PEG-cholesterol is dissolved in the external leaflet of the lipid bilayer, and expands it to flatten the caveolae and widen the gap between the two leaflets. We studied the effect of PEG-cholesterol on whole cell L-type Ca(2+ channel currents (I(Ca,L recorded from cultured A7r5 arterial smooth muscle cells. The pretreatment of cells with PEG-cholesterol decreased the density of ICa,L and augmented the voltage-dependent inactivation with acceleration of time course of inactivation and negative shift of steady-state inactivation curve. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD is a cholesterol-binding oligosaccharide. The enrichment of cholesterol by the MβCD:cholesterol complex (cholesterol (MβCD caused inhibition of I(Ca,L but did not augment voltage-dependent inactivation. Incubation with MβCD increased I(Ca,L, slowed the time course of inactivation and shifted the inactivation curve to a positive direction. Additional pretreatment by a high concentration of MβCD of the cells initially pretreated with PEG-cholesterol, increased I(Ca,L to a greater level than the control, and removed the augmented voltage-dependent inactivation. Due to the enhancement of the voltage-dependent inactivation, PEG-cholesterol inhibited window I(Ca,L more strongly as compared with cholesterol (MβCD. Poly(ethylene glycol conferred to cholesterol the efficacy to induce sustained augmentation of voltage-dependent inactivation of I(Ca,L.

  4. Peripheral blood complete remission after splenic irradiation in Mantle-Cell Lymphoma with 11q22-23 deletion and ATM inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galliano Marco

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL is a well-known histological and clinical subtype of B-cell non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas. It is usually characterized by an aggressive disease course, presenting with advanced stage disease at diagnosis and with low response rates to therapy. However few cases of indolent course MCL have been described. We herein report a case of MCL with splenomegaly and peripheral blood involvement as main clinical features. The patient underwent moderate dose splenic radiation therapy and achieved spleen downsizing and peripheral blood complete remission. Splenic irradiation has been extensively used in the past as palliative treatment in several lymphoproliferative disorders and a systemic effect and sometimes peripheral blood complete remissions have been observed. Mainly advocated mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are considered direct radiation-induced apoptotic cell death, immune modulation via proportional changes of lymphocyte subsets due to known differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity and a radiation-induced cytokine release. The peculiar intrinsic radiosensitivity pattern of lymphoid cells could probably be explained by well-defined individual genetic and molecular features. In this context, among NHLs, MCL subtype has the highest rate of ATM (Ataxia Teleangiectasia Mutated inactivation. While the ATM gene is thought to play a key-role in detecting radiation-induced DNA damage (expecially Double Strand Breaks, recent in vitro data support the hypothesis that ATM loss may actually contribute to the radiosensitivity of MCL cells. ATM status was retrospectively investigated in our patient, with the tool of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization, showing a complete inactivation of a single ATM allele secondary to the deletion of chromosomal region 11q22-23. The presence of this kind of cytogenetic aberration may be regarded in the future as a potential predictive marker of radiation response.

  5. (1)H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors.

  6. Inactivation of TGFβ receptors in stem cells drives cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammareri, Patrizia; Rose, Aidan M.; Vincent, David F.; Wang, Jun; Nagano, Ai; Libertini, Silvana; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Coates, Philip J.; McHugh, Angela; Pourreyron, Celine; Dayal, Jasbani H. S.; Larsson, Jonas; Weidlich, Simone; Spender, Lindsay C.; Sapkota, Gopal P.; Purdie, Karin J.; Proby, Charlotte M.; Harwood, Catherine A.; Leigh, Irene M.; Clevers, Hans; Barker, Nick; Karlsson, Stefan; Pritchard, Catrin; Marais, Richard; Chelala, Claude; South, Andrew P.; Sansom, Owen J.; Inman, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma patients treated with oncogenic BRAF inhibitors can develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) within weeks of treatment, driven by paradoxical RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway activation. Here we identify frequent TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 mutations in human vemurafenib-induced skin lesions and in sporadic cSCC. Functional analysis reveals these mutations ablate canonical TGFβ Smad signalling, which is localized to bulge stem cells in both normal human and murine skin. MAPK pathway hyperactivation (through BrafV600E or KrasG12D knockin) and TGFβ signalling ablation (through Tgfbr1 deletion) in LGR5+ve stem cells enables rapid cSCC development in the mouse. Mutation of Tp53 (which is commonly mutated in sporadic cSCC) coupled with Tgfbr1 deletion in LGR5+ve cells also results in cSCC development. These findings indicate that LGR5+ve stem cells may act as cells of origin for cSCC, and that RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway hyperactivation or Tp53 mutation, coupled with loss of TGFβ signalling, are driving events of skin tumorigenesis. PMID:27558455

  7. SMARCA4-inactivating mutations increase sensitivity to Aurora kinase A inhibitor VX-680 in non-small cell lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagal, Vural; Wei, Shuguang; Zhang, Wei; Brekken, Rolf A.; Posner, Bruce A.; Peyton, Michael; Girard, Luc; Hwang, TaeHyun; Wheeler, David A.; Minna, John D.; White, Michael A.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Roth, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the SMARCA4/BRG1 gene resulting in complete loss of its protein (BRG1) occur frequently in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Currently, no single therapeutic agent has been identified as synthetically lethal with SMARCA4/BRG1 loss. We identify AURKA activity as essential in NSCLC cells lacking SMARCA4/BRG1. In these cells, RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of AURKA induces apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in xenograft mouse models. Disc large homologue-associated protein 5 (HURP/DLGAP5), required for AURKA-dependent, centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly is essential for the survival and proliferation of SMARCA4/BRG1 mutant but not of SMARCA4/BRG1 wild-type cells. AURKA inhibitors may provide a therapeutic strategy for biomarker-driven clinical studies to treat the NSCLCs harbouring SMARCA4/BRG1-inactivating mutations. PMID:28102363

  8. pRb inactivation in mammary cells reveals common mechanisms for tumor initiation and progression in divergent epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Simin

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma 1 (pRb and the related pocket proteins, retinoblastoma-like 1 (p107 and retinoblastoma-like 2 (p130 (pRb(f, collectively, play a pivotal role in regulating eukaryotic cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and terminal differentiation. While aberrations in the pRb-signaling pathway are common in human cancers, the consequence of pRb(f loss in the mammary gland has not been directly assayed in vivo. We reported previously that inactivating these critical cell cycle regulators in divergent cell types, either brain epithelium or astrocytes, abrogates the cell cycle restriction point, leading to increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and predisposing to cancer. Here we report that mouse mammary epithelium is similar in its requirements for pRb(f function; Rb(f inactivation by T(121, a fragment of SV40 T antigen that binds to and inactivates pRb(f proteins, increases proliferation and apoptosis. Mammary adenocarcinomas form within 16 mo. Most apoptosis is regulated by p53, which has no impact on proliferation, and heterozygosity for a p53 null allele significantly shortens tumor latency. Most tumors in p53 heterozygous mice undergo loss of the wild-type p53 allele. We show that the mechanism of p53 loss of heterozygosity is not simply the consequence of Chromosome 11 aneuploidy and further that chromosomal instability subsequent to p53 loss is minimal. The mechanisms for pRb and p53 tumor suppression in the epithelia of two distinct tissues, mammary gland and brain, are indistinguishable. Further, this study has produced a highly penetrant breast cancer model based on aberrations commonly observed in the human disease.

  9. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint promotes androgen induced chromosomal instability in prostate epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tuen Chiu

    Full Text Available The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis.

  10. Living with an imperfect cell wall : compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hübscher, Judith; Jansen, Andrea; Kotte, Oliver; Schäfer, Juliane; Majcherczyk, Paul A.; Harris, Llinos G.; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Heinemann, Matthias; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Background: Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. fem

  11. Par-3 partitioning defective 3 homolog (C. elegans and androgen-induced prostate proliferative shutoff associated protein genes are mutationally inactivated in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Igor

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene identification by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay inhibition (GINI has proven its usefulness in identifying mutant genes in cancer cell lines. An increase in transcription in response to NMD inhibition of a subset of genes is a major cause of false positives when genes are selected for sequencing analysis. To distinguish between mRNA accumulations caused by stress response-induced transcription and nonsense-containing mRNA stabilizations is a challenge in identifying mutant genes using GINI. Methods To identify potential tumor-suppressor genes mutated in prostate cancer cell lines, we applied a version of GINI that involves inhibition of NMD in two steps. In the first step, NMD is inhibited in duplicate tissue-culture plates. During this step, both the substrate for NMD and stress-response mRNA transcripts are accumulated in cells. In the second step, transcription is inhibited in both plates and NMD is inhibited in one plate and released in the second plate. Microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in both plates after the second step detects only the differences in mRNA degradation but not in mRNA accumulation. Results Analyzing gene expression profile alterations in 22RV1 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells following NMD inhibition we selected candidates for sequencing analysis in both cell lines. Sequencing identified inactivating mutations in both alleles of the PARD3 and AS3 genes in the LNCaP and 22RV1 cells, respectively. Introduction of a wild-type PARD3 cDNA into the LNCaP cells resulted in a higher proliferation rate in tissue culture, a higher adhesion of LNCaP cells to the components of extracellular matrix and impaired the growth of the LNCaP cells in soft agar and in a three-dimensional cell-culture. Conclusion The mutational inactivation in a prostate cancer cell line of the PARD3 gene involved in asymmetric cell division and maintenance of cell-polarity suggests that the loss of cell-polarity contributes

  12. Caffeine Induces Cell Death via Activation of Apoptotic Signal and Inactivation of Survival Signal in Human Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsiung Chan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine consumption is a risk factor for osteoporosis, but the precise regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here, we show that cell viability decreases in osteoblasts treated with caffeine in a dose-dependent manner. This cell death is attributed primarily to apoptosis and to a smaller extent, necrosis. Moreover, caffeine directly stimulates intracellular oxidative stress. Our data support caffeine-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts via a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The apoptotic biochemical changes were effectively prevented upon pretreatment with ROS scavengers, indicating that ROS plays a critical role as an upstream controller in the caffeine-induced apoptotic cascade. Additionally, p21-activated protein kinase 2 (PAK2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK were activated in caffeine-treated osteoblasts. Experiments further found that PAK2 activity is required for caffeine-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Importantly, our data also show that caffeine triggers cell death via inactivation of the survival signal, including the ERK- and Akt-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways. Finally, exposure of rats to dietary water containing 10~20 μM caffeine led to bone mineral density loss. These results demonstrate for the first time that caffeine triggers apoptosis in osteoblasts via activation of mitochondria-dependent cell death signaling and inactivation of the survival signal, and causes bone mineral density loss in vivo.

  13. Matrine-induced apoptosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via in vitro vascular endothelial growth factor-A/extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 pathway inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M; He, G; Wang, R; Shi, S; Chen, J; Ye, Y; Xie, L; Yi, X; Tang, A

    2014-07-01

    Matrine, a main active extract from Sophora flavescens Ait, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects on various cancer cell lines, such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. However, it is currently unclear whether matrine could also elicit an inhibitory effect on growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), let alone the possible molecular mechanisms. Therefore, in a previous study, we investigated matrine-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in NPC cells. It was shown that proliferation of human NPC cells (CNE1 and CNE2) was significantly diminished by matrine in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced in both 2 NPC cells, particularly in CNE2 cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis rate in matrine-treated CNE2 cells confirmed the proapoptotic activity of matrine. We further found that matrine treatment dose- and time-dependently reduced the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and inactivated extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), followed by increased expression of downstream target caspase-3. Overall, we conclude that matrine could induce apoptosis of human NPC cells via VEGF-A/ERK1/2 pathway, which supports the potential use of matrine in clinically treating NPC.

  14. NIH 3T3 cells malignantly transformed by mot—2 show inactivation and cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WADHWA; SYUICHITAKANO; 等

    1999-01-01

    In previous studies we have reported that a high level of expression of mot-2 protein results in malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as analyzed by anchorage independent growth and nude mice assays [Kaul et al.,Oncogene,17,907-11,1998].Mot-2 was found to interact with tumor suppressor protein p53.The transient overexpression of mot-2 was inhibitory to transcriptional activation function of p53 [Wadhwa et al.,J.Biol.Chem.,273,2958691,1998].We demonstrate here that mot-2 transfected stable clone of NIH 3T3 that showed malignant properties indeed show inactivation of p53 function as assayed by exogenous p53 dependent reporter.The expression level of p53 in response to UV-irradiation was lower in NIH 3T3/mot-2 as compared to NIH 3T3 cells and also exhibited delay in reachingpeak.Furthermore,upon serum starvation p53 was seen to translocate to the nucleus in NIH 3T3,but not in its mot-3 derivative.The data suggests that mot-2 mediated cytoplasmic sequestration and inactivation of p53 may operate,at least in part,for malignant phenotype of NIH 3T3/mot-2 cells.

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms and planktonic cells by 5-aminolevulinic acid and 5-aminolevulinic acid methyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Yingli; Wang, Li; Han, Lei; Lei, Jin'e; Ishaq, Hafiz Muhammad; Nair, Sean P; Xu, Jiru

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae, particularly extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae, is currently a great challenge. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy is a promising approach for killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and its derivative 5-ALA methyl ester (MAL) in the presence of white light to cause photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of K. pneumoniae planktonic and biofilm cells. In the presence of white light, 5-ALA and MAL inactivated planktonic cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Biofilms were also sensitive to 5-ALA and MAL-mediated PDI. The mechanisms by which 5-ALA and MAL caused PDI of ESBL-producing K. pneumonia were also investigated. Exposure of K. pneumonia to light in the presence of either 5-ALA or MAL induced cleavage of genomic DNA and the rapid release of intracellular biopolymers. Intensely denatured cytoplasmic contents and aggregated ribosomes were also detected by transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that PDI of biofilms caused aggregated bacteria to detach and that the bacterial cell envelope was damaged. This study provides insights into 5-ALA and MAL-mediated PDI of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae.

  16. Inactivation of the putative ubiquitin-E3 ligase PDLIM2 in classical Hodgkin and anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, K D; Hummel, F; Richter, J; Giefing, M; Hartmann, S; Hansmann, M-L; Kreher, S; Köchert, K; Krappmann, D; Klapper, W; Hummel, M; Wenzel, S-S; Lenz, G; Janz, M; Dörken, B; Siebert, R; Mathas, S

    2017-01-01

    Apart from its unique histopathological appearance with rare tumor cells embedded in an inflammatory background of bystander cells, classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by an unusual activation of a broad range of signaling pathways involved in cellular activation. This includes constitutive high-level activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), activator protein-1 (AP-1) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) transcription factors (TFs) that are physiologically only transiently activated. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of the putative ubiquitin E3-ligase PDLIM2 contributes to this TF activation. PDLIM2 expression is lost at the mRNA and protein levels in the majority of cHL cell lines and Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells of nearly all cHL primary samples. This loss is associated with PDLIM2 genomic alterations, promoter methylation and altered splicing. Reconstitution of PDLIM2 in HRS cell lines inhibits proliferation, blocks NF-κB transcriptional activity and contributes to cHL-specific gene expression. In non-Hodgkin B-cell lines, small interfering RNA-mediated PDLIM2 knockdown results in superactivation of TFs NF-κB and AP-1 following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. Furthermore, expression of PDLIM2 is lost in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) that shares key biological aspects with cHL. We conclude that inactivation of PDLIM2 is a recurrent finding in cHL and ALCL, promotes activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and thereby contributes to their pathogenesis. PMID:27538486

  17. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala blocks classical conditioning but not conditioning-specific reflex modification of rabbit heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Lauren B; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) conditioning in rabbits is a widely used model of classical conditioning of autonomic responding that is noted for being similar to the development of conditioned heart rate slowing (bradycardia) in humans. We have shown previously that in addition to HR changes to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS), the HR reflex itself can undergo associative change called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) that manifests when tested in the absence of the CS. Because CRM resembles the conditioned bradycardic response to the CS, we sought to determine if HR conditioning and CRM share a common neural substrate. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical part of the pathway through which conditioned bradycardia is established. To test whether the CeA is also involved in the acquisition and/or expression of CRM, we inactivated the CeA with muscimol during HR conditioning or CRM testing. CeA inactivation blocked HR conditioning without completely preventing CRM acquisition or expression. These results suggest that the CeA may therefore only play a modulatory role in CRM. Theories on the biological significance of conditioned bradycardia suggest that it may represent a state of hypervigilance that facilitates the detection of new and changing contingencies in the environment. We relate these ideas to our results and discuss how they may be relevant to the hypersensitivity observed in fear conditioning disorders like post-traumatic stress.

  18. Canonical and Alternative Pathways in Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1/Cyclin B Inactivation upon M-Phase Exit in Xenopus laevis Cell-Free Extracts

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    Jacek Z. Kubiak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1 is the major M-phase kinase known also as the M-phase Promoting Factor or MPF. Studies performed during the last decade have shown many details of how CDK1 is regulated and also how it regulates the cell cycle progression. Xenopus laevis cell-free extracts were widely used to elucidate the details and to obtain a global view of the role of CDK1 in M-phase control. CDK1 inactivation upon M-phase exit is a primordial process leading to the M-phase/interphase transition during the cell cycle. Here we discuss two closely related aspects of CDK1 regulation in Xenopus laevis cell-free extracts: firstly, how CDK1 becomes inactivated and secondly, how other actors, like kinases and phosphatases network and/or specific inhibitors, cooperate with CDK1 inactivation to assure timely exit from the M-phase.

  19. Ethanol Inactivated Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Maintain the Self-Renew and Proliferation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Boxian; Ning, Song; Zhuang, Lili; Jiang, Chunyan; Cui, Yugui; Fan, Guoping; Qin, Lianju; Liu, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) inactivated by mitomycin C or irradiation were applied to support the self-renew and proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). To avoid the disadvangtages of mitomycin C and irradiation, here MEFs were treated by ethanol (ET). Our data showed that 10% ET-inactivated MEFs (eiMEFs) could well maintain the self-renew and proliferation of hESCs. hESCs grown on eiMEFs expressed stem cell markers of NANOG, octamer-binding protein 4 (OCT4), stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA4) and tumour related antigen-1-81 (TRA-1-81), meanwhile maintained normal karyotype after long time culture. Also, hESCs cocultured with eiMEFs were able to form embryoid body (EB) in vitro and develop teratoma in vivo. Moreover, eiMEFs could keep their nutrient functions after long time cryopreservation. Our results indicate that the application of eiMEF in hESCs culture is safe, economical and convenient, thus is a better choice.

  20. Role of p53 and CDKN2A Inactivation in Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas

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    Alessia Pacifico

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human SCCs harbour unique mutations in the p53 gene as well as inactivation of the CDKN2A gene. While mutations in the p53 gene are induced by UV radiation and represent tumor initiating events, the majority of alterations detected in the CDKN2A gene do not appear to be UV-dependent. In conclusion, in addition to p53 mutations, silencing of the CDKN2A gene might play a significant role in SCC development.

  1. d,l-Sulforaphane Induces ROS-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Gliomablastoma Cells by Inactivating STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ziwei; Yu, Fei; Ren, Yahao; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    d,l-Sulforaphane (SFN), a synthetic analogue of broccoli-derived isomer l-SFN, exerts cytotoxic effects on multiple tumor cell types through different mechanisms and is more potent than the l-isomer at inhibiting cancer growth. However, the means by which SFN impairs glioblastoma (GBM) cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of SFN in GBM cells and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell viability assays, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot results revealed that SFN could induced apoptosis of GBM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, via up-regulation of caspase-3 and Bax, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Mechanistically, SFN treatment led to increase the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in GBM cells. Meanwhile, SFN also suppressed both constitutive and IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, and the activation of upstream JAK2 and Src tyrosine kinases, dose- and time-dependently. Moreover, blockage of ROS production by using the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine totally reversed SFN-mediated down-regulation of JAK2/Src-STAT3 signaling activation and the subsequent effects on apoptosis by blocking the induction of apoptosis-related genes in GBM cells. Taken together, our data suggests that SFN induces apoptosis in GBM cells via ROS-dependent inactivation of STAT3 phosphorylation. These findings motivate further evaluation of SFN as a cancer chemopreventive agent in GBM treatment. PMID:28054986

  2. d,l-Sulforaphane Induces ROS-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Gliomablastoma Cells by Inactivating STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwei Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available d,l-Sulforaphane (SFN, a synthetic analogue of broccoli-derived isomer l-SFN, exerts cytotoxic effects on multiple tumor cell types through different mechanisms and is more potent than the l-isomer at inhibiting cancer growth. However, the means by which SFN impairs glioblastoma (GBM cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of SFN in GBM cells and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell viability assays, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot results revealed that SFN could induced apoptosis of GBM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, via up-regulation of caspase-3 and Bax, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Mechanistically, SFN treatment led to increase the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in GBM cells. Meanwhile, SFN also suppressed both constitutive and IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, and the activation of upstream JAK2 and Src tyrosine kinases, dose- and time-dependently. Moreover, blockage of ROS production by using the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine totally reversed SFN-mediated down-regulation of JAK2/Src-STAT3 signaling activation and the subsequent effects on apoptosis by blocking the induction of apoptosis-related genes in GBM cells. Taken together, our data suggests that SFN induces apoptosis in GBM cells via ROS-dependent inactivation of STAT3 phosphorylation. These findings motivate further evaluation of SFN as a cancer chemopreventive agent in GBM treatment.

  3. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  4. p53功能失活在食管鳞癌中的表达及意义%Significance of Functional Inactivation of p53 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小东; 戎铁华; 傅剑华; 龙浩

    2001-01-01

    目的:建立一种评价肿瘤生物学特性的新方法棗p53功能失活检测法,并探讨p53功能失活与食管鳞癌TNM分期(tumor,nodes,metastasisstaging)和组织学分级的关系。方法:采用p53功能测定法对45例新鲜食管鳞癌组织和正常食管组织进行p53功能检测(p53基因突变检测作为对照),将检测结果与患者的TNM分期和组织学分级进行统计学分析。结果:p53功能失活率为64%,明显高于p53基因突变率49%。p53功能失活和食管鳞癌的TNM分期有关,分期越高,p53功能失活率越高;p53功能失活和食管鳞癌的组织学分级有关,分级越高,p53功能失活率越高。结论:p53功能失活有望成为一种评价食管鳞癌生物学特性的新指标;p53功能失活与食管鳞癌的TNM分期和组织学分级有关。%Objective: The current study was designed to establish a new method to evaluate biological activity of carcinoma— functional status of p53, and investigate the relationship between functional inactivation of p53 and the TNM(tumor,nodes,metastasis) staging or histological classification of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. Methods: A total of 45 samples of fresh esophageal tissues of squamous cell carcinoma and normal esophageal tissues were examined for functional inactivation of p53 by detection of functional inactivation of p53 ( comparison with detection of p53 gene mutation ) . Then the analyses of detected results and the TNM stagings or the histological classifications of the carcinoma were statistically analyzed in SPSS. Results: The rate of functional inactivation of p53 (64% ) seemed to be obviously higher than that of p53 gene mutation (49% ) with a significant difference (P=0.046). There was a significant relationship between functional inactivation of p53 and the TNM staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Its rate tended to be increased with the advance of the TNM staging; there was a significant

  5. Inactivation of the Progesterone Receptor in Mx1+ Cells Potentiates Osteogenesis in Calvaria but Not in Long Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhendong A; Sun, Weihua; Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Lane, Nancy E; Yao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The effect of progesterone on bone remains elusive. We previously reported that global progesterone receptor (PR) knockout mice displayed high bone mass phenotype, suggesting that PR influences bone growth and modeling. Recently, Mx1+ cells were characterized to be mesenchymal stem cell-like pluripotent Cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the PR in Mx1+ cells regulates osteogenesis. Using the Mx1-Cre;mT/mG reporter mouse model, we found that the calvarial cells exhibited minimal background Mx1-Cre activity prior to Cre activation by IFNα treatment as compared to the bone marrow stromal cells. IFNα treatment significantly activated Mx1-Cre in the calvarial cells. When the PR gene was deleted in the Mx1-Cre;PR-flox calvarial cells in vitro, significantly higher levels of expression of osteoblast maturation marker genes (RUNX2, Osteocalcin, and Dmp1) and osteogenic potential were detected. The PR-deficient calvariae exhibited greater bone volume, especially in the males. Although Mx1-Cre activity could be induced on the bone surface in vivo, the Mx1+ cells did not differentiate into osteocytes in long bones. Bone volumes at the distal femurs and the bone turnover marker serum Osteocalcin were similar between the Mx1-Cre;PR-flox mutant mice and the corresponding wild types in both sexes. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that blocking progesterone signaling via PRs in calvarial Mx1+ cells promoted osteoblast differentiation in the calvaria. Mx1+ was expressed by heterogeneous cells in bone marrow and did not differentiate into osteocyte during long bone development in vivo. Selectively inactivating the PR gene in Mx1+ cells affected the membrane bone formation but did not affect peripheral skeletal homeostasis.

  6. Inactivation of the Progesterone Receptor in Mx1+ Cells Potentiates Osteogenesis in Calvaria but Not in Long Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhendong A Zhong

    Full Text Available The effect of progesterone on bone remains elusive. We previously reported that global progesterone receptor (PR knockout mice displayed high bone mass phenotype, suggesting that PR influences bone growth and modeling. Recently, Mx1+ cells were characterized to be mesenchymal stem cell-like pluripotent Cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the PR in Mx1+ cells regulates osteogenesis. Using the Mx1-Cre;mT/mG reporter mouse model, we found that the calvarial cells exhibited minimal background Mx1-Cre activity prior to Cre activation by IFNα treatment as compared to the bone marrow stromal cells. IFNα treatment significantly activated Mx1-Cre in the calvarial cells. When the PR gene was deleted in the Mx1-Cre;PR-flox calvarial cells in vitro, significantly higher levels of expression of osteoblast maturation marker genes (RUNX2, Osteocalcin, and Dmp1 and osteogenic potential were detected. The PR-deficient calvariae exhibited greater bone volume, especially in the males. Although Mx1-Cre activity could be induced on the bone surface in vivo, the Mx1+ cells did not differentiate into osteocytes in long bones. Bone volumes at the distal femurs and the bone turnover marker serum Osteocalcin were similar between the Mx1-Cre;PR-flox mutant mice and the corresponding wild types in both sexes. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that blocking progesterone signaling via PRs in calvarial Mx1+ cells promoted osteoblast differentiation in the calvaria. Mx1+ was expressed by heterogeneous cells in bone marrow and did not differentiate into osteocyte during long bone development in vivo. Selectively inactivating the PR gene in Mx1+ cells affected the membrane bone formation but did not affect peripheral skeletal homeostasis.

  7. Bio-inactivation of human malignant cells through highly responsive diluted colloidal suspension of functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Roberta V.; Silva-Caldeira, Priscila P.; Pereira-Maia, Elene C.; Fabris, José D.; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Ardisson, José D.; Domingues, Rosana Z.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fluids, more specifically aqueous colloidal suspensions containing certain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), have recently been gaining special interest due to their potential use in clinical treatments of cancerous formations in mammalians. The technological application arises mainly from their hyperthermic behavior, which means that the nanoparticles dissipate heat upon being exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). If the temperature is raised to slightly above 43 °C, cancer cells are functionally inactivated or killed; however, normal cells tend to survive under those same conditions, entirely maintaining their bioactivity. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that under simultaneous exposure to an AMF and magnetic nanoparticles, certain lines of cancer cells are bio-inactivated even without experiencing a significant temperature increase. This non-thermal effect is cell specific, indicating that MNPs, under alternating magnetic fields, may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions that were previously thought to be implausible, considering that the temperature does not increase more than 5 °C, which is also true in cases for which the concentration of MNPs is too low. To experimentally test for this effect, this study focused on the feasibility of inducing K562 cell death using an AMF and aqueous suspensions containing very low concentrations of MNPs. The assay was designed for a ferrofluid containing magnetite nanoparticles, which were obtained through the co-precipitation method and were functionalized with citric acid; the particles had an average diameter of 10 ± 2 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 40 nm. Experiments were first performed to test for the ability of the ferrofluid to release heat under an AMF. The results show that for concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 1.0 × 103 mg L-1, the maximum temperature increase was actually less than 2 °C. However, the in vitro test results from K562 cells and suspensions

  8. Role of iron in inactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor after asbestos treatment of human lung and pleural target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldys, Aleksander; Aust, Ann E

    2005-05-01

    Although the mechanism by which asbestos causes cancer remains unknown, iron associated with asbestos is thought to play a role in the pathogenic effects of fibers. Here, we examined the effects of asbestos on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human lung epithelial (A549) cells, human pleural mesothelial (MET5A) cells, and normal human small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells. Treatment of A549, MET5A, and SAEC cells with asbestos caused a significant reduction of EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation. This was both time- (15 min to 24 h) and concentration-dependent (1.5, 3, and 6 mug/cm(2)) in A549 cells. Also, treatment with 6 mug/cm(2) crocidolite for 24 h diminished the phosphorylation levels of human EGFR 2 (HER2). Exposure of A549 cells to 6 mug/cm(2) crocidolite for 3-24 h resulted in no detectable Y1045 phosphorylation and no apparent degradation of the EGFR. Inhibition of fiber endocytosis resulted in a considerable inhibition of EGFR dephosphorylation. Removal of iron from asbestos by desferrioxamine B or phytic acid inhibited asbestos-induced decreases in EGFR phosphorylation. The effects of crocidolite, amosite, and chrysotile on the EGFR phosphorylation state appeared to be directly related to the amount of iron mobilized from these fibers. These results strongly suggest that iron plays an important role in asbestos-induced inactivation of EGFR.

  9. Inactivation of stable viruses in cell culture facilities by peracetic acid fogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter; Roth, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Looking for a robust and simple method to replace formaldehyde fumigation for the disinfection of virus-handling laboratories and facilities, we tested peracetic acid fogging as a method to inactivate stable viruses under practical conditions. Peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (5.8%/27.5%, 2.0 mL/m³) was diluted in sufficient water to achieve ≥ 70% relative humidity and was vaporized as peracetic acid fog in various positions in the laboratory. After vaporization, a 60 min exposure time, and venting of the laboratory, no residual virus was detected on any of the carriers (detection limit <1 infectious unit/sample volume tested). The log reduction values were 9.0 for reovirus, 6.4 for MVM parvovirus, and 7.65 for the polyomavirus. After more than 10 disinfection runs within 12 months, no damage or functional impairment of electrical and electronic equipment was noted.

  10. Production of inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccines from MDCK cells in serum-free medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Yung-Chih Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly pathogenic influenza viruses pose a constant threat which could lead to a global pandemic. Vaccination remains the principal measure to reduce morbidity and mortality from such pandemics. The availability and surging demand for pandemic vaccines needs to be addressed in the preparedness plans. This study presents an improved high-yield manufacturing process for the inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccines using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells grown in a serum-free (SF medium microcarrier cell culture system. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The current study has evaluated the performance of cell adaptation switched from serum-containing (SC medium to several commercial SF media. The selected SF medium was further evaluated in various bioreactor culture systems for process scale-up evaluation. No significant difference was found in the cell growth in different sizes of bioreactors studied. In the 7.5 L bioreactor runs, the cell concentration reached to 2.3 × 10(6 cells/mL after 5 days. The maximum virus titers of 1024 Hemagglutinin (HA units/50 µL and 7.1 ± 0.3 × 10(8 pfu/mL were obtained after 3 days infection. The concentration of HA antigen as determined by SRID was found to be 14.1 µg/mL which was higher than those obtained from the SC medium. A mouse immunogenicity study showed that the formalin-inactivated purified SF vaccine candidate formulated with alum adjuvant could induce protective level of virus neutralization titers similar to those obtained from the SC medium. In addition, the H5N1 viruses produced from either SC or SF media showed the same antigenic reactivity with the NIBRG14 standard antisera. CONCLUSIONS: The advantages of this SF cell-based manufacturing process could reduce the animal serum contamination, the cost and lot-to-lot variation of SC medium production. This study provides useful information to manufacturers that are planning to use SF medium for cell-based influenza vaccine production.

  11. The DNA damage-binding protein XPC is a frequent target for inactivation in squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Feraudy, Sebastien; Ridd, Katie; Richards, Lauren M; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Revet, Ingrid; Oh, Dennis; Feeney, Luzviminda; Cleaver, James E

    2010-08-01

    XPC, the main damage-recognition protein responsible for nucleotide excision repair of UVB damage to DNA, is lost or mutated in xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C), a rare inherited disease characterized by high incidence and early onset of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. The high incidence of skin cancers in XP-C patients suggests that loss of expression of XPC protein might also provide a selective advantage for initiation and progression of similar cancers in non XP-C patients in the general population. To test whether XPC is selectively lost in squamous cell carcinomas from non XP-C patients, we examined XPC expression by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray with 244 tissue cores, including in situ and invasive squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), keratoacanthoma (KA), and normal skin samples from both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients. We found that XPC expression was lost in 49% of invasive squamous cell carcinomas from immunocompetent patients and 59% from immunosuppressed patients. Loss of expression was correlated with deletions of chromosomal 3p and mutations in the XPC gene. The XPC gene is consequently inactivated or lost in almost half of squamous cell carcinomas from non XP-C patients. Loss or mutation of XPC may be an early event during skin carcinogenesis that provides a selective advantage for initiation and progression of squamous cell carcinomas in non XP-C patients.

  12. BRG1/SMARCA4 inactivation promotes non-small cell lung cancer aggressiveness by altering chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvis, Tess; Hepperla, Austin; Walter, Vonn; Song, Shujie; Simon, Jeremy; Parker, Joel; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Desai, Nisarg; Major, Michael B; Hayes, D Neil; Davis, Ian J; Weissman, Bernard

    2014-11-15

    SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes regulate critical cellular processes, including cell-cycle control, programmed cell death, differentiation, genomic instability, and DNA repair. Inactivation of this class of chromatin remodeling complex has been associated with a variety of malignancies, including lung, ovarian, renal, liver, and pediatric cancers. In particular, approximately 10% of primary human lung non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) display attenuations in the BRG1 ATPase, a core factor in SWI/SNF complexes. To evaluate the role of BRG1 attenuation in NSCLC development, we examined the effect of BRG1 silencing in primary and established human NSCLC cells. BRG1 loss altered cellular morphology and increased tumorigenic potential. Gene expression analyses showed reduced expression of genes known to be associated with progression of human NSCLC. We demonstrated that BRG1 losses in NSCLC cells were associated with variations in chromatin structure, including differences in nucleosome positioning and occupancy surrounding transcriptional start sites of disease-relevant genes. Our results offer direct evidence that BRG1 attenuation contributes to NSCLC aggressiveness by altering nucleosome positioning at a wide range of genes, including key cancer-associated genes.

  13. The SKINT1-like gene is inactivated in hominoids but not in all primate species: implications for the origin of dendritic epidermal T cells.

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    Rania Hassan Mohamed

    Full Text Available Dendritic epidermal T cells, which express an invariant Vγ5Vδ1 T-cell receptor and account for 95% of all resident T cells in the mouse epidermis, play a critical role in skin immune surveillance. These γδ T cells are generated by positive selection in the fetal thymus, after which they migrate to the skin. The development of dendritic epidermal T cells is critically dependent on the Skint1 gene expressed specifically in keratinocytes and thymic epithelial cells, suggesting an indispensable role for Skint1 in the selection machinery for specific intraepithelial lymphocytes. Phylogenetically, rodents have functional SKINT1 molecules, but humans and chimpanzees have a SKINT1-like (SKINT1L gene with multiple inactivating mutations. In the present study, we analyzed SKINT1L sequences in representative primate species and found that all hominoid species have a common inactivating mutation, but that Old World monkeys such as olive baboons, green monkeys, cynomolgus macaques and rhesus macaques have apparently functional SKINT1L sequences, indicating that SKINT1L was inactivated in a common ancestor of hominoids. Interestingly, the epidermis of cynomolgus macaques contained a population of dendritic-shaped γδ T cells expressing a semi-invariant Vγ10/Vδ1 T-cell receptor. However, this population of macaque T cells differed from rodent dendritic epidermal T cells in that their Vγ10/Vδ1 T-cell receptors displayed junctional diversity and expression of Vγ10 was not epidermis-specific. Therefore, macaques do not appear to have rodent-type dendritic epidermal T cells despite having apparently functional SKINT1L. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis indicates that SKINT1L emerged in an ancestor of placental mammals but was inactivated or lost multiple times in mammalian evolution and that Skint1 arose by gene duplication in a rodent lineage, suggesting that authentic dendritic epidermal T cells are presumably unique to rodents.

  14. Salinomycin induces cell death via inactivation of Stat3 and downregulation of Skp2

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, K H; Kim, H.; Bae, Y-K; Kim, K.; Park, B-K; Lee, C-H; Kim, Y-N

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin has been shown to control breast cancer stem cells, although the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects are not clear. Deregulation of cell cycle regulators play critical roles in tumorigenesis, and they have been considered as anticancer targets. In this study, we investigated salinomycin effect on cell cycle progression using OVCAR-8 ovarian cancer cell line and multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES and DXR cell lines that are derived from OVCAR-8. Parental OVCAR-8 cells are sen...

  15. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL inactivation in sporadic clear cell renal cancer: associations with germline VHL polymorphisms and etiologic risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee E Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal tumor heterogeneity studies have utilized the von Hippel-Lindau VHL gene to classify disease into molecularly defined subtypes to examine associations with etiologic risk factors and prognosis. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of VHL inactivation in clear cell renal tumors (ccRCC and to evaluate relationships between VHL inactivation subgroups with renal cancer risk factors and VHL germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. VHL genetic and epigenetic inactivation was examined among 507 sporadic RCC/470 ccRCC cases using endonuclease scanning and using bisulfite treatment and Sanger sequencing across 11 CpG sites within the VHL promoter. Case-only multivariate analyses were conducted to identify associations between alteration subtypes and risk factors. VHL inactivation, either through sequence alterations or promoter methylation in tumor DNA, was observed among 86.6% of ccRCC cases. Germline VHL SNPs and a haplotype were associated with promoter hypermethylation in tumor tissue (OR = 6.10; 95% CI: 2.28-16.35, p = 3.76E-4, p-global = 8E-5. Risk of having genetic VHL inactivation was inversely associated with smoking due to a higher proportion of wild-type ccRCC tumors [former: OR = 0.70 (0.20-1.31 and current: OR = 0.56 (0.32-0.99; P-trend = 0.04]. Alteration prevalence did not differ by histopathologic characteristics or occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. ccRCC cases with particular VHL germline polymorphisms were more likely to have VHL inactivation through promoter hypermethylation than through sequence alterations in tumor DNA, suggesting that the presence of these SNPs may represent an example of facilitated epigenetic variation (an inherited propensity towards epigenetic variation in renal tissue. A proportion of tumors from current smokers lacked VHL alterations and may represent a biologically distinct clinical entity from inactivated cases.

  16. Antihepatic Fibrosis Effect of Active Components Isolated from Green Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Involves the Inactivation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunge; Jiang, Chunyu; Xia, Xichun; Mu, Teng; Wei, Lige; Lou, Yuntian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Yuqing; Bi, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a vegetable with numerous nutritional properties. In the current study, a total of 23 compounds were isolated from green asparagus, and 9 of these compounds were obtained from this genus for the first time. Preliminary data showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-extracted fraction of green asparagus exerted a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, giving an IC50 value of 45.52 μg/mL. The biological activities of the different compounds isolated from the EtOAc-extracted fraction with respect to antihepatic fibrosis were investigated further. Four compounds, C3, C4, C10, and C12, exhibited profound inhibitory effect on the activation of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells induced by TNF-α. The activation t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, which led to the production of fibrotic matrix (TGF-β1, activin C) and accumulation of TNF-α, was dramatically decreased by these compounds. The mechanisms by which these compounds inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells appeared to be associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the ERK phosphorylation cascade.

  17. Spontaneous reactivation of clusters of X-linked genes is associated with the plasticity of X-inactivation in mouse trophoblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Agnès; Deuve, Jane Lynda; Navarro, Pablo; Merzouk, Sarra; Pichard, Sylvain; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Louise, Anne; Arnaud, Danielle; Avner, Philip; Morey, Céline

    2014-02-01

    Random epigenetic silencing of the X-chromosome in somatic tissues of female mammals equalizes the dosage of X-linked genes between the sexes. Unlike this form of X-inactivation that is essentially irreversible, the imprinted inactivation of the paternal X, which characterizes mouse extra-embryonic tissues, appears highly unstable in the trophoblast giant cells of the placenta. Here, we wished to determine whether such instability is already present in placental progenitor cells prior to differentiation toward lineage-specific cell types. To this end, we analyzed the behavior of a GFP transgene on the paternal X both in vivo and in trophoblast stem (TS) cells derived from the trophectoderm of XX(GFP) blastocysts. Using single-cell studies, we show that not only the GFP transgene but also a large number of endogenous genes on the paternal X are subject to orchestrated cycles of reactivation/de novo inactivation in placental progenitor cells. This reversal of silencing is associated with local losses of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation extending over several adjacent genes and with the topological relocation of the hypomethylated loci outside of the nuclear compartment of the inactive X. The "reactivated" state is maintained through several cell divisions. Our study suggests that this type of "metastable epigenetic" states may underlie the plasticity of TS cells and predispose specific genes to relaxed regulation in specific subtypes of placental cells.

  18. Photocatalytic Inactivation Effect of Gold-Doped TiO2 (Au/TiO2) Nanocomposites on Human Colon Carcinoma LoVo Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Xu; Yi Sun; Yaomin Zhao; Junjie Huang; Chunmei Chen; Zhiyu Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The photocatalytic inactivation effecting of gold-doped TiO2 (Au/TiO2) nanocomposites on human colon carcinoma LoVo cells was investigated for the first time. The Au/TiO2 samples containing different amounts of Au (1–4 wt%) were prepared by deposition-precipitation (DP) method. These synthesized Au/TiO2 nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. It was found that the photocatalytic inactivation ...

  19. Effects of inactivated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and intestinal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Zhao, Shanshan; Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a serious infection in neonatal piglets. As the causative agent of PED, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) results in acute diarrhea and dehydration with high mortality rates in swine. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly effective antigen-presenting cells to uptake and present viral antigens to T cells, which then initiate a distinct immune response. In this study, our results show that the expression of Mo-DCs surface markers such as SWC3a(+)CD1a(+), SWC3a(+)CD80/86(+) and SWC3a(+)SLA-II-DR(+) is increased after incubation with UV-PEDV for 24h. Mo-DCs incubated with UV-PEDV produce higher levels of IL-12 and INF-γ compared to mock-infected Mo-DCs. Interactions between Mo-DCs and UV-PEDV significantly stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. Consistent with these results, there is an enhancement in the ability of porcine intestinal DCs to activate T-cell proliferation in vivo. We conclude that UV-PEDV may be a useful and safe vaccine to trigger adaptive immunity.

  20. Effect of temperature on the formation and inactivation of syringomycin E pores in human red blood cells and bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, G; Kaulin, Y A; Schagina, L V; Takemoto, J Y; Blasko, K

    2000-06-01

    The effects of temperature on the formation and inactivation of syringomycin E (SRE) pores were investigated with human red blood cells (RBCs) and lipid bilayer membranes (BLMs). SRE enhanced the RBC membrane permeability of 86Rb and monomeric hemoglobin in a temperature dependent manner. The kinetics of 86Rb and hemoglobin effluxes were measured at different temperatures and pore formation was found to be only slightly affected, while inactivation was strongly influenced by temperature. At 37 degrees C, SRE pore inactivation began 15 min after and at 20 degrees C, 40 min after SRE addition. At 6 degrees C, below the phase transition temperature of the major lipid components of the RBC membrane, no inactivation occurred for as long as 90 min. With BLMs, SRE induced a large current that remained stable at 14 degrees C, but at 23 degrees C it decreased over time while the single channel conductance and dwell time did not change. The results show that the temperature dependent inactivation of SRE pores is due to a decrease in the number of open pores.

  1. Inactivation of Hela cancer cells by an atmospheric pressure cold plasma jet∗%大气压冷等离子体射流灭活子宫颈癌Hela细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄骏†; 陈维; 李辉; 王鹏业; 杨思泽

    2013-01-01

    An inactivation mechanism study on Hela cancer cells by means of an atmospheric pressure cold plasma jet is presented. Cell morphology is observed under an inverted microscope after plasma treatment. The neutral red uptake assay provides quantitative evaluations of cell viability under different conditions. The effect of the inactivation efficiency of Hela cancer cells in the argon (900 mL/min) with addition of different amount of oxygen (1%, 2%, 4%, 8%) into atmospheric pressure cold plasma jet is discussed under the fixed power 18 W. Results show that 2% O2 addition provides the best inactivation efficiency, and the survival rate can be reduced to 7%after 180 s treatment. When the oxygen addition exceeds 2%, the inactivation efficiency gradually weakens. The effect is not so good as that in pure argon plasma when the oxygen addition arrives at 8%. According to the emission spectrum of the plasmum, it is concluded that the reactive oxygen species in the plasma play a key role in cancer cell inactivation process.%  研究了大气压冷等离子体射流对子宫颈癌Hela细胞的灭活机制。在倒置显微镜下观察不同等离子体处理条件下的细胞形态,并通过中性红吸收测试定量测定各个条件下的细胞存活率。将功率维持在18 W,在900 mL/min氩等离子体中添入氧气的百分含量分别为1%,2%,4%和8%的条件下处理Hela细胞,探讨活性气体氧气在惰性气体氩气中的百分含量对Hela癌细胞灭活效率的影响,发现添加2%氧气时,氩/氧等离子体灭活效果最佳,处理180 s后细胞存活率可降至7%。当继续添加氧超过2%时,灭活效果逐渐减弱,直至8%时,其效果反而不如单纯氩等离子体。通过测量等离子体发射光谱,结果表明活性氧自由基在癌细胞灭活过程中可能起关键作用。

  2. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling.

  3. Study on Toxicity Reduction and Potency Induction in Whole-cell Pertussis Vaccine by Developing a New Optimal Inactivation Condition Processed on Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour Dounighi, Naser; Razzaghi-Abyane, Mehdi; Nofeli, Mojtaba; Zolfagharian, Hossein; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Background Whooping cough is caused by Bordetella pertussis, and it remains a public health concern. Whole-cell pertussis vaccines have been commonly employed for expanded immunization. There is no doubt of the efficacy of whole cell pertussis vaccine, but it is necessary to improve the vaccine to decrease its toxicity. Objectives In this study, an inactivation process of dealing with pertussis bacteria is optimized in order to decrease the bacteria content in human doses of vaccines and reduce the vaccine’s toxicity. Materials and Methods The bacterial suspensions of pertussis strains 509 and 134 were divided into 21 sample parts from F1 to F21 and inactivated under different conditions. The inactivated suspensions of both strains were tested for opacity, non-viability, agglutination, purity, and sterility; the same formulation samples that passed quality tests were then pooled together. The pool of inactivated suspensions were analyzed for sterility, agglutination, opacity, specific toxicity, and potency. Results The harvest of both bacterial strains showed purity. The opacity of various samples were lost under different treatment conditions by heat from 8% to 12%, formaldehyde 6% to 8%, glutaraldehyde 6% to 8%, and thimerosal 5% to 8%. Tests on suspensions after inactivation and on pooled suspensions showed inactivation conditions not degraded agglutinins of both strains. The samples of F2, F4, F8, F12, F15, and F17 passed the toxicity test. The potency (ED50) of these samples showed following order F17 > F12 > F8 > F15, F4 > F2, and F17 revealed higher potency compared to other formulations. Conclusions It can be concluded that F17 showed desirable outcomes in the toxicity test and good immunogenicity with a low bacterial number content. Consequently, lower adverse effects and good immunogenicity are foreseeable for vaccine preparation with this method. PMID:27679704

  4. MECHANISM OF FUSARIUM TRICINCTUM (CORDA SACC. SPORE INACTIVATION BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of Fusarium tricinctum (Corda Sacc. spore inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2 was investigated. During F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2, protein, DNA, and metal ion leakage, enzyme activity, and cell ultrastructure were examined. Protein and DNA leakages were not detected, while there were metal ion leakages of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, which were well-correlated with the inactivation rate. The enzyme activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and phosphofructokinase were inhibited and were also well-correlated with the inactivation rate. Electron micrographs showed the ultrastructural modifications of spores and demonstrated that spores were heavily distorted and collapsed from their regular structure. Spore surface damage and disruption in inner components was also severe. The metal ion leakage, the inhibition of enzyme activities, and the damage of spore structure were significant in F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2.

  5. Pharmacology of the human cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part II: inactivation and blocking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, Poul; Barksmann, Trine L.; Kristensen, Berit I.

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents......Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents...

  6. Synergistic Effect of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma and TiO2 Photocatalysis on Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Li, Jiangwei; Wang, Xingquan; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Size; Chen, Zhong; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma and TiO2 photocatalysis have been widely investigated separately for the management and reduction of microorganisms in aqueous solutions. In this paper, the two methods were combined in order to achieve a more profound understanding of their interactions in disinfection of water contaminated by Escherichia coli. Under water discharges carried out by microplasma jet arrays can result in a rapid inactivation of E. coli cells. The inactivation efficiency is largely dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2, He and air microplasma arrays, O2 microplasma had the highest activity against E. coli cells in aqueous solution, and showed >99.9% bacterial inactivation efficiency within 4 min. Addition of TiO2 photocatalytic film to the plasma discharge reactor significantly enhanced the inactivation efficiency of the O2 microplasma system, decreasing the time required to achieve 99.9% killing of E. coli cells to 1 min. This may be attributed to the enhancement of ROS generation due to high catalytic activity and stability of the TiO2 photocatalyst in the combined plasma-TiO2 systems. Present work demonstrated the synergistic effect of the two agents, which can be correlated in order to maximize treatment efficiency. PMID:28004829

  7. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie; Charbonneau, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX.

  8. Synergistic Effect of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma and TiO2 Photocatalysis on Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Li, Jiangwei; Wang, Xingquan; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Size; Chen, Zhong; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma and TiO2 photocatalysis have been widely investigated separately for the management and reduction of microorganisms in aqueous solutions. In this paper, the two methods were combined in order to achieve a more profound understanding of their interactions in disinfection of water contaminated by Escherichia coli. Under water discharges carried out by microplasma jet arrays can result in a rapid inactivation of E. coli cells. The inactivation efficiency is largely dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2, He and air microplasma arrays, O2 microplasma had the highest activity against E. coli cells in aqueous solution, and showed >99.9% bacterial inactivation efficiency within 4 min. Addition of TiO2 photocatalytic film to the plasma discharge reactor significantly enhanced the inactivation efficiency of the O2 microplasma system, decreasing the time required to achieve 99.9% killing of E. coli cells to 1 min. This may be attributed to the enhancement of ROS generation due to high catalytic activity and stability of the TiO2 photocatalyst in the combined plasma-TiO2 systems. Present work demonstrated the synergistic effect of the two agents, which can be correlated in order to maximize treatment efficiency.

  9. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  10. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2-4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0-6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0-6.0.

  11. Dosage and cell line dependent inhibitory effect of bFGF supplement in human pluripotent stem cell culture on inactivated human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Tara; Marquez, Maribel; Blanco, Giselle; Zhao, Yuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Many different culture systems have been developed for expanding human pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs). In general, 4-10 ng/ml of bFGF is supplemented in culture media in feeder-dependent systems regardless of feeder cell types, whereas in feeder-free systems, up to 100 ng/ml of bFGF is required for maintaining long-term culture on various substrates. The amount of bFGF required in native hESCs growth niche is unclear. Here we report using inactivated adipose-derived human mesenchymal stem cells as feeder cells to examine long-term parallel cultures of two hESCs lines (H1 and H9) and one hiPSCs line (DF19-9-7T) in media supplemented with 0, 0.4 or 4 ng/ml of bFGF for up to 23 passages, as well as parallel cultures of H9 and DF19 in media supplemented with 4, 20 or 100 ng/ml bFGF for up to 13 passages for comparison. Across all cell lines tested, bFGF supplement demonstrated inhibitory effect over growth expansion, single cell colonization and recovery from freezing in a dosage dependent manner. In addition, bFGF exerted differential effects on different cell lines, inducing H1 and DF19 differentiation at 4 ng/ml or higher, while permitting long-term culture of H9 at the same concentrations with no apparent dosage effect. Pluripotency was confirmed for all cell lines cultured in 0, 0.4 or 4 ng/ml bFGF excluding H1-4 ng, as well as H9 cultured in 4, 20 and 100 ng/ml bFGF. However, DF19 demonstrated similar karyotypic abnormality in both 0 and 4 ng/ml bFGF media while H1 and H9 were karyotypically normal in 0 ng/ml bFGF after long-term culture. Our results indicate that exogenous bFGF exerts dosage and cell line dependent effect on human pluripotent stem cells cultured on mesenchymal stem cells, and implies optimal use of bFGF in hESCs/hiPSCs culture should be based on specific cell line and its culture system.

  12. Cucurmosin induces apoptosis of BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells via inactivation of the EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoming; Huang, Heguang; Xie, Jieming; Xu, Chunsen; Chen, Minghuang; Wang, Congfei; Yang, Aiqin; Yin, Qiang

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Potent therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for pancreatic cancer. Cucurmosin is a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin). Due to its cytotoxicity, cucurmosin can inhibit tumor cell proliferation through induction of apoptosis on tumor cells, but the specific mechanism is still unclear. We explored the function of cucurmosin in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells using multiple cellular and molecular approaches such as 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting and transmission electron microscopy for observing typical changes and formation of apoptotic bodies. We found that cucurmosin inhibited the proliferation of BxPC-3 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and increased the cell population in the G0-G1 phase. With increasing concentration of cucurmosin, the expression of EGFR, p-PI3K, Akt, p-Akt, mTOR, p-mTOR, P70S6K-α, p-P70S6K-α, 4E-BP1 and p-4E-BP1 at the protein level was decreased, whereas the expression of p-Bad and caspase-9 was elevated. However, the mRNA expression of EGFR did not change. These findings suggest that cucurmosin can down-regulate the expression of EGFR by targeting. Cucurmosin induces the apoptosis of BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway.

  13. Matrine induces apoptosis in human acute myeloid leukemia cells via the mitochondrial pathway and Akt inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghui Zhang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a hematological malignancy characterized by a rapid increase in the number of immature myeloid cells in bone marrow. Despite recent advances in the treatment, AML remains an incurable disease. Matrine, a major component extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects on various cancer cell lines. However, the effects of matrine on AML remain largely unknown. Here we investigated its anticancer effects and underlying mechanisms on human AML cells in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that matrine inhibited cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in AML cell lines as well as primary AML cells from patients with AML in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Matrine induced apoptosis by collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential, inducing cytochrome c release from mitochondria, reducing the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, increasing activation of caspase-3, and decreasing the levels of p-Akt and p-ERK1/2. The apoptotic effects of matrine on AML cells were partially blocked by a caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK and a PI3K/Akt activator IGF-1, respectively. Matrine potently inhibited in vivo tumor growth following subcutaneous inoculation of HL-60 cells in SCID mice. These findings indicate that matrine can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of AML cells and may be a novel effective candidate as chemotherapeutic agent against AML.

  14. Graptopetalum paraguayense ameliorates chemical-induced rat hepatic fibrosis in vivo and inactivates stellate cells and Kupffer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jen Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4-induced liver injury rats. METHODS: Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. RESULTS: Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl(4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis.

  15. Andrographolide inhibits oral squamous cell carcinogenesis through NF-κB inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-J; Zhou, X; Wang, W; Tang, F; Qi, C-L; Yang, X; Wu, S; Lin, Y-Q; Wang, J-T; Geng, J-G

    2011-10-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors is essential for promoting cell proliferation and preventing cell apoptosis. We have previously shown that Andrographolide (Andro) isolated from an herbal plant, Andrographis paniculata, covalently modifies reduced cysteine(62) in the oligonucleotide binding pocket of p50 for inhibition of NF-κB activation. Here we report that Andro, but not its inactive structural analog 4H-Andro, potently suppressed squamous cell carcinogenesis induced by 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) in the hamster model of cheek buccal pouch. Compared with 4H-Andro, Andro reduced phosphorylation of p65 (Ser536) and IκBα (Ser32/36) for inhibiting aberrant NF-κB activation, suppressed c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression and attenuated neoplastic cell proliferation, promoted cancerous cell apoptosis, and mitigated tumor-induced angiogenesis. Consistently, Andro retarded growth, decreased proliferation, and promoted apoptosis of Tb cells, a human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line, in time- and dose-dependent manners, with concomitant reduction of the expression of NF-κB targeting molecules in vitro. Our results thus demonstrate that NF-κB activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of chemically induced squamous cell carcinoma. By inhibition of aberrant NF-κB activation, Andro treats chemically induced oral squamous cell carcinogenesis.

  16. Early B-cell Specific Inactivation of ATM Synergizes with Ectopic CyclinD1 Expression to Promote Pre-germinal center B-cell Lymphomas in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lee, Brian J.; Li, Chen; Dubois, Richard L.; Hobeika, Elias; Bhagat, Govind; Zha, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (B-NHL), including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B-cells causes cell-autonomous, clonal mature B cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly naïve B cell specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. While EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increased the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas towards pre-GC derived small lymphocytic neoplasms sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naïve B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.g. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-germinal center B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  17. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL.

  18. EGFR inhibition evokes innate drug resistance in lung cancer cells by preventing Akt activity and thus inactivating Ets-1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuchareon, Janyaporn; McCormick, Frank; Eisele, David W; Tetsu, Osamu

    2015-07-21

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About 14% of NSCLCs harbor mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite remarkable progress in treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), only 5% of patients achieve tumor reduction >90%. The limited primary responses are attributed partly to drug resistance inherent in the tumor cells before therapy begins. Recent reports showed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is an important determinant of this innate drug resistance. In contrast, we demonstrate that EGFR inhibition promotes innate drug resistance despite blockade of RTK activity in NSCLC cells. EGFR TKIs decrease both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt protein kinase pathways for a short time, after which the Ras/MAPK pathway becomes reactivated. Akt inhibition selectively blocks the transcriptional activation of Ets-1, which inhibits its target gene, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), a negative regulator specific for ERK1/2. As a result, ERK1/2 is activated. Furthermore, elevated c-Src stimulates Ras GTP-loading and activates Raf and MEK kinases. These observations suggest that not only ERK1/2 but also Akt activity is essential to maintain Ets-1 in an active state. Therefore, despite high levels of ERK1/2, Ets-1 target genes including DUSP6 and cyclins D1, D3, and E2 remain suppressed by Akt inhibition. Reduction of DUSP6 in combination with elevated c-Src renews activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which enhances cell survival by accelerating Bim protein turnover. Thus, EGFR TKIs evoke innate drug resistance by preventing Akt activity and inactivating Ets-1 function in NSCLC cells.

  19. Epigenetic inactivation of Notch-Hes pathway in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Qing Kuang

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway can have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, depending on cell context. For example, Notch signaling promotes T cell differentiation and is leukemogenic in T cells, whereas it inhibits early B cell differentiation and acts as a tumor suppressor in B cell leukemia where it induces growth arrest and apoptosis. The regulatory mechanisms that contribute to these opposing roles are not understood. Aberrant promoter DNA methylation and histone modifications are associated with silencing of tumor suppressor genes and have been implicated in leukemogenesis. Using methylated CpG island amplification (MCA/DNA promoter microarray, we identified Notch3 and Hes5 as hypermethylated in human B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We investigated the methylation status of other Notch pathway genes by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Notch3, JAG1, Hes2, Hes4 and Hes5 were frequently hypermethylated in B leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL, in contrast to T-ALL cell lines and patient samples. Aberrant methylation of Notch3 and Hes5 in B-ALL was associated with gene silencing and was accompanied by decrease of H3K4 trimethylation and H3K9 acetylation and gain of H3K9 trimethylation and H3K27 trimethylation. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment restored Hes5 expression and decreased promoter hypermethylation in most leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL samples. Restoration of Hes5 expression by lentiviral transduction resulted in growth arrest and apoptosis in Hes5 negative B-ALL cells but not in Hes5 expressing T-ALL cells. These data suggest that epigenetic modifications are implicated in silencing of tumor suppressor of Notch/Hes pathway in B-ALL.

  20. THE CYTOKINES SYNTHESIS IN VITRO IN THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS INFECTED CELLS AND IN THE PRESENCE OF INACTIVATED VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mesentseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE is severe neuroinfectious disease with involvement of immune mechanisms in pathogenesis. Comparative analysis of synthesis of key cytokines had been performed for the TBE virus (TBEV infected cells and in the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE in vitro. Persistent TBEV infection of immortal tissue culture of human larynx cancer cells caused transcription activation of interferons IFNα, IFNγ, IFNλ1, interleukins IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor TNFα as well as one of apoptosis factors Fas. Comparison of transcription and production of cytokines revealed that the TBEV infection resulted in posttranscription Th1 shift of cytokine response. In the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE based on the same strain Sofjin of the TBEV activation of transcription of cytokines IFNα, IFNλ1, IL-4, IL-10 was also observed as after the TBEV infection that together with an additional stimulation of GM-CSF production might serve as an evidence of Th2 response. Involvement of IFNIII type (IFNλ1 both during persistent infection and after addition of inactivated vaccines was found in the first time. Differences in dynamics of cytokines IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNFα response during the TBEV infection and in the presence of inactivated vaccine are described.

  1. Tracing the spatiotemporally resolved inactivation of optically arranged bacteria by photofunctional microparticles at the single-cell level (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso Peña, Alvaro; Grüner, Malte; Forbes, Taylor; Denz, Cornelia; Strassert, Cristian A.

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) represents an attractive alternative in the treatment of infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria. In PDI a photosensitizer (PS) is administered to the site of the biological target in order to generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen which reacts with the biological membrane upon application of harmless visible light. Established methods for testing the photoinduced cytotoxicity of PSs rely on the observation of the whole bacterial ensemble providing only a population-averaged information about the overall produced toxicity. However, for a deeper understanding of the processes that take place in PDI, new methods are required that provide simultaneous regulation of the ROS production, monitoring the subsequent damage induced in the bacteria cells, and full control of the distance between the bacteria and the center of the singlet oxygen production. Herein we present a novel method that enables the quantitative spatio-time-resolved analysis at the single cell level of the photoinduced damage produced by transparent microspheres functionalized with PSs. For this purpose, a methodology was introduced to monitor phototriggered changes with spatiotemporal resolution employing holographic optical tweezers and functional fluorescence microscopy. The defined distance between the photoactive particles and individual bacteria can be fixed under the microscope before the photosensitization process, and the photoinduced damage is monitored by tracing the fluorescence turn-on of a suitable marker. Our methodology constitutes a new tool for the in vitro design and analysis of photosensitizers, as it enables a quantitative response evaluation of living systems towards oxidative stress.

  2. Acquisition of Chemoresistance and Other Malignancy-related Features of Colorectal Cancer Cells Are Incremented by Ribosome-inactivating Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Seung Joon; Park, Seong-Hwan; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) as an environmental disease is largely influenced by accumulated epithelial stress from diverse environmental causes. We are exposed to ribosome-related insults, including ribosome-inactivating stress (RIS), from the environment, dietary factors, and medicines, but their physiological impacts on the chemotherapy of CRC are not yet understood. Here we revealed the effects of RIS on chemosensitivity and other malignancy-related properties of CRC cells. First, RIS led to bidirectional inhibition of p53-macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1)-mediated death responses in response to anticancer drugs by either enhancing ATF3-linked antiapoptotic signaling or intrinsically inhibiting MIC-1 and p53 expression, regardless of ATF3. Second, RIS enhanced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and biogenesis of cancer stem-like cells in an ATF3-dependent manner. These findings indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to RIS interferes with the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, mechanistically implying that ATF3-linked malignancy and chemoresistance can be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of environmentally aggravated cancers.

  3. Epigenetic inactivation of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Wen Hao; Sheng-Tao Zhu; Yuan-Long He; Peng Li; Yong-Jun Wang; Shu-Tian Zhang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression and methylation status of the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and explore its role in ESCC carcinogenesis.METHODS: Seven ESCC cell lines (KYSE 30, KYSE150, KYSE410, KYSE510, EC109, EC9706 and TE-1) and one immortalized human esophageal epithelial cell line (Het-1A), 20 ESCC tissue samples and 20 paired adjacent non-tumor esophageal epithelial tissues were analyzed in this study. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to investigate the expression of SFRP2 in cell lines, primary ESCC tumor tissue, and paired adjacent normal tissue. Methylation status was evaluated by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. The correlation between expression and promoter methylation of the SFRP2 gene was confirmed with treatment of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. To assess the potential role of SFRP2 in ESCC, we established stable SFRP2-transfected cells and examined them with regard to cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis and cell cycle in vivo and in vitro.RESULTS: SFRP2 mRNA was expressed in the immortalized normal esophageal epithelial cell line but not in seven ESCC cell lines. By methylation-specific PCR, complete methylation was detected in three cell lines with silenced SFRP2 expression, and extensive methylation was observed in the other four ESCC cell lines. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine could restore the expression of SFRP2 mRNA in the three ESCC cell lines lacking SFRP2 expression. SFRP2 mRNA expression was obviously lower in primary ESCC tissue than in adjacent normal tissue (0.939 ± 0.398 vs 1.51 ± 0.399, P < 0.01). SFRP2 methylation was higher in tumor tissue than in paired normal tissue (95% vs 65%, P < 0.05). The DNA methylation status of the SFRP2 correlated inversely with the SFRP2 expression. To assess the potential role of SFRP2 in ESCC, we established stable SFRP2 transfectants and control counterparts by introducing pcDNA3.1/v5 his

  4. Revealing mechanisms of selective, concentration-dependent potentials of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal to induce apoptosis in cancer cells through inactivation of membrane-associated catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling by the expression of membrane-associated catalase. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a versatile second messenger generated during lipid peroxidation, has been shown to induce apoptosis selectively in malignant cells. The findings described in this paper reveal the strong, concentration-dependent potential of 4-HNE to specifically inactivate extracellular catalase of tumor cells both indirectly and directly and to consequently trigger apoptosis in malignant cells through superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Namely, 4-HNE caused apoptosis selectively in NOX1-expressing tumor cells through inactivation of their membrane-associated catalase, thus reactivating subsequent intercellular signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and HOCl pathways, followed by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Concentrations of 4-HNE of 1.2 µM and higher directly inactivated membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells, whereas at lower concentrations, 4-HNE triggered a complex amplificatory pathway based on initial singlet oxygen formation through H2O2 and peroxynitrite interaction. Singlet-oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8 increased superoxide anion generation by NOX1 and amplification of singlet oxygen generation, which allowed singlet-oxygen-dependent inactivation of catalase. 4-HNE and singlet oxygen cooperate in complex autoamplificatory loops during this process. The finding of these novel anticancer pathways may be useful for understanding the role of 4-HNE in the control of malignant cells and for the optimization of ROS-dependent therapeutic approaches including antioxidant treatments.

  5. Epigenetic inactivation of SPINT2 is associated with tumor suppressive function in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Dongli [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Fan, Qingxia [The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Chen, Xinfeng; Li, Feng [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Wang, Liping [The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Huang, Lan [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Xiaoqi [The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Zhang, Zhen [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Liu, Jinyan; Wang, Fei [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The School of Life Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Wang, Meng [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Zhang, Bin [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The Department of Hematology/Oncology, School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago 60611 (United States); and others

    2014-03-10

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type 2 (SPINT2), a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor, has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter methylation. We aimed to investigate whether SPINT2 might act as an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tumor suppressor gene. Four ESCC cell lines, Fifty-two ESCC tissues and twenty-nine neighboring non-cancerous tissues were included in this study. The expression of SPINT2 was monitored by real time PCR. Bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylation-specific PCR were used to analyze methylation status. The effect of SPINT2 on cell proliferation and apoptosis in EC109 and EC9706 cells was observed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. We found that silencing of SPINT2 was associated with promoter methylation in ESCC cell lines. The densely methylated SPINT2 promoter region was confirmed by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Ectopic expression of SPINT2 inhibited cell proliferation through inducing cell apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, methylation-specific PCR analysis revealed that SPINT2 promoter methylation was prominent in carcinoma tissues (52.08%) compared with neighboring non-cancerous tissues (22.58%). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with SPINT2 hypermethylation had shorter survival time. The tumor suppressor gene of SPINT2 is commonly silenced by promoter hypermethylation in human ESCC and SPINT2 hypermethylation is correlated with poor overall survival, implicating SPINT2 is an underlying prognostic marker for human ESCC. - Highlights: • We firstly found SPINT2 gene may be transcriptionally repressed by promoter hypermethylation in ESCC cells. • SPINT2 overexpressing cells induced proliferation inhibition through promoting apoptosis. • mRNA expression of SPINT2 was significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in neighboring non-cancerous tissues. • Promoter hypermethylation of SPINT2 is significantly linked to TNM stage and poor overall survival.

  6. Edwardsiella tarda OmpA Encapsulated in Chitosan Nanoparticles Shows Superior Protection over Inactivated Whole Cell Vaccine in Orally Vaccinated Fringed-Lipped Peninsula Carp (Labeo fimbriatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Dubey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of oral vaccination in finfish has lagged behind injectable vaccines for a long time as oral vaccines fall short of injection vaccines in conferring protective immunity. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs have shown potential to serve as antigen delivery systems for oral vaccines. In this study the recombinant outer membrane protein A (rOmpA of Edwardsiella tarda was encapsulated in chitosan NPs (NP-rOmpA and used for oral vaccination of Labeo fimbriatus. The rOmpA purity was 85%, nanodiameter <500 nm, encapsulation efficiency 60.6%, zeta potential +19.05 mV, and there was an in vitro release of 49% of encapsulated antigen within 48 h post incubation in phosphate-buffered saline. Empty NPs and a non-formulated, inactivated whole cell E. tarda (IWC-ET vaccine were used as controls. Post-vaccination antibody levels were significantly (p = 0.0458 higher in the NP-rOmpA vaccinated fish (Mean OD450 = 2.430 than in fish vaccinated with inactivated whole cell E. tarda (IWC-ET vaccine (Mean OD450 = 1.735, which corresponded with post-challenge survival proportions (PCSP of 73.3% and 48.28% for the NP-rOmpA and IWC-ET groups, respectively. Serum samples from NP-rOmpA-vaccinated fish had a higher inhibition rate for E. tarda growth on tryptic soy agar (TSA than the IWC-ET group. There was no significant difference (p = 0.989 in PCSPs between fish vaccinated with empty NPs and the unvaccinated control fish, while serum from both groups showed no detectable antibodies against E. tarda. Overall, these data show that the NP-rOmpA vaccine produced higher antibody levels and had superior protection over the IWC-ET vaccine, showing that encapsulating OmpA in chitosan NPs confer improved protection against E. tarda mortality in L. fimbriatus. There is a need to elucidate the possible adjuvant effects of chitosan NPs and the immunological mechanisms of protective immunity induced by OMPs administered orally to fish.

  7. Frataxin Silencing Inactivates Mitochondrial Complex I in NSC34 Motoneuronal Cells and Alters Glutathione Homeostasis

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    Barbara Carletti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease characterized by a reduced synthesis of the mitochondrial iron chaperon protein frataxin as a result of a large GAA triplet-repeat expansion within the first intron of the frataxin gene. Despite neurodegeneration being the prominent feature of this pathology involving both the central and the peripheral nervous system, information on the impact of frataxin deficiency in neurons is scant. Here, we describe a neuronal model displaying some major biochemical and morphological features of FRDA. By silencing the mouse NSC34 motor neurons for the frataxin gene with shRNA lentiviral vectors, we generated two cell lines with 40% and 70% residual amounts of frataxin, respectively. Frataxin-deficient cells showed a specific inhibition of mitochondrial Complex I (CI activity already at 70% residual frataxin levels, whereas the glutathione imbalance progressively increased after silencing. These biochemical defects were associated with the inhibition of cell proliferation and morphological changes at the axonal compartment, both depending on the frataxin amount. Interestingly, at 70% residual frataxin levels, the in vivo treatment with the reduced glutathione revealed a partial rescue of cell proliferation. Thus, NSC34 frataxin silenced cells could be a suitable model to study the effect of frataxin deficiency in neurons and highlight glutathione as a potential beneficial therapeutic target for FRDA.

  8. Conditional inactivation of PDCD2 induces p53 activation and cell cycle arrest

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    Celine J. Granier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available PDCD2 (programmed cell death domain 2 is a highly conserved, zinc finger MYND domain-containing protein essential for normal development in the fly, zebrafish and mouse. The molecular functions and cellular activities of PDCD2 remain unclear. In order to better understand the functions of PDCD2 in mammalian development, we have examined PDCD2 activity in mouse blastocyst embryos, as well as in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs and embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We have studied mice bearing a targeted PDCD2 locus functioning as a null allele through a splicing gene trap, or as a conditional knockout, by deletion of exon2 containing the MYND domain. Tamoxifen-induced knockout of PDCD2 in MEFs, as well as in ESCs, leads to defects in progression from the G1 to the S phase of cell cycle, associated with increased levels of p53 protein and p53 target genes. G1 prolongation in ESCs was not associated with induction of differentiation. Loss of entry into S phase of the cell cycle and marked induction of nuclear p53 were also observed in PDCD2 knockout blastocysts. These results demonstrate a unique role for PDCD2 in regulating the cell cycle and p53 activation during early embryonic development of the mouse.

  9. Inactivation of tumor suppressor Dlg1 augments transformation of a T-cell line induced by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax protein

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    Tanaka Yuetsu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax1 protein with the tumor suppressor Dlg1 is correlated with cellular transformation. Results Here, we show that Dlg1 knockdown by RNA interference increases the ability of Tax1 to transform a mouse T-cell line (CTLL-2, as measured interleukin (IL-2-independent growth. A Tax1 mutant defective for the Dlg1 interaction showed reduced transformation of CTLL-2 compared to wild type Tax1, but the transformation was minimally affected by Dlg1 reduction. The few Tax1ΔC-transduced CTLL-2 cells that became transformed expressed less Dlg1 than parental cells, suggesting that Dlg1-low cells were selectively transformed by Tax1ΔC. Moreover, all human T-cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1, including the recombinant HTLV-1-containing Tax1ΔC, expressed less Dlg1 than control T-cell lines. Conclusion These results suggest that inactivation of Dlg1 augments Tax1-mediated transformation of CTLL-2, and PDZ protein(s other than Dlg1 are critically involved in the transformation.

  10. Autologous aldrithiol-2-inactivated HIV-1 combined with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose as a vaccine platform for therapeutic dendritic cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Spadaccia, Meredith; Sabado, Rachel; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Trubey, Charles Mac; Holman, Rose Marie; Salazar, Andres; Lifson, Jeffrey; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-03

    Therapeutic interventions for HIV-1 that successfully augment adaptive immunity to promote killing of infected cells may be a requisite component of strategies to reduce latent cellular reservoirs. Adoptive immunotherapies utilizing autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have been activated and antigen loaded ex vivo may serve to circumvent defects in DC function that are present during HIV infection in order to enhance adaptive immune responses. Here we detail the clinical preparation of DCs loaded with autologous aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated HIV that have been potently activated with the viral mimic, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-l-lysine carboxymethylcellulose (Poly-ICLC). HIV is first propagated from CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected donors and then rendered non-replicative by chemical inactivation with aldrithiol-2 (AT-2), purified, and quantified. Viral inactivation is confirmed through measurement of Tat-regulated β-galactosidase reporter gene expression following infection of TZM-bl cells. In-process testing for sterility, mycoplasma, LPS, adventitious agents, and removal of AT-2 is performed on viral preparations. Autologous DCs are generated and pulsed with autologous AT-2-inactivated virus and simultaneously stimulated with Poly-ICLC to constitute the final DC vaccine product. Phenotypic identity, maturation, and induction of HIV-specific adaptive immune responses are confirmed via flow cytometric analysis of DCs and cocultured autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Lot release criteria for the DC vaccine have been defined in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines. The demonstrated feasibility of this approach has resulted in approval by the FDA for investigational use in antiretroviral (ART) suppressed individuals. We discuss how this optimized DC formulation may enhance the quality of anti-HIV adaptive responses beyond what has been previously observed during DC immunotherapy trials for HIV infection.

  11. Systems biology modeling reveals a possible mechanism of the tumor cell death upon oncogene inactivation in EGFR addicted cancers.

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    Jian-Ping Zhou

    Full Text Available Despite many evidences supporting the concept of "oncogene addiction" and many hypotheses rationalizing it, there is still a lack of detailed understanding to the precise molecular mechanism underlying oncogene addiction. In this account, we developed a mathematic model of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR associated signaling network, which involves EGFR-driving proliferation/pro-survival signaling pathways Ras/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT, and pro-apoptotic signaling pathway apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1/p38. In the setting of sustained EGFR activation, the simulation results show a persistent high level of proliferation/pro-survival effectors phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT, and a basal level of pro-apoptotic effector phospho-p38. The potential of p38 activation (apoptotic potential due to the elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS is largely suppressed by the negative crosstalk between PI3K/AKT and ASK1/p38 pathways. Upon acute EGFR inactivation, the survival signals decay rapidly, followed by a fast increase of the apoptotic signal due to the release of apoptotic potential. Overall, our systems biology modeling together with experimental validations reveals that inhibition of survival signals and concomitant release of apoptotic potential jointly contribute to the tumor cell death following the inhibition of addicted oncogene in EGFR addicted cancers.

  12. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in broth and sausage by combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract (CE) on Escherichia coli O157 strains with variation in pressure resistance in broth and sausage. Pressure-resistant (O157:H7 and O157:H12) and -sensitive (O157-M1 and O157-M2) E. coli strains were used. Pressure treatment at 350 MPa for 20 min in broth caused 1.1-1.2 logs reduction in O157:H12 and O157:H7 and 4.1-5.5 logs reduction in the O157-M1 and O157-M2. When high pressure was treated in the presence of CE (32 CEAU/mL), the combination treatment caused a significant inactivation in the pressure-resistant O157:H7 strains resulting in the viability loss of 4.3-4.6 logs and the synergistic effect increased with increase in treatment time (p high pressure treatment. The synergy between high pressure processing and Lb. casei OSY-LB6A CE against pressure-resistant E. coli O157 strains suggests the feasibility of using this combination to minimize the risk of transmission of E. coli O157 by food.

  13. Photocatalytic Inactivation Effect of Gold-Doped TiO2 (Au/TiO2 Nanocomposites on Human Colon Carcinoma LoVo Cells

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    Juan Xu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic inactivation effecting of gold-doped TiO2 (Au/TiO2 nanocomposites on human colon carcinoma LoVo cells was investigated for the first time. The Au/TiO2 samples containing different amounts of Au (1–4 wt% were prepared by deposition-precipitation (DP method. These synthesized Au/TiO2 nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. It was found that the photocatalytic inactivation effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on LoVo cancer cells could be greatly improved by the surface modification of Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the loading amount of Au on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles affects the photocatalytic inactivation efficiency strongly, and it was found that the most efficient nanocomposites were TiO2 nanoparticles doped with 2 wt% Au. When 50 μg/mL 2 wt% Au/TiO2 nanocomposites were used, all of the LoVo cancer cells were killed under the irradiation of UV light (λmax = 365 nm, Intensity = 1.8 mW/cm2 within 100 minutes. But for 50 μg/mL TiO2 nanoparticles, only 40% cancer cells were killed under the same condition.

  14. The release of dipicolinic acid--the rate-limiting step of Bacillus endospore inactivation during the high pressure thermal sterilization process.

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    Reineke, Kai; Schlumbach, Karl; Baier, Daniel; Mathys, Alexander; Knorr, Dietrich

    2013-03-01

    High pressure combined with elevated temperatures can produce low acid, commercially sterile and shelf-stable foods. Depending on the temperature and pressure levels applied, bacterial endospores pass through different pathways, which can lead to a pressure-induced germination or inactivation. Regardless of the pathway, Bacillus endospores first release pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), which contributes to the low amount of free water in the spore core and is consequently responsible for the spore's high resistance against wet and dry heat. This is therefore the rate-limiting step in the high pressure sterilization process. To evaluate the impact of a broad pressure, temperature and time domain on the DPA release, Bacillus subtilis spores were pressure treated between 0.1 and 900 MPa at between 30 and 80 °C under isothermal isobaric conditions during dwell time. DPA quantification was assessed using HPLC, and samples were taken both immediately and 2 h after the pressure treatment. To obtain a release kinetic for some pressure-temperature conditions, samples were collected between 1s and 60 min after decompression. A multiresponse kinetic model was then used to derive a model covering all kinetic data. The isorate lines modeled for the DPA release in the chosen pressure-temperature landscape enabled the determination of three distinct zones. (I) For pressures 50 °C, a 90% DPA release was achievable in less than 5 min and no difference in the amount of DPA was found immediately 2 h after pressurization. This may indicate irreversible damage to the inner spore membrane or membrane proteins. (II) Above 600 MPa the synergism between pressure and temperature diminished, and the treatment temperature alone dominated DPA release. (III) Pressures pressure-induced physiological like germination with cortex degradation, which continues after pressure release. Furthermore, at 600 MPa and 40 °C, a linear relationship was found for the DPA release rate constants ln

  15. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  16. Apigenin induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells and exhibits anti-leukemic activity in vivo via inactivation of Akt and activation of JNK

    OpenAIRE

    Budhraja, Amit; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Zhuo; Son, Young-Ok; Cheng, Senping; Wang, Xin; Ding, Songze; Hitron, Andrew; Chen, Gang; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional role of Akt and JNK signaling cascades in apigenin-induced apoptosis in U937 human leukemia cells and anti-leukemic activity of apigenin in vivo. Apigenin-induced apoptosis by inactivation of Akt with a concomitant activation of JNK, Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 down-regulation, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and activation of caspases. Constitutively active myristolated Akt prevented apigenin-induced JNK, caspases activation, and apoptosis. Conversely...

  17. Conditional Inactivation of Pten with EGFR Overexpression in Schwann Cells Models Sporadic MPNST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent W. Keng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic mechanisms involved in the transformation from a benign neurofibroma to a malignant sarcoma in patients with neurofibromatosis-type-1- (NF1-associated or sporadic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs remain unclear. It is hypothesized that many genetic changes are involved in transformation. Recently, it has been shown that both phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR play important roles in the initiation of peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs. In human MPNSTs, PTEN expression is often reduced, while EGFR expression is often induced. We tested if these two genes cooperate in the evolution of PNSTs. Transgenic mice were generated carrying conditional floxed alleles of Pten, and EGFR was expressed under the control of the 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′phosphodiesterase (Cnp promoter and a desert hedgehog (Dhh regulatory element driving Cre recombinase transgenic mice (Dhh-Cre. Complete loss of Pten and EGFR overexpression in Schwann cells led to the development of high-grade PNSTs. In vitro experiments using immortalized human Schwann cells demonstrated that loss of PTEN and overexpression of EGFR cooperate to increase cellular proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation. This mouse model can rapidly recapitulate PNST onset and progression to high-grade PNSTs, as seen in sporadic MPNST patients.

  18. Treated domestic sewage: kinetics of Escherichia coli and total coliform inactivation by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gean Delise L. P. Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide has been used for decades in developed countries as an oxidizing agent in the treatment of water, domestic sewage and industrial effluents. This study evaluated the influence of the concentration of H2O2 and pH on the inactivation of Escherichia coli cells and the disinfection of sewage treated. The results showed that the inactivation rate increased with pH and H2O2. The presence of other contaminants dissolved in the effluent is probably the cause of these differences, because E. coli inactivation in synthetic wastewater was found to be much faster than in the real treated domestic sewage.

  19. Evolutionarily conserved pressure for the existence of distinct G2/M cell cycle arrest and A3H inactivation functions in HIV-1 Vif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke; Du, Juan; Rui, Yajuan; Zheng, Wenwen; Kang, Jian; Hou, Jingwei; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Wenyan; Simon, Viviana A; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 Vif assembles the Cul5-EloB/C E3 ubiquitin ligase to induce proteasomal degradation of the cellular antiviral APOBEC3 proteins. Detailed structural studies have confirmed critical functional domains in Vif that we have previously identified as important for the interaction of EloB/C, Cul5, and CBFβ. However, the mechanism by which Vif recognizes substrates remains poorly understood. Specific regions of Vif have been identified as being responsible for binding and depleting APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F. Interestingly, we have now identified distinct yet overlapping domains that are required for HIV-1 Vif-mediated G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and APOBEC3H degradation, but not for the inactivation of APOBEC3G or APOBEC3F. Surprisingly, Vif molecules from primary HIV-1 variants that caused G2/M arrest were unable to inactivate APOBEC3H; on the other hand, HIV-1 Vif variants that could inactivate APOBEC3H were unable to induce G2/M arrest. All of these Vif variants still maintained the ability to inactivate APOBEC3G/F. Thus, primary HIV-1 variants have evolved to possess distinct functional activities that allow them to suppress APOBEC3H or cause G2 cell cycle arrest, using mutually exclusive interface domains. APOBEC3H depletion and G2 arrest are apparently evolutionary selected features that cannot co-exist on a single Vif molecule. The existence and persistence of both types of HIV-1 Vif variant suggests the importance of APOBEC3H suppression and cell cycle regulation for HIV-1's survival in vivo.

  20. Inactivation of Cdk1/Cyclin B in metaphase-arrested mouse FT210 cells induces exit from mitosis without chromosome segregation or cytokinesis and allows passage through another cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, James R

    2007-04-01

    It is well known that inactivation of Cdk1/Cyclin B is required for cells to exit mitosis. The work reported here tests the hypothesis that Cdk1/Cyclin B inactivation is not only necessary but also sufficient to induce mitotic exit and reestablishment of the interphase state. This hypothesis predicts that inactivation of Cdk1 in metaphase-arrested cells will induce the M to G1-phase transition. It is shown that when mouse FT210 cells (in which Cdk1 is temperature-sensitive) are arrested in metaphase and then shifted to their non-permissive temperature, they rapidly exit mitosis as evidenced by reassembly of interphase nuclei, decondensation of chromosomes, and dephosphorylation of histones H1 and H3. The resulting interphase cells are functionally normal as judged by their ability to progress through another cell cycle. However, they have double the normal number of chromosomes because they previously bypassed anaphase, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. These results, taken together with other observations in the literature, strongly suggest that in mammalian cells, inactivation of Cdk1/cyclin B is the trigger for mitotic exit and reestablishment of the interphase state.

  1. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract.

  2. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T;

    2006-01-01

    Tight regulation of fatty acid metabolism in pancreatic beta-cells is important for beta-cell viability and function. Chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fatty acid is associated with beta-cell lipotoxicity. Glucose is known to repress fatty acid oxidation and hence to augment the toxi......Tight regulation of fatty acid metabolism in pancreatic beta-cells is important for beta-cell viability and function. Chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fatty acid is associated with beta-cell lipotoxicity. Glucose is known to repress fatty acid oxidation and hence to augment...... but not AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....

  3. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer.

  4. The amplitude and inactivation properties of the delayed potassium currents are regulated by protein kinase activity in hair cells of the frog semicircular canals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martini

    Full Text Available In hair cells dissected from the frog crista ampullaris, the combination of a calcium-dependent (IKCa and a purely voltage-dependent component (IKV gives rise to the delayed potassium current complex (IKD. These currents have been recently reported to display slow depolarization-induced inactivation and biphasic inactivation removal by hyperpolarization. The amplitude and inactivation kinetics of both IKCa and IKV are drastically modulated by a previously unrecognized mechanism of protein phosphorylation (sensitive to kinase inhibitors H89 and KT5823, which does not interfere with the transient potassium current (IA or the calcium current (ICa. IKD amplitude was stable in cells patched with pipettes containing 8 mM ATP or under perforated-patch; under these conditions, a 10 min treatment with 10 µM H89 or 1-10 µM KT5823 reduced IKD amplitude by a mean of 67% at +40 mV. Similarly affected was the isolated IKV component (ICa blocked with Cd(2+. Thus, a large potassium conductance can be activated by depolarization, but it is made available to the cell to a variable extent that depends on membrane potential and protein kinase activity. The total gKD ranged 4.6-44.0 nS in control cells, according to the level of steady-state inactivation, and was reduced to 1.4-2.7 nS after protein kinase inhibition. When sinusoidal membrane potential changes in the -70/-10 mV range were applied, to mimic receptor response to hair bundle deflection, IKD proved the main current dynamically activated and the only one regulated by PK: H89 decreased the total outward charge during each cycle by 60%. Phosphorylation appears to control both the amount of IKCa and IKV conductance activated by depolarization and the fraction thereof which can be rescued by removal of inactivation. The balance between the depolarizing transduction current and the repolarizing potassium current, and eventually the transmitter release at the cytoneural junction, are therefore modulated by a

  5. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the i...

  6. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N;

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...... cancer (SCLC). The purpose of this study was to examine the cause of absent RII expression in SCLC cell lines. Northern blot analysis showed that RII RNA expression was very weak in 16 of 21 cell lines. To investigate if the absence of RII transcript was due to mutations, we screened the poly-A tract...... for mutations, but no mutations were detected. Additional screening for mutations of the RII gene revealed a GG to TT base substitution in one cell line, which did not express RII. This mutation generates a stop codon resulting in predicted synthesis of a truncated RII of 219 amino acids. The nature...

  7. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds.

  8. Inactivated properties of activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles for bacteria and kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youji; Ma, Mingyuan; Wang, Xiaohu; Wang, Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    The activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2/AC) were prepared by a properly controlled sol-gel method. The effects of activated carbons (AC) support on inactivated properties of TiO2 nanoparticles were evaluated by photocatalytic inactivation experiments of Escherichia coli. The key factors affecting the inactivation efficiency were investigated, including electric power of lamp, temperature, and pH values. The results show that the TiO2/AC composites have high inactivation properties of E. coli in comparison with pure TiO2 powder. The kinetics of photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli was found to follow a pseudo-first order rate law for TiO2/AC composites, and kinetic behavior could be described in terms of a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The values of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the bacteria, K(c), and for the rate constants, k(r), were certainly depended on TiO2 content. At 47 wt.% TiO2 coatings with the highest rate constant, the K(c) and k(r) were 1.17 x 10(-8) L/cfu and 1.43 x 10(6) cfu/(L x min), respectively. The variety of parameters shows significant effects on inactivation rate. The outer layer of bacteria decomposed first resulting in inactivation of cell, and with further illumination, the cells nearly decomposed.

  9. Edwardsiella tarda OmpA Encapsulated in Chitosan Nanoparticles Shows Superior Protection over Inactivated Whole Cell Vaccine in Orally Vaccinated Fringed-Lipped Peninsula Carp (Labeo fimbriatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Saurabh; Avadhani, Kiran; Mutalik, Srinivas; Sivadasan, Sangeetha Madambithara; Maiti, Biswajit; Girisha, Shivani Kallappa; Venugopal, Moleyur Nagarajappa; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein; Karunasagar, Indrani; Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba

    2016-11-07

    The use of oral vaccination in finfish has lagged behind injectable vaccines for a long time as oral vaccines fall short of injection vaccines in conferring protective immunity. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have shown potential to serve as antigen delivery systems for oral vaccines. In this study the recombinant outer membrane protein A (rOmpA) of Edwardsiella tarda was encapsulated in chitosan NPs (NP-rOmpA) and used for oral vaccination of Labeo fimbriatus. The rOmpA purity was 85%, nanodiameter fish (Mean OD450 = 2.430) than in fish vaccinated with inactivated whole cell E. tarda (IWC-ET) vaccine (Mean OD450 = 1.735), which corresponded with post-challenge survival proportions (PCSP) of 73.3% and 48.28% for the NP-rOmpA and IWC-ET groups, respectively. Serum samples from NP-rOmpA-vaccinated fish had a higher inhibition rate for E. tarda growth on tryptic soy agar (TSA) than the IWC-ET group. There was no significant difference (p = 0.989) in PCSPs between fish vaccinated with empty NPs and the unvaccinated control fish, while serum from both groups showed no detectable antibodies against E. tarda. Overall, these data show that the NP-rOmpA vaccine produced higher antibody levels and had superior protection over the IWC-ET vaccine, showing that encapsulating OmpA in chitosan NPs confer improved protection against E. tarda mortality in L. fimbriatus. There is a need to elucidate the possible adjuvant effects of chitosan NPs and the immunological mechanisms of protective immunity induced by OMPs administered orally to fish.

  10. The Photocatalytic Inactivation Effect of Fe-Doped TiO2 Nanocomposites on Leukemic HL60 Cells-Based Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangqiang Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fe-doped TiO2 nanocomposites synthesized by a deposition-precipitation method were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and UV-vis adsorption spectra and then were taken as a new “photosensitizer” for photodynamic therapy (PDT. The photocatalytic inactivation of Fe-doped TiO2 on Leukemic HL60 cells was investigated using PDT reaction chamber based on LED light source, and the viability of HL60 cells was examined by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. The experimental results showed that the growth of leukemic HL60 cells was significantly inhibited by adding TiO2 nanoparticles, and the inactivation efficiency could be effectively enhanced by the surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles with Fe doping. Furthermore, the optimized conditions were achieved at 5 wt% Fe/TiO2 at a final concentration of 200 μg/mL, in which up to 82.5% PDT efficiency for the HL60 cells can be obtained under the irradiation of 403 nm light (the power density is 5 mW/cm2 within 60 minutes.

  11. Observations on the Inactivation Efficacy of a MALDI-TOF MS Chemical Extraction Method on Bacillus anthracis Vegetative Cells and Spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Weller

    Full Text Available A chemical (ethanol; formic acid; acetonitrile protein extraction method for the preparation of bacterial samples for matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS identification was evaluated for its ability to inactivate bacterial species. Initial viability tests (with and without double filtration of the extract through 0.2 μM filters, indicated that the method could inactivate Escherichia coli MRE 162 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 35657, with or without filtration, but that filtration was required to exclude viable, avirulent, Bacillus anthracis UM23CL2 from extracts. Multiple, high stringency, viability experiments were then carried out on entire filtered extracts prepared from virulent B. anthracis Vollum vegetative cells and spores ranging in concentration from 10(6-10(8 cfu per extract. B. anthracis was recovered in 3/18 vegetative cell extracts and 10/18 spore extracts. From vegetative cell extracts B. anthracis was only recovered from extracts that had undergone prolonged Luria (L-broth (7 day and L-agar plate (a further 7 days incubations. We hypothesise that the recovery of B. anthracis in vegetative cell extracts is due to the escape of individual sub-lethally injured cells. We discuss our results in view of working practises in clinical laboratories and in the context of recent inadvertent releases of viable B. anthracis.

  12. Observations on the Inactivation Efficacy of a MALDI-TOF MS Chemical Extraction Method on Bacillus anthracis Vegetative Cells and Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Simon A; Stokes, Margaret G M; Lukaszewski, Roman A

    2015-01-01

    A chemical (ethanol; formic acid; acetonitrile) protein extraction method for the preparation of bacterial samples for matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification was evaluated for its ability to inactivate bacterial species. Initial viability tests (with and without double filtration of the extract through 0.2 μM filters), indicated that the method could inactivate Escherichia coli MRE 162 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 35657, with or without filtration, but that filtration was required to exclude viable, avirulent, Bacillus anthracis UM23CL2 from extracts. Multiple, high stringency, viability experiments were then carried out on entire filtered extracts prepared from virulent B. anthracis Vollum vegetative cells and spores ranging in concentration from 10(6)-10(8) cfu per extract. B. anthracis was recovered in 3/18 vegetative cell extracts and 10/18 spore extracts. From vegetative cell extracts B. anthracis was only recovered from extracts that had undergone prolonged Luria (L)-broth (7 day) and L-agar plate (a further 7 days) incubations. We hypothesise that the recovery of B. anthracis in vegetative cell extracts is due to the escape of individual sub-lethally injured cells. We discuss our results in view of working practises in clinical laboratories and in the context of recent inadvertent releases of viable B. anthracis.

  13. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Stellrecht, K; Sercarz, E

    1996-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the initial encephalitogenic T cells recognize MBP Ac1-9 and predominantly use the TCR V beta 8.2 gene segment. In mice recovering from MBP-induced EAE, regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) specific for a single immunodominant TCR peptide B5 (76-101) from framework region 3 of the V beta 8.2 chain, become primed. We have earlier shown that cloned B5-reactive Treg can specifically downregulate responses to Ac1-9 and also protect mice from EAE. These CD4 Treg clones predominantly use the TCR V beta 14 or V beta 3 gene segments. Here we have directly tested whether deletion/blocking of the Treg from the peripheral repertoire affects the spontaneous recovery from EAE. Treatment of F1 mice with appropriate V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies resulted in an increase in the severity and duration of the disease; even relapses were seen in one-third to one-half of the Treg-deleted mice. Interestingly, chronic disease in treated mice appears to be due to the presence of Ac1-9-specific T cells. Thus, once self-tolerance to MBP is broken by immunization with the antigen in strong adjuvant, TCR peptide-specific CD4 Treg cells participate in reestablishing peripheral tolerance. Thus, a failure to generate Treg may be implicated in chronic autoimmune conditions.

  14. Photodynamic treatment of red blood cell concentrates for virus inactivation enhances red blood cell aggregation: protection with antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, E; Barshtein, G; Chen, S; Yedgar, S

    1997-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using phthalocyanines and red light appears to be a promising procedure for decontamination of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates for transfusion. A possible complication of this treatment may be induced aggregation of RBC. The production of RBC aggregates was measured with a novel computerized cell flow properties analyzer (CFA). The PDT of RBC concentrates with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AIPcS4) and the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 under virucidal conditions markedly enhanced RBC aggregation and higher shear stress was required to disperse these aggregates. The clusters of cells were huge and abnormally shaped, unlike the rouleaux formed by untreated RBC. This aggregation was prevented when a mixture of antioxidants was included during PDT. Addition of the antioxidants after PDT reduced aggregation only partially. It is concluded that inclusion of antioxidants during PDT of RBC concentrates prior to transfusion may reduce or eliminate the hemodynamic risk that the virucidal treatment may present to the recipient.

  15. Light parameters influence cell viability in antifungal photodynamic therapy in a fluence and rate fluence-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Yamada, Aécio M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light parameters on yeast cells. It has been proposed for many years that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate microbial cells. A number of photosensitizer and light sources were reported in different light parameters and in a range of dye concentrations. However, much more knowledge concerning the importance of fluence, fluence rate and exposure time are required for a better understanding of the photodynamic efficiency. Suspensions (106 CFU/mL) of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were used. Two fluence rates, 100 and 300 mW/cm2 were compared at 3, 6, and 9 min of irradiation, resulting fluences from 18 to 162 J/cm2. The light source was a laser emitting at λ = 660 nm with output power adjusted at 30 and 90 mW. As photosensitizer, one hundred-μM methylene blue was used. Temperature was monitored to verify possible heat effect and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was evaluated. The same fluence in different fluence rates showed dissimilar levels of inactivation on yeast cells as well as in ROS formation. In addition, the increase of the fluence rate showed an improvement on cell photoinactivation. PDT was efficient against yeast cells (6 log reduction), and no significant temperature increase was observed. Fluence per se should not be used as an isolate parameter to compare photoinactivation effects on yeast cells. The higher fluence rate was more effective than the lower one. Furthermore, an adequate duration of light exposure cannot be discarded.

  16. How reduction of theta rhythm by medial septum inactivation may covary with disruption of entorhinal grid cell responses due to reduced cholinergic transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K. Pilly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in the coordinated firing of brain neurons have been proposed to play important roles in perception, cognition, attention, learning, navigation, and sensory-motor control. The network theta rhythm has been associated with properties of spatial navigation, as has the firing of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells. Two recent studies reduced the theta rhythm by inactivating the medial septum (MS and demonstrated a correlated reduction in the characteristic hexagonal spatial firing patterns of grid cells. These results, along with properties of intrinsic membrane potential oscillations (MPOs in slice preparations of entorhinal cells, have been interpreted to support oscillatory interference models of grid cell firing. The current article shows that an alternative self-organizing map model of grid cells can explain these data about intrinsic and network oscillations without invoking oscillatory interference. In particular, the adverse effects of MS inactivation on grid cells can be understood in terms of how the concomitant reduction in cholinergic inputs may increase the conductances of leak potassium (K+ and slow and medium after-hyperpolarization (sAHP and mAHP channels. This alternative model can also explain data that are problematic for oscillatory interference models, including how knockout of the HCN1 gene in mice, which flattens the dorsoventral gradient in MPO frequency and resonance frequency, does not affect the development of the grid cell dorsoventral gradient of spatial scales, and how hexagonal grid firing fields in bats can occur even in the absence of theta band modulation. These results demonstrate how models of grid cell self-organization can provide new insights into the relationship between brain learning, oscillatory dynamics, and navigational behaviors.

  17. Inactivated properties of activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles for bacteria and kinetic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Youji; MA Mingyuan; WANG Xiaohu; WANG Xiaohua

    2008-01-01

    The activated carbon-supported TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2/AC) were prepared by a properly controlled sol-gel method. The effects of activated carbons (AC) support on inactivated properties of TiO2 nanoparticles were evaluated by photocatalytic inactivation experiments ofEscherichia coli. The key factors affecting the inactivation efficiency were investigated, including electric power of lamp, temperature, and pH values. The results show that the TiO2/AC composites have high inactivation properties of E. coli in comparison with pure TiO2 powder. The kinetics of photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli was found to follow a pseudo-first order rate law for TiO2/AC composites, and kinetic behavior could be described in terms of a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The values of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the bacteria, Kc, and for the rate constants, kr, were certainly depended on TiO2 content. At 47 variety of parameters shows significant effects on inactivation rate. The outer layer of bacteria decomposed first resulting in inactivation of cell, and with further illumination, the cells nearly decomposed.

  18. Effect of radiation on cell interactions with respect to the phenomenon of inactivation on non-syngeneic stem cells. A radiation-induced change in B-lymphocyte function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, R.V.; Dozmorov, I.M.; Lutsenko, G.V.; Nikolaeva, I.S.; Rudneva, T.B. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    A study was made of the changes in the mode of interaction between T- and B-lymphocytes of mouse lymph nodes with respect to the phenomenon of inactivation of non-syngeneic haemopoietic stem cells. It was shown that irradiation of B-lymphocytes with doses of 77.4-232.2 mC/kg changes their helper activity into a suppressor activity with regard to T-cell-killers having a low electrophoretic mobility.

  19. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, Brian K.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A.; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N.; Distasi, Matthew R.; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin causes airway goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia and mucus hypersecretion by inactivating the transcriptional factor FoxA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yonghua; Kuang, Zhizhou; Walling, Brent E; Bhatia, Shikha; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen, Yin; Gaskins, H Rex; Lau, Gee W

    2012-03-01

    The redox-active exotoxin pyocyanin (PCN) can be recovered in 100 µM concentrations in the sputa of bronchiectasis patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). However, the importance of PCN within bronchiectatic airways colonized by PA remains unrecognized. Recently, we have shown that PCN is required for chronic PA lung infection in mice, and that chronic instillation of PCN induces goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH), pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema and influx of immune cells in mouse airways. Many of these pathological features are strikingly similar to the mouse airways devoid of functional FoxA2, a transcriptional repressor of GCH and mucus biosynthesis. In this study, we postulate that PCN causes and exacerbates GCH and mucus hypersecretion in bronchiectatic airways chronically infected by PA by inactivating FoxA2. We demonstrate that PCN represses the expression of FoxA2 in mouse airways and in bronchial epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface or conventionally, resulting in GCH, increased MUC5B mucin gene expression and mucus hypersecretion. Immunohistochemical and inhibitor studies indicate that PCN upregulates the expression of Stat6 and EGFR, both of which in turn repress the expression of FoxA2. These studies demonstrate that PCN induces GCH and mucus hypersecretion by inactivating FoxA2.

  1. Impairment of in vitro generation of monocyte-derived human dendritic cells by inactivated human immunodeficiency virus-1: Involvement of type I interferon produced from plasmacytoid dendritc cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Zhang, Li Feng; Adachi, Tetsuya; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2010-06-01

    In an attempt to simplify the protocol of DC generation in vitro, studies conducted herein show that functional DCs could be generated from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in media containing GM-CSF and IL-4. Interestingly, when PBMCs, but not purified monocytes, were exposed to either CCR5- or CXCR4-tropic inactivated HIV-1 isolates (iHIV-1) at the initiation of the culture, DC yields were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner because of monocyte apoptosis. Similar impairment of DC generation was noted using type I IFNs and poly IC not only in cultures of PBMCs but also using highly enriched monocytes. This effect was reversed by antihuman type I IFN receptor, but not by anti-FasL, anti-TRAIL, anti-TNF, or a mixture of these antibodies. iHIV-1-exposed PBMCs, but not monocytes, produced high levels of IFN-alpha but not IFN-beta. PBMCs depleted of CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs produced low levels of IFN-alpha and were resistant to iHIV-1-mediated DC impairment. Interestingly, exogenously added TNF reversed the impairment by iHIV-1 in the PBMC cultures. In conclusion, the present results indicate that iHIV-1 impairs the in vitro generation of functional DCs from PBMCs through the induction of IFN-alpha from plasmacytoid DCs in a CD4-dependent fashion in the absence of TNF.

  2. The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Sun, Bing; Zhu, Xiaomei; Yan, Zhiyu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with high voltage and frequency pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in hybrid gas-liquid reactor with a suspension electrode was studied experimentally. In the hybrid gas-liquid reactor, a steel plate was used as high voltage electrode while a quartz plate as a dielectric layer, another steel plate placing in the aqueous solution worked as a whole ground electrode. A suspension electrode is installed near the surface of solution between high voltage and ground electrode to make the dielectric barrier discharge uniform and stable, the discharge gap was between the quartz plate and the surface of the water. The effect of peak voltage, treatment time, the initial concentration of Chlorella spp. and conductivity of solution on the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. was investigated, and the inactivation mechanism of Chlorella spp. preliminarily was studied. Utilizing this system inactivation of Chlorella spp., the inactivation rate increased with increasing of peak voltage, treatment time and electric conductivity. It was found that the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. arrived at 100% when the initial concentration was 4 × 106 cells mL-1, and the optimum operation condition required a peak voltage of 20 kV, a treatment time of 10 min and a frequency of 7 kHz. Though the increasing of initial concentration of the Chlorella spp. contributed to the addition of interaction probability between the Chlorella spp. and O3, H2O2, high-energy electrons, UV radiation and other active substances, the total inactivation number raise, but the inactivation rate of the Chlorella spp. decreased.

  3. Tendon cell outgrowth rates and morphology associated with kevlar-49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M; Gordon, K E

    1988-12-01

    A rat tendon cell model was used to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of kevlar-49. The cell response to kevlar was compared to carbon AS-4 and nylon sutures. Three trials were run and cell growth rates were statistically similar for all the materials tested. A separate experiment was conducted in which the same fiber materials were placed in the same Petri dish. Again, the rates were similar for each material. Finally, the cells were observed with a scanning electron microscope, and the three classic cell morphologies associated with this tendon cell model were observed. Also, cellular attachment to the fiber and cellular encapsulation of the fiber were identical for the three materials tested. Kevlar-49 proved to be comparable to carbon AS4 and nylon sutures in terms of cellular response and cell outgrowth rates.

  4. Pathogen inactivation of whole blood and red cell components: an overview of concept, design, developments, criteria of acceptability and storage lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Putter, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Multilayer preventative strategies have been instituted to enhance transfusion safety for patients in need of critical blood components. Presently blood safety is at its highest levels, with the implementation of precautionary/preventative measures against vCJD, bacterial and viral contamination of the blood supply. The implementation of these strategies together with advances in automation and computerization led to significant improvements in standardisation for transfusion practices. These include validation, verification, adherence to GLP and GMP and other regulatory requirements. In most European countries, universal prestorage leukodepletion is routine practice. In France proactive pathogen inactivation treatments [PITs] have been implemented emphasizing patient safety. This at least conceptually reduces the risk of transfusing viable WBCs, emerging bacteria and viruses, all with potential transfusion complications. In the UK, prion removal filters for red cell products are used selectively for special groups of patients. Some research establishments are exploring the potential impact of pathogen inactivation of whole blood or red cell components, using the new generation of S-303 PIT and the prion removal filters in combination. It needs to be determined whether such a combined strategy, applied synergistically, enhances red cell transfusion safety without compromising the overall criteria of acceptability. It is necessary to critically examine the impact of a new generation of PIT technologies, which may exacerbate the red cell storage lesion and cause the development of undesirable antibodies in the recipient. The development of innovative laboratory tools is vital to study impacts of these measures on the quality of stored blood and their clinical outcome. The ultimate aim of red cell transfusion is to provide oxygen enriched red blood cells to the microcirculations and tissues. Definitive studies are needed to establish the potential unforeseen negative

  5. Comparative study of the immunogenicity in mice and monkeys of an inactivated CA16 vaccine made from a human diploid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Erxia; Cheng, Chen; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jingjing; Che, Yanchun; Pu, Jing; Dong, Chenghong; Liu, Longding; He, Zhanlong; Lu, Shuaiyao; Zhao, Yuan; Jiang, Li; Liao, Yun; Shao, Congwen; Li, Qihan

    2014-01-01

    The coxsackie A16 virus (CA16), along with enterovirus 71 (EV71), is a primary pathogen that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). To control HFMD, CA16, and EV71 vaccines are needed. In this study, an experimental inactivated CA16 vaccine was prepared using human diploid cells, and the vaccine's immunogenicity was analyzed in mice and rhesus monkeys. The results showed that the neutralizing antibody was developed in a dose-dependent manner, and was sustained for 70 days with an average GMT (geometric mean titer) level of 80 to 90 in immunized mouse and for 56 days with GMT of higher than 300 in monkeys. The neutralizing antibody had a cross-neutralizing activity against different viral strains (genotype A and B), and the specific IFN-γ-secreting cell response was activated by these virus strains in an ELISPOT assay. This study provides evidence for the potential use of inactivated CA16 as a candidate for use in vaccines.

  6. Evaluation of the matrix effect of thermophilic anaerobic digestion on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus using real-time PCR and viral cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tiejun; Bowlby, Evelyn; Tong, Yupin; Wu, John T Y; Wong, Lester; Tower, Robert J; Pang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaomei

    2012-04-01

    The matrix effect of the thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) process on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) was evaluated. Viral cell culture and real-time PCR were used for assessing removal of the viral infectivity and degradation of viral DNA, respectively. Results showed that the TAD-derived matrix alone can inactivate the virus and destroy the nucleic acid helix core of ILTV in a time-and- dose-dependent manner. No cytopathogenic effect (CPE) was observed in the cells exposed to ILTV pre-treated with TAD matrix for 1.5h in experiment 1 and for 16h in experiment 2. There was a significant statistical difference between TAD matrix treated and non-treated cultures (p<0.001, Chi-test). Amplifiable ILT viral DNA was reduced 2.27 log by 1.5h-treatment and was not present by 16h-treatment with TAD matrix, indicating complete viral DNA fragmentation. The TAD process is an environmentally friendly way for disposing of poultry biowaste and carcasses.

  7. Inactivation of SOCS3 in leptin receptor-expressing cells protects mice from diet-induced insulin resistance but does not prevent obesitya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, João A.B.; Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Cardinali, Lais I.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M.; Tirapegui, Julio; Elias, Carol F.; Donato, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that improve leptin sensitivity have potential as an alternative treatment approach against obesity and related comorbidities. We investigated the effects of Socs3 gene ablation in different mouse models to understand the role of SOCS3 in the regulation of leptin sensitivity, diet-induced obesity (DIO) and glucose homeostasis. Neuronal deletion of SOCS3 partially prevented DIO and improved glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of SOCS3 only in LepR-expressing cells protected against leptin resistance induced by HFD, but did not prevent DIO. However, inactivation of SOCS3 in LepR-expressing cells protected mice from diet-induced insulin resistance by increasing hypothalamic expression of Katp channel subunits and c-Fos expression in POMC neurons. In summary, the regulation of leptin signaling by SOCS3 orchestrates diet-induced changes on glycemic control. These findings help to understand the molecular mechanisms linking obesity and type 2 diabetes, and highlight the potential of SOCS3 inhibitors as a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25161884

  8. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  9. EPO improves the proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of trophoblast and decidual stromal cells through activating STAT-5 and inactivating p38 signal in human early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu Qing; Zhang, Yu Quan; Li, Ming Qing; Du, Mei Rong; Wei, Wei Wei; Li, Da Jin

    2011-01-01

    The erythropoietin (EPO) belongs to the family of angiogenic factors, which is regulated by Hypoxia-inducible factor- 1α (HIF-1α). As known, EPO are expressed in human villi and decidua, but the function is not clear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of HIF-1α, EPO and its receptor (EPOR) in the biological functions of trophoblast and decidual stromal cell (DSC) in human early pregnancy. The expression of EPO, EPOR and HIF-1α was evaluated in the villi and deciduas by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Thereafter, we silenced HIF-1α expression in HTR-8/SVneo cell line and decidual stromal cells (DSCs). The effects of EPO on the proliferation and apoptosis of trophoblasts and DSCs, and activation of signal molecules were investigated by BrdU proliferation assay, flow cytometry and western blot, respectively. We have observed that the HIF-1α silence results in the lower expression of EPO in trophoblasts and DSCs. The anti-EPO neutralizing antibody can inactivate the phosphorylation of STAT5 and activate p38 of these cells in a dosage-dependent manner. Furthermore, the expressions of EPO, EPOR and HIF-1α in the villi and decidua from the unexplained miscarriage were significantly lower than that of the normal early pregnancy. This study suggests that HIF-1α may regulate the expression of EPO, which plays a favorable regulatory role in the proliferation and survival of human first-trimester trophoblast cells and DSCs via inactivating p38 and activating STAT5 in an autocrine manner, while the inadequate EPO expression at maternal-fetal interface may lead to pregnancy wastage in humans.

  10. Inactivated Sendai Virus Strain Tianjin Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells by Promoting Caspase Activation and Fas/FasL Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhe; Li, Xiao-Xia; Li, Mei; Han, Han; Chen, Jun; Zang, Sitao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Virotherapy represents a promising new approach for treating cancer. Here the authors have analyzed the effect of ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus strain Tianjin (UV-Tianjin) on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, UV-Tianjin inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and T47D breast cancer cell lines, although MCF-7 cells were most susceptible to UV-Tianjin treatment. Hoechst staining and flow cytometric analysis of UV-Tianjin-treated MCF-7 cells revealed that UV-Tianjin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, UV-Tianjin treatment resulted in reductions in the mitochondria membrane potential of MCF-7 cells and regulated the levels and activities of Bcl-2, Bax, cyt c, caspases, Fas, and Fas ligand (FasL). In vivo, UV-Tianjin inhibited the growth of MCF-7 tumors in nude mice and increased tumor cell apoptosis compared with saline-treated controls. In addition, the percentage of tumor cells positive for cleaved versions of caspase-7, caspase-8, and caspase-9 was higher in UV-Tianjin-treated tumors than in saline-treated controls. In summary, UV-Tianjin exhibited the antitumor activity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells both in vitro and in vivo. The UV-Tianjin treatment seemed to induce apoptosis by activating both the mitochondrial and death receptor apoptotic pathways. PMID:25517620

  11. Sex-differential selection and the evolution of X inactivation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Connallon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available X inactivation--the transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome copy per female somatic cell--is universal among therian mammals, yet the choice of which X to silence exhibits considerable variation among species. X inactivation strategies can range from strict paternally inherited X inactivation (PXI, which renders females haploid for all maternally inherited alleles, to unbiased random X inactivation (RXI, which equalizes expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles in each female tissue. However, the underlying evolutionary processes that might account for this observed diversity of X inactivation strategies remain unclear. We present a theoretical population genetic analysis of X inactivation evolution and specifically consider how conditions of dominance, linkage, recombination, and sex-differential selection each influence evolutionary trajectories of X inactivation. The results indicate that a single, critical interaction between allelic dominance and sex-differential selection can select for a broad and continuous range of X inactivation strategies, including unequal rates of inactivation between maternally and paternally inherited X chromosomes. RXI is favored over complete PXI as long as alleles deleterious to female fitness are sufficiently recessive, and the criteria for RXI evolution is considerably more restrictive when fitness variation is sexually antagonistic (i.e., alleles deleterious to females are beneficial to males relative to variation that is deleterious to both sexes. Evolutionary transitions from PXI to RXI also generally increase mean relative female fitness at the expense of decreased male fitness. These results provide a theoretical framework for predicting and interpreting the evolution of chromosome-wide expression of X-linked genes and lead to several useful predictions that could motivate future studies of allele-specific gene expression variation.

  12. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdur Rakib

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly enhanced GJIC of MCF-7 cells at 40 μM concentration, whereas CLA inhibited cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. CLA increased connexin43 (Cx43 expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels. CLA inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activity and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. No significant difference was observed in the efficacy of c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA. These results suggest that the anticancer effect of CLA is associated with upregulation of GJIC mediated by enhanced Cx43 expression through inactivation of NF-κB and generation of ROS in MCF-7 cells.

  13. High rate, high reliability Li/SO2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chireau, R.

    1982-03-01

    The use of the lithium/sulfur dioxide system for aerospace applications is discussed. The high rate density in the system is compared to some primary systems: mercury zinc, silver zinc, and magnesium oxide. Estimates are provided of the storage life and shelf life of typical lithium sulfur batteries. The design of lithium cells is presented and criteria are given for improving the output of cells in order to achieve high rate and high reliability.

  14. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid inhibits invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells through the inactivation of p70S6K and Akt activity: Involvement of p53 in differential regulation of signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Oh, Joa Sub; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanism of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Ligularia fischeri, on cell invasion, proliferation and adhesion in p53 wild-type A549 and p53-deficient H1299 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. 5-CQA abrogated mitogen-stimulated invasion, but not proliferation, in both A549 and H1299 cells. In addition, 5-CQA inhibited mitogen-stimulated adhesion in A549 cells only. Anti-invasive activity of 5-CQA in A549 cells was mediated by the inactivation of p70(S6K)-dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, in H1299 cells the inactivation of Akt was found to be involved in 5-CQA-mediated inhibition of cell invasion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the pharmacological roles and molecular targets of 5-CQA in regulating NSCLC cell fate, and suggest further evaluation and development of 5-CQA as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment and prevention of lung cancer.

  15. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy that does not activate LMO2 expression in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Mody, Disha; DeRavin, Suk See; Hauer, Julia; Lu, Taihe; Ma, Zhijun; Hacein-Bey Abina, Salima; Gray, John T; Greene, Michael R; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2010-08-12

    To develop safer and more effective vectors for gene therapy of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), we have evaluated new self-inactivating lentiviral vectors based on the HIV virus. The CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector contains the entire human common gamma chain (gamma(c)) genomic sequence driven by the gamma(c) promoter. The CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector uses a promoter fragment from the eukaryotic elongation factor alpha (EF1alpha) gene to express a codon-optimized human gamma(c) cDNA. Both vectors contain a 400-bp insulator fragment from the chicken beta-globin locus within the self-inactivating long-terminal repeat. Transduction of bone marrow cells using either of these vectors restored T, B, and natural killer lymphocyte development and function in a mouse SCID-X1 transplantation model. Transduction of human CD34(+) bone marrow cells from SCID-X1 patients with either vector restored T-cell development in an in vitro assay. In safety studies using a Jurkat LMO2 activation assay, only the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector lacked the ability to transactivate LMO2 protein expression, whereas the CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector significantly activated LMO2 protein expression. In addition, the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector has not caused any tumors in transplanted mice. We conclude that the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector may be suitable for testing in a clinical trial based on these preclinical demonstrations of efficacy and safety.

  16. Investigation of high-rate lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Catherine A.; Gust, Steven; Farrington, Michael D.; Lockwood, Judith A.; Donaldson, George J.

    Chemical analysis of a commercially produced high-rate D-size lithium-thionyl cell was carried out, as a function of rate of discharge (1 ohm and 5 ohms), depth of discharge, and temperature (25 C and -40 C), using specially developed methods for identifying suspected minor cell products or impurities which may effect cell performance. These methods include a product-retrieval system which involves solvent extraction to enhance the recovery of suspected semivolatile minor chemicals, and methods of quantitative GC analysis of volatile and semivolatile products. The nonvolatile products were analyzed by wet chemical methods. The results of the analyses indicate that the predominant discharge reaction in this cell is 4Li + 2SOCl2 going to 4LiCl + S + SO2, with SO2 formation decreasing towards the end of cell life (7 to 12 Ah). The rate of discharge had no effect on the product distribution. Upon discharge of the high-rate cell at -40 C, one cell exploded, and all others exhibited overheating and rapid internal pressure rise when allowed to warm up to room temperature.

  17. Alpharetroviral self-inactivating vectors produced by a superinfection-resistant stable packaging cell line allow genetic modification of primary human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenski, Verena; Suerth, Julia D; Barczak, Elke; Heckl, Dirk; Levy, Camille; Bernadin, Ornellie; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Williams, David A; Fehse, Boris; Verhoeyen, Els; Schambach, Axel

    2016-08-01

    Primary human T lymphocytes represent an important cell population for adoptive immunotherapies, including chimeric-antigen and T-cell receptor applications, as they have the capability to eliminate non-self, virus-infected and tumor cells. Given the increasing numbers of clinical immunotherapy applications, the development of an optimal vector platform for genetic T lymphocyte engineering, which allows cost-effective high-quality vector productions, remains a critical goal. Alpharetroviral self-inactivating vectors (ARV) have several advantages compared to other vector platforms, including a more random genomic integration pattern and reduced likelihood for inducing aberrant splicing of integrated proviruses. We developed an ARV platform for the transduction of primary human T lymphocytes. We demonstrated functional transgene transfer using the clinically relevant herpes-simplex-virus thymidine kinase variant TK.007. Proof-of-concept of alpharetroviral-mediated T-lymphocyte engineering was shown in vitro and in a humanized transplantation model in vivo. Furthermore, we established a stable, human alpharetroviral packaging cell line in which we deleted the entry receptor (SLC1A5) for RD114/TR-pseudotyped ARVs to prevent superinfection and enhance genomic integrity of the packaging cell line and viral particles. We showed that superinfection can be entirely prevented, while maintaining high recombinant virus titers. Taken together, this resulted in an improved production platform representing an economic strategy for translating the promising features of ARVs for therapeutic T-lymphocyte engineering.

  18. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D; Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor.

  19. Guizhi Fuling Wan, a Traditional Chinese Herbal Formula, Sensitizes Cisplatin-Resistant Human Ovarian Cancer Cells through Inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the possible mechanisms that Guizhi Fuling Wan (GFW enhances the sensitivity of the SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells and the resistant xenograft tumours to cisplatin. Rat medicated sera containing GFW were prepared by administering GFW to rats, and the primary bioactive constituents of the sera were gallic acid, paeonol, and paeoniflorin analysed by HPLC/QqQ MS. Cell counting kit-8 analysis was shown that coincubation of the sera with cisplatin/paclitaxel enhanced significantly the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin or paclitaxel in SKOV3/DDP cells. The presence of the rat medicated sera containing GFW resulted in an increase in rhodamine 123 accumulation by flow cytometric assays and a decrease in the protein levels of P-gp, phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, and mTOR in a dose-dependent manner in SKOV3/DDP cells by western blot analysis, but the sera had no effect on the protein levels of PI3K p110α and total AKT. The low dose of GFW enhanced the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin and paclitaxel treatment in resistant SKOV3/DDP xenograft tumours. GFW could sensitize cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells by inhibiting the protein level and function of P-gp, which may be medicated through inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.

  20. Complexities of X chromosome inactivation status in female human induced pluripotent stem cells-a brief review and scientific update for autism research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandulakis, Mary G; Meganathan, Kesavan; Kroll, Kristen L; Bonni, Azad; Constantino, John N

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allow researchers to make customized patient-derived cell lines by reprogramming noninvasively retrieved somatic cells. These cell lines have the potential to faithfully represent an individual's genetic background; therefore, in the absence of available human brain tissue from a living patient, these models have a significant advantage relative to other models of neurodevelopmental disease. When using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to model X-linked developmental disorders or inherited conditions that undergo sex-specific modulation of penetrance (e.g., autism spectrum disorders), there are significant complexities in the course and status of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) that are crucial to consider in establishing the validity of cellular models. There are major gaps and inconsistencies in the existing literature regarding XCI status during the derivation and maintenance of hiPSCs and their differentiation into neurons. Here, we briefly describe the importance of the problem, review the findings and inconsistencies of the existing literature, delineate options for specifying XCI status in clonal populations, and develop recommendations for future studies.

  1. Antagonism of miR-21 reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype through AKT/ERK1/2 inactivation by targeting PTEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingli Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence suggested that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cancer stem cell (CSC characteristics, both of which contribute to tumor invasion and metastasis, are interrelated with miR-21. MiR-21 is one of the important microRNAs associated with tumor progression and metastasis, but the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT and CSC phenotype during miR-21 contributes to migration and invasion of breast cancer cells remain to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, MDA-MB-231/anti-miR-21 cells were established by transfected hsa-miR-21 antagomir into breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. EMT was evaluated by the changes of mesenchymal cell markers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and alpha-SMA, epithelial cell marker (E-cadherin, as well as capacities of cell migration and invasion; CSC phenotype was measured using the changes of CSC surface markers (ALDH1 and CD44, and the capacity of sphereforming (mammospheres. We found that antagonism of miR-21 reversed EMT and CSC phenotype, accompanied with PTEN up-regulation and AKT/ERK1/2 inactivation. Interestingly, down-regulation of PTEN by siPTEN suppressed the effects of miR-21 antagomir on EMT and CSC phenotype, confirming that PTEN is a target of miR-21 in reversing EMT and CSC phenotype. The inhibitors of PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 pathways, LY294002 and U0126, both significantly suppressed EMT and CSC phenotype, indicating that AKT and ERK1/2 pathways are required for miR-21 mediating EMT and CSC phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, our results demonstrated that antagonism of miR-21 reverses EMT and CSC phenotype through targeting PTEN, via inactivation of AKT and ERK1/2 pathways, and showed a novel mechanism of which might relieve the malignant biological behaviors of breast cancer.

  2. Preferential amplification of CD8 effector-T cells after transcutaneous application of an inactivated influenza vaccine: a randomized phase I trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behazine Combadière

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current conventional vaccination approaches do not induce potent CD8 T-cell responses for fighting mostly variable viral diseases such as influenza, avian influenza viruses or HIV. Following our recent study on vaccine penetration by targeting of vaccine to human hair follicular ducts surrounded by Langerhans cells, we tested in the first randomized Phase-Ia trial based on hair follicle penetration (namely transcutaneous route the induction of virus-specific CD8 T cell responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We chose the inactivated influenza vaccine - a conventional licensed tetanus/influenza (TETAGRIP vaccine - to compare the safety and immunogenicity of transcutaneous (TC versus IM immunization in two randomized controlled, multi-center Phase I trials including 24 healthy-volunteers and 12 HIV-infected patients. Vaccination was performed by application of inactivated influenza vaccine according to a standard protocol allowing the opening of the hair duct for the TC route or needle-injection for the IM route. We demonstrated that the safety of the two routes was similar. We showed the superiority of TC application, but not the IM route, to induce a significant increase in influenza-specific CD8 cytokine-producing cells in healthy-volunteers and in HIV-infected patients. However, these routes did not differ significantly for the induction of influenza-specific CD4 responses, and neutralizing antibodies were induced only by the IM route. The CD8 cell response is thus the major immune response observed after TC vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This Phase Ia clinical trial (Manon05 testing an anti-influenza vaccine demonstrated that vaccines designed for antibody induction by the IM route, generate vaccine-specific CD8 T cells when administered transcutaneously. These results underline the necessity of adapting vaccination strategies to control complex infectious diseases when CD8 cellular responses are crucial. Our work opens up a key area for the

  3. Advanced glycation end products accelerate ischemia/reperfusion injury through receptor of advanced end product/nitrative thioredoxin inactivation in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Ma, Yanzhuo; Wang, Rutao; Xia, Chenhai; Zhang, Rongqing; Lian, Kun; Luan, Ronghua; Sun, Lu; Yang, Lu; Lau, Wayne B; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling

    2011-10-01

    The advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are associated with increased cardiac endothelial injury. However, no causative link has been established between increased AGEs and enhanced endothelial injury after ischemia/reperfusion. More importantly, the molecular mechanisms by which AGEs may increase endothelial injury remain unknown. Adult rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) were isolated and incubated with AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) or BSA. After AGE-BSA or BSA preculture, CMECs were subjected to simulated ischemia (SI)/reperfusion (R). AGE-BSA increased SI/R injury as evidenced by enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release and caspase-3 activity. Moreover, AGE-BSA significantly increased SI/R-induced oxidative/nitrative stress in CMECs (as measured by increased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, total nitric oxide production, superoxide generation, and peroxynitrite formation) and increased SI/R-induced nitrative inactivation of thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), an essential cytoprotective molecule. Supplementation of EUK134 (peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst), human Trx-1, or soluble receptor of advanced end product (sRAGE) (a RAGE decoy) in AGE-BSA precultured cells attenuated SI/R-induced oxidative/nitrative stress, reduced SI/R-induced Trx-1 nitration, preserved Trx-1 activity, and reduced SI/R injury. Our results demonstrated that AGEs may increase SI/R-induced endothelial injury by increasing oxidative/nitrative injury and subsequent nitrative inactivation of Trx-1. Interventions blocking RAGE signaling or restoring Trx activity may be novel therapies to mitigate endothelial ischemia/reperfusion injury in the diabetic population.

  4. Cerebrovascular accidents in sickle cell disease: rates and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohene-Frempong, K; Weiner, S J; Sleeper, L A; Miller, S T; Embury, S; Moohr, J W; Wethers, D L; Pegelow, C H; Gill, F M

    1998-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a major complication of sickle cell disease. The incidence and mortality of and risk factors for CVA in sickle cell disease patients in the United States have been reported only in small patient samples. The Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease collected clinical data on 4,082 sickle cell disease patients enrolled from 1978 to 1988. Patients were followed for an average of 5.2 +/- 2.0 years. Age-specific prevalence and incidence rates of CVA in patients with the common genotypes of sickle cell disease were determined, and the effects of hematologic and clinical events on the risk of CVA were analyzed. The highest rates of prevalence of CVA (4.01%) and incidence (0.61 per 100 patient-years) were in sickle cell anemia (SS) patients, but CVA occurred in all common genotypes. The incidence of infarctive CVA was lowest in SS patients 20 to 29 years of age and higher in children and older patients. Conversely, the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in SS patients was highest among patients aged 20 to 29 years. Across all ages the mortality rate was 26% in the 2 weeks after hemorrhagic stroke. No deaths occurred after infarctive stroke. Risk factors for infarctive stroke included prior transient ischemic attack, low steady-state hemoglobin concentration and rate of and recent episode of acute chest syndrome, and elevated systolic blood pressure. Hemorrhagic stroke was associated with low steady-state hemoglobin and high leukocyte count.

  5. Helicobacter pylori induces Snail expression through ROS-mediated activation of Erk and inactivation of GSK-3β in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Lee, Hee Geum; Piao, Juan-Yu; Zhong, Xiancai; Lee, Ha-Na; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kim, Wonki; Kim, Do-Hee; Cha, Young-Nam; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been known to be implicated in human gastric carcinogenesis. Snail, the zinc-finger transcription factor known as a key inducer of changes in the cell shape and morphogenetic movement, is aberrantly overexpressed and correlates with lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether H. pylori could induce Snail activation to provoke these changes. Using a cell scatter assay, we noticed that human gastric cancer AGS cells infected with H. pylori underwent morphological changes as well as disruption of cell-cell interaction, which was then reversed by silencing of Snail by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, infection with H. pylori resulted in an increased intracellular level of Snail in gastric cancer cells, which was abrogated in the presence of U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors of MEK/Erk and PI3K/Akt pathways, respectively. Cycloheximide pulse-chase experiments coupled with immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the induction of Snail by H. pylori was regulated at multiple levels, including increased transcription of Snail mRNA, inhibition of protein degradation, and enhancement of nuclear translocation of Snail. Pre-treatment of AGS cells with N-acetylcysteine, a well-known reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, attenuated the H. pylori-induced activation of Erk, its binding to Snail promoter, inactivation of GSK-3β, and accumulation of Snail. Collectively, these findings suggest that the upregulation of Snail expression induced by H. pylori and transformation to a spindle-like shape as a consequence in gastric cancer cells are attributable to ROS-mediated activation of Erk and the inhibition of GSK-3β signaling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fast transcription rates of RNA polymerase II in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Paolo; Knezevich, Anna; De Marco, Alex; Mazza, Davide; Kula, Anna; McNally, Jim G; Marcello, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Averaged estimates of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to range between 1.3 and 4.3 kb min−1. In this work, nascent RNAs from an integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1-derived vector were detectable at the single living cell level by fluorescent RNA tagging. At steady state, a constant number of RNAs was measured corresponding to a minimal density of polymerases with negligible fluctuations over time. Recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was complete within seconds, indicating a high rate of RNA biogenesis. The calculated transcription rate above 50 kb min−1 points towards a wide dynamic range of RNAPII velocities in living cells. PMID:22015688

  7. Inactivation of certain insect pathogens by ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, A.; Groener, A.; Huber, J.; Zimmermann, G.

    1981-01-01

    The UV-sensitivity of two baculoviruses (granulosis virus, nuclear polyhedrosis virus) and two entomopathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana) was determined by radiation tests. In the far UV (254 nm) the stability, measured at an inactivation rate of 99%, was in declining order: nuclear polyhedra >= conidia of B. bassiana > granula > spores of B. thuringiensis >= vegetative cells of B. thuringiensis. In the near UV (285-380 nm) the following order could be found: conidia of B. bassiana >= nuclear polyhedra > spores of B. thuringiensis >= granula > vegetative cells of B. thuringiensis. Far UV had a much higher germicidal effect for all pathogens tested than near UV.

  8. Self-discharge rate of lithium thionyl-chloride cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslak, W.R.

    1993-12-31

    Our low-rate lithium/thionyl-chloride ``D`` cell is required to provide power continuously for up to 10 years. The cell was designed at Sandia National Laboratories and manufactured at Eagle-Picher Industries, Joplin, Missouri. We have conducted accelerated aging studies at elevated temperatures to predict long-term performance of cells fabricated in 1992. Cells using 1.0M LiAlCl{sub 4} electrolyte follow Arrhenius kinetics with an activation energy of 14.6 Kcal/mol. This results in an annual capacity loss to self-discharge of 0.13 Ah at 25 C. Cells using a 1.0M LiAlCl{sub 4}{sm_bullet}SO{sub 2} electrolyte do not follow Arrhenius behavior. The performance of aged cells from an earlier fabrication lot is variable.

  9. Fisetin induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest by inactivating cdc25C-cdc2 via ATM-Chk1/2 activation in human endometrial cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Ying Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is one of the most prevalent gynaecological malignancies where, currently available therapeutic options remain limited. Recently phytochemicals are exploited for their efficiency in cancer therapy. The present study investigates the anti-proliferative effect of fisetin, a flavonoid on human endometrial cancer cells (KLE and Hec1 A. Fisetin (20-100 µM effectively reduced the viability of Hec1 A and KLE cells and potentially altered the cell population at G2/M stage. Expression levels of the cell cycle proteins (cyclin B1, p-Cdc2, p-Cdc25C, p-Chk1, Chk2, p-ATM, cyclin B1, H2AX, p21 and p27 were analyzed. Fisetin suppressed cyclin B1 expression and caused inactiva-tion of Cdc25C and Cdc2 by increasing their phosphorylation levels and further activated ATM, Chk1 and Chk2. Increased levels of p21 and p27 were observed as well. These results suggest that fisetin induced G2/M cell cycle arrest via inactivating Cdc25c and Cdc2 through activation of ATM, Chk1 and Chk2.

  10. Toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid to Escherichia coli: Membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gesheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are two widely used polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and are persistent in the environment. This study for the first time systematically investigated their toxicities and the underlying mechanisms to Escherichia coli. Much higher toxicity was observed for PFOA than PFOS, with the 3 h half growth inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined to be 10.6 ± 1.0 and 374 ± 3 mg L(-1), respectively, while the bacterial accumulation of PFOS was much greater than that of PFOA. The PFC exposures disrupted cell membranes as evidenced by the dose-dependent variations of cell structures (by transmission electron microscopy observations), surface properties (electronegativity, hydrophobicity, and membrane fluidity), and membrane compositions (by gas chromatogram and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses). The increases in the contents of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde and the activity of superoxide dismutase indicated the increment of oxidative stress induced by the PFCs in the bacterial cells. The fact that the cell growth inhibition was mitigated by the addition of ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine) further evidenced the important role of oxidative damage in the toxicities of PFOS and PFOA. Eighteen genes involved in cell division, membrane instability, oxidative stress, and DNA damage of the exposed cells were up or down expressed, indicating the DNA damage by the PFCs. The toxicities of PFOS and PFOA to E. coli were therefore ascribed to the membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death. The difference in the bactericidal effect between PFOS and PFOA was supposed to be related to their different dominating toxicity mechanisms, i.e., membrane disruption and oxidative damage, respectively. The outcomes will shed new light on the assessment of ecological effects of PFCs.

  11. Fucoidan Induces ROS-Dependent Apoptosis in 5637 Human Bladder Cancer Cells by Downregulating Telomerase Activity via Inactivation of the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min Ho; Lee, Dae-Sung; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Hong, Su-Hyun; Choi, Il-Whan; Cha, Hee-Jae; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Heui-Soo; Park, Cheol; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Wun-Jae; Hyun Choi, Yung

    2017-02-01

    Preclinical Research Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, is a compound found in various species of seaweed that has anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory activities; however, the underlying relationship between apoptosis and anti-telomerase activity has not been investigated. Here, we report that fucoidan-induced apoptosis in 5637 human bladder cancer cells was associated with an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, Δψm), and cytosolic release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Under the same experimental conditions, fucoidan-treatment decreased hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) expression and the transcription factors, c-myc and Sp1. This was accompanied by decreased telomerase activity. Fucoidan-treatment also suppressed activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling enhanced fucoidan-induced apoptosis and anti-telomerase activity. Meanwhile, fucoidan treatment increased the generation of intracellular ROS, whereas the over-elimination of ROS by N-acetylcysteine, an anti-oxidant, attenuated fucoidan-induced apoptosis, inhibition of hTERT, c-myc, and Sp1 expression, and reversed fucoidan-induced inactivation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Collectively, these data indicate that the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of telomerase activity by fucoidan are mediated via ROS-dependent inactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Drug Dev Res 78 : 37-48, 2017.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of Bacterial Inactivation Methods on Downstream Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α = 1.71x10-2 for E. coli, α = 4.97x10-4 for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α = 9.43x10-7 for E. coli, α = 1.21x10-5 for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  13. Allium cepa Extract and Quercetin Protect Neuronal Cells from Oxidative Stress via PKC-ε Inactivation/ERK1/2 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurologic disorders. Allium cepa extract (ACE) and their main flavonoid component quercetin (QCT) possess antioxidant activities and protect neurons from oxidative stress. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, particularly those linked to the antioxidant effects of the ACE. Primary cortical neuronal cells derived from mouse embryos were preincubated with ACE or QCT for 30 min and exposed to L-buthionine sulfoximine for 4~24 h. We found that ACE and QCT significantly decreased neuronal death and the ROS increase induced by L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine (BSO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACE and QCT activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), leading to downregulation of protein kinase C-ε (PKC-ε) in BSO-stimulated neuronal cells. In addition, ACE and QCT decreased the phosphorylated levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results provide new insight into the protective mechanism of ACE and QCT against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. The results suggest that the inactivation of PKC-ε induced by phosphorylating ERK1/2 is responsible for the neuroprotective effect of ACE and QCT against BSO-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27668036

  14. In vitro photodynamic inactivation effects of cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers on clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans planktonic cells and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaona; Fang, Yanyan; Ye, Zulin; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Yuxia; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: An increasing prevalence of Candida infections has emerged with the wide use of immune-suppressants and antibiotics. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) as a new approach to treat localized Candida infections is an emerging and promising field nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy using two new Cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers(P1 and P2) against strains of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. Methods: Suspensions and biofilms of Candida species were incubated with P1 and P2 concentrations (0.25 50 μM) for 30 min followed by 532nm laser irradiation. For planktonic suspensions, viability of cells was assayed by CFU counting. For biofilms, the metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT. Results: In PDI of a planktonic culture of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, P2 showed the higher efficacy. After incubation with 25 μM of P2 for 30 min and irradiation with 532nm laser (36 J cm-2), the viability of C. albicans planktonic cells decreased by 3.84 log10. For biofilm cells, a higher light dose of 75 mW cm-2 was necessary to achieve 97.71% metabolic activity reduction. Conclusions: The results of this investigation demonstrated that benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizer, P2, is an efficient photosensitizer to kill C. albicans. Moreover, single-species biofilms were less susceptible to PDT than their planktonic counterparts.

  15. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation--towards a spatiotemporal-functional analysis of proteins, and the ablation of chromatin, organelle and cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yukimi; Watanabe, Wataru; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2014-04-15

    Chromophore-assisted laser or light inactivation (CALI) has been employed as a promising technique to achieve spatiotemporal knockdown or loss-of-function of target molecules in situ. CALI is performed using photosensitizers as generators of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are two CALI approaches that use either transgenic tags with chemical photosensitizers, or genetically encoded fluorescent protein fusions. Using spatially restricted microscopy illumination, CALI can address questions regarding, for example, protein isoforms, subcellular localization or phase-specific analyses of multifunctional proteins that other knockdown approaches, such as RNA interference or treatment with chemicals, cannot. Furthermore, rescue experiments can clarify the phenotypic capabilities of CALI after the depletion of endogenous targets. CALI can also provide information about individual events that are involved in the function of a target protein and highlight them in multifactorial events. Beyond functional analysis of proteins, CALI of nuclear proteins can be performed to induce cell cycle arrest, chromatin- or locus-specific DNA damage. Even at organelle level - such as in mitochondria, the plasma membrane or lysosomes - CALI can trigger cell death. Moreover, CALI has emerged as an optogenetic tool to switch off signaling pathways, including the optical depletion of individual neurons. In this Commentary, we review recent applications of CALI and discuss the utility and effective use of CALI to address open questions in cell biology.

  16. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia by inhibiting reactive oxygen species production and inactivating the Ras-ERK1/2-MEK1/2 and Akt pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yali; Jiang, Jinyao; Miao, Huibing; Chen, Xingjuan; Sun, Xuejun; Li, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen-rich saline has been reported to prevent neointimal hyperplasia induced by carotid balloon injury. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Daily injection of a hydrogen-rich saline solution (HRSS) in rats was employed to study the effect of hydrogen on balloon injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia and the neointima/media ratio was assessed. HRSS significantly decreased the neointima area and neointima/media ratio in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro effects of hydrogen on fetal bovine serum (FBS)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation were also investigated. Hydrogen-rich medium (HRM) inhibited rat VSMC proliferation and migration induced by 10% FBS. FBS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activation of intracellular Ras, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Akt were significantly inhibited by HRM. In addition, HRM blocked FBS-induced progression from the G0/G1 to the S-phase and increased the apoptosis rate of VSMCs. These results showed that hydrogen-rich saline was able to attenuate FBS-induced VSMC proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia by inhibiting ROS production and inactivating the Ras-ERK1/2-MEK1/2 and Akt pathways. Thus, HRSS may have potential therapeutic relevance for the prevention of human restenosis.

  17. Inactivation of jack bean urease by allicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkiewicz, Adam; Zaborska, Wiesława; Sepioł, Janusz; Góra, Maciej; Zaborska, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Allicin--diallyl thiosulfinate--is the main biologically active component of freshly crushed garlic. Allicin was synthesized as described elsewhere and was tested for its inhibitory ability against jack bean urease in 20 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 22 degrees C. The results indicate that allicin is an enzymatic inactivator. The loss of urease activity was irreversible, time- and concentration dependent and the kinetics of the inactivation was biphasic; each phase, obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The rate constants for inactivation were measured for the fast and slow phases and for several concentrations of allicin. Thiol reagents, and competitive inhibitor (boric acid) protected the enzyme from loss of enzymatic activity. The studies demonstrate that urease inactivation results from the reaction between allicin and the SH-group, situated in the urease active site (Cys592).

  18. Photosensitizers mediated photodynamic inactivation against virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Lukasz; Skupin-Mrugalska, Paulina; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Goslinski, Tomasz; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause many diseases in humans from the rather innocent common cold to more serious or chronic, life-threatening infections. The long-term side effects, sometimes low effectiveness of standard pharmacotherapy and the emergence of drug resistance require a search for new alternative or complementary antiviral therapeutic approaches. One new approach to inactivate microorganisms is photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). PACT has evolved as a potential method to inactivate viruses. The great challenge for PACT is to develop a methodology enabling the effective inactivation of viruses while leaving the host cells as untouched as possible. This review aims to provide some main directions of antiviral PACT, taking into account different photosensitizers, which have been widely investigated as potential antiviral agents. In addition, several aspects concerning PACT as a tool to assure viral inactivation in human blood products will be addressed.

  19. Inactivation of the Progesterone Receptor in Mx1+ Cells Potentiates Osteogenesis in Calvaria but Not in Long Bone

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The effect of progesterone on bone remains elusive. We previously reported that global progesterone receptor (PR) knockout mice displayed high bone mass phenotype, suggesting that PR influences bone growth and modeling. Recently, Mx1+ cells were characterized to be mesenchymal stem cell-like pluripotent Cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the PR in Mx1+ cells regulates osteogenesis. Using the Mx1-Cre;mT/mG reporter mouse model, we found that the calvarial cells exhibited mini...

  20. Matrine Suppresses Proliferation and Invasion of SGC7901 Cells through Inactivation of PI3K/Akt/uPA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaochun; Zhou, Dawei; Wang, Xianwang; Hu, Zhifan; Yan, Yan; Huang, Jiangrong

    2016-09-01

    This study was to examine the inhibitory effect of matrine on the proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer cells, and to explore the possible mechanisms involved in these processes. MTT was used to evaluate the proliferation ability of SGC7901 cells. A two and three-dimensional cell migration assay were performed to determine the effect of matrine on the migration of SGC7901 cells. Then, the changes of the uPA protein and other possible signal molecules were detected by western blot. We found that the proliferation ability of SGC 7901 cells was suppressed by matrine (pmatrine when compared to the control in a two-dimensional cell migration assay. In addition, SGC7901cells treated with matrine (50μg/ml) migrated less than the control cells in a three-dimensional cell migration assay. At the meantime, the decreased uPA protein expression in SGC7901 cells treated with matrine was observed, and the PI3K/Akt pathway was inhibited. These results suggested that matrine can inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer cells through the PI3K/Akt/uPA pathway, indicating that matrine might be a potential molecular target for treatment of gastric carcinoma.

  1. Inferring time derivatives including cell growth rates using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Peter S.; Stevenson, Keiran; Leary, Allen; Montano-Gutierrez, Luis F.; Clark, Ivan B. N.; Vogel, Jackie; Pilizota, Teuta

    2016-12-01

    Often the time derivative of a measured variable is of as much interest as the variable itself. For a growing population of biological cells, for example, the population's growth rate is typically more important than its size. Here we introduce a non-parametric method to infer first and second time derivatives as a function of time from time-series data. Our approach is based on Gaussian processes and applies to a wide range of data. In tests, the method is at least as accurate as others, but has several advantages: it estimates errors both in the inference and in any summary statistics, such as lag times, and allows interpolation with the corresponding error estimation. As illustrations, we infer growth rates of microbial cells, the rate of assembly of an amyloid fibril and both the speed and acceleration of two separating spindle pole bodies. Our algorithm should thus be broadly applicable.

  2. Role in fast inactivation of the IV/S4-S5 loop of the human muscle Na+ channel probed by cysteine mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, H; Peter, W; Fleischhauer, R; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Malina, T; Mitrovic, N; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1997-12-01

    1. In order to investigate the role in fast inactivation of the cytoplasmic S4-S5 loop of the fourth domain (IV/S4-S5) within the alpha-subunit of the adult human muscle Na+ channel, every single amino acid from R1469 to G1486 was substituted by a cysteine and the mutants were studied by functional expression in human embryonic kidney cells (tsA201) using whole-cell patch clamping. Effects following intracellular application of the sulfhydryl reagents MTSET and MTSES on the mutants were investigated. 2. Sixteen of eighteen mutants resulted in the formation of functional channels. For P1480C and N1484C, no Na+ currents could be detected in transfected cells. In the absence of sulfhydryl reagents, F1473C and A1481C slowed fast Na+ channel inactivation by 2- and 1.5-fold, respectively, and L1482C induced a steady-state Na+ current (Iss) of 3% of peak current (Ipeak) (1% for wild-type). 3. Upon application of MTSET and MTSES, changes in fast inactivation gating occurred for most of the mutants. The most dramatic destabilizing effects on fast inactivation were observed for M1476C (9-fold slowing of inactivation; Iss/Ipeak, 3.6%; +15 mV shift in steady-state inactivation; 2- to 3-fold acceleration of recovery from inactivation), A1481C (3-fold; 14%; +20 mV; no change) and F1473C (2.5-fold; 2.4%; +8 mV; 1.5-fold). Less pronounced destabilizing effects were observed for M1477C and L1479C. Strongly stabilizing effects on the inactivated state, that is a 20-30 mV hyperpolarizing shift of the inactivation curve associated with a 3- to 4-fold decrease in the rate of recovery from inactivation, occurred for T1470C, L1471C and A1474C. Almost all effects were independent of the membrane potential; however, A1474C only reacted when cells were depolarized. Significant effects on activation were not observed. 4. We conclude that the IV/S4-S5 loop plays an important role in fast inactivation of the muscle Na+ channel and may contribute to the formation of a receptor for the putative

  3. Ferric ions accumulate in the walls of metabolically inactivating Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and are reductively mobilized during reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joshua D; Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2016-07-13

    Mössbauer and EPR spectra of fermenting yeast cells before and after cell wall (CW) digestion revealed that CWs accumulated iron as cells transitioned from exponential to post-exponential growth. Most CW iron was mononuclear nonheme high-spin (NHHS) Fe(III), some was diamagnetic and some was superparamagnetic. A significant portion of CW Fe was removable by EDTA. Simulations using an ordinary-differential-equations-based model suggested that cells accumulate Fe as they become metabolically inactive. When dormant Fe-loaded cells were metabolically reactivated in Fe-deficient bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS)-treated medium, they grew using Fe that had been mobilized from their CWs AND using trace amounts of Fe in the Fe-deficient medium. When grown in Fe-deficient medium, Fe-starved cells contained the lowest cellular Fe concentrations reported for a eukaryotic cell. During metabolic reactivation of Fe-loaded dormant cells, Fe(III) ions in the CWs of these cells were mobilized by reduction to Fe(II), followed by release from the CW and reimport into the cell. BPS short-circuited this process by chelating mobilized and released Fe(II) ions before reimport; the resulting Fe(II)(BPS)3 complex adsorbed on the cell surface. NHHS Fe(II) ions appeared transiently during mobilization, suggesting that these ions were intermediates in this process. In the presence of chelators and at high pH, metabolically inactive cells leached CW Fe; this phenomenon probably differs from metabolic mobilization. The iron regulon, as reported by Fet3p levels, was not expressed during post-exponential conditions; Fet3p was maximally expressed in exponentially growing cells. Decreased expression of the iron regulon and metabolic decline combine to promote CW Fe accumulation.

  4. Electromagnetic fields at mobile phone frequency induce apoptosis and inactivation of the multi-chaperone complex in human epidermoid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, Michele; Marra, Monica; Mancinelli, Fabrizio; D'Ambrosio, Guglielmo; Massa, Rita; Giordano, Antonio; Budillon, Alfredo; Abbruzzese, Alberto; Bismuto, Ettore

    2005-08-01

    The exposure to non-thermal microwave electromagnetic field (MW-EMF) at 1.95 MHz, a frequency used in mobile communication, affects the refolding kinetics of eukaryotic proteins (Mancinelli et al., 2004). On these basis we have evaluated the in vivo effect of MW-EMF in human epidermoid cancer KB cells. We have found that MW-EMF induces time-dependent apoptosis (45% after 3 h) that is paralleled by an about 2.5-fold decrease of the expression of ras and Raf-1 and of the activity of ras and Erk-1/2. Although also the expression of Akt was reduced its activity was unchanged likely as a consequence of the increased expression of its upstream activator PI3K. In the same experimental conditions an about 2.5-fold increase of the ubiquitination of ras and Raf-1 was also found and the addition for 12 h of proteasome inhibitor lactacystin at 10 microM caused an accumulation of the ubiquitinated isoforms of ras and Raf-1 and counteracted the effects of MW-EMF on ras and Raf-1 expression suggesting an increased proteasome-dependent degradation induced by MW-EMF. The exposure of KB cells to MW-EMF induced a differential activation of stress-dependent pathway with an increase of JNK-1 activity and HSP70 and 27 expression and with a reduction of p38 kinase activity and HSP90 expression. The overexpression of HSP90 induced by transfection of KB cells with a plasmid encoding for the factor completely antagonized the apoptosis and the inactivation of the ras --> Erk-dependent survival signal induced by MW-EMF. Conversely, the inhibition of Erk activity induced by 12 h exposure to 10 mM Mek-1 inhibitor U0126 antagonized the effects induced by HSP90 transfection on apoptosis caused by MW-EMF. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time that MW-EMF induces apoptosis through the inactivation of the ras --> Erk survival signaling due to enhanced degradation of ras and Raf-1 determined by decreased expression of HSP90 and the consequent increase of proteasome dependent

  5. Rate dependence of swelling in lithium-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, KY; Siegel, JB; Secondo, L; Kim, SU; Samad, NA; Qin, JW; Anderson, D; Garikipati, K; Knobloch, A; Epureanu, BI; Monroe, CW; Stefanopoulou, A

    2014-12-01

    Swelling of a commercial 5 Ah lithium-ion cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode is investigated as a function of the charge state and the charge/discharge rate. In combination with sensitive displacement measurements, knowledge of the electrode configuration within this prismatic cell's interior allows macroscopic deformations of the casing to be correlated to electrochemical and mechanical transformations in individual anode/separator/cathode layers. Thermal expansion and interior charge state are both found to cause significant swelling. At low rates, where thermal expansion is negligible, the electrode sandwich dilates by as much as 1.5% as the charge state swings from 0% to 100% because of lithium-ion intercalation. At high rates a comparably large residual swelling was observed at the end of discharge. Thermal expansion caused by joule heating at high discharge rate results in battery swelling. The changes in displacement with respect to capacity at low rate correlate well with the potential changes known to accompany phase transitions in the electrode materials. Although the potential response changes minimally with the C-rate, the extent of swelling varies significantly, suggesting that measurements of swelling may provide a sensitive gauge for characterizing dynamic operating states. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevention of allergic rhinitis by ginger and the molecular basis of immunosuppression by 6-gingerol through T cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yuki; Nakahashi, Emiko; Obayashi, Momoko; Sugihara, Kento; Qiao, Shanlou; Iida, Machiko; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yajima, Ichiro; Goto, Yuji; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kato, Masashi; Takeda, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of allergies has recently been increasing worldwide. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity is central to the pathogenesis of asthma, hay fever and other allergic diseases. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its extracts have been valued for their medical properties including antinausea, antiinflammation, antipyresis and analgesia properties. In this study, we investigated the antiallergic effects of ginger and 6-gingerol, a major compound of ginger, using a mouse allergy model and primary/cell line culture system. In mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis, oral administration of 2% ginger diet reduced the severity of sneezing and nasal rubbing by nasal sensitization of OVA and suppressed infiltration of mast cells in nasal mucosa and secretion of OVA-specific IgE in serum. 6-Gingerol inhibited the expression of not only Th2 cytokines but also Th1 cytokines in OVA-sensitized spleen cells. Accordingly, 6-gingerol suppressed in vitro differentiation of both Th1 cells and Th2 cells from naïve T cells. In addition, 6-gingerol suppressed both superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)- and anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation. 6-Gingerol also abrogated PMA plus ionomycin- and SEB-induced IL-2 production in T cells, suggesting that 6-gingerol affected T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction rather than the antigen-presentation process. Indeed, 6-gingerol inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, calcium release and nuclear localization of c-fos and NF-κB by PMA and ionomycin stimulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that 6-gingerol suppresses cytokine production for T cell activation and proliferation, thereby not causing B cell and mast cell activation and resulting in prevention or alleviation of allergic rhinitis symptoms.

  7. Inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, O.E.; Bogdanov, M.V.; Kazantseva, V.A.; Gabrilevskaia, L.N.; Kodkind, G.K.H.

    The study of ozone inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage showed the presence in sewage of suspensions of organic origin and bacterial flora to influence the rate of inactivation. The inactivation rate of poliomyelitis virus in sewage free from organic suspension and bacterial flora was significantly higher than that in sewage containing such suspension and bacterial flora. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses was found not to depend upon the protein and salt composition and pH of sewage or strain appurtenance of viruses. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses directly depended upon the dose of ozone and time of contact with it. Differences in the resistance of different types of poliomyelitis virus, ECHO and Coxsackie viruses to the effect of ozone are likely exist. These differences are manifested within the range of relatively small doses of ozone. E. coli is more resistant to ozone than entero-viruses. The results of laboratory studies were used to choose the regimen of sanitation of urban sewage to be used in technological cycles of industrial enterprises.

  8. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  9. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  10. A self-inactivating retrovector incorporating the IL-2 promoter for activation-induced transgene expression in genetically engineered T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejeune Laurence

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cell activation leads to signaling pathways that ultimately result in induction of gene transcription from the interleukin-2 (IL-2 promoter. We hypothesized that the IL-2 promoter or its synthetic derivatives can lead to T-cell specific, activation-induced transgene expression. Our objective was to develop a retroviral vector for stable and activation-induced transgene expression in T-lymphocytes. Results First, we compared the transcriptional potency of the full-length IL-2 promoter with that of a synthetic promoter composed of 3 repeats of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells (NFAT element following activation of transfected Jurkat T-cells expressing the large SV40 T antigen (Jurkat TAg. Although the NFAT3 promoter resulted in a stronger induction of luciferase reporter expression post stimulation, the basal levels of the IL-2 promoter-driven reporter expression were much lower indicating that the IL-2 promoter can serve as a more stringent activation-dependent promoter in T-cells. Based on this data, we generated a self-inactivating retroviral vector with the full-length human IL-2 promoter, namely SINIL-2pr that incorporated the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP fused to herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase as a reporter/suicide "bifunctional" gene. Subsequently, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-G Protein pseudotyped retroparticles were generated for SINIL-2pr and used to transduce the Jurkat T-cell line and the ZAP-70-deficient P116 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that EGFP expression was markedly enhanced post co-stimulation of the gene-modified cells with 1 μM ionomycin and 10 ng/ml phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. This activation-induced expression was abrogated when the cells were pretreated with 300 nM cyclosporin A. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the SINIL-2pr retrovector leads to activation-inducible transgene expression in Jurkat T-cell lines. We propose that this design can be

  11. Synthetic virus seeds for improved vaccine safety: Genetic reconstruction of poliovirus seeds for a PER.C6 cell based inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Papic, Natasa; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Custers, Jerome H H V

    2015-10-13

    Safety of vaccines can be compromised by contamination with adventitious agents. One potential source of adventitious agents is a vaccine seed, typically derived from historic clinical isolates with poorly defined origins. Here we generated synthetic poliovirus seeds derived from chemically synthesized DNA plasmids encoding the sequence of wild-type poliovirus strains used in marketed inactivated poliovirus vaccines. The synthetic strains were phenotypically identical to wild-type polioviruses as shown by equivalent infectious titers in culture supernatant and antigenic content, even when infection cultures are scaled up to 10-25L bioreactors. Moreover, the synthetic seeds were genetically stable upon extended passaging on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. Use of synthetic seeds produced on the serum-free PER.C6 cell platform ensures a perfectly documented seed history and maximum control over starting materials. It provides an opportunity to maximize vaccine safety which increases the prospect of a vaccine end product that is free from adventitious agents.

  12. Comparison of the effect of rose bengal- and eosin Y-mediated photodynamic inactivation on planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Fernanda; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Beltrame Junior, Milton; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2014-05-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast that can cause oral candidosis through the formation of a biofilm, an important virulence factor that compromises the action of antifungal agents. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of rose bengal (RB)- and eosin Y (EY)-mediated photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using a green light-emitting diode (LED; 532 ± 10 nm) on planktonic cells and biofilms of C. albicans (ATCC 18804). Planktonic cultures were treated with photosensitizers at concentrations ranging from 0.78 to 400 μM, and biofilms were treated with 200 μM of photosensitizers. The number of colony-forming unit per milliliter (CFU/mL) was compared by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P ≤ 0.05). After treatment, one biofilm specimen of the control and PDI groups were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The photosensitizers (6.25, 25, 50, 200, and 400 μM of EY, and 6.25 μM of RB or higher) significantly reduced the number of CFU/mL in the PDI groups when compared to the control group. With respect to biofilm formation, RB- and EY-mediated PDI promoted reductions of 0.22 log10 and 0.45 log10, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the two photosensitizers reduced fungal structures. In conclusion, EY- and RB-mediated PDI using LED irradiation significantly reduced C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilms.

  13. Whole inactivated avian Influenza H9N2 viruses induce nasal submucosal dendritic cells to sample luminal viruses via transepithelial dendrites and trigger subsequent DC maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Haofei; Lin, Jian; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2015-03-10

    Nasal mucosal barrier is a key impediment for the absorption of influenza whole inactivated virus (WIV) intranasal vaccine. Yet it is still unclear how WIV cross the epithelial cells (ECs) in nasal cavity. Here, in vitro, a coculture system was well established, consisting of surrogate nasal ECs (Calu-3) and dendritic cells (DCs). After adding H9N2 WIV on the apical side of ECs, we found that submucosal DCs extended their transepithelial dendrites (TEDs) and sampled luminal viruses. However, ECs were not involved in the transepithelial transport of viruses. Subsequently, the phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs were also enhanced, whereas they were attenuated after blocking of TED formation by anti-JAM1 antibody. In vivo, we confirmed that H9N2 WIV were capable of inducing nasal submucosal DCs to sample luminal viruses via TEDs in the nasal passage but not nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). CD103(+) and CD103(-) DC subsets participated in this process. Of note, chemokine CCL20, released from the H9N2 WIV-induced ECs, played a vital role in DC recruitment and TED formation. Taken together, our findings indicated that TEDs played a critical role in facilitating viral transport across the epithelial barrier, which may guide the design of novel nasal mucosal vaccine strategies.

  14. CpG DNA assists the whole inactivated H9N2 influenza virus in crossing the intestinal epithelial barriers via transepithelial uptake of dendritic cell dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y; Qin, T; Wang, X; Lin, J; Yu, Q; Yang, Q

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal mucosa remains a pivotal barrier for the oral vaccine absorption of H9N2 whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV). However, CpG DNA, as an adjuvant, can effectively improve relevant mucosal and systemic immunity. The downstream mechanism is well confirmed, yet the evidence of CpG DNA assisting H9N2 WIV in transepithelial delivery is lacking. Here, we reported both in vitro and in vivo that CpG DNA combined with H9N2 WIV was capable of recruiting additional dendritic cells (DCs) to the intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) to form transepithelial dendrites (TEDs) for luminal viral uptake. Both CD103(+) and CD103(-) DCs participated in this process. The engagement of the chemokine CCL20 from the apical ECs and the DCs drove DC recruitment and TED formation. Virus-loaded CD103(+) but not CD103(-) DCs also quickly migrated into mesenteric lymph nodes within 2 h. Moreover, the mechanism of CpG DNA was independent of epithelial transcytosis and disruption of the epithelial barriers. Finally, the subsequent phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs was also enhanced. Our findings indicated that CpG DNA improved the delivery of H9N2 WIV via TEDs of intestinal DCs, and this may be an important mechanism for downstream effective antigen-specific immune responses.

  15. The biological effect of large single doses: a possible role for non-targeted effects in cell inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon R Veldwijk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Novel radiotherapy techniques increasingly use very large dose fractions. It has been argued that the biological effect of large dose fractions may differ from that of conventional fraction sizes. The purpose was to study the biological effect of large single doses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clonogenic cell survival of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was determined after direct X-ray irradiation, irradiation of feeder cells, or transfer of conditioned medium (CM. Cell-cycle distributions and the apoptotic sub-G1 fraction were measured by flow cytometry. Cytokines in CM were quantified by a cytokine antibody array. γH2AX foci were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: The surviving fraction of MCF7 cells irradiated in vitro with 12 Gy showed an 8.5-fold decrease (95% c.i.: 4.4-16.3; P<0.0001 when the density of irradiated cells was increased from 10 to 50×10(3 cells per flask. Part of this effect was due to a dose-dependent transferrable factor as shown in CM experiments in the dose range 5-15 Gy. While no effect on apoptosis and cell cycle distribution was observed, and no differentially expressed cytokine could be identified, the transferable factor induced prolonged expression of γH2AX DNA repair foci at 1-12 h. CONCLUSIONS: A dose-dependent non-targeted effect on clonogenic cell survival was found in the dose range 5-15 Gy. The dependence of SF on cell numbers at high doses would represent a "cohort effect" in vivo. These results support the hypothesis that non-targeted effects may contribute to the efficacy of very large dose fractions in radiotherapy.

  16. Assessing Photocatalytic Oxidation Using Modified TiO 2 Nanomaterials for Virus Inactivation in Drinking Water: Mechanisms and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liga, Michael Vincent

    Photocatalytic oxidation is an alternative water treatment method under consideration for disinfecting water. Chlorine disinfection can form harmful byproducts, and some viruses (e.g. adenoviruses) are resistant to other alternative disinfection methods. Photocatalytic oxidation using nano-sized photocatalytic particles (e.g. TiO2, fullerene) holds promise; however, it is limited by its low efficiency and long required treatment times. This research focuses on improving virus inactivation by photocatalytic oxidation by modifying catalysts for improved activity, by analyzing virus inactivation kinetics, and by elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of adenovirus serotype 2 (AdV2) and bacteriophage MS2. Modifying TiO2 with silver (nAg/TiO2) or silica (SiO2-TiO2) improves the inactivation kinetics of bacteriophage MS2 by a factor of 3-10. nAg/ TiO2 increases hydroxyl radical (HO·) production while SiO2 increases the adsorption of MS2 to TiO 2. These results suggest that modifying the photocatalyst surface to increase contaminant adsorption is an important improvement strategy along with increasing HO· production. The inactivation kinetics of AdV2 by P25 TiO2 is much slower than the MS2 inactivation kinetics and displays a strong shoulder, which is not present in the MS2 kinetics. nAg/TiO2 initially improves the inactivation rate of AdV2. SiO2-TiO2 reduces the AdV2 inactivation kinetics since adsorption is not significantly enhanced, as it is with MS2. Amino-C60 is highly effective for AdV2 inactivation under visible light irradiation, making it a good material for use in solar disinfection systems. The efficacy of amino-fullerene also demonstrates that singlet oxygen is effective for AdV2 inactivation. When exposed to irradiated TiO2, AdV2 hexon proteins are heavily damaged resulting in the release of DNA. DNA damage is also present but may occur after capsids break. With MS2, the host interaction protein is rapidly damaged, but not the coat protein. The kinetics

  17. Matrine inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells in vitro by inactivating the Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gong-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Zhuang, Jin-Peng; Zu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Duan-Yang; Han, Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Peng; Yan, Jing-Long

    2015-03-01

    Matrine, a natural product, has been demonstrated to be a promising chemotherapeutic drug for some cancers. Using flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle and apoptosis, we found that matrine inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis in the human osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines MG63, HOS, U2OS, and SAOS2 in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. We therefore assessed the role of the serine/threonine kinase Akt in the regulation of matrine-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human OS cell lines. After treatment for 48 h, matrine induced G0/G1-stage cell cycle arrest in MG63, U2OS, and SAOS2 cells associated with an increase in the expression of p27(Kip1) and a decrease in the expression of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)-β (Ser9), and cyclin D1. Furthermore, the pro-apoptotic factor Bax was upregulated. Overall, our findings suggest that matrine may be an effective anti-osteosarcoma drug due to its ability to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in OS cells, possibly through the involvement of Akt signaling.

  18. Functional Inactivation of pRB Results in Aneuploid Mammalian Cells After Release From a Mitotic Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lentini

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread chromosome instability observed in tumors and in early stage carcinomas suggests that aneuploidy could be a prerequisite for cellular transformation and tumor initiation. Defects in tumor suppressers and genes that are part of mitotic checkpoints are likely candidates for the aneuploid phenotype. By using flow cytometric, cytogenetic, immunocytochemistry techniques we investigated whether pRB deficiency could drive perpetual aneuploidy in normal human and mouse fibroblasts after mitotic checkpoint challenge by microtubule-destabilizing drugs. Both mouse and human pRB-deficient primary fibroblasts resulted, upon release from a mitotic block, in proliferating aneuploid cells possessing supernumerary centrosomes. Aneuploid pRB-deficient cells show an elevated variation in chromosome numbers among cells of the same clone. In addition, these cells acquired the capability to grow in an anchorage-independent way at the same extent as tumor cells did suggesting aneuploidy as an initial mutational step in cell transformation. Normal Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts. (MEFs harboring LoxP sites flanking exon 19 of the Rb gene arrested in G2/M with duplicated centrosomes after colcemid treatment. However, these cells escaped the arrest and became aneuploid upon pRB ablation by CRE recombinase, suggesting pRB as a major component of a checkpoint that controls cellular ploidy.

  19. Metformin inhibits heme oxygenase-1 expression in cancer cells through inactivation of Raf-ERK-Nrf2 signaling and AMPK-independent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hee [Department of Pathology, College of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Resistance to therapy is the major obstacle to more effective cancer treatment. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is often highly up-regulated in tumor tissues, and its expression is further increased in response to therapies. It has been suggested that inhibition of HO-1 expression is a potential therapeutic approach to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-tumor effects of metformin are mediated by suppression of HO-1 expression in cancer cells. Our results indicate that metformin strongly suppresses HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human hepatic carcinoma HepG2, cervical cancer HeLa, and non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells. Metformin also markedly reduced Nrf2 mRNA and protein levels in whole cell lysates and suppressed tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ)-induced Nrf2 protein stability and antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase activity in HepG2 cells. We also found that metformin regulation of Nrf2 expression is mediated by a Keap1-independent mechanism and that metformin significantly attenuated Raf-ERK signaling to suppress Nrf2 expression in cancer cells. Inhibition of Raf-ERK signaling by PD98059 decreased Nrf2 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells, confirming that the inhibition of Nrf2 expression is mediated by an attenuation of Raf-ERK signaling in cancer cells. The inactivation of AMPK by siRNA, DN-AMPK or the pharmacological AMPK inhibitor compound C, revealed that metformin reduced HO-1 expression in an AMPK-independent manner. These results highlight the Raf-ERK-Nrf2 axis as a new molecular target in anticancer therapy in response to metformin treatment. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits HO-1 expression in cancer cells. • Metformin attenuates Raf-ERK-Nrf2 signaling. • Suppression of HO-1 by metformin is independent of AMPK. • HO-1 inhibition contributes to anti-proliferative effects of metformin.

  20. Inactivation of human myeloperoxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Furtmüller, Paul G; Hofbauer, Stefan; Paton, Louise N; Obinger, Christian; Kettle, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide generated by the oxidative burst of neutrophils to produce an array of antimicrobial oxidants. During this process MPO is irreversibly inactivated. This study focused on the unknown role of hydrogen peroxide in this process. When treated with low concentrations of H2O2 in the absence of reducing substrates, there was a rapid loss of up to 35% of its peroxidase activity. Inactivation is proposed to occur via oxidation reactions of Compound I with the prosthetic group or amino acid residues. At higher concentrations hydrogen peroxide acts as a suicide substrate with a rate constant of inactivation of 3.9 × 10(-3) s(-1). Treatment of MPO with high H2O2 concentrations resulted in complete inactivation, Compound III formation, destruction of the heme groups, release of their iron, and detachment of the small polypeptide chain of MPO. Ten of the protein's methionine residues were oxidized and the thermal stability of the protein decreased. Inactivation by high concentrations of H2O2 is proposed to occur via the generation of reactive oxidants when H2O2 reacts with Compound III. These mechanisms of inactivation may occur inside neutrophil phagosomes when reducing substrates for MPO become limiting and could be exploited when designing pharmacological inhibitors.

  1. Inactivation of GDP-fucose transporter gene (Slc35c1) in CHO cells by ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR-Cas9 for production of fucose-free antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kah Fai; Shahreel, Wahyu; Wan, Corrine; Teo, Gavin; Hayati, Noor; Tay, Shi Jie; Tong, Wen Han; Yang, Yuansheng; Rudd, Pauline M; Zhang, Peiqing; Song, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Removal of core fucose from N-glycans attached to human IgG1 significantly enhances its affinity for the receptor FcγRIII and thereby dramatically improves its antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity. While previous works have shown that inactivation of fucosyltransferase 8 results in mutants capable of producing fucose-free antibodies, we report here the use of genome editing techniques, namely ZFNs, TALENs and the CRISPR-Cas9, to inactivate the GDP-fucose transporter (SLC35C1) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A FACS approach coupled with a fucose-specific lectin was developed to rapidly isolate SLC35C1-deficient cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that both EPO-Fc produced in mutants arising from CHO-K1 and anti-Her2 antibody produced in mutants arising from a pre-existing antibody-producing CHO-HER line lacked core fucose. Lack of functional SLC35C1 in these cells does not affect cell growth or antibody productivity. Our data demonstrate that inactivating Slc35c1 gene represents an alternative approach to generate CHO cells for production of fucose-free antibodies.

  2. Radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes - Molecular mechanism based on inactivation of dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Gerszon, Joanna; Puchala, Mieczyslaw; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2016-11-01

    Proteins, which have enzymatic activities play a fundamental role in the cell due to participation in most of biological processes. Oxidative-induced damage of enzymes often have marked effects on cellular processes, which in consequence determine cell functioning and survival. In this review, we focused on the radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes with particular emphasis on the inactivation of dehydrogenases. For a better understanding of this issue, the efficiency of products of water radiolysis (•OH, O2•- and H2O2) in enzyme inactivation has been analysed. Reactions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with amino acids present in the active site of enzymes appear to have the greatest impact on enzyme inactivation.

  3. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  4. β-Lactam analogues of combretastatin A-4 prevent metabolic inactivation by glucuronidation in chemoresistant HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malebari, Azizah M; Greene, Lisa M; Nathwani, Seema M; Fayne, Darren; O'Boyle, Niamh M; Wang, Shu; Twamley, Brendan; Zisterer, Daniela M; Meegan, Mary J

    2017-04-21

    Glucuronidation by uridine 5-diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase enzymes (UGTs) is a cause of intrinsic drug resistance in cancer cells. Glucuronidation of combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) was previously identified as a mechanism of resistance in hepatocellular cancer cells. Herein, we propose chemical manipulation of β-lactam bridged analogues of Combretastatin A-4 as a novel means of overcoming drug resistance associated with glucuronidation due to the expression of UGTs in the CA-4 resistant human colon cancer HT-29 cells. The alkene bridge of CA-4 is replaced with a β-lactam ring to circumvent potential isomerisation while the potential sites of glucuronate conjugation are deleted in the novel 3-substituted-1,4-diaryl-2-azetidinone analogues of CA-4. We hypothesise that glucuronidation of CA-4 is the mechanism of drug resistance in HT-29 cells. Ring B thioether containing 2-azetidinone analogues of CA-4 such as 4-(4-(methylthio)phenyl)-3-phenyl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)azetidin-2-one (27) and 3-hydroxy-4-(4-(methylthio)phenyl)-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)azetidin-2-one (45) were identified as the most potent inhibitors of tumour cell growth, independent of UGT status, displaying antiproliferative activity in the low nanomolar range. These compounds also disrupted the microtubular structure in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells, and caused G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential of chemical manipulation as a means of overcoming glucuronidation attributed drug resistance in CA-4 resistant human colon cancer HT-29 cells, allowing the development of therapeutically superior analogues.

  5. Cdc7-Dbf4 Kinase Overexpression in Multiple Cancers and Tumor Cell Lines Is Correlated with p53 Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorine Bonte

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cdc7 is a conserved serine/threonine kinase essential for the initiation of DNA replication, likely by activating the MCM DNA helicase at the G1- to S-phase transition. Cdc7 kinase activity requires association with its regulatory subunit Dbf4/activator of S-phase kinase. Cdc7-Dbf4 is also downstream of the conserved Ataxia telangectasia and RAD3-related kinase that responds to stalled replication forks or DNA damage. In this study, we found that Cdc7 protein was very low or undetectable in normal tissues and cell lines but had increased expression in ∼50% of the 62 human tumor cell lines we examined. Most cell lines with increased Cdc7 protein levels also had increased Dbf4 abundance, and some tumor cell lines had extra copies of the DBF4 gene. A high expression of Cdc7 protein was also detected in primary breast, colon, and lung tumors but not in the matched normal tissues. We also found a high correlation between p53 loss and increased CDC7 and DBF4 expression in primary breast cancers (P = 3.6 × 10−9 and 1.8 × 10−10, respectively and in the cancer cell lines we studied. Therefore, increased Cdc7-Dbf4 abundance may be a common occurrence in human malignancies.

  6. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  7. Data analysis of the inactivation of foodborne microorganisms under high hydrostatic pressure to establish global kinetic parameters and influencing factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santillana Farakos, S.M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The inactivation rate of foodborne microorganisms under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is influenced by factors such as substrate, species, strain, temperature, pH, and stage of growth of the cell. In this study, 445 DP-values from previously published data were analyzed, including those from bacte

  8. Berberine and a Berberis lycium extract inactivate Cdc25A and induce {alpha}-tubulin acetylation that correlate with HL-60 cell cycle inhibition and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Musa [Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Giessrigl, Benedikt; Vonach, Caroline; Madlener, Sibylle [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prinz, Sonja [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Herbaceck, Irene; Hoelzl, Christine [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Bauer, Sabine; Viola, Katharina [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mikulits, Wolfgang [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Quereshi, Rizwana Aleem [Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Knasmueller, Siegfried; Grusch, Michael [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Kopp, Brigitte [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Krupitza, Georg, E-mail: georg.krupitza@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-01-05

    Berberis lycium Royle (Berberidacea) from Pakistan and its alkaloids berberine and palmatine have been reported to possess beneficial pharmacological properties. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic activities of different B. lycium root extracts and the major constituting alkaloids, berberine and palmatine were investigated in p53-deficient HL-60 cells. The strongest growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects were found in the n-butanol (BuOH) extract followed by the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-, and the water (H{sub 2}O) extract. The chemical composition of the BuOH extract was analyzed by TLC and quantified by HPLC. 11.1 {mu}g BuOH extract (that was gained from 1 mg dried root) contained 2.0 {mu}g berberine and 0.3 {mu}g/ml palmatine. 1.2 {mu}g/ml berberine inhibited cell proliferation significantly, while 0.5 {mu}g/ml palmatine had no effect. Berberine and the BuOH extract caused accumulation of HL-60 cells in S-phase. This was preceded by a strong activation of Chk2, phosphorylation and degradation of Cdc25A, and the subsequent inactivation of Cdc2 (CDK1). Furthermore, berberine and the extract inhibited the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1. Berberine and the BuOH extract induced the acetylation of {alpha}-tubulin and this correlated with the induction of apoptosis. The data demonstrate that berberine is a potent anti-neoplastic compound that acts via anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms independent of genotoxicity.

  9. Brazilian Propolis Suppresses Angiogenesis by Inducing Apoptosis in Tube-Forming Endothelial Cells through Inactivation of Survival Signal ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimasa, Kazuhiro; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon; Kobayashi, Tomomi; Eguchi, Ryoji; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Fujimori, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Takashi; Nakayama, Tsutomu; Kaji, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Toshiro

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that propolis suppresses tumor-induced angiogenesis through tube formation inhibition and apoptosis induction in endothelial cells. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such angiogenesis suppression by propolis have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ethanol extract of Brazilian propolis (EEBP) on two major survival signals, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt, and to elucidate whether changes in these signals were actually involved in antiangiogenic effects of the propolis. Detection by western blotting revealed that EEBP suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but not that of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition by U0126 demonstrated that ERK1/2 inactivation alone was enough to inhibit tube formation and induce apoptosis. It was also shown that EEBP and U0126 similarly induced activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and lamin A/C, all of which are molecular markers of apoptosis. These results indicate that inhibition of survival signal ERK1/2, and subsequent induction of apoptosis, is a critical mechanism of angiogenesis suppression by EEBP.

  10. Development of an inactivated iridovirus vaccine against turbot viral reddish body syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingjun; Hu, Xiuzhong; Wang, Liyan; Geng, Xiaofen; Jiang, Guojian; Yang, Xiuxia; Yu, Miaomiao

    2012-03-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.) reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was propagated in turbot fin cells (TF cells) and inactivated as the TRBIV vaccine with its protection efficiency evaluated in this study. TF cells were cultured in 10% bovine calf serum (BCS)-containing MEM medium (pH7.0) at 22°C, in which TRBIV propagated to a titer as high as 105.6 TCID50 mL-1. The TRBIV was inactivated with 0.1% formalin and formulated with 0.5% aluminum hydroxide. The inactivated vaccine caused neither cytopathogenic effect (CPE) on TF cells nor pathogenic effect on turbots. After being administered with the vaccine twice via muscle injection, the turbot developed high-tittered TRBIV neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. The vaccine protected the turbot from dying with an immunoprotection rate of 83.3% as was determined via subcutaneous vaccination in the laboratory and 90.5% via bath vaccination in turbot farms, respectively. The inactivated vaccine was very immunogenic, efficiently preventing turbot from death. It holds the potential of being applied in aquaculture.

  11. Development of an Inactivated Iridovirus Vaccine Against Turbot Viral Reddish Body Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Tingjun; HU Xiuzhong; WANG Liyan; GENG Xiaofen; JIANG Guojian; YANG Xiuxia; YU Miaomiao

    2012-01-01

    Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was propagated in turbot fin cells (TF cells) and inactivated as the TRBIV vaccine with its protection efficiency evaluated in this study.TF cells were cultured in 10% bovine calf serum (BCS)-containing MEM medium (pH7.0) at 22 ℃,in which TRBIV propagated to a titer as high as 105.6 TCID50 mL-1.The TRBIV was inactivated with 0.1% formalin and formulated with 0.5% aluminum hydroxide.The inactivated vaccine caused neither cytopathogenic effect (CPE) on TF cells nor pathogenic effect on turbots.After being administered with the vaccine twice via muscle injection,the turbot developed high-tittered TRBIV neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner.The vaccine protected the turbot from dying with an immunoprotection rate of 83.3% as was determined via subcutaneous vaccination in the laboratory and 90.5% via bath vaccination in turbot farms,respectively.The inactivated vaccine was very immunogenic,efficiently preventing turbot from death.It holds the potential of being applied in aquaculture.

  12. Inactivation of a single copy of Crebbp selectively alters pre-mRNA processing in mouse hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine E Lemieux

    Full Text Available Global expression analysis of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells (FL HSCs revealed the presence of unspliced pre-mRNA for a number of genes in normal FL HSCs. In a subset of these genes, Crebbp+/- FL HSCs had less unprocessed pre-mRNA without a corresponding reduction in total mRNA levels. Among the genes thus identified were the key regulators of HSC function Itga4, Msi2 and Tcf4. A similar but much weaker effect was apparent in Ep300+/- FL HSCs, indicating that, in this context as in others, the two paralogs are not interchangeable. As a group, the down-regulated intronic probe sets could discriminate adult HSCs from more mature cell types, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is regulated with differentiation stage and is active in both fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Consistent with increased myelopoiesis in Crebbp hemizygous mice, targeted reduction of CREBBP abundance by shRNA in the multipotent EML cell line triggered spontaneous myeloid differentiation in the absence of the normally required inductive signals. In addition, differences in protein levels between phenotypically distinct EML subpopulations were better predicted by taking into account not only the total mRNA signal but also the amount of unspliced message present. CREBBP thus appears to selectively influence the timing and degree of pre-mRNA processing of genes essential for HSC regulation and thereby has the potential to alter subsequent cell fate decisions in HSCs.

  13. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phage by pulsed electric field treatment and analysis of inactivation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Yoshida, Tomoki; Sakai, Kazuki; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Inactivation of bacteriophage by pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, one of the effective procedures for bacteria nonthermal inactivation, was studied. Model phage particles Escherichia coli bacteriophages M13mp18 and λ phage, were successfully inactivated by PEF treatment. The survival ratios of both bacteriophages decreased depending on the PEF treatment time when applied peak voltage was 5 or 7 kV, and the survival ratios after 12 min PEF treatment were 10-4 - 10-5. Electrophoresis analyses of biological molecules of inactivated λ phage detected no degradation of total protein and genomic DNA. These results suggested that the factor of phage inactivation by PEF treatment was not based on the degradation of protein or DNA, but on the destruction of phage particle structure. Sensitivity of E. coli phage to PEF treatment was compared with that of E. coli cell. Phage and MV1184 cell were treated with same condition PEF at 5 kV, respectively. After 12 min treatment, the survival ration of λ phage and MV1184 were 4.0 × 10-5 and 1.7 × 10-3, respectively. The survival ratio of phage was lower than that of MV1184. E. coli cell is more tolerant to inactivation with PEF treatment than coli phage.

  14. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice.

  15. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2 Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhao

    Full Text Available Ferredoxin (Fd protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1 mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice.

  16. Met inactivation by S-allylcysteine suppresses the migration and invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer cells induced by hepatocyte growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, O Yeon; Hwang, Hye Sook; Lee, Bok Soon; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Chul Ho; Chun, Mi Son [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Past studies have reported that S-allylcysteine (SAC) inhibits the migration and invasion of cancer cells through the restoration of E-cadherin, the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and Slug protein expression, and inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, evidence is emerging that shows that ROS induced by radiation could increase Met activation. Following on these reports of SAC and Met, we investigated whether SAC could suppress Met activation. Wound healing, invasion, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT), soft agar colony forming, western blotting, and gelatin zymography assays were performed in the human nasopharyngeal cancer cell lines HNE1 and HONE1 treated with SAC (0, 10, 20, or 40 mM) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). This study showed that SAC could suppress the migration and invasion of HNE1 and HONE1 cell lines by inhibiting p-Met. An increase of migration and invasion induced by HGF and its decrease in a dose dependent manner by SAC in wound healing and invasion assays was observed. The reduction of p-Met by SAC was positively correlated with p-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK) and p-extracellular related kinase (p-ERK in both cell lines). SAC reduced Slug, MMP2, and MMP9 involved in migration and invasion with the inhibition of Met-FAK signaling. These results suggest that SAC inhibited not only Met activation but also the downstream FAK, Slug, and MMP expression. Finally, SAC may be a potent anticancer compound for nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy.

  17. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araten, David J., E-mail: david.araten@nyumc.org [Division of Hematology, Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System (United States); Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Krejci, Ondrej [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); DiTata, Kimberly [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Wunderlich, Mark [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Mulloy, James C. [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10{sup −7} per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10{sup −7} (range ∼3.6–23 × 10{sup −7}) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis.

  18. Triazole-dithiocarbamate based selective lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) inactivators inhibit gastric cancer cell growth, invasion, and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi-Chao; Duan, Ying-Chao; Ma, Jin-Lian; Xu, Rui-Min; Zi, Xiaolin; Lv, Wen-Lei; Wang, Meng-Meng; Ye, Xian-Wei; Zhu, Shun; Mobley, David; Zhu, Yan-Yan; Wang, Jun-Wei; Li, Jin-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ru; Zhao, Wen; Liu, Hong-Min

    2013-11-14

    Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, plays an important role in epigenetic regulation of gene activation and repression. The up-regulated LSD1's expression has been reported in several malignant tumors. In the current study, we designed and synthesized five series of 1,2,3-triazole-dithiocarbamate hybrids and screened their inhibitory activity toward LSD1. We found that some of these compounds, especially compound 26, exhibited the most specific and robust inhibition of LSD1. Interestingly, compound 26 also showed potent and selective cytotoxicity against LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803 and HGC-27, as well as marked inhibition of cell migration and invasion, compared to 2-PCPA. Furthermore, compound 26 effectively reduced the tumor growth bared by human gastric cancer cells in vivo with no signs of adverse side effects. These findings suggested that compound 26 deserves further investigation as a lead compound in the treatment of LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer.

  19. Inactivation of a GAL4-Like Transcription Factor Improves Cell Fitness and Product Yield in Glycoengineered Pichia pastoris Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyros, Rebecca; Bukowski, John; Nelson, Stephanie; Sharkey, Nathan; Kim, Sehoon; Copeland, Victoria; Davidson, Robert C.; Chen, Ronghua; Zhuang, Jun; Sethuraman, Natarajan; Stadheim, Terrance A.

    2014-01-01

    With a completely reengineered and humanized glycosylation pathway, glycoengineered Pichia pastoris has emerged as a promising production host for the manufacture of therapeutic glycoproteins. However, the extensive genetic modifications have also negatively affected the overall fitness levels of the glycoengineered host cells. To make glycoengineered Pichia strains more compatible with a scalable industrial fermentation process, we sought to identify genetic solutions to broadly improve cell robustness during fermentation. In this study, we report that mutations within the Pichia pastoris ATT1 (PpATT1) gene (a homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL4 [ScGAL4] transcriptional activator) dramatically increased the cellular fitness levels of glycoengineered Pichia strains. We demonstrate that deletion of the PpATT1 gene enabled glycoengineered Pichia strains to improve their thermal tolerance levels, reduce their cell lysis defects, and greatly improve fermentation robustness. The extension of the duration of fermentation enabled the PpATT1-modified glycoengineered Pichia strains to increase their product yields significantly without any sacrifice in product quality. Because the ATT1 gene could be deleted from any Pichia strains, including empty hosts and protein-expressing production strains alike, we suggest that the findings described in this study are broadly applicable to any Pichia strains used for the production of therapeutic proteins, including monoclonal antibodies, Fc fusions, peptides, hormones, and growth factors. PMID:25344235

  20. Mechanism-based inactivation of serine transhydroxymethylases by D-fluoroalanine and related amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E A; Kallen, R; Walsh, C

    1981-07-10

    Serine transhydroxymethylase, from lamb or rabbit liver, is known to catalyze slow transamination of D-alanine, but not of L-amino acids, in a tetrahydrofolate-independent reaction. Both enzymes will process the D-isomer of beta-fluoroalanine for alpha, beta-elimination of HF to yield an aminoacrylate-pyridoxal-P-enzyme intermediate. This intermediate partitions between harmless hydrolysis to pyruvate, NH4+, and active enzyme-pyridoxal-P (catalytic turnover) and suicidal enzyme alkylation by covalent modification with an average partition ratio of 40-60 turnovers/inactivation event/monomer unit of this tetrameric enzyme. Enzyme inactivation occurs with stoichiometric incorporation of radioactive label from D-[1,2-14C]fluoroalanine. Titration of enzymic cysteinyl --SH groups with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) indicates loss of 1 --SH group on inactivation. Acid hydrolysis of radioactive-inactive enzyme confirms cysteine residue modification. Treatment of inactive enzyme with 6 M urea, then KBH4, followed by acid hydrolysis yields two radioactive compounds, lanthionine and S-carboxyhydroxyethylcysteine, in about equal amounts. The addition of tetrahydrofolate stimulates both pyruvate production and inactivation to equal extents with about a 200-fold rate acceleration at 0.5 mM tetrahydrofolate to turnover numbers of approximately 120 min-1. The Km for D-fluoroalanine is high, 10-60 mM, and this low substrate affinity suggests D-fluoroalanine will not be a useful in vivo agent for selective inactivation of liver cell serine transhydroxymethylases.

  1. Numerical evaluation of lactoperoxidase inactivation during continuous pulsed electric field processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckow, Roman; Semrau, Julius; Sui, Qian; Wan, Jason; Knoerzer, Kai

    2012-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model describing the flow, electric field and temperature distribution of a laboratory-scale pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment chamber with co-field electrode configuration was developed. The predicted temperature increase was validated by means of integral temperature studies using thermocouples at the outlet of each flow cell for grape juice and salt solutions. Simulations of PEF treatments revealed intensity peaks of the electric field and laminar flow conditions in the treatment chamber causing local temperature hot spots near the chamber walls. Furthermore, thermal inactivation kinetics of lactoperoxidase (LPO) dissolved in simulated milk ultrafiltrate were determined with a glass capillary method at temperatures ranging from 65 to 80 °C. Temperature dependence of first order inactivation rate constants was accurately described by the Arrhenius equation yielding an activation energy of 597.1 kJ mol(-1). The thermal impact of different PEF processes on LPO activity was estimated by coupling the derived Arrhenius model with the CFD model and the predicted enzyme inactivation was compared to experimental measurements. Results indicated that LPO inactivation during combined PEF/thermal treatments was largely due to thermal effects, but 5-12% enzyme inactivation may be related to other electro-chemical effects occurring during PEF treatments.

  2. New liquid cathode electrolytes in high rate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jean W.; Kalisz, David W.; Blomgren, George E.

    1990-03-01

    The power limitations of liquid oxyhalide batteries were explored by examining the physical and electrical properties of new electrolytes. Conductivity, kinematic viscosity, and specific gravity of electrolytes were measured inside a specially adapted argon filled drybox. Liquid cathode oxyhalide electrolytes designed to enhance power density were tested first in demountable test cells and then, the most promising, in hermetically sealed high rate F size jellyroll cells. For F cells, the capacity on constant current discharge was measured at 3.5 and 12.5 mA/sq cm for fresh cells at 21 C and at 3.5 mA/sq cm for cells stored 4 weeks at 54 C then discharged at -30 C. An optimized cell design with thicker electrodes was developed for testing electrolytes with higher conductivity than LiAlCl4-SOCl2. The best capacity at 2A was achieved with LiGaCl4-SOCl2 or LiAlCl4-SOCl2. The best capacity at 7A was achieved with LiGaCl4-SOCl2. LiGaCl4 in SOCl2 was found to discharge at higher temperatures than LiAlCl4 in SOCl2. Imidazolium, aralkylammonium, and sulfonium chlorides were found to have high solubility and conductivity in thionyl chloride, but lithium was found to be passive in contact with these solutions and most metals corroded excessively. These salts mixed with aluminum chloride were much less aggressive and when mixed with lithium salts in addition gave high conductivity and test cell capacities.

  3. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 tax requires CADM1/TSLC1 for inactivation of the NF-κB inhibitor A20 and constitutive NF-κB signaling.

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    Rajeshree Pujari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activation of NF-κB by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 oncoprotein, Tax, is vital for the development and pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. K63-linked polyubiquitinated Tax activates the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid raft microdomain. Tax also interacts with TAX1BP1 to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulatory ubiquitin-editing A20 enzyme complex. However, the molecular mechanisms of Tax-mediated IKK activation and A20 protein complex inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that membrane associated CADM1 (Cell adhesion molecule1 recruits Ubc13 to Tax, causing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Tax, and IKK complex activation in the membrane lipid raft. The c-terminal cytoplasmic tail containing PDZ binding motif of CADM1 is critical for Tax to maintain persistent NF-κB activation. Finally, Tax failed to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulator ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 complex, and activate the IKK complex in the lipid raft in absence of CADM1. Our results thus indicate that CADM1 functions as a critical scaffold molecule for Tax and Ubc13 to form a cellular complex with NEMO, TAX1BP1 and NRP, to activate the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid rafts, to inactivate NF-κB negative regulators, and maintain persistent NF-κB activation in HTLV-1 infected cells.

  4. Targeted genetic inactivation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa impairs insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and evokes type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The biological significance of protein N-glycosylation has been elucidated using a mouse model bearing a genetic mutation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases (GnTs), which initiate the formation of specific branch structures on the mannose core of N-glycans. These glycosylation defects evoked a variety of abnormalities and disorders in specific cell types, tissues, and the whole body, reflecting functional requirements. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa (GnT-IVa) initiates the GlcNAcbeta1-4 branch synthesis on the Manalpha1-3 arm of the N-glycan core thereby increasing N-glycan branch complexity. To investigate the physiological function of GnT-IVa, we engineered and characterized GnT-IVa-deficient mice. GnT-IVa-deficient mice showed a metabolic disorder subsequently diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. In this chapter, methods for characterizing GnT-IVa-deficient mice by physiological analyses to detect metabolic alterations and biochemical analyses using primary isolated pancreatic beta cells are summarized and discussed.

  5. Control of aerosol contaminants in indoor air: combining the particle concentration reduction with microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Honda, Takeshi; Kim, Ki Youn; Toivola, Mika; Rao, K S Ramchander; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-01-15

    An indoor air purification technique, which combines unipolar ion emission and photocatalytic oxidation (promoted by a specially designed RCI cell), was investigated in two test chambers, 2.75 m3 and 24.3 m3, using nonbiological and biological challenge aerosols. The reduction in particle concentration was measured size selectively in real-time, and the Air Cleaning Factor and the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) were determined. While testing with virions and bacteria, bioaerosol samples were collected and analyzed, and the microorganism survival rate was determined as a function of exposure time. We observed that the aerosol concentration decreased approximately 10 to approximately 100 times more rapidly when the purifier operated as compared to the natural decay. The data suggest that the tested portable unit operating in approximately 25 m3 non-ventilated room is capable to provide CADR-values more than twice as great than the conventional closed-loop HVAC system with a rating 8 filter. The particle removal occurred due to unipolar ion emission, while the inactivation of viable airborne microorganisms was associated with photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 90% of initially viable MS2 viruses were inactivated resulting from 10 to 60 min exposure to the photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 75% of viable B. subtilis spores were inactivated in 10 min, and about 90% or greater after 30 min. The biological and chemical mechanisms that led to the inactivation of stress-resistant airborne viruses and bacterial spores were reviewed.

  6. Anti-proliferative effect of chalcone derivatives through inactivation of NF-κB in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswararao, Eeda; Sharma, Vinay K; Yun, Jieun; Kim, Youngsoo; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of NF-κB inhibitor, a series of analogs of (E)-1-(2-hydroxy-6-(isopentyloxy)phenyl)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (5a) were prepared and evaluated for their NF-κB inhibition and anti-proliferative activity against various human cancer cell lines. Compounds (E)-1-(2-(3,3-dimethylbutoxy)-6-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (5e) and (E)-4-(3-(2-(3,3-dimethylbutoxy)-6-hydroxyphenyl)-3-oxoprop-1-enyl)benzenesulfonamide (5p) showed good NF-κB inhibition as well as potent anti-proliferative activity. SAR studies showed that all the compounds with potent or moderate NF-κB inhibition displayed good anti-proliferative activity. All the analogs (5b-r) maintained a good correlation between their NF-κB inhibition and anti-proliferative activity though the extent is not directly proportional to each other.

  7. Inactivation of hepatitis B virus replication in cultured cells and in vivo with engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an important global health problem. Stability of the episomal covalently closed circular HBV DNA (cccDNA) is largely responsible for the modest curative efficacy of available therapy. Since licensed anti-HBV drugs have a post-transcriptional mechanism of action, disabling cccDNA is potentially of therapeutic benefit. To develop this approach, we engineered mutagenic transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target four HBV-specific sites within the viral genome. TALENs with cognate sequences in the S or C open-reading frames (ORFs) efficiently disrupted sequences at the intended sites and suppressed markers of viral replication. Following triple transfection of cultured HepG2.2.15 cells under mildly hypothermic conditions, the S TALEN caused targeted mutation in ~35% of cccDNA molecules. Markers of viral replication were also inhibited in vivo in a murine hydrodynamic injection model of HBV replication. HBV target sites within S and C ORFs of the injected HBV DNA were mutated without evidence of toxicity. These findings are the first to demonstrate a targeted nuclease-mediated disruption of HBV cccDNA. Efficacy in vivo also indicates that these engineered nucleases have potential for use in treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  8. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  9. Sex chromosome inactivation in the male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian females have two X chromosomes, while males have only one X plus a Y chromosome. In order to balance X-linked gene dosage between the sexes, one X chromosome undergoes inactivation during development of female embryos. This process has been termed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Inactivation of the single X chromosome also occurs in the male, but is transient and is confined to the late stages of first meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis. This phenomenon has been termed meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). A substantial portion ( approximately 15-25%) of X-linked mRNA-encoding genes escapes XCI in female somatic cells. While no mRNA genes are known to escape MSCI in males, approximately 80% of X-linked miRNA genes have been shown to escape this process. Recent results have led to the proposal that the RNA interference mechanism may be involved in regulating XCI in female cells. We suggest that some MSCI-escaping miRNAs may play a similar role in regulating MSCI in male germ cells.

  10. Inactivation of vegetative cells, but not spores, of Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus, and B. subtilis on stainless steel surfaces coated with an antimicrobial silver- and zinc-containing zeolite formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Belinda; Korff, Emily; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2003-07-01

    Stainless steel surfaces coated with paints containing a silver- and zinc-containing zeolite (AgION antimicrobial) were assayed in comparison to uncoated stainless steel for antimicrobial activity against vegetative cells and spores of three Bacillus species, namely, B. anthracis Sterne, B. cereus T, and B. subtilis 168. Under the test conditions (25 degrees C and 80% relative humidity), the zeolite coating produced approximately 3 log(10) inactivation of vegetative cells within a 5- to 24-h period, but viability of spores of the three species was not significantly affected.

  11. Multi-Layered TiO2 Films towards Enhancement of Escherichia coli Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorachon Yoriya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline TiO2 has shown its great photocatalytic properties in bacterial inactivation. This work presents a design fabrication of low-cost, layered TiO2 films assembled reactors and a study of their performance for a better understanding to elucidate the photocatalytic effect on inactivation of E. coli in water. The ability to reduce the number of bacteria in water samples for the layered TiO2 composing reactors has been investigated as a function of time, while varying the parameters of light sources, initial concentration of bacteria, and ratios of TiO2 film area and volume of water. Herein, the layered TiO2 films have been fabricated on the glass plates by thermal spray coating prior to screen printing, allowing a good adhesion of the films. Surface topology and crystallographic phase of TiO2 for the screen-printed active layer have been characterized, resulting in the ratio of anatase:rutile being 80:20. Under exposure to sunlight and a given condition employed in this study, the optimized film area:water volume of 1:2.62 has shown a significant ability to reduce the E. coli cells in water samples. The ratio of surface area of photocatalytic active base to volume of water medium is believed to play a predominant role facilitating the cells inactivation. The kinetic rate of inactivation and its behavior are also described in terms of adsorption of reaction species at different contact times.

  12. Hydrazine inactivates bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne; Plett, G. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Barengoltz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Protection places requirements on the maximum number of viable bacterial spores that may be delivered by a spacecraft to another solar system body. Therefore, for such space missions, the spores that may be found in hydrazine are of concern. A proposed change in processing procedures that eliminated a 0.2 um filtration step propmpted this study to ensure microbial contamination issue existed, especially since no information was found in the literature to substantiate bacterial spore inactivation by hydrazine.

  13. Inactivation of virus and bacteria in red blood cell suspension by Thiazole orange photo-chemistry%噻唑橙光化学法对红细胞中病毒及细菌灭活作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玲玲; 来家明; 王卓妍; 宋美兰; 任芙蓉

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨噻唑橙(TO)光化学法对红细胞中病毒及细菌灭活效果.方法 以伪狂犬病毒(PRV)和辛德毕斯(Sindbis)病毒为指示病毒,分别加入红细胞比积为20%的红细胞悬液中,TO孵育1h后做476 nm光照射处理;研究病毒灭活动力学特征;做TO浓度(C)、光照强度(Ⅰ)、光照时间(T)三因素三水平正交试验确定最优灭活条件;最优条件下检测裸照、密闭血袋中、密闭血袋充氧后的病毒灭活效果;最优条件下检测血液污染常见细菌小肠结肠炎耶尔森氏菌、金黄色葡萄球菌及表皮葡萄球菌灭活效果.结果 病毒灭活动力学研究显示:在60μmol/LTO、1.06E-01 w·m-2·nm-1光强条件下,照射5 min可将大部分PRV和Sindbis病毒灭活,20 min灭活作用达峰值,分别为5.88和5.12LogTCID50;正交试验显示:裸照时PRV及Sindbis病毒灭活最优条件均为I=1.33E-01 w·m-2·nm-1,T=20 main,C=80μmol/L;在此条件下,可灭活红细胞中PRV≥6.13LogTCID50(裸照,n=4)、(4.75±0.62)LogTCID50(密闭血袋,n=4)、(6.06±0.16) LogTCID50(密闭血袋充氧,n=4);可灭活红细胞中Sindbis病毒(5.41±0.12) LogTCID50(裸照,n=4)、(3.72±0.77)LogTCID50(密闭血袋,n=4)、(5.76±0.25) LogTCID50(密闭血袋充氧,n=4).在此条件下细菌灭活效果:小肠结肠炎耶尔森氏菌(5.91±0.13)Log10、金黄色葡萄球菌>6.8Log10、表皮葡萄球菌>6.0 Log10.结论 TO光化学法可有效灭活红细胞中病毒,有氧情况下(裸照或充氧)病毒灭活效果好于密闭无氧.TO光化学法可有效灭活红细胞中细菌.%Objective To evaluate the inactivation effect of thiazole orange (TO ) photo-chemistry on virus and bacteria in red blood cell (RBC) suspension. Methods Pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Sindbis virus were used as indicator virus, and virus infected samples were prepared by adding PRV or Sindbis virus to RBC suspension (RBC). Incubated the samples with TO 1 h and exposed them to 476 nm light Viral

  14. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  15. Inactivation of Chikungunya virus by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Anuj

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthropod borne alphavirus of the family Togaviridae. CHIKV is a reemerging virus for which there is no safe prophylactic vaccine. A live attenuated strain of CHIKV, CHIK181/25, was previously demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in humans, however, it showed residual virulence causing transient arthralgia. Findings In this study, we demonstrate the complete inactivation of CHIKV181/25 by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide (INA. No cytopathic effect and virus replication was observed in cells infected with the INA-inactivated CHIKV. However, a reduction in the INA-inactivated CHIK virus-antibody binding capacity was observed by western blot analysis. Conclusion INA completely inactivated CHIKV and can further be explored for developing an inactivated-CHIKV vaccine.

  16. Maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells culture due to the cells with reduced attachment rate

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    Shuvalova N. S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The classic detachment techniques lead to changes in cells properties. We offer a simple method of cultivating the population of cells that avoided an influence on the surface structures. Methods. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC from human umbilical cord matrix were obtained and cultivated in standard conditions. While substituting the culture media by a fresh portion, the conditioned culture medium, where the cells were maintained for three days, was transferred to other culture flacks with addition of serum and growth factors. Results. In the flacks, one day after medium transfer, we observed attached cells with typical MSC morphology. The cultures originated from these cells had the same rate of surface markers expression and clonogenic potential as those replated by standard methods. Conclusions. MSC culture, derived by preserving the cells with reduced attachment ability, actually has the properties of «parent» passage. Using this method with accepted techniques of cells reseeding would allow maintaining the cells that avoided an impact on the cell surface proteins.

  17. Astaxanthin down-regulates Rad51 expression via inactivation of AKT kinase to enhance mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, the molecular mechanism of astaxanthin-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination, and studies show that chemo-resistant carcinomas exhibit high levels of Rad51 expression. In this study, astaxanthin treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Astaxanthin treatment (2.5-20 μM) decreased Rad51 expression and phospho-AKT(Ser473) protein level in a time and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vector rescued the decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels in astaxanthin-treated NSCLC cells. Combined treatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) further decreased the Rad51 expression in astaxanthin-exposed A549 and H1703 cells. Knockdown of Rad51 expression by transfection with si-Rad51 RNA or cotreatment with LY294002 further enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of astaxanthin. Additionally, mitomycin C (MMC) as an anti-tumor antibiotic is widely used in clinical NSCLC chemotherapy. Combination of MMC and astaxanthin synergistically resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced phospho-AKT(Ser473) level and Rad51 expression. Overexpression of AKT-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 reversed the astaxanthin and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in astaxanthin and MMC co-treated cells. In conclusion, astaxanthin enhances MMC-induced cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression and AKT activation. These findings may provide rationale to combine astaxanthin with MMC for the treatment of NSCLC.

  18. DDX3 loss by p53 inactivation promotes tumor malignancy via the MDM2/Slug/E-cadherin pathway and poor patient outcome in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D-W; Lee, M-C; Wang, J; Chen, C-Y; Cheng, Y-W; Lee, H

    2014-03-20

    P53 inactivation by p53 mutation and E6 oncoprotein has a crucial role in human carcinogenesis. DDX3 has been shown to be a target of p53. In this study, we hypothesized that DDX3 loss by p53 inactivation may promote tumor malignancy and poor patients' outcome. Mechanically, DDX3 loss by p53 knockdown and E6 overexpression was observed in A549 lung cancer cells. Conversely, DDX3 expression was markedly elevated by wild-type (WT) p53 ectopic expression in p53-null H1299 cells, E6-knockdown TL-1 lung cancer and SiHa cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, DDX3 loss promotes soft-agar growth and invasive capability; however, both capabilities were suppressed by DDX3 overexpression. We next expected that DDX3 loss might result in Slug-suppressed E-cadherin expression via decreased MDM2-mediated Slug degradation. As expected, MDM2 transcription is suppressed by DDX3 loss via decreased SP1 binding activity to the MDM2 promoter. Consequently, Slug expression was elevated by the reduction of MDM2 because of DDX3 loss, and E-cadherin expression was suppressed by Slug. Consistent observations in the correlation of DDX3 loss with MDM2, Slug and E-cadherin were seen in lung tumors from lung cancer patients. In addition, patients with low-DDX3 tumors had poorer survival and relapse than patients with high-DDX3 tumors. In conclusion, we suggest that DDX3 loss by p53 inactivation via MDM2/Slug/E-cadherin pathway promotes tumor malignancy and poor patient outcome.

  19. Engraftment of human iPS cells and allogeneic porcine cells into pigs with inactivated RAG2 and accompanying severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiho; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Chankyu; Ericsson, Aaron C.; Brown, Alana N.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Park, Kwang-Wook; Walters, Eric M.; Kim, Dae Young; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Franklin, Craig L.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Roberts, R. Michael; Prather, Randall S.; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) may provide useful models for regenerative medicine, xenotransplantation, and tumor development and will aid in developing therapies for human SCID patients. Using a reporter-guided transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system, we generated targeted modifications of recombination activating gene (RAG) 2 in somatic cells at high efficiency, including some that affected both alleles. Somatic-cell nuclear transfer performed with the mutated cells produced pigs with RAG2 mutations without integrated exogenous DNA. Biallelically modified pigs either lacked a thymus or had one that was underdeveloped. Their splenic white pulp lacked B and T cells. Under a conventional housing environment, the biallelic RAG2 mutants manifested a “failure to thrive” phenotype, with signs of inflammation and apoptosis in the spleen compared with age-matched wild-type animals by the time they were 4 wk of age. Pigs raised in a clean environment were healthier and, following injection of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), quickly developed mature teratomas representing all three germ layers. The pigs also tolerated grafts of allogeneic porcine trophoblast stem cells. These SCID pigs should have a variety of uses in transplantation biology. PMID:24799706

  20. Chemotherapeutic drugs sensitize human renal cell carcinoma cells to ABT-737 by a mechanism involving the Noxa-dependent inactivation of Mcl-1 or A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantl Niko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human renal cell carcinoma (RCC is very resistant to chemotherapy. ABT-737 is a novel inhibitor of anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family that has shown promise in various preclinical tumour models. Results We here report a strong over-additive pro-apoptotic effect of ABT-737 and etoposide, vinblastine or paclitaxel but not 5-fluorouracil in cell lines from human RCC. ABT-737 showed very little activity as a single agent but killed RCC cells potently when anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 or, unexpectedly, A1 was targeted by RNAi. This potent augmentation required endogenous Noxa protein since RNAi directed against Noxa but not against Bim or Puma reduced apoptosis induction by the combination of ABT-737 and etoposide or vinblastine. At the level of mitochondria, etoposide-treatment had a similar sensitizing activity and allowed for ABT-737-induced release of cytochrome c. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic drugs can overcome protection afforded by Mcl-1 and A1 through endogenous Noxa protein in RCC cells, and the combination of such drugs with ABT-737 may be a promising strategy in RCC. Strikingly, A1 emerged in RCC cell lines as a protein of similar importance as the well-established Mcl-1 in protection against apoptosis in these cells.

  1. Engraftment of human iPS cells and allogeneic porcine cells into pigs with inactivated RAG2 and accompanying severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiho; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Chankyu; Ericsson, Aaron C; Brown, Alana N; Samuel, Melissa S; Park, Kwang-Wook; Walters, Eric M; Kim, Dae Young; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Franklin, Craig L; Murphy, Clifton N; Roberts, R Michael; Prather, Randall S; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-05-20

    Pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) may provide useful models for regenerative medicine, xenotransplantation, and tumor development and will aid in developing therapies for human SCID patients. Using a reporter-guided transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system, we generated targeted modifications of recombination activating gene (RAG) 2 in somatic cells at high efficiency, including some that affected both alleles. Somatic-cell nuclear transfer performed with the mutated cells produced pigs with RAG2 mutations without integrated exogenous DNA. Biallelically modified pigs either lacked a thymus or had one that was underdeveloped. Their splenic white pulp lacked B and T cells. Under a conventional housing environment, the biallelic RAG2 mutants manifested a "failure to thrive" phenotype, with signs of inflammation and apoptosis in the spleen compared with age-matched wild-type animals by the time they were 4 wk of age. Pigs raised in a clean environment were healthier and, following injection of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), quickly developed mature teratomas representing all three germ layers. The pigs also tolerated grafts of allogeneic porcine trophoblast stem cells. These SCID pigs should have a variety of uses in transplantation biology.

  2. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  3. Inactivation of Pseudomonas putida by pulsed electric field treatment: a study on the correlation of treatment parameters and inactivation efficiency in the short-pulse range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Wolfgang; Gusbeth, Christian; Schwartz, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    An important issue for an economic application of the pulsed electric field treatment for bacterial decontamination of wastewater is the specific treatment energy needed for effective reduction of bacterial populations. The present experimental study performed in a field amplitude range of 40 > E > 200 kV/cm and for a suspension conductivity of 0.01 = κ(e) > 0.2 S/m focusses on the application of short pulses, 25 ns > T > 10 μs, of rectangular, bipolar and exponential shape and was made on Pseudomonas putida, which is a typical and widespread wastewater microorganism. The comparison of inactivation results with calculations of the temporal and azimuthal membrane charging dynamics using the model of Pauly and Schwan revealed that for efficient inactivation, membrane segments at the cell equator have to be charged quickly and to a sufficiently high value, on the order of 0.5 V. After fulfilling this basic condition by an appropriate choice of pulse field strength and duration, the log rate of inactivation for a given suspension conductivity of 0.2 S/m was found to be independent of the duration of individual pulses for constant treatment energy expenditure. Moreover, experimental results suggest that even pulse shape plays a minor role in inactivation efficiency. The variation of the suspension conductivity resulted in comparable inactivation performance of identical pulse parameters if the product of pulse duration and number of pulses was the same, i.e., required treatment energy can be linearly downscaled for lower conductivities, provided that pulse amplitude and duration are selected for entire membrane surface permeabilization.

  4. X chromosome inactivation and X-linked mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-07-12

    The expression of X-linked genes in females heterozygous for X-linked defects can be modulated by epigenetic control mechanisms that constitute the X chromosome inactivation pathway. At least four different effects have been found to influence, in females, the phenotypic expression of genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, non-random X inactivation, due either to stochastic or genetic factors, can result in tissues in which one cell type (for example, that in which the X chromosome carrying a mutant XLMR gene is active) dominates, instead of the normal mosaic cell population expected as a result of random X inactivation. Second, skewed inactivation of the normal X in individuals carrying a deletion of part of the X chromosome has been documented in a number of mentally retarded females. Third, functional disomy of X-linked genes that are expressed inappropriately due to the absence of X inactivation has been found in mentally retarded females with structurally abnormal X chromosomes that do not contain the X inactivation center. And fourth, dose-dependent overexpression of X-linked genes that normally {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} X inactivation may account for the mental and developmental delay associated with increasing numbers of otherwise inactive X chromosomes in individuals with X chromosome aneuploidy. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Effects of glutamate and nimodipine on survival rate of embryonic rat neuronal stem cells cultured in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohong Lü; Hailong Fu; Qiang Sun; Li Cui; Dihui Ma; Weihong Lin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At least three types of calcium ion channel (T, N, and L) have been recognized in nerve cells, but only the L type of channel is sensitive to drugs. Theoretically, nimodipine can lead to L-type channel inactivation and prevent calcium ion inflow, thereby exhibiting protective effects on nerve cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effects of nimodipine on glutamate-induced injury to embryonic rat neural stem cells, and to make a comparison with MK-801, a nonselective glutamate receptor antagonist.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present in vitro experiment pertaining to neural stem cells was performed at the Department of Neurology, First Hospital, Jilin University between January 2005 and December 2006.MATERIALS: Glutamate was sourced from the Shanghai Biological Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Nimodipine was provided by Bayer Company, Germany. Brain tissue was taken from Wistar rats on day 15 of gestation for isolation and culture of neural stem cells.METHODS: Passage 2 neural stem cell spheres were taken for preparation of single cell suspension. The prepared single cell suspension was divided into 4 groups: (1) Normal control, normally cultured. (2)Glutamate, cultured with 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 μ mol/L glutamate. (3) Nimodipine, received a 30-minute nimodipine [1 ×(10-8-10-2) g/L] culture followed by a glutamate (200 μ mol/L) treatment step. (4)MK-801, given as 30- minute MK-801 (100 μ mol/L) culture, followed by a glutamate (200 μ mol/L)treatment step.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determination of glutamate-induced cell death by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay; calculation of neural stem cell survival rate following addition of nimodipine.RESULTS: The survival rate of neural stem cells was approximately 25.26% following 24 hour 50 μ mol/L glutamate culture and gradually decreased as the glutamate dose increased (P < 0.05 0.01). Only 9.27% of neural stem cells survived when the glutamate dose was 1 000 μ mol

  6. Inactivation of Microorganisms by Gamma Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    L’inactivation cbimique (ex :formald6hyde) et thermique (ex :autoclave) peut atre utilis~e dans la pr6paration des antig~nes mais la structure d’antig~ne...change overtime. Due to 60Co having a half life of 5.24 years, the time required to achieve the initial central dose rate (kGy/hr) at 0.00 years from

  7. Dynamics of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Loos (Friedemann)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dosage compensation evolved to account for the difference in expression of sex chromosome-linked genes. In mammals dosage compensation is achieved by inactivation of one X chromosome during early female embryogenesis in a process called X chromosome inactivation (XCI).

  8. Haematopoietic stem cells require a highly regulated protein synthesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Robert A J; Magee, Jeffrey A; Salic, Adrian; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-05-01

    Many aspects of cellular physiology remain unstudied in somatic stem cells, for example, there are almost no data on protein synthesis in any somatic stem cell. Here we set out to compare protein synthesis in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and restricted haematopoietic progenitors. We found that the amount of protein synthesized per hour in HSCs in vivo was lower than in most other haematopoietic cells, even if we controlled for differences in cell cycle status or forced HSCs to undergo self-renewing divisions. Reduced ribosome function in Rpl24(Bst/+) mice further reduced protein synthesis in HSCs and impaired HSC function. Pten deletion increased protein synthesis in HSCs but also reduced HSC function. Rpl24(Bst/+) cell-autonomously rescued the effects of Pten deletion in HSCs; blocking the increase in protein synthesis, restoring HSC function, and delaying leukaemogenesis. Pten deficiency thus depletes HSCs and promotes leukaemia partly by increasing protein synthesis. Either increased or decreased protein synthesis impairs HSC function.

  9. Effect of repeated microwave hyperthermia inactivation on distal femur giant cell tumor%重复应用微波高温灭活治疗股骨远端骨巨细胞瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      目的探讨重复应用微波高温灭活治疗股骨远端骨巨细胞瘤的临床应用效果。方法回顾性分析我科2006年6月-2012年6月采用重复应用微波高温灭活方法治疗股骨远端骨巨细胞瘤11例,男7例,女4例,年龄19~42岁,中位年龄27岁,术后自体髂骨、骨水泥修复骨缺损从手术技术、肿瘤复发情况、膝关节功能等方面全面综合评价此方法临床应用效果。结果全部患者均获得随访,平均随访时间26个月,11例均获得骨性愈合,无骨折及内固定断裂发生,1例在术后18个月局部复发;无伤口并发症及深部感染发生,无远处转移。肢体关节功能优8例、良3例。结论微波原位灭活后再行微波辅助残腔灭活,可以有效灭活术后残腔和周围肿瘤卫星灶。术后行自体髂骨、骨水泥修复骨缺损,可以早期负重活动,获得良好的关节功能锻炼,缩短疗程,从而获得优良的疗效及肢体关节功能。%Objective To study the effect of repeated microwave hyperthermia inactivation on distal femur giant cell tumor. Methods Clinical data about 11 patients (7 males and 4 females) aged 19-42 years old (mean 27 years old) with distal femur giant cell tumor who underwent repeated microwave hyperthermia inactivation in our department from June 2006 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect of repeated microwave hyperthermia inactivation on repair of knee-cap defect with bone cement was assessed from the aspects of tumor reccurrence and knee joint function after operation. Results The patients were followed up for an average period of 26 months, during which the knee-cap was healed without fracture, internal fixation plate rupture, complication, deep infection, and distal metastasis. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient 18 months after operation. Excellent and good functions of joints were achieved in 8 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusion Combined in situ

  10. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods for the production of arbovirus antigens inactivated by binary ethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Teck F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods have been developed and standardised for the safe and reproducible production of inactivated arbovirus antigens which are appropriate for use in diagnostic serological applications. Methods To optimise the maximum titre of growth during the propagation of arboviruses, the multiplicity of infection and choice of cell line were investigated using stocks of Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus grown in both mosquito and mammalian cell lines. To standardise and improve the efficacy of the inactivation of arboviral suspensions, stocks of Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus and Alfuy virus were chemically inactivated using binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 3 mM. Aliquots were then taken at hourly intervals and crude inactivation rates were determined for each virus using a plaque assay. To ensure complete inactivation, the same aliquots were each passaged 3 times in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells and the presence of viral growth was detected using an immunofluorescent assay. For larger quantities of viral suspensions, centrifugation on an isopycnic sucrose density gradient or cross-flow filtration was used to produce concentrated, pure antigens or partially concentrated, semi-purified antigens respectively. Results The results of the propagation experiments suggested that the maximum viral titres obtained for both Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus were affected by the incubation period and choice of cell line, rather than the use of different multiplicity of infection values. Results of the binary ethylenimine inactivation trial suggested that standardised periods of 5 or 8 hours would be suitable to ensure effective and complete inactivation for a number of different arboviral antigens. Conclusion Two methods used to prepare inactivated arbovirus antigens have been

  11. Estimation of the rate of energy production of rat mast cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1983-01-01

    Rat mast cells were treated with glycolytic and respiratory inhibitors. The rate of adenosine triphosphate depletion of cells incubated with both types of inhibitors and the rate of lactate produced in presence of antimycin A and glucose were used to estimate the rate of oxidative and glycolytic...

  12. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  13. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  14. Kinetic analysis of Legionella inactivation using ozone in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Kunquan; Zhou, Yan; Li, Xuebin; Tao, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Legionella inactivation using ozone was studied in wastewater using kinetic analysis and modeling. The experimental results indicate that the relationship between the ozone concentration, germ concentration, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be used to predict variations in germ and COD concentrations. The ozone reaction with COD and inactivation of Legionella occurred simultaneously, but the reaction with COD likely occurred at a higher rate than the inactivation, as COD is more easily oxidized by ozone than Legionella. Higher initial COD concentrations resulted in a lower inactivation rate and higher lnN/N0. Higher temperature led to a higher inactivation efficiency. The relationship of the initial O3 concentration and Legionella inactivation rate was not linear, and thus, the Ct value required for a 99.99% reduction was not constant. The initial O3 concentration was more important than the contact time, and a reduction of the initial O3 concentration could not be compensated by increasing the contact time. The Ct values were compared over a narrow range of initial concentrations; the Ct values could only be contrasted when the initial O3 concentrations were very similar. A higher initial O3 concentration led to a higher inflection point value for the lnN/N0 vs C0t curve. Energy consumption using a plasma corona was lower than when using boron-doped diamond electrodes.

  15. Pathogen inactivation technologies for cellular blood components: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenke, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays patients receiving blood components are exposed to much less transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases than three decades before when among others HIV was identified as causative agent for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the transmission by blood or coagulation factors became evident. Since that time the implementation of measures for risk prevention and safety precaution was socially and politically accepted. Currently emerging pathogens like arboviruses and the well-known bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates still remain major concerns of blood safety with important clinical consequences, but very rarely with fatal outcome for the blood recipient. In contrast to the well-established pathogen inactivation strategies for fresh frozen plasma using the solvent-detergent procedure or methylene blue and visible light, the bench-to-bedside translation of novel pathogen inactivation technologies for cell-containing blood components such as platelets and red blood cells are still underway. This review summarizes the pharmacological/toxicological assessment and the inactivation efficacy against viruses, bacteria, and protozoa of each of the currently available pathogen inactivation technologies and highlights the impact of the results obtained from several randomized clinical trials and hemovigilance data. Until now in some European countries pathogen inactivation technologies are in in routine use for single-donor plasma and platelets. The invention and adaption of pathogen inactivation technologies for red blood cell units and whole blood donations suggest the universal applicability of these technologies and foster a paradigm shift in the manufacturing of safe blood.

  16. Taking advantage: high-affinity B cells in the germinal center have lower death rates, but similar rates of division, compared to low-affinity cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shannon M; Khalil, Ashraf; Uduman, Mohamed; Hershberg, Uri; Louzoun, Yoram; Haberman, Ann M; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2009-12-01

    B lymphocytes producing high-affinity Abs are critical for protection from extracellular pathogens, such as bacteria and parasites. The process by which high-affinity B cells are selected during the immune response has never been elucidated. Although it has been shown that high-affinity cells directly outcompete low-affinity cells in the germinal center (GC), whether there are also intrinsic differences between these cells has not been addressed. It could be that higher affinity cells proliferate more rapidly or are more likely to enter cell cycle, thereby outgrowing lower affinity cells. Alternatively, higher affinity cells could be relatively more resistant to cell death in the GC. By comparing high- and low-affinity B cells for the same Ag, we show here that low-affinity cells have an intrinsically higher death rate than do cells of higher affinity, even in the absence of competition. This suggests that selection in the GC reaction is due at least in part to the control of survival of higher affinity B cells and not by a proliferative advantage conferred upon these cells compared with lower affinity B cells. Control over survival rather than proliferation of low- and high-affinity B cells in the GC allows greater diversity not only in the primary response but also in the memory response.

  17. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in male mice with targeted disruptions of Xist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James M A; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Elliott, David J; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Pehrson, John R; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    X chromosome inactivation occurs twice during the life cycle of placental mammals. In normal females, one X chromosome in each cell is inactivated early in embryogenesis, while in the male, the X chromosome is inactivated together with the Y chromosome in spermatogenic cells shortly before or during early meiotic prophase. Inactivation of one X chromosome in somatic cells of females serves to equalise X-linked gene dosage between males and females, but the role of male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) is unknown. The inactive X-chromosome of somatic cells and male meiotic cells share similar properties such as late replication and enrichment for histone macroH2A1.2, suggesting a common mechanism of inactivation. This possibility is supported by the fact that Xist RNA that mediates somatic X-inactivation is expressed in the testis of male mice and humans. In the present study we show that both Xist RNA and Tsix RNA, an antisense RNA that controls Xist function in the soma, are expressed in the testis in a germ-cell-dependent manner. However, our finding that MSCI and sex-body formation are unaltered in mice with targeted mutations of Xist that prevent somatic X inactivation suggests that somatic X-inactivation and MSCI occur by fundamentally different mechanisms.

  18. Role of dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size on microbial inactivation of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Manoranjan; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Liying; Jacobson, Craig; Wang, Wei-Ning; Jones, Kristen; Goyal, Yogesh; Tang, Yinjie J; Biswas, Pratim

    2011-10-14

    The properties of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) were independently controlled in a flame aerosol reactor by varying the molar feed ratios of the precursors, and by optimizing temperature and time history in the flame. The effect of the physico-chemical properties (dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size) of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles on inactivation of Mycobacterium smegmatis (a model pathogenic bacterium) was investigated under three light conditions (complete dark, fluorescent light and UV light). The survival rate of M. smegmatis (in a minimal salt medium for 2 h) exposed to the NPs varied depending on the light irradiation conditions as well as the dopant concentrations. In dark conditions, pristine TiO(2) showed insignificant microbial inactivation, but inactivation increased with increasing dopant concentration. Under fluorescent light illumination, no significant effect was observed for TiO(2). However, when TiO(2) was doped with copper, inactivation increased with dopant concentration, reaching more than 90% (>3 wt% dopant). Enhanced microbial inactivation by TiO(2) NPs was observed only under UV light. When TiO(2) NPs were doped with copper, their inactivation potential was promoted and the UV-resistant cells were reduced by over 99%. In addition, the microbial inactivation potential of NPs was also crystal-phase-and size-dependent under all three light conditions. A lower ratio of anatase phase and smaller sizes of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs resulted in decreased bacterial survival. The increased inactivation potential of doped TiO(2) NPs is possibly due to both enhanced photocatalytic reactions and leached copper ions.

  19. Retraction: "Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways" by Wang et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on January 5, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Wang Z, Li Y, Banerjee S, Kong D, Ahmad A, Nogueira V, Hay N, Sarkar FH. 2010. Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. J Cell Biochem 109:726-736; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22451.

  20. The responses of I beta cells to increases in the rate of lung inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, P L; Davies, R O; Pack, A I

    1981-08-31

    The activity of inspiratory cells in the region of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) was recorded extracellularly in paralyzed, artificially ventilated cats either during chloralose-urethane anesthesia or following midcollicular decerebration. Twenty-three of the 68 inspiratory cells recorded in the region of the NTS were classified as I beta cells on the basis of their response to withholding lung inflation. The dynamic sensitivity of I beta cells was determined by studying their response to increases in the rate of lung inflation at constant peak volume. The I beta cells in this study showed 3 distinct patterns of response to increases in the rate of inflation. Five cells showed no change in firing pattern (fixed firing pattern). Ten cells showed an increase in the rate of rise of cell activity but no change in peak frequency (low dynamic sensitivity). Eight cells showed increases in both the rate of rise of cell activity and peak frequency (high dynamic sensitivity). It was concluded that I beta cells are not a functionally homogeneous population, at least in terms of their dynamic sensitivity. Cells showing fixed firing patterns have the characteristics of off-switch neurons. Cells with low levels of dynamic sensitivity may receive afferents from pulmonary stretch receptors. Cells showing a high degree of dynamic sensitivity may receive afferents from rapidly adapting receptors. The fact that I beta cells are not a functionally homogeneous population may explain the many divergent observations reported from studies of these cells.

  1. Inactivation of E. Coli in Water Using Photocatalytic, Nanostructured Films Synthesized by Aerosol Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Biswas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanostructured films were synthesized by an aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD method with different controlled morphologies: columnar, granular, and branched structures for the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli in water. Effects of film morphology and external applied voltage on inactivation rate were investigated. As-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and UV-VIS. Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical inactivation of E. coli using as-prepared TiO2 films were performed under irradiation of UVA light (note: UVA has a low efficiency to inactivate E. coli. Inactivation rate constants for each case were obtained from their respective inactivation curve through a 2 h incubation period. Photocatalytic inactivation rate constants of E. coli are 0.02/min (using columnar films, and 0.08/min (using branched films. The inactivation rate constant for the columnar film was enhanced by 330% by applied voltage on the film while that for the branched film was increased only by 30%. Photocatalytic microbial inactivation rate of the columnar and the branched films were also compared taking into account their different surface areas. Since the majority of the UV radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface is UVA, this study provides an opportunity to use sunlight to efficiently decontaminate drinking water.

  2. Rating PV Power and Energy: Cell, Module, and System Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, Keith

    2016-06-02

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current vs. voltage measurement theory including basic PV operation, equivalent circuit, and concept of spectral error; PV power performance including PV irradiance sensors, simulators and commercial and generic I-V systems; PV measurement artifacts, intercomparisons, and alternative rating methods.

  3. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  4. Reduction of the Earth's magnetic field inhibits growth rates of model cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Carlos F; Portelli, Lucas; McCabe, Kevin; Hernandez, Mark; Barnes, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Small alterations in static magnetic fields have been shown to affect certain chemical reaction rates ex vivo. In this manuscript, we present data demonstrating that similar small changes in static magnetic fields between individual cell culture incubators results in significantly altered cell cycle rates for multiple cancer-derived cell lines. This change as assessed by cell number is not a result of apoptosis, necrosis, or cell cycle alterations. While the underlying mechanism is unclear, the implications for all cell culture experiments are clear; static magnetic field conditions within incubators must be considered and/or controlled just as one does for temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide concentration.

  5. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  6. Overexpression of AQP3 Modifies the Cell Cycle and the Proliferation Rate of Mammalian Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Serna, Ana; Echevarría, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal AQP3 overexpression in tumor cells of different origins has been reported and a role for this enhanced AQP3 expression in cell proliferation and tumor processess has been indicated. To further understand the role AQP3 plays in cell proliferation we explore the effect that stable over expression of AQP3 produces over the proliferation rate and cell cycle of mammalian cells. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) and the cell proliferation rate measured through cell counting and BrdU staining. Cells with overexpression of AQP3 (AQP3-o) showed higher proliferation rate and larger percentage of cells in phases S and G2/M, than wild type cells (wt). Evaluation of the cell response against arresting the cell cycle with Nocodazole showed that AQP3-o exhibited a less modified cell cycle pattern and lower Annexin V specific staining than wt, consistently with a higher resistance to apoptosis of AQP3-overexpressing cells. The cell volume and complexity were also larger in AQP3-o compared to wt cells. After transcriptomic analysis, RT-qPCR was performed to highlight key molecules implicated in cell proliferation which expression may be altered by overexpression of AQP3 and the comparative analysis between both type of cells showed significant changes in the expression of Zeb2, Jun, JunB, NF-kβ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, TNF, and TNF receptors. We conclude that the role of AQP3 in cell proliferation seems to be connected to increments in the cell cycle turnover and changes in the expression levels of relevant genes for this process. Larger expression of AQP3 may confer to the cell a more tumor like phenotype and contributes to explain the presence of this protein in many different tumors.

  7. Inactivation of pectin methylesterase by immobilized trypsins from cunner fish and bovine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Matos, Madyu; Simpson, Benjamin K

    2013-01-01

    Immobilized cunner fish trypsin was used to inactivate pectin methylesterase (PME). The effects of different reaction conditions (e.g., incubation time, PME concentration, and temperature) on PME inactivation and kinetics of inactivation were investigated. Temperature, incubation time, and PME concentration significantly affected the extent of PME inactivation. Generally, higher temperature, longer incubation time, and low PME concentration caused more PME inactivation. The immobilized fish trypsin had higher capacity to inactivate PME than immobilized bovine trypsin. The inactivation efficiency of the immobilized fish trypsin was about 20% higher than that of its bovine counterpart. However, PME inactivated by both trypsins regained partial activity during storage at 4°C, with immobilized fish trypsin-treated PME regaining more of its original activity than the immobilized bovine trypsin-treated PME. Heat-denatured PME was hydrolyzed more extensively by immobilized fish trypsin than by its bovine counterpart. The rate constants increased, whereas the D-values decreased with temperature for both immobilized fish and bovine trypsins. The inactivation rate constants of immobilized fish trypsin at all the temperatures investigated (i.e., 15-35°C) were higher than those of immobilized bovine trypsin. Furthermore, the activation energy (Ea ) of PME inactivation by immobilized fish trypsin was lower than that of immobilized bovine trypsin.

  8. Developmental regulation of X-chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    With the emergence of sex-determination by sex chromosomes, which differ in composition and number between males and females, appeared the need to equalize X-chromosomal gene dosage between the sexes. Mammals have devised the strategy of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), in which one of the two X-chromosomes is rendered transcriptionally silent in females. In the mouse, the best-studied model organism with respect to XCI, this inactivation process occurs in different forms, imprinted and random, interspersed by periods of X-chromosome reactivation (XCR), which is needed to switch between the different modes of XCI. In this review, I describe the recent advances with respect to the developmental control of XCI and XCR and in particular their link to differentiation and pluripotency. Furthermore, I review the mechanisms, which influence the timing and choice, with which one of the two X-chromosomes is chosen for inactivation during random XCI. This has an impact on how females are mosaics with regard to which X-chromosome is active in different cells, which has implications on the severity of diseases caused by X-linked mutations.

  9. Effect of feed and bleed rate on hybridoma cells in an acoustic perfusion bioreactor: Metabolic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalm, M.C.F.; Lamers, P.P.; Cuijten, S.M.R.; Tjeerdsma, A.M.; Grunsven, van W.M.J.; Tramper, J.; Martens, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    For the development of optimal perfusion processes, insight into the effect of feed and bleed rate on cell growth, productivity, and metabolism is essential. In the here presented study the effect of the feed and bleed rate on cell metabolism was investigated using metabolic flux analysis. Under all

  10. Rate of renal cell carcinoma subtypes in different races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sankin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We sought to identify racial differences among histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC between black and non-black patients in an equal-access health care system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We established a multi-institutional, prospective database of patients undergoing partial or radical nephrectomy between January 1, 2000 and Sept 31, 2009. For the purposes of this study, data captured included age at diagnosis, race, tumor size, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of capsular invasion, margin status, and tumor histology. RESULTS: 204 kidney tumors were identified (Table-1. Of these, 117 (57.4% were in black patients and 87 (42.6% were in non-black patients. Age at surgery ranged from 37 to 87 with a median of 62. Tumor size ranged from 1.0 to 22.0 cm with a median of 5.0 cm. Overall, tumors were composed of clear cell RCC in 97 cases (47.5%, papillary RCC in 65 cases (31.9%, chromophobe RCC in 13 cases (6.4%, collecting duct/medullary RCC in 2 cases (1.0%, RCC with multiple histological subtypes in 8 cases (3.9%, malignant tumors of other origin in 6 cases (2.9%, and benign histology in 13 cases (6.4%. Among black patients, papillary RCC was seen in 56 cases (47.9%, compared to 9 cases (10.3% among non-black patients (p < 0.001 (Table-2. Clear cell RCC was present in 38 (32.5% of black patients and in 59 (67.8% of non-blacks (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, papillary RCC had a much higher occurrence among black patients compared to non-black patients. This is the first study to document such a great racial disparity among RCC subtypes.

  11. Oxygen analyzers: failure rates and life spans of galvanic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R M

    1990-07-01

    Competing technologies exist for measuring oxygen concentrations in breathing circuits. Over a 4-year period, two types of oxygen analyzers were studied prospectively in routine clinical use to determine the incidence and nature of malfunctions. Newer AC-powered galvanic analyzers (North American Dräger O2med) were compared with older, battery-powered polarographic analyzers (Ohmeda 201) by recording all failures and necessary repairs. The AC-powered galvanic analyzer had a significantly lower incidence of failures (0.12 +/- 0.04 failures per machine-month) than the battery-powered polarographic analyzer (4.0 +/- 0.3 failures per machine-month). Disposable capsules containing the active galvanic cells lasted 12 +/- 7 months. Although the galvanic analyzers tended to remain out of service longer, awaiting the arrival of costly parts, the polarographic analyzers were more expensive to keep operating when calculations included the cost of time spent on repairs. Stocking galvanic capsules would have decreased the amount of time the galvanic analyzers were out of service, while increasing costs. In conclusion, galvanic oxygen analyzers appear capable of delivering more reliable service at a lower overall cost. By keeping the galvanic capsules exposed to room air during periods of storage, it should be possible to prolong their life span, further decreasing the cost of using them. In addition, recognizing the aberrations in their performance that warn of the exhaustion of the galvanic cells should permit timely recording and minimize downtime.

  12. Circuits and methods for determination and control of signal transition rates in electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, David Kay

    2016-04-12

    A charge/discharge input is for respectively supplying charge to, or drawing charge from, an electrochemical cell. A transition modifying circuit is coupled between the charge/discharge input and a terminal of the electrochemical cell and includes at least one of an inductive constituent, a capacitive constituent and a resistive constituent selected to generate an adjusted transition rate on the terminal sufficient to reduce degradation of a charge capacity characteristic of the electrochemical cell. A method determines characteristics of the transition modifying circuit. A degradation characteristic of the electrochemical cell is analyzed relative to a transition rate of the charge/discharge input applied to the electrochemical cell. An adjusted transition rate is determined for a signal to be applied to the electrochemical cell that will reduce the degradation characteristic. At least one of an inductance, a capacitance, and a resistance is selected for the transition modifying circuit to achieve the adjusted transition rate.

  13. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  14. In vitro study of the effect of virus inactivated plasma on the function of human CIK cells%病毒灭活血浆对人CIK细胞功能影响的体外实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚仁南; 陈玲; 刘军权; 周忠海; 陈娜云; 陈复兴

    2012-01-01

    目的 利用CIK细胞(细胞因子诱导的杀伤细胞)来研究亚甲蓝光化学法病毒灭活血浆是否会对免疫细胞产生影响.方法 对10名健康献血者外周血单个核细胞分别采用病毒灭活血浆和新鲜冰冻血浆培养人CIK细胞,观察2组培养体系中CIK细胞的扩增情况;用流式细胞仪(FCM)检测CIK细胞CD3+ CD56+表达;检测经白藜芦醇终浓度为0.8 μmol/L诱导48 h后的CIK细胞穿孔素和颗粒酶B的含量变化;以及用乳酸脱氢酶法测定CIK细胞杀伤SGC-7901细胞活性.结果 新鲜冰冻血浆与病毒灭活血浆比较培养5、10、15 d CIK细胞的增殖倍数,分别为17.62±1.88、26.31±1.95、46.05±2.86与18.10±1.73、25.97±1.55、45.82±1.15,CD3+ CD56+的表达分别为(12.37±1.38)%、(17.39±2.81)%、(24.3±1.72)%与(11.46±1.35)%、(18.36±1.96)%、(24.08±2.21)%,在促进CIK细胞的增殖以及CD3+ CD56+的表达上,2组无统计学意义(P>0.05);经白藜芦醇终浓度为0.8 μmol/L诱导培养48 h后,新鲜冰冻血浆与病毒灭活血浆培养的CIK细胞穿孔素、颗粒酶B、杀伤活性分别为(37.17±1.95)%、(38.79±1.91)%、(46.05±2.86)%和(32.04±1.92)%、(33.50±1.17)%、(45.82±1.15)%,2组无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 病毒灭活血浆对人CIK细胞的增殖、细胞穿孔素和颗粒酶B含量变化以及体外杀伤功能均无明显影响.%Objective To study whether the immune cells could be affected by the virus inactivated plasma,which u-sing methylene blue light chemical method,via CIK cells. Methods The peripheral mononuclear cells of 10 healthy blood donors were used to culture human CIK by using virus inactivated plasma and fresh frozen plasma. And the amplification of CIK cells was observed in the two groups. The CD3 + CD56 + expression on CIK cells was detected via flow cytometry( FCM).The variation of perforin and granzyme B content, which were induced by Resveratrol with a final concentration of 0. 8

  15. Dynamic Model of Heat Inactivation Kinetics for Bacterial Adaptation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Maria G.; Peleg, Micha

    2009-01-01

    The Weibullian-log logistic (WeLL) inactivation model was modified to account for heat adaptation by introducing a logistic adaptation factor, which rendered its “rate parameter” a function of both temperature and heating rate. The resulting model is consistent with the observation that adaptation is primarily noticeable in slow heat processes in which the cells are exposed to sublethal temperatures for a sufficiently long time. Dynamic survival patterns generated with the proposed model were in general agreement with those of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes as reported in the literature. Although the modified model's rate equation has a cumbersome appearance, especially for thermal processes having a variable heating rate, it can be solved numerically with commercial mathematical software. The dynamic model has five survival/adaptation parameters whose determination will require a large experimental database. However, with assumed or estimated parameter values, the model can simulate survival patterns of adapting pathogens in cooked foods that can be used in risk assessment and the establishment of safe preparation conditions. PMID:19201963

  16. Quantitative, functional and biochemical alterations in the peritoneal cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma-irradiation. 1. Changes in cellular protein, adherence properties and enzymatic activities associated with platelet-activating factor formation and inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steel, L.K.; Hughes, H.N.; Walden, T.L. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    Changes in total number, differentials, cell protein, adherence properties, acetyl-CoA transferase and acetylhydrolase activities, prostaglandin E/sub 2/ and leukotriene C/sub 4/ production, as well as Ca/sup 2+/ ionophore A23187 stimulation were examined in resident peritoneal cells isolated from mice 2 h to 10 days postexposure to a single dose (7, 10 or 12 Gy) of gamma-radiation. Radiation dose-related reductions in macrophage and lymphocyte numbers and increases in cellular protein and capacity to adhere to plastic surfaces were evident. In vivo irradiation also elevated the activities of acetyltransferase and acetyl-CoA hydrolase (catalysing platelet-activating factor biosynthesis and inactivation, respectively) in adherent and nonadherent peritoneal cells, particularly 3-4 days postexposure. Blood plasma from irradiated animals did not reflect the increased cellular acetyl-hydrolase activity. Prostaglandin E/sub 2/ and leukotriene C/sub 4/ synthesis were elevated postexposure, suggesting increased substrate (arachidonate) availability and increased cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activities. Ionophore stimulation of enzyme activities and eicosanoid release also differed in irradiated peritoneal cells.

  17. Cells Sensing Mechanical Cues: Stiffness Influences the Lifetime of Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions by Affecting the Loading Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Sun, Zhenglong; Chen, Xiaofei; Li, Jing; Xu, Yue; Zu, Yan; Hu, Jiliang; Han, Dong; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-26

    The question of how cells sense substrate mechanical cues has gained increasing attention among biologists. By introducing contour-based data analysis to single-cell force spectroscopy, we identified a loading-rate threshold for the integrin α2β1-DGEA bond beyond which a dramatic increase in bond lifetime was observed. On the basis of mechanical cues (elasticity or topography), the effective spring constant of substrates k is mapped to the loading rate r under actomyosin pulling speed v, which, in turn, affects the lifetime of the integrin-ligand bond. Additionally, downregulating v with a low-dose blebbistatin treatment promotes the neuronal lineage specification of mesenchymal stem cells on osteogenic stiff substrates. Thus, sensing of the loading rate is central to how cells sense mechanical cues that affect cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cell differentiation.

  18. A synthetic lymph node containing inactivated Treponema pallidum cells elicits strong, antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Lola V; Drapp, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a synthetic lymph node (SLN) for delivery of Treponema pallidum (Tp) antigens. Immune responses of C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after SLN implantation. Group 1 mice received SLN with no antigen; Group 2, SLN with formalin-inactivated Tp (f-Tp); and Group 3, SLN with f-Tp plus a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. When tested by ELISA, sera from Group 2 and Group 3 mice showed stronger IgG antibody reactivity than sera from Group 1 mice to sonicates of f-Tp or untreated Tp, but not to sonicate of normal rabbit testicular extract at all times. The IgG1 level was higher than IgG2c level for Group 2 mice at all times and for Group 3 mice at 4 and 8 weeks. IgG1 and IgG2c levels were nearly equivalent for Group 3 mice at 12 weeks. Immunoblotting showed that IgG from Group 2 and Group 3 mice recognized several Tp proteins at all times. Supernatants of splenocytes from Group 2 and Group 3 mice contained significantly more IFNγ than those from Group 1 mice after stimulation with f-Tp at all times. A significant level of IL-4 was not detected in any supernatants. These data show that strong humoral and cellular immune responses to Tp can be elicited via a SLN.

  19. Measuring the firing rate of high-resistance neurons with cell-attached recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcami, Pepe; Franconville, Romain; Llano, Isabel; Marty, Alain

    2012-02-29

    Cell-attached recording is extensively used to study the firing rate of mammalian neurons, but potential limitations of the method have not been investigated in detail. Here we perform cell-attached recording of molecular layer interneurons in cerebellar slices from rats and mice, and we study how experimental conditions influence the measured firing rate. We find that this rate depends on time in cell-attached mode, on pipette potential, and on pipette ionic composition. In the first minute after sealing, action currents are variable in shape and size, presumably reflecting membrane instability. The firing rate remains approximately constant during the first 4 min after sealing and gradually increases afterward. Making the pipette potential more positive leads to an increase in the firing rate, with a steeper dependence on voltage if the pipette solution contains K(+) as the main cation than if it contains Na(+). Ca(2+) imaging experiments show that establishing a cell-attached recording can result in an increased somatic Ca(2+) concentration, reflecting an increased firing rate linked to an increase in the pipette-cell conductance. Pipette effects on cell firing are traced to a combination of passive electrical coupling, opening of voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels (BK channels) after action potentials, and random activation of voltage-insensitive, presumably mechanosensitive, cationic channels. We conclude that, unless experimental conditions are optimized, cell-attached recordings in small neurons may report erroneous firing rates.

  20. Strong Constraint on Human Genes Escaping X-Inactivation Is Modulated by their Expression Level and Breadth in Both Sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavney, Andrea; Arbiza, Leonardo; Clark, Andrew G; Keinan, Alon

    2016-02-01

    In eutherian mammals, X-linked gene expression is normalized between XX females and XY males through the process of X chromosome inactivation (XCI). XCI results in silencing of transcription from one ChrX homolog per female cell. However, approximately 25% of human ChrX genes escape XCI to some extent and exhibit biallelic expression in females. The evolutionary basis of this phenomenon is not entirely clear, but high sequence conservation of XCI escapers suggests that purifying selection may directly or indirectly drive XCI escape at these loci. One hypothesis is that this signal results from contributions to developmental and physiological sex differences, but presently there is limited evidence supporting this model in humans. Another potential driver of this signal is selection for high and/or broad gene expression in both sexes, which are strong predictors of reduced nucleotide substitution rates in mammalian genes. Here, we compared purifying selection and gene expression patterns of human XCI escapers with those of X-inactivated genes in both sexes. When we accounted for the functional status of each ChrX gene's Y-linked homolog (or "gametolog"), we observed that XCI escapers exhibit greater degrees of purifying selection in the human lineage than X-inactivated genes, as well as higher and broader gene expression than X-inactivated genes across tissues in both sexes. These results highlight a significant role for gene expression in both sexes in driving purifying selection on XCI escapers, and emphasize these genes' potential importance in human disease.

  1. mTOR inactivation by ROS-JNK-p53 pathway plays an essential role in psedolaric acid B induced autophagy-dependent senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Min; Zhou, Haiyan; Fan, Simiao; Li, Zhao; Yao, Guodong; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Xia, Mingyu; Ikejima, Takashi

    2013-09-05

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB), the primary biologically active compound isolated from the root bark of P. kaempferi Gordon, has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor effect primarily via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our previous study demonstrated that PAB triggered mitotic catastrophe in L929 cells. In addition, a small percentage of the cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe displayed an apoptotic phenotype. Therefore, we continued to investigate the fate of the other cells. The results indicated that PAB induced senescence through p19-p53-p21 and p16-Rb pathways in L929 cells. PAB also triggered autophagy via inhibiting Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity in L929 cells. In addition, autophagy was demonstrated to reinforce senescence through regulating the senescence pathways. Thus, we focused on the detailed molecular mechanisms whereby autophagy promoted senescence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important in autophagy and senescence. We found that PAB triggered a ROS-JNK-p53 positive feedback loop and this feedback loop played a crucial role in autophagy via repressing the activation of mTOR. Furthermore, ROS-JNK-p53 positive feedback loop was demonstrated to regulate senescence. Tuberous sclerosis proteins1 and 2, also known as TSC1 and TSC2, form a protein-complex. TSC1/TSC2 heterodimer is a downstream target of growth factor-phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signaling which negatively regulates mTOR activity. Activation of mTOR by insulin or inhibition of endogenous TSC2 levels by siRNA obviously delayed PAB-induced senescence. In conclusion, mTOR inactivation by ROS-JNK-p53 pathway played an important role in autophagy-dependent senescence in PAB-treated L929 cells.

  2. Flow rate and humidification effects on a PEM fuel cell performance and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvelioglu, Galip H.; Stenger, Harvey G.

    A new algorithm is presented to integrate component balances along polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) channels to obtain three-dimensional results from a detailed two-dimensional finite element model. The analysis studies the cell performance at various hydrogen flow rates, air flow rates and humidification levels. This analysis shows that hydrogen and air flow rates and their relative humidity are critical to current density, membrane dry-out, and electrode flooding. Uniform current densities along the channels are known to be critical for thermal management and fuel cell life. This approach, of integrating a detailed two-dimensional across-the-channel model, is a promising method for fuel cell design due to its low computational cost compared to three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, its applicability to a wide range of fuel cell designs, and its ease of extending to fuel cell stack models.

  3. Effects of diltiazem and propafenone on the inactivation and recovery kinetics of fKvl.4 channel currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong ZHANG; Shi-min WANG; Hui CHEN; Xue-jun JIANG; Sheng-ping CHAO

    2011-01-01

    Alm: TO investigate the effects of diltiazem. an L-type calcium channel blocker, and propafenone, a sodium channel blocker,on the inactivation and recovery kinetics of fKvl.4.a potassium channel that generates the cardiac transient outward potassium current.Methods:The cRNA for fKv1.4△N.an N-rerminal deleted mutant of the flerret Kvl.4 potassium channel.was injected into Xenopusoocytes to express the fKv1.4△N channel in these cells. Currents were recorded using a two electrode voltage clamp technique. Results: Diltiazem(10 to 1000 μmol/L)inhibited the fKv1.4△N channel in a frequency-dependent,voltage-dependent,and concerttration-dependent manneh Suggesting an open channel block.The ICso was 241.04±23.06 μmol/L for the fKvl.4&N channel(at+50mY).and propafenone(10 to 500 μmol/L)showed a similar effect(IC50=103.68±10.13 μmol/L).After application of diltiazem and propafenone, fKv1.4AN inactivation was bi-exponential.with a faster drug-induced inactivation and a slower C-type inactivation.Diltiazem increased the C-type inactivation rate and slowed recovery in fKv1.4△N channels.Howeve, propafenone had no effect on either the slow inactivation time constant or the recovery.Conclusion:Diltiazem and propafenone accelerate the inactivation of the Kvl.4AN channeI by binding to the open state of the channel.Unlike propafenone, diltiazem slows the recovery of the Kv1.4AN channel.

  4. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornecker, Jacey L; Samollow, Paul B; Robinson, Edward S; Vandeberg, John L; McCarrey, John R

    2007-11-01

    In eutherian mammals, the X and Y chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis in males. However, following fertilization, both the paternally (Xp) and maternally (Xm) inherited X chromosomes are active in the inner cell mass of the female blastocyst, and then random inactivation of one X chromosome occurs in each cell, leading to a mosaic pattern of X-chromosome activity in adult female tissues. In contrast, marsupial females show a nonrandom pattern of X chromosome activity, with repression of the Xp in all somatic tissues. Here, we show that MSCI also occurs during spermatogenesis in marsupials in a manner similar to, but more stable than that in eutherians. These findings support the suggestion that MSCI may have provided the basis for an early dosage compensation mechanism in mammals based solely on gametogenic events, and that random X-chromosome inactivation during embryogenesis may have evolved subsequently in eutherian mammals.

  5. RGDS-fuctionalized alginates improve the survival rate of encapsulated embryonic stem cells during cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambu, S; Xu, X; Schiffer, H A; Cui, Z F; Ye, H

    2011-01-01

    Cryopreservation of stem cells, especially embryonic stem cells, is problematic because of low post-thaw cell survival rates and spontaneous differentiation following recovery. In this investigation, mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were encapsulated in arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (RGDS)-coupled calcium alginates (1.2 percent, w/v), allowed to attach to the substratum and then cryopreserved in 10 percent (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution at a slow cooling rate of 1 C per min. RGDS coupling to alginate was confirmed by Transmission Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (T-FTIR) and quantified by using ninhydrin-Ultraviolet/Visible light (ninhydrin-UV/VIS) assay. Flow cytometry data showed that mESCs cryopreserved in RGDS-alginate beads had a higher expression of stem cell markers compared with cells cryopreserved in suspension or cells cryopreserved in unmodified alginates. Cell viability after thawing was assessed using trypan blue exclusion assay and monitored using Alamar blue assay for 6 hours. It was shown that post-thaw cell survival rate was significantly higher for cells encapsulated in RGDS-modified alginate (93 ± 2 percent, mean and standard error) than those in suspension (52 ± 2 percent) or in unmodified alginates (62 ± 3 percent). These results showed that cells encapsulated and attached to a substratum have better survival rate and stem cell marker expression 24 hours after cryopreservation than those in suspension. Encapsulation in RGDS-alginate was optimized for peptide concentration, cryoprotective agent loading time and cooling rate. The best result was obtained when using 12.5 mg peptide per g alginate, 30 minutes loading time and 1 C per min cooling rate.

  6. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma.

  7. Inactivation of Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilms on Polystyrene, Stainless Steel, and Urinary Catheters by Octenidine Dihydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Amoolya; Nair, Meera S.; Karumathil, Deepti P.; Baskaran, Sangeetha A.; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major nosocomial pathogen causing human infections with significant mortality rates. In most cases, infections are acquired through exposure to A. baumannii biofilms that persist on contaminated hospital equipment and surfaces. Thus, it is imperative to develop effective measures for controlling A. baumannii biofilms in nosocomial settings. This study investigated the efficacy of octenidine dihydrochloride (OH), a new generation disinfectant for reducing A. baumannii biofilms on polystyrene, stainless steel and catheters. OH at 0.3% (5 mM), 0.6% (10 mM), and 0.9% (15 mM) was effective in significantly inactivating A. baumannii biofilms on all tested surfaces (P < 0.05). Furthermore, OH was equally effective in inactivating biofilms of multidrug resistant and drug susceptible A. baumannii isolates. In addition, confocal imaging revealed the predominance of dead cells in the OH-treated samples in comparison to the control. Further, scanning electron microscopy of biofilms formed on catheters revealed that OH treatment significantly reduced A. baumannii biofilm populations in corroboration with our antibiofilm assay. These data underscore the efficacy of OH in inactivating A. baumannii biofilms, thereby suggesting its potential use as a disinfectant or a catheter lock solution to control A. baumannii infections. PMID:27375572

  8. Inactivation of Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilms on Polystyrene, Stainless Steel, and Urinary Catheters by Octenidine Dihydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Amoolya; Nair, Meera S; Karumathil, Deepti P; Baskaran, Sangeetha A; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major nosocomial pathogen causing human infections with significant mortality rates. In most cases, infections are acquired through exposure to A. baumannii biofilms that persist on contaminated hospital equipment and surfaces. Thus, it is imperative to develop effective measures for controlling A. baumannii biofilms in nosocomial settings. This study investigated the efficacy of octenidine dihydrochloride (OH), a new generation disinfectant for reducing A. baumannii biofilms on polystyrene, stainless steel and catheters. OH at 0.3% (5 mM), 0.6% (10 mM), and 0.9% (15 mM) was effective in significantly inactivating A. baumannii biofilms on all tested surfaces (P < 0.05). Furthermore, OH was equally effective in inactivating biofilms of multidrug resistant and drug susceptible A. baumannii isolates. In addition, confocal imaging revealed the predominance of dead cells in the OH-treated samples in comparison to the control. Further, scanning electron microscopy of biofilms formed on catheters revealed that OH treatment significantly reduced A. baumannii biofilm populations in corroboration with our antibiofilm assay. These data underscore the efficacy of OH in inactivating A. baumannii biofilms, thereby suggesting its potential use as a disinfectant or a catheter lock solution to control A. baumannii infections.

  9. Surface water disinfection by chlorination and advanced oxidation processes: Inactivation of an antibiotic resistant E. coli strain and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Andreza Costa; Lepretti, Marilena; Rizzo, Luigi; Caputo, Ivana; Vaiano, Vincenzo; Sacco, Olga; Lopes, Wilton Silva; Sannino, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The release of antibiotics into the environment can result in antibiotic resistance (AR) spread, which in turn can seriously affect human health. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in different aquatic environments used as drinking water source. Water disinfection may be a possible solution to minimize AR spread but conventional processes, such as chlorination, result in the formation of dangerous disinfection by-products. In this study advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV and N-TiO2/UV, have been compared with chlorination in the inactivation of an AR Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain in surface water. TiO2 P25 and nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2), prepared by sol-gel method at two different synthesis temperatures (0 and -20°C), were investigated in heterogeneous photocatalysis experiments. Under the investigated conditions, chlorination (1.0 mg L(-1)) was the faster process (2.5 min) to achieve total inactivation (6 Log). Among AOPs, H2O2/UV resulted in the best inactivation rate: total inactivation (6 Log) was achieved in 45 min treatment. Total inactivation was not observed (4.5 Log), also after 120 min treatment, only for N-doped TiO2 synthesized at 0°C. Moreover, H2O2/UV and chlorination processes were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity potential by means of 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium colorimetric test on a human-derived cell line and they similarly affected HepG2 cells viability.

  10. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA ameliorates stress-induced depression-related behavior by promoting cell surface 5-HT1A receptor translocation, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Impairment of serotonergic neurotransmission is the major factor responsible for depression and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) participates in serotonergic transmission-mediated signaling networks relevant to mental illnesses. In the forced-swim test to assess depression-like behavior, the immobility time for mice with restraint stress was significantly longer than that for nonstressed control mice. Postsynaptic cell surface localization of 5-HT1A receptor, but not 5-HT2A receptor, in the hypothalamus for mice with restraint stress was significantly reduced as compared with that for control mice, which highly correlated to prolonged immobility time, i.e., depression-like behavior. The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) restored restraint stress-induced reduction of cell surface 5-HT1A receptor and improved depression-like behavior in mice with restraint stress. Moreover, DCP-LA stimulated serotonin release from hypothalamic slices and cancelled restraint stress-induced reduction of GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA could ameliorate depression-like behavior by promoting translocation of 5-HT1A receptor to the plasma membrane on postsynaptic cells, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

  11. Growth of pulsed electric field exposed Escherichia coli in relation to inactivation and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronsson, Kristina; Borch, Elisabeth; Stenlöf, Bo; Rönner, Ulf

    2004-05-15

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) have been proven to inactivate microorganisms during nonthermal conditions and have the potential to replace thermal processing as a method for food preservation. However, there is a need to understand the recovery and growth of survivors and potentially injured microorganisms following PEF processing. The purpose of this investigation was to study the growth of Escherichia coli at 10 degrees C following exposure to electrical field strengths (15, 22.5 and 30 kV/cm) in relation to inactivation and the amount of potentially sublethally injured cells. One medium was used as both a treatment medium and an incubation medium, to study the influence of environmental factors on the inactivation and the growth of the surviving population. The pH (5.0, 6.0 and 7.0) and water activity (1.00, 0.985 and 0.97) of the medium was varied by adding HCl and glycerol, respectively. Growth was followed continuously by measuring the optical density. The time-to-detection (td) and the maximum specific growth rate (micromax) were calculated from these data. Results showed that the PEF process did not cause any obvious sublethal injury to the E. coli cells. The number of survivors was a consequence of the combination of electrical field strength and environmental factors, with pH being the most prominent. Interestingly, the micromax of subsequent growth was influenced by the applied electrical field strength during the process, with an increased micromax at more intense electrical field strengths. In addition, the micromax was also influenced by the pH and water activity. The td, which could theoretically be considered as an increase in shelf life, was found to depend on a complex correlation between electrical field strength, pH and water activity. That could be explained by the fact that the td is a combination of the number of survivors, the recovery of sublethal injured cells and the growth rate of the survivors.

  12. A systematic approach to determine global thermal inactivation parameters for various food pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van E.D.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inactivation of pathogens has been studied extensively, which has resulted in a wide range of D- and z-values. Estimating the inactivation rate for a specific condition based on these reported values is difficult, since one has to select representative conditions, and data obtained exactly a

  13. Oncogenic transformation through the cell cycle and the LET dependent inverse dose rate effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geard, C. R.; Miller, R. C.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.; Wachholz, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Synchronised populations of mouse C3H/10T-1/2 cells were obtained by a stringent mitotic dislodgment procedure. Mitotic cells rapidly attach and progress sequentially through the cell cycle. Irradiation (3 Gy of X rays) was carried out at intervals from 0 to 18 h after initiating cell cycle progression of the mitotic cells. Oncogenic transformation was enhanced 10-fold over cells irradiated soon after replating (G1 and S phases) for cells in a near 2 h period corresponding to cells in G2 phase but not in mitosis. The cell surviving fraction had a 2-1/2-fold variation with resistant peaks corresponding to the late G1 and late S phases. These findings provide experimental support for the hypothesis initiated by Rossi and Kellerer and developed by Brenner and Hall to explain the LET dependent inverse dose rate effect for oncogenic transformation.

  14. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  15. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  16. Protection against Japanese encephalitis by inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Nisalak, A; Sangawhipa, N; Jatanasen, S; Laorakapongse, T; Innis, B L; Kotchasenee, S; Gingrich, J B; Latendresse, J; Fukai, K

    1988-09-01

    Encephalitis caused by Japanese encephalitis virus occurs in annual epidemics throughout Asia, making it the principal cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in the world. No currently available vaccine has demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease in a controlled trial. We performed a placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial in a northern Thai province, with two doses of monovalent (Nakayama strain) or bivalent (Nakayama plus Beijing strains) inactivated, purified Japanese encephalitis vaccine made from whole virus derived from mouse brain. We examined the effect of these vaccines on the incidence and severity of Japanese encephalitis and dengue hemorrhagic fever, a disease caused by a closely related flavivirus. Between November 1984 and March 1985, 65,224 children received two doses of monovalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 21,628), bivalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 22,080), or tetanus toxoid placebo (n = 21,516), with only minor side effects. The cumulative attack rate for encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus was 51 per 100,000 in the placebo group and 5 per 100,000 in each vaccine group. The efficacy in both vaccine groups combined was 91 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 70 to 97 percent). Attack rates for dengue hemorrhagic fever declined, but not significantly. The severity of cases of dengue was also reduced. We conclude that two doses of inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine, either monovalent or bivalent, protect against encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus and may have a limited beneficial effect on the severity of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  17. FEF inactivation with improved optogenetic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Leah; Pino, Erica N; Boyden, Edward S; Desimone, Robert

    2016-11-15

    Optogenetic methods have been highly effective for suppressing neural activity and modulating behavior in rodents, but effects have been much smaller in primates, which have much larger brains. Here, we present a suite of technologies to use optogenetics effectively in primates and apply these tools to a classic question in oculomotor control. First, we measured light absorption and heat propagation in vivo, optimized the conditions for using the red-light-shifted halorhodopsin Jaws in primates, and developed a large-volume illuminator to maximize light delivery with minimal heating and tissue displacement. Together, these advances allowed for nearly universal neuronal inactivation across more than 10 mm(3) of the cortex. Using these tools, we demonstrated large behavioral changes (i.e., up to several fold increases in error rate) with relatively low light power densities (≤100 mW/mm(2)) in the frontal eye field (FEF). Pharmacological inactivation studies have shown that the FEF is critical for executing saccades to remembered locations. FEF neurons increase their firing rate during the three epochs of the memory-guided saccade task: visual stimulus presentation, the delay interval, and motor preparation. It is unclear from earlier work, however, whether FEF activity during each epoch is necessary for memory-guided saccade execution. By harnessing the temporal specificity of optogenetics, we found that FEF contributes to memory-guided eye movements during every epoch of the memory-guided saccade task (the visual, delay, and motor periods).

  18. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  19. In vitro studies of chlorin e6-assisted photodynamic inactivation of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C.; Mohrbacher, C.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bauer-Marschall, Ina; Krickhahn, C.; Stachon, A.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP), a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium located in gastric mucosa, plays an im- portant role in gastro carcinogenesis. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance, photodynamic inactivation of bacteria presents a new approach to treat bacterial infections, like HP. In vitro experiments were performed to determine the irradiation conditions for a complete inactivation of HP with the photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). The HP strain CCUG 38770 (Culture Collection, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) was routinely cultured under microaerophilic conditions, suspended in sodium chloride, incubated with Ce6 and irradiated briefly with red light of the appropriate wavelength of λ = 660 nm. Series of measurements of different Ce6-concentrations (0.1 μM - 100 μM) were carried out, whereby the incubation time was kept constant at 1 min. The absorbed energy dose has been selected in varying the irradiation time (1 s - 300 s) and the power density (4.5 mW/cm2 - 31 mW/cm2 ). Quantification of inactivation was performed by enumeration of the grown colonies. In addition, the accumulation of Ce6 in HP cells was studied more precisely by uorescence spectroscopy. With a Ce6 concentration of 100 μM and a power density of 9 mW cm2 , a 6-log10 reduction in the survival rate of HP was achieved within 30 seconds of irradiation. In conclusion the most relevant factor for the inactivation of HP is the exposure time of irradiation, followed by the concentration of Ce6 and the light intensity. Further studies with HP strains obtained from patient specimens are under current investigation.

  20. Validation of virus inactivation by heat treatment in the manufacture of diaspirin crosslinked hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M; Ebeling, A; Marshall, T; Hauck, W; Sun, C S; White, E; Long, Z

    1992-01-01

    Diaspirin crosslinked hemoglobin (DCLHb), a hemoglobin based oxygen carrying solution prepared from outdated human blood, is subjected to a heat treatment step to inactivate viruses in our manufacturing process. To validate the efficacy of this inactivation, we have simulated the heat treatment procedure at a reduced scale using hemoglobin solution spiked with representative viruses. Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV) were used in this validation. Inoculation with concentrated virus was performed just prior to the heat treatment to determine the effect of that specific process step. Samples were taken before, during, and after heat treatment and assayed for virus titer in an attempt to assess the rate as well as the extent of virus inactivation. CMV was analyzed in a plaque assay using MRC-5 indicator cells. The titer was reduced from 3.3 x 10(6) plaque forming units (PFU) per mL to less than 5 x 10(1) PFU/mL (detection limit) within 30 minutes. DHBV was analyzed by inoculation of serially diluted samples into Pekin ducklings, followed at intervals by screening sera for DHBV DNA by dot blot hybridization. The titer was reduced from 5.0 x 10(6) duck infectious units (DIU) per mL to less than 5 x 10(0) DIU/mL (detection limit) within 1 hour. HIV titers were determined through an ELISA assay for p24 antigen present in peripheral blood lymphocyte cocultivation supernatants. The titer was reduced from 2.0 x 10(4) infectious units (IU) per mL to less than 2 x 10(0) IU/mL (detection limit) within 1 hour. These data indicate that high titers of these blood borne viruses are rapidly inactivated by this heat treatment process.

  1. MicroRNA-340 Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Metastasis of Ovarian Cancer Cells by Inactivation of NF-κB1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiquan Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Aberrant expression of microRNA-340 (miR-340 has been frequently reported in some cancers excluding ovarian cancer (OC. The role and its molecular mechanism of miR-340 in OC have not been reported. Methods: Real-time PCR was performed to detect the expression of miR-340 in OC cell lines. MiR-340 mimic and negative control were transfected into OC cells and the effects of miR-340 on the cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis were investigated by Brdu-ELISA assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Transwell and ELISA assays. Furthermore, protein level of NF-κB1 was measured by Western blotting. Meanwhile, luciferase assays were performed to validate NF-κB1 as miR-340 target in OC cells. Results: In this study, we explored the effects of miR-340 overexpression on apoptosis, invasion and EMT in OC cells. The mRNA level of miR-340 in OC cell lines and tissues was evidently reduced. The miR-340 mimic was transiently transfected into OC cells using Lipofectamine™ 2000 reagent. Subsequently, the Brdu-ELISA results showed that introduction of miR-340 inhibited cell proliferation. Our data also demonstrated that miR-340 mimic arrested cell cycle progression and promoted apoptosis of OC cells. In addition, miR-340 overexpression could also inhibit invasion and EMT of OC cells. qRT-PCR were used to determined the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and -9 in OC cells. Next, we found that NF-κB1 expression was evidently reduced by up-regulation of miR-340. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that the NF-κB1 was a potential target gene of miR-340. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-340 could directly target the 3' UTR of NF-κB1. Moreover, overexpression of NF-κB1 in OC cells transfected with miR-340 mimic partially reversed the inhibitory of miR-340 mimic. Conclusion: miR-340 induced cell apoptosis and inhibited metastasis in OC cells by down-regulation of NF-κB1.

  2. The influence of printing parameters on cell survival rate and printability in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yang; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Yao, Rui

    2015-11-02

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has provided a versatile methodology to fabricate cell-laden tissue-like constructs and in vitro tissue/pathological models for tissue engineering, drug testing and screening applications. However, it still remains a challenge to print bioinks with high viscoelasticity to achieve long-term stable structure and maintain high cell survival rate after printing at the same time. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of 3D cell printing parameters, i.e. composition and concentration of bioink, holding temperature and holding time, on the printability and cell survival rate in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology. Rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the viscoelasticity of gelatin-based bioinks. Results demonstrated that the bioink viscoelasticity was increased when increasing the bioink concentration, increasing holding time and decreasing holding temperature below gelation temperature. The decline of cell survival rate after 3D cell printing process was observed when increasing the viscoelasticity of the gelatin-based bioinks. However, different process parameter combinations would result in the similar rheological characteristics and thus showed similar cell survival rate after 3D bioprinting process. On the other hand, bioink viscoelasticity should also reach a certain point to ensure good printability and shape fidelity. At last, we proposed a protocol for 3D bioprinting of temperature-sensitive gelatin-based hydrogel bioinks with both high cell survival rate and good printability. This research would be useful for biofabrication researchers to adjust the 3D bioprinting process parameters quickly and as a referable template for designing new bioinks.

  3. Observation on the Efficiency of the Mongolian Gerbil Kidney Tissue Culture Inactivated Bivalent Vaccine for Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董关木; 朱智勇; 安祺; 朱凤才; 刘文雪; 孔艳; 杨立宏; 俞永新

    2004-01-01

    The Z10 and Z37 strains of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) virus and the Mongolian gerbil (Merions unguiculatus ) kidney cells were used to prepare the inactivated bivalent vaccine. A phase Ⅱ clinical trial use of this vaccine was made in 750 Chinese volunteers. The results showed that the side reaction rate was 2.5% and the sero-conversion rate of neutralizing antibodies against Hantaan and Seoul viruses in the inoculated volunteers were 87.6% and 96.3% respectively.

  4. Dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 guanylyl cyclase in granulosa cells contributes to the LH-induced decrease in cGMP that causes resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Jeremy R; Shuhaibar, Leia C; Edmund, Aaron B; Van Helden, Dusty A; Robinson, Jerid W; Uliasz, Tracy F; Baena, Valentina; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Potter, Lincoln R; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2014-09-01

    In mammals, the meiotic cell cycle of oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses. Much later, in preparation for fertilization, oocytes within preovulatory follicles resume meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Before LH stimulation, the arrest is maintained by diffusion of cyclic (c)GMP into the oocyte from the surrounding granulosa cells, where it is produced by the guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2). LH rapidly reduces the production of cGMP, but how this occurs is unknown. Here, using rat follicles, we show that within 10 min, LH signaling causes dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 through a process that requires the activity of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP)-family members. The rapid dephosphorylation of NPR2 is accompanied by a rapid phosphorylation of the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5, an enzyme whose activity is increased upon phosphorylation. Later, levels of the NPR2 agonist C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in the follicle, and these sequential events contribute to the decrease in cGMP that causes meiosis to resume in the oocyte.

  5. X chromosome inactivation is initiated in human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Ilse M; Laven, Joop S E; Stevens, Mary; Jonkers, Iris; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Gribnau, Joost; van Doorninck, J Hikke

    2009-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is the mammalian mechanism that compensates for the difference in gene dosage between XX females and XY males. Genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms induce transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome in female cells. In mouse embryos, XCI is initiated at the

  6. Inactivation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 is essential for PKB-mediated survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells by kit ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Richard; Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation of phosphatidylinos......OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation...... of hematopoietic progenitors. Because forkhead proteins are involved in controlling apoptosis and cell-cycle progression, this may be one important mechanism by which survival of hematopoietic progenitors is mediated....

  7. Chronic oxidative stress causes estrogen-independent aggressive phenotype, and epigenetic inactivation of estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2015-08-01

    The role of chronic oxidative stress in the development and aggressive growth of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is well known; however, the mechanistic understanding is not clear. Estrogen-independent growth is one of the features of aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on estrogen sensitivity and expression of nuclear estrogen receptors in ER-positive breast cancer cells. MCF-7 cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide were used as a cell model in this study, and their growth in response to 17-β estradiol was evaluated by cell viability, cell cycle, and cell migration analysis. Results were further confirmed at molecular level by analysis of gene expressions at transcript and protein levels. Histone H3 modifications, expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, and the effect of DNA demethylation were also analyzed. Loss of growth in response to estrogen with a decrease in ERα expression was observed in MCF-7 cells adapted to chronic oxidative stress. Increases in mtTFA and NRF1 in these cells further suggested the role of mitochondria-dependent redox-sensitive growth signaling as an alternative pathway to estrogen-dependent growth. Changes in expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, levels of histone H3 modifications as well as significant restorations of both ERα expression and estrogen response by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further confirmed the epigenetic basis for estrogen-independent growth in these cells. In conclusion, results of this study suggest that chronic oxidative stress can convert estrogen-dependent nonaggressive breast cancer cells into estrogen-independent aggressive form potentially by epigenetic mechanism.

  8. Apoptosis induced by 7-difluoromethoxyl-5,4'-di-n-octyl genistein via the inactivation of FoxM1 in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yingxia; Li, Qingxiu; Xiang, Honglin; Liu, Fei; Cao, Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    Genistein, 5,7,4'-trihydroxylisoflavone, a major component of soybean products, has been reported to possess anticancer activities. We examined the antitumor effects of 7-difluoromethoxyl-5,4'-di-n-octylgenistein (DFOG), a novel synthetic genistein derivative, on human ovarian cancer cells as well as the molecular mechanism. The growth-inhibitory effects of genistein and DFOG were determined using MTT assay and clonogenic assay in CoC1 and SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells. Apoptotic activities of DFOG were observed using histone/DNA ELISA assay and flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) staining. Multiple molecular techniques, such as RT-PCR, western blot analysis, siRNA and cDNA transfection were used to explore the molecular mechanism. We demonstrated that nine of the genistein derivatives had a more effective antitumor activity than genistein. Among the afore-mentioned derivatives, DFOG presented with the strongest activity against CoC1 and SKOV3 cells in vitro. DFOG and genistein inhibited the growth of CoC1 and SKOV3 cells, accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. DFOG caused apoptotic cell death with concomitant attenuation of Forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1) and its downstream genes, such as survivin, cdc25B, cyclin B, and increased p27KIP1. Downregulation of FoxM1 by siRNA followed by DFOG treatment resulted in enhanced cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Upregulation of FoxM1 by cDNA transfection attenuated DFOG-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death. Our results show that the molecular role of FoxM1 in mediating the biological effects of DFOG and genistein in human ovarian cancer cells suggests that FoxM1 could be a novel target for the treatment of human ovarian cancer.

  9. Real-time monitoring of specific oxygen uptake rates of embryonic stem cells in a microfluidic cell culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Alexandre; Jaccard, Nicolas; Cardoso Marques, Marco Paulo; Macown, Rhys Jarred; Griffin, Lewis Donald; Veraitch, Farlan Singh; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in stem cell biology as a signaling molecule and as an indicator of cell energy metabolism. Quantification of cellular oxygen kinetics, i.e. the determination of specific oxygen uptake rates (sOURs), is routinely used to understand metabolic shifts. However current methods to determine sOUR in adherent cell cultures rely on cell sampling, which impacts on cellular phenotype. We present real-time monitoring of cell growth from phase contrast microscopy images, and of respiration using optical sensors for dissolved oxygen. Time-course data for bulk and peri-cellular oxygen concentrations obtained for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse embryonic stem cell (mESCs) cultures successfully demonstrated this non-invasive and label-free approach. Additionally, we confirmed non-invasive detection of cellular responses to rapidly changing culture conditions by exposing the cells to mitochondrial inhibiting and uncoupling agents. For the CHO and mESCs, sOUR values between 8 and 60 amol cell(-1) s(-1) , and 5 and 35 amol cell(-1) s(-1) were obtained, respectively. These values compare favorably with literature data. The capability to monitor oxygen tensions, cell growth, and sOUR, of adherent stem cell cultures, non-invasively and in real time, will be of significant benefit for future studies in stem cell biology and stem cell-based therapies.

  10. 病毒灭活血浆对人γδT细胞功能影响的实验研究%Experimental study of virus inactivated plasma for human γδT cell function influence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚仁南; 陈玲; 陈娜云; 刘军权; 周忠海; 陈复兴; 孙阳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the influence of virus inactivated plasma for human γδT cell growth and function. Methods The isopentenyl pyrophosphate assay were used to amplify human peripheral blood γδT cells in vitro. The γδT cells were cultured with 10 % virus inactivated plasma and 10 % fresh frozen plasma,the amplification factors were detected at culture before,after 5 days and 10 days; The flow cytometry were detected cell surface markers,Granzyme B,perform and CD107a of γδT cultured after 10 days. Results The 10 % fresh frozen plasma and virus inactivated plasma on human γδT cells cultured by amplification at 10 days,which were increased from 3.12 % to 80.46 % and 81.18 %,5 days and 10 days of cell proliferation multiples were 11.65 ± 211,38.21 ± 157 and 11.77 ± 2.13,37.11 ± 1.81,respectively. The expression of CD107a,perform and Granzyme B were 90.54 % ± 1.99 % ,23.47 % ± 3.18 %,35.47 % ± 2.42 % and 90.22 % ± 2.21 %,22.58 % ± 3.41 %,34.63 % ± 2.22 %,respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion It is demonstrated that the virus inactivated plasma in certain concentration of human γδT cell growth and proliferation,Granzyme B,perform and CD107a expression and fresh frozen plasma have no obvious difference.%目的 探讨病毒灭活血浆对人γδT细胞生长和功能的影响.方法 取人外周血γδT细胞,用异戊烯焦磷酸法体外扩增.用10%病毒灭活血浆和10%新鲜冰冻血浆分别培养γδT细胞,分别检测培养前、培养5d和10d后的扩增倍数;用流式细胞术分别检测培养10d后的γδT细胞表面标记,即颗粒酶B、穿孔素和CD107a的表达等.结果 10%新鲜冰冻血浆和10%病毒灭活血浆对人γδT细胞培养10d时,由扩增前的3.12%增加到80.46%和81.18%,5d和10d的细胞增殖倍数分别为11.65±2.11、38.21±1.57和11.77±2.13、37.11±1.81,CD107a、穿孔素、颗粒酶B含量表达分别为90.54%±1.99

  11. Resistance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE prions to inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Giles

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Distinct prion strains often exhibit different incubation periods and patterns of neuropathological lesions. Strain characteristics are generally retained upon intraspecies transmission, but may change on transmission to another species. We investigated the inactivation of two related prions strains: BSE prions from cattle and mouse-passaged BSE prions, termed 301V. Inactivation was manipulated by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, variations in pH, and different temperatures. Infectivity was measured using transgenic mouse lines that are highly susceptible to either BSE or 301V prions. Bioassays demonstrated that BSE prions are up to 1,000-fold more resistant to inactivation than 301V prions while Western immunoblotting showed that short acidic SDS treatments reduced protease-resistant PrP(Sc from BSE prions and 301V prions at similar rates. Our findings argue that despite being derived from BSE prions, mouse 301V prions are not necessarily a reliable model for cattle BSE prions. Extending these comparisons to human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and hamster Sc237 prions, we found that BSE prions were 10- and 10(6-fold more resistant to inactivation, respectively. Our studies contend that any prion inactivation procedures must be validated by bioassay against the prion strain for which they are intended to be used.

  12. Resistance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions to inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V; Beckwith, Robyn; Seoanes, Rose; Peretz, David; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2008-11-01

    Distinct prion strains often exhibit different incubation periods and patterns of neuropathological lesions. Strain characteristics are generally retained upon intraspecies transmission, but may change on transmission to another species. We investigated the inactivation of two related prions strains: BSE prions from cattle and mouse-passaged BSE prions, termed 301V. Inactivation was manipulated by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), variations in pH, and different temperatures. Infectivity was measured using transgenic mouse lines that are highly susceptible to either BSE or 301V prions. Bioassays demonstrated that BSE prions are up to 1,000-fold more resistant to inactivation than 301V prions while Western immunoblotting showed that short acidic SDS treatments reduced protease-resistant PrP(Sc) from BSE prions and 301V prions at similar rates. Our findings argue that despite being derived from BSE prions, mouse 301V prions are not necessarily a reliable model for cattle BSE prions. Extending these comparisons to human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and hamster Sc237 prions, we found that BSE prions were 10- and 10(6)-fold more resistant to inactivation, respectively. Our studies contend that any prion inactivation procedures must be validated by bioassay against the prion strain for which they are intended to be used.

  13. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Marimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT. The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1 was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs.

  14. Combined ozone and ultraviolet inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Benjamin S; Savant, Gaurav; Truax, Dennis D

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of Escherichia coli inactivation using ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, separately and simultaneously, was evaluated at 25 degrees C in buffered (pH 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0), demand-free media. While ozone was found to be a stronger disinfectant than UV radiation, using both simultaneously was more effective than using them individually. Inactivation kinetics was pseudo first-order for the three treatment processes, while the disinfection rate was a linear function of the disinfectant dose. The synergism observed in microbial inactivation when the disinfectant processes were combined was illustrated by estimates of kinetic model parameters. This synergy was attributed to the generation of hydroxyl radicals via ozone photolysis. Subsequently, dosage calculations, as based on disinfectant level and exposure time, indicated that the simultaneous use of UV and ozone could substantially reduce their individual doses.

  15. An MDCK cell culture-derived formalin-inactivated influenza virus whole-virion vaccine from an influenza virus library confers cross-protective immunity by intranasal administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haredy, Ahmad M; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Omasa, Takeshi; Ohtake, Hisao; Mori, Yasuko; Kida, Hiroshi; Yamanishi, Koichi; Okamoto, Shigefumi

    2013-07-01

    It is currently impossible to predict the next pandemic influenza virus strain. We have thus established a library of influenza viruses of all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes and their genes. In this article, we examine the applicability of a rapid production model for the preparation of vaccines against emerging pandemic influenza viruses. This procedure utilizes the influenza virus library, cell culture-based vaccine production, and intranasal administration to induce a cross-protective immune response. First, an influenza virus reassortant from the library, A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (H5N1), was passaged 22 times (P22) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The P22 virus had a titer of >2 ×10(8) PFU/ml, which was 40 times that of the original strain, with 4 point mutations, which altered amino acids in the deduced protein sequences encoded by the PB2 and PA genes. We then produced a formalin-inactivated whole-virion vaccine from the MDCK cell-cultured A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (H5N1) P22 virus. Intranasal immunization of mice with this vaccine protected them against challenges with lethal influenza viruses of homologous and heterologous subtypes. We further demonstrated that intranasal immunization with the vaccine induced cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses against the homotypic H5N1 influenza virus and its antigenic variants and cross-reactive cell-mediated immune responses to the homologous virus, its variants within a subtype, and even an influenza virus of a different subtype. These results indicate that a rapid model for emergency vaccine production may be effective for producing the next generation of pandemic influenza virus vaccines.

  16. Effect of fractionation and rate of radiation dose on human leukemic cells, HL-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, J.G.; Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1985-03-01

    The capacity of HL-60 cells, human acute promyelocytic leukemic cells established in culture, to repair sublethal radiation damage was estimated from the response of the cells to fractionated irradiation or to a single irradiation at difference dose rates. After exposure of cells to a single dose of X rays at a dose rate of 78 rad/min, the survival curve was characterized by n = 2.5, D/sub q/ = 80 rad, and D/sub 0/ = 83.2 rad. Split-dose studies demonstrated that the cells were able to repair a substantial portion of sublethal radiation damage in 2 hr. The response of the cells to irradiation at different dose rates decreased with a decrease in the dose rates, which could be attributed to repair of sublethal radiation damage. The possibility that some of the malignant hemopoietic cells, if not all, may possess a substantial capacity to repair sublethal radiation damage should not be underestimated in planning total-body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation.

  17. High-Rate Vapor Deposition of Cadmium Telluride Films for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasim Akhter

    1992-01-01

    High rate vapor deposition is presently used for large scale low cost deposition of thin films for packaging and other applications. The feasibility of using this technology for low cost deposition of solar cells was explored. After an exhaustive literature survey, the cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cell was found to be most suitable candidate for high rate vapor deposition. The high rate vapor deposition was investigated by sublimation with a short distance between sublimation source and the substrate (Close-Spaced Sublimation, CSS). Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells were fabricated by depositing CdTe films at different rates on cadmium sulphide (CdS) films deposited by CSS or by evaporation. The CdTe films deposited at higher deposition rates were observed to have open circuit voltages (V_{ rm oc}) comparable to those deposited at lower rates. The effect of CdS film which acts as window layer for the cells were also investigated on the V_ {rm oc} of the solar cells. The results achieved proved the fact that CdS window layer is necessary to achieve higher V_{ rm oc} from solar cells. The substrate temperature during deposition of films by close space sublimation plays a vital role in the performance of solar cell. The increase in the substrate temperature during deposition of CdTe films increased the V_{rm oc} of solar cells. The solar cells with indium tin oxide (ITO) as top conductor, i.e. ITO/CdS/CdTe configuration were fabricated at rates up to 34 mum/minute and with tin oxide (TO) i.e. TO/CdTe configuration fabricated at rates up to 79 mum/minute have shown similar V_{rm oc} compared to those produced at lower rates. Higher CdTe film deposition rates are possible with larger capacity experimental setup. The method of contacting CdTe, used in this study, results in higher series resistance. An improved method of contacting CdTe needs to be developed.

  18. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR for solar photocatalytic inactivation of aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadia J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of infectious diseases by microbial pathogens can cause substantial losses of stock in aquaculture systems. There are several ways to eliminate these pathogens including the use of antibiotics, biocides and conventional disinfectants, but these leave undesirable chemical residues. Conversely, using sunlight for disinfection has the advantage of leaving no chemical residue and is particularly suited to countries with sunny climates. Titanium dioxide (TiO2 is a photocatalyst that increases the effectiveness of solar disinfection. In recent years, several different types of solar photocatalytic reactors coated with TiO2 have been developed for waste water and drinking water treatment. In this study a thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR, designed as a sloping flat plate reactor coated with P25 DEGUSSA TiO2, was used. Results The level of inactivation of the aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined after travelling across the TFFBR under various natural sunlight conditions (300-1200 W m-2, at 3 different flow rates (4.8, 8.4 and 16.8 L h-1. Bacterial numbers were determined by conventional plate counting using selective agar media, cultured (i under conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and (ii under conditions designed to neutralise reactive oxygen species (agar medium supplemented with the peroxide scavenger sodium pyruvate at 0.05% w/v, incubated under anaerobic conditions, to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive cells. The results clearly demonstrate that high sunlight intensities (≥ 600 W m-2 and low flow rates (4.8 L h-1 provided optimum conditions for inactivation of A. hydrophila ATCC 3564, with greater overall inactivation and fewer sub-lethally injured cells than at low sunlight intensities or high flow rates. Low sunlight intensities resulted in reduced overall inactivation and greater sub-lethal injury at all flow rates. Conclusions This

  19. Mechanisms of appearance of the Pasteur effect in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: inactivation of sugar transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas, R; Dominguez, C; Busturia, A; Sáez, M J

    1982-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not show a noticeable Pasteur effect (activation of sugar catabolism by anaerobiosis) when growing with an excess of sugar and nitrogen source, but it does do so after exhaustion of the nitrogen source in the medium (resting state). We have found that this different behavior of growing and resting S. cerevisiae seems due to differences in the contribution of respiration to catabolism under both states. Growing S. cerevisiae respired only 3 to 20% of the catabolized sugar, depending on the sugar present; the remainder was fermented. In contrast, resting S. cerevisiae respired as much as 25 to 100% of the catabolized sugar. These results suggest that a shift to anaerobiosis would have much greater energetic consequences in resting than in growing S. cerevisiae. In resting S. cerevisiae anaerobiosis would strongly decrease the formation of ATP; as a consequence, various regulatory mechanisms would switch on, producing the observed increase of the rate of glycolysis. The greater significance that respiration reached in resting cells was not due to an increase of the respiratory capacity itself, but to a loss of fermentation which turned respiration into the main catabolic pathway. The main mechanism involved in the loss of fermentation observed during nitrogen starvation was a progressive inactivation of the sugar transport systems that reduced the rate of fermentation to less than 10% of the value observed in growing cells. Inactivation of the sugar transports seems a consequence of the turnover of the sugar carriers whose apparent half-lives were 2 to 7 h.

  20. Effects of solutions treated with oxygen radicals in neutral pH region on inactivation of microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of microorganisms using nonequilbrium atmospheric pressure plasmas has been attracted much attention due to the low temperature processing and high speed treatment. In this study, we have inactivated E. coli suspended in solutions with neutral pH using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source which can selectively supply electrically neutral oxygen radicals. E. coli cells were suspended with deionized distilled water (DDW) (pH = 6.8) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (pH = 7.4) or Citrate-Na buffer (pH = 6.5). The treated samples were diluted and spread on nutrient agar (Nutrient Broth). They were cultured at 37° C. The inactivation effects of oxygen radicals on those cells in solutions were evaluated by colony-counting method. O2 diluted by Ar gas were employed as a working gas for the radical source. The total gas flow rate and the gas mixture ratio of O2/(Ar + O2) were set at 5 slm and 0.6%, respectively. The distance between the radical exit and the suspension surface were set at 10 mm. As a result, the D values for DDW(pH = 6.8), PBS(pH = 7.4) and Citrate-Na buffer(pH = 6.5) were estimated to be 1.4 min, 0.9 min and 16.8 min respectively. The inactivation rates in DDW, PBS were significantly different from that in Citrate-Na buffer. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26286072 and project for promoting Research Center in Meijo University.

  1. Passage number of porcine embryonic germ cells affects epigenetic status and blastocyst rate following somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Gao, Yu; Petkov, Stoyan; Purup, Stig; Hyttel, Poul; Callesen, Henrik

    2014-06-10

    Epigenetic instability of donor cells due to long-term in vitro culture may influence the success rate of subsequent somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Therefore, the present study was designed (1) to investigate the epigenetic changes after prolonged culture in vitro of porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells, including differences in expression levels of both DNA methylation and demethylation-related genes and catalyses of histone modifications, and (2) to assess the efficiency of SCNT using EG cells from different passages. Results showed that genes either associated with DNA demethylation including DNMTs and TET1 or genes related to histone acetylation including HDACs were highly expressed in EG cells at higher passages when compared to EG cells at lower passages. In addition, the expression level of H3K27me3 functional methylase EZH2 increased while no changes were observed on H3K27me3 demethylase JMJD3 in relation to passage number. Moreover, the expression levels of both the H3K4me3 methylase MLL1 and the H3K4me3 demethylase RBP2 were increased at high passages. By using lower passage (numbers 3-5) EG cells as donor cells, the SCNT efficiency was significantly lower compared with use of fetal fibroblast donor cells. However, similar blastocyst rates were achieved when using higher passage (numbers 9-12) EG cells as donor cells. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the epigenetic status of EG cells change with increasing passage numbers, and that higher passage number EG cells are better primed for SCNT.

  2. Salvianolic acid A reverses the paclitaxel resistance and inhibits the migration and invasion abilities of human breast cancer cells by inactivating transgelin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Chen, Siying; Yang, Qianting; Cai, Jiangxia; Zhang, Weipeng; You, Haisheng; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance and tumor migration and invasion are the major obstacles to effective breast cancer chemotherapy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the potential of transgelin 2 and salvianolic acid A to modulate the resistance and the migration and invasion abilities of paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/PTX). MCF-7/PTX cells were found to exhibit not only a high degree of resistance to paclitaxel, but also strong migration and invasion abilities. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TAGLN2 sensitized the MCF-7/PTX cells to paclitaxel, and inhibited their migration and invasion abilities. In addition, we also observed that combined salvianolic acid A and paclitaxel treatment could reverse paclitaxel resistance, markedly inhibit tumor migration and invasion, and suppress the expression of transgelin 2 in MCF-7/PTX cells. These findings indicate that salvianolic acid A can reverse the paclitaxel resistance and inhibit the migration and invasion abilities of human breast cancer cells by down-regulating the expression of transgelin 2, and hence could be useful in breast cancer treatments.

  3. Salvianolic acid A reverses the paclitaxel resistance and inhibits the migration and invasion abilities of human breast cancer cells by inactivating transgelin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Chen, Siying; Yang, Qianting; Cai, Jiangxia; Zhang, Weipeng; You, Haisheng; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance and tumor migration and invasion are the major obstacles to effective breast cancer chemotherapy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the potential of transgelin 2 and salvianolic acid A to modulate the resistance and the migration and invasion abilities of paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/PTX). MCF-7/PTX cells were found to exhibit not only a high degree of resistance to paclitaxel, but also strong migration and invasion abilities. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TAGLN2 sensitized the MCF-7/PTX cells to paclitaxel, and inhibited their migration and invasion abilities. In addition, we also observed that combined salvianolic acid A and paclitaxel treatment could reverse paclitaxel resistance, markedly inhibit tumor migration and invasion, and suppress the expression of transgelin 2 in MCF-7/PTX cells. These findings indicate that salvianolic acid A can reverse the paclitaxel resistance and inhibit the migration and invasion abilities of human breast cancer cells by down-regulating the expression of transgelin 2, and hence could be useful in breast cancer treatments PMID:26176734

  4. Slow motion picture of protein inactivation during single-droplet drying: a study of inactivation kinetics of L-glutamate dehydrogenase dried in an acoustic levitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    A novel technique is presented to allow measurement of the kinetics of protein inactivation during drying of an acoustically levitated single droplet. Droplets/particles are removed from the acoustic field after various times during drying, and the state of the protein within them is analyzed. The influence of drying air temperature, relative humidity, buffer concentration, and the presence of a substrate on the inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase is described. The kinetics of inactivation showed three distinct phases. The first phase of constant drying rate demonstrated little protein inactivation in the solution droplet. After the critical point of drying, a second phase was distinguishable when the surface temperature has risen sharply, but there is still only little inactivation of the protein in the solid particle. An onset point of rapid inactivation of the protein marked the start of the third phase that proceeded with approximately first-order rate kinetics. In the case of L-glutamate dehydrogenase, the evidence suggests that the residual moisture content of the solid and not the temperature alone determines the point of onset of protein inactivation.

  5. Radiobiological inactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. [UV and X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, E.; Heston, L.; Grogan, E.; Miller, G.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte transforming properties of B95-8 strain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are very sensitive to inactivation by either uv or x irradiation. No dose of irradiation increases the transforming capacity of EBV. The x-ray dose needed for inactivation of EBV transformation (dose that results in 37% survival, 60,000 rads) is similar to the dose required for inactivation of plaque formation by herpes simplex virus type 1 (Fischer strain). Although herpes simplex virus is more sensitive than EBV to uv irradiation, this difference is most likely due to differences in the kinetics or mechanisms of repair of uv damage to the two viruses. The results lead to the hypothesis that a large part, or perhaps all, of the EBV genome is in some way needed to initiate transformation. The abilities of EBV to stimulate host cell DNA synthesis, to induce nuclear antigen, and to immortalize are inactivated in parallel. All clones of marmoset cells transformed by irradiated virus produce extracellular transforming virus. These findings suggest that the abilities of the virus to transform and to replicate complete progeny are inactivated together. The amounts of uv and x irradiation that inactivate transformation by B95-8 virus are less than the dose needed to inactivate early antigen induction by the nontransforming P/sub 3/HR-1 strain of EBV. Based on radiobiological inactivation, 10 to 50% of the genome is needed for early antigen induction.

  6. Mixed effects modeling of proliferation rates in cell-based models: consequence for pharmacogenomics and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Im

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The International HapMap project has made publicly available extensive genotypic data on a number of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Building on this resource, many research groups have generated a large amount of phenotypic data on these cell lines to facilitate genetic studies of disease risk or drug response. However, one problem that may reduce the usefulness of these resources is the biological noise inherent to cellular phenotypes. We developed a novel method, termed Mixed Effects Model Averaging (MEM, which pools data from multiple sources and generates an intrinsic cellular growth rate phenotype. This intrinsic growth rate was estimated for each of over 500 HapMap cell lines. We then examined the association of this intrinsic growth rate with gene expression levels and found that almost 30% (2,967 out of 10,748 of the genes tested were significant with FDR less than 10%. We probed further to demonstrate evidence of a genetic effect on intrinsic growth rate by determining a significant enrichment in growth-associated genes among genes targeted by top growth-associated SNPs (as eQTLs. The estimated intrinsic growth rate as well as the strength of the association with genetic variants and gene expression traits are made publicly available through a cell-based pharmacogenomics database, PACdb. This resource should enable researchers to explore the mediating effects of proliferation rate on other phenotypes.

  7. Gambogic acid-loaded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles inhibit Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration by inactivating transcription factor ETS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cailian Wang1, Haijun Zhang1, Yan Chen1, Fangfang Shi1, Baoan Chen2,31Department of Oncology, 2Department of Hematology, Zhongda Hospital, 3Faculty of Oncology, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: E26 transformation-specific sequence-1 (ETS1 transcription factor plays important roles in both carcinogenesis and the progression of a wide range of malignancies. Aberrant ETS1 expression correlates with aggressive tumor behavior and a poorer prognosis in patients with various malignancies. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of a drug delivery system utilizing gambogic acid-loaded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (GA-MNP- Fe3O4 on the suppression of ETS1-mediated cell proliferation and migration in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells.Methods: The effects caused by GA-MNP- Fe3O4 on the proliferation of Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells were evaluated using a MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay while inhibition of tumor cell migration was investigated in a scratch assay. The expressions of ETS1, cyclin D1, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA, and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor were examined by Western blot to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved.Results: In Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells, we observed that application of GA-MNP- Fe3O4 was able to suppress cancer cell proliferation and prevent cells from migrating effectively. After treatment, Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells showed significantly decreased expression of ETS1, as well as its downstream target genes for cyclin D1, u-PA, and VEGF.Conclusion: Our novel finding reaffirmed the significance of ETS1 in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and application of GA-MNP- Fe3O4 nanoparticles targeting ETS1 should be considered as a promising contribution for better pancreatic cancer care.Keywords: ETS1 transcription factor, gambogic acid, pancreatic cancer, magnetic nanoparticles

  8. Nasopharyngeal carriage rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateete David P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a determinant for invasive pneumococcal disease, which often complicates homozygous sickle cell disease. Here, we determined the nasopharyngeal carriage rate of S. pneumoniae in Ugandan children with homozygous sickle cell disease, who attended the outpatient Sickle Cell Clinic at Mulago National Referral hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Results S. pneumoniae occurred in 27 of the 81 children with homozygous sickle cell disease (giving a carriage rate of 33%, 27/81. Twenty three children were previously hospitalized of whom S. pneumoniae occurred in only two (9%, 2/23, while among the 58 who were not previously hospitalized it occurred in 25 (43%, 25/58, χ2 = 8.8, p = 0.003, meaning there is an association between high carriage rate and no hospitalization. Two children previously immunized with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine did not carry the organism. Prior antimicrobial usage was reported in 53 children (65%, 53/81. There was high resistance of pneumococci to penicillin (100%, 27/27 and trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole (97%, 26/27, but low resistance to other antimicrobials. Of the 70 children without sickle cell disease, S. pneumoniae occurred in 38 (54%, 38/70 of whom 43 were males and 27 females (53% males, 23/43, and 56% females, 15/27. Conclusion Nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci in Ugandan children with homozygous sickle cell disease is high. While nasopharyngeal carriage of S. pneumoniae is a determinant for invasive pneumococcal disease, pneumococcal bacteremia is reportedly low in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease. Studies on the contribution of high carriage rates to invasive pneumococcal disease in these children will be helpful. This is the first report on pneumococcal carriage rate in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease.

  9. Inactivation of Bacillus Subtilis by Atomic Oxygen Radical Anion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Longchun; WANG Lian; YU Zhou; LV Xuanzhong; LI Quanxin

    2007-01-01

    UAtomic oxygen radical anion (O- ) is one of the most active oxygen species, and has extremely high oxidation ability toward small-molecules of hydrocarbons. However, to our knowledge, little is known about the effects of O- on cells of micro-organisms. This work showed that O- could quickly react with the Bacillus subtilis cells and seriously damage the cell walls a s well as their other contents, leading to a fast and irreversible inactivation. SEM micrographs revealed that the cell structures were dramatically destroyed by their exposure to O-. The inactivation efficiencies of B. subtilis depend on the O-- intensity, the initial population of cells and the treatment temperature, but not on the pH in the range of our investigation. For a cell concentration of 106 cfu/ml, the number of survived cells dropped from 106 cfu/ml to 103 cfu/ml after about five-minute irradiation by an O- flux in an intensity of 233 nA/cm2 under a dry argon environment (30 ℃, 1 atm, exposed size: 1.8 cm2). The inactivation mechanism of micro-organisms induced by O- is also discussed.

  10. Purification and characterization of Moschatin, a novel type I ribosome-inactivating protein from the mature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and preparation of its immunotoxin against human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Heng Chuan; Li, Feng; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Zu Chuan

    2003-10-01

    A novel ribosome-inactivating protein designated Moschatin from the mature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) has been successively purified to homogeneity, using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose 52 column chromatography, Blue Sepharose CL-6B Affinity column chromatography and FPLC size-exclusion column chromatography. Moschatin is a type 1 RIP with a pI of 9.4 and molecular weight of approximately 29 kD. It is a rRNA N-glycosidase and potently blocked the protein synthesis in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate with a IC50 of 0.26 nM. Using the anti-human melanoma McAb Ng76, a novel immunotoxin Moschatin-Ng76 was prepared successfully and it efficiently inhibited the growth of targeted melanoma cells M21 with a IC50 of 0.04 nM, 1500 times lower than that of free Moschatin. The results implied that Moschatin could be used as a new potential anticancer agent.

  11. Purification and characterization of Moschatin, a novel type Ⅰ ribosome-inactivating protein from the mature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata),and preparation of its immunotoxin against human melanoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO TONG; HENG YU FAN; DA YUAN CHEN; XIANG FEN SONG; HEIDE SCHATTEN; QING YUAN SUN

    2003-01-01

    A novel ribosome-inactivating protein designated Moschatin from the mature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) has been successively purified to homogeneity, using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose 52 column chromatography, Blue Sepharose CL-6B Affinity column chromatography and FPLC size-exclusion column chromatography. Moschatin is a type 1 RIP with a pI of 9.4 and molecular weight of~29 kD. It is a rRNA Nglycosidase and potently blocked the protein synthesis in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate with a IC50 of 0.26 nM. Using the anti-human melanoma McAb Ng76, a novel immunotoxin Moschatin-Ng76 was prepared successfully and it efficiently inhibited the growth of targeted melanoma cells M21 with a IC50 of 0.04 nM, 1500 times lower than that of free Moschatin. The results implied that Moschatin could be used as a new potential anticancer agent.

  12. Proliferation rates of bovine primary muscle cells relate to liveweight and carcase weight in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Chantal A; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina P; Siddell, Jason P; Greenwood, Paul L; White, Jason D; McDonagh, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Muscling in cattle is largely influenced by genetic background, ultimately affecting beef yield and is of major interest to the beef industry. This investigation aimed to determine whether primary skeletal muscle cells isolated from different breeds of cattle with a varying genetic potential for muscling differ in their myogenic proliferative capacity. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the Longissimus muscle (LM) of 6 month old Angus, Hereford and Wagyu X Angus cattle. Cells were assessed for rate of proliferation and gene expression of PAX7, MYOD, MYF5, and MYOG. Proliferation rates were found to differ between breeds of cattle whereby myoblasts from Angus cattle were found to proliferate at a greater rate than those of Hereford and Wagyu X Angus during early stages of growth (5-20 hours in culture) in vitro (P cattle (P cattle (P cattle.

  13. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and cancer therapy: An evolutionary game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Heydar; Kebriaei, Hamed; Veisi, Zahra

    2017-03-06

    Inactivation of alleles in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is one of the important issues resulting in evolution of cancerous cells. In this paper, the evolution of healthy, one and two missed allele cells is modeled using the concept of evolutionary game theory and replicator dynamics. The proposed model also takes into account the interaction rates of the cells as designing parameters of the system. Different combinations of the equilibrium points of the parameterized nonlinear system is studied and categorized into some cases. In each case, the interaction rates' values are suggested in a way that the equilibrium points of the replicator dynamics are located on an appropriate region of the state space. Based on the suggested interaction rates, it is proved that the system doesn't have any undesirable interior equilibrium point as well. Therefore, the system will converge to the desirable region, where there is a scanty level of cancerous cells. In addition, the proposed conditions for interaction rates guarantee that, when a trajectory of the system reaches the boundaries, then it will stay there forever which is a desirable property since the equilibrium points have been already located on the boundaries, appropriately. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the suggestions in the elimination of the cancerous cells in different scenarios.

  14. High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced electrode spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Practical applications of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved by reducing electrode spacing but high surface area anodes are needed. The brush anode MEC with electrode spacing of 2 cm had a higher hydrogen production rate and energy efficiency than an MEC with a flat cathode and a 1-cm electrode spacing. The maximum hydrogen production rate with a 2 cm electrode spacing was 17.8 m(3)/m(3)d at an applied voltage of E(ap)=1 V. Reducing electrode spacing increased hydrogen production rates at the lower applied voltages, but not at the higher (>0.6 V) applied voltages. These results demonstrate that reducing electrode spacing can increase hydrogen production rate, but that the closest electrode spacing do not necessarily produce the highest possible hydrogen production rates.

  15. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    Vancauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  16. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest—a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  17. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories.

  18. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  19. Sinularin Induces Apoptosis through Mitochondria Dysfunction and Inactivation of the pI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway in Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sinularin is an active compound isolated from the cultured soft coral Sinularia flexibilis. In this study, we investigated the effects of sinularin on two human gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and NCI-N87. Our results demonstrated that sinularin suppressed the proliferation of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis. In addition, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome C, the activation of Bax, Bad and caspase-3/9, and the suppression of p-Bad, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were observed in the cells treated with sinularin. This finding suggests that sinularin-induced apoptosis is associated with mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and occurs through caspase-dependent pathways. Furthermore, sinularin inhibited the phosphoinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of the rapamycin signaling pathway. Taken together, our results show that sinularin-induced apoptosis is mediated by activation of the caspase cascade and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that sinularin merits further evaluation as a chemotherapeutic agent for human gastric cancer.

  20. Case-positive versus case-negative designs for low-rate lithium thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahy, T. X.

    1982-01-01

    Case polarity design choices are discussed. Two examples of case-negative designs are presented. One battery is thionyl chloride limited and the other is lithium limited. The case-positive design is thionyl chloride limited. It is found that the case-positive/case-negative design consideration does not seem to have much bearing on storage. However, during low rate discharge, the case-negative cells show a steadily decreasing capacity as you go to lower and lower rates.

  1. DNA replication initiation, doubling of rate of phospholipid synthesis, and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseleau-Petit, D; Képès, F; Peutat, L; D'Ari, R; Képès, A

    1987-01-01

    In synchronized culture of Escherichia coli, the specific arrest of phospholipid synthesis (brought about by glycerol starvation in an appropriate mutant) did not affect the rate of ongoing DNA synthesis but prevented the initiation of new rounds. The initiation block did not depend on cell age at the time of glycerol removal, which could be before, during, or after the doubling in the rate of phospholipid synthesis (DROPS) and as little as 10 min before the expected initiation. We conclude t...

  2. Genetic architecture of skewed X inactivation in the laboratory mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Calaway

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mammalian mechanism of dosage compensation that balances X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Early during female development, each cell of the embryo proper independently inactivates one of its two parental X-chromosomes. In mice, the choice of which X chromosome is inactivated is affected by the genotype of a cis-acting locus, the X-chromosome controlling element (Xce. Xce has been localized to a 1.9 Mb interval within the X-inactivation center (Xic, yet its molecular identity and mechanism of action remain unknown. We combined genotype and sequence data for mouse stocks with detailed phenotyping of ten inbred strains and with the development of a statistical model that incorporates phenotyping data from multiple sources to disentangle sources of XCI phenotypic variance in natural female populations on X inactivation. We have reduced the Xce candidate 10-fold to a 176 kb region located approximately 500 kb proximal to Xist. We propose that structural variation in this interval explains the presence of multiple functional Xce alleles in the genus Mus. We have identified a new allele, Xce(e present in Mus musculus and a possible sixth functional allele in Mus spicilegus. We have also confirmed a parent-of-origin effect on X inactivation choice and provide evidence that maternal inheritance magnifies the skewing associated with strong Xce alleles. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 155 laboratory strains and wild mice we conclude that Xce(a is either a derived allele that arose concurrently with the domestication of fancy mice but prior the derivation of most classical inbred strains or a rare allele in the wild. Furthermore, we have found that despite the presence of multiple haplotypes in the wild Mus musculus domesticus has only one functional Xce allele, Xce(b. Lastly, we conclude that each mouse taxa examined has a different functional Xce allele.

  3. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  4. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  5. Inactivation of A549 cancer cells by a helium-oxygen vlasma needle%氦-氧等离子体针灭活肺癌A549细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈维; 黄骏; 李辉; 吕国华; 王兴权; 张国平; 王鹏业; 杨思泽

    2012-01-01

    研究了介质阻挡放电等离子体针对肺癌A549细胞的灭活机制,探讨从不锈钢管注入到氦等离子体尾流区域的氧气含量对杀灭肺癌细胞A549的影响.利用中性红吸收测试法定性观察了等离子体处理后死亡的细胞和活着的细胞的形态区别,并且定量测定了不同条件下的细胞存活率.在固定功率24w的处理过程中,氦一氧等离子体的灭活效率主要取决于等离子体曝光时间以及氦气中添加氧气的百分含量.实验结果显示最好的处理参数为:处理时间150S,800mL/min的氦气添加3%氧气,保持针距样品的距离为3nlnl.根据氦.氧等离子体发射光谱,可以推断在细胞灭活过程中,氦.氧等离子体中的活性粒子(如羟基和氧自由基)起主要作用.%An inactivation mechanism of A549 cancer cells is studied by using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma needle. The influence of oxygen concentration, which is injected into helium plasma afterglow region through a stainless steel tube, is investigated. The neutral red uptake assay provides a qualitative observation of morphological differences between the dead cells and the viable ceils after plasma treatment and a quantitative estimation of cell viability under different conditions. In the treatment process at a fixed power of 24 W, the inactivation efficiency of helium-oxygen plasma depends mainly on the exposure time and percentage of added oxygen in helium plasma. Experimental results show that the best parameters of the process are 150 s treatment time, 800 mL/min He with 3% Oz addition and separation of needle-to-sample 3 mm. According to the helium-oxygen emission spectra of the plasma jet, it is concluded that the reactive species (for example, OH and O) in the helium-oxygen plasma play a major role in the cell deactivation.

  6. Characterisation of the effects of robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus, on sodium channel activation and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, G M; Walsh, R; Little, M J; Tyler, M I

    1998-06-01

    The present study investigates the actions of robustoxin (atracotoxin-Ar1) purified from the venom of the male Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus on sodium channel gating. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques the study assessed the actions of robustoxin on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Similar to the closely related funnel-web spider toxin versutoxin (delta-atracotoxin-Hv1) from Hadronyche versuta, robustoxin had no effect on TTX-R sodium currents but exerted potent effects on TTX-S sodium currents. The main action of robustoxin was a concentration-dependent slowing or removal of TTX-S sodium current inactivation. This steady-state current was maintained during long-lasting depolarisations at all test potentials. Robustoxin (30 nM) also caused a 13-mV hyperpolarising shift in the voltage midpoint of steady-state sodium channel inactivation (h infinity) leading to a reduced peak current at a holding potential of -80 mV. Moreover there was a steady-state or non-inactivating component present (18% of maximal sodium current) at prepulse potentials that normally inactivate all TTX-S sodium channels (more depolarised than -40 mV). In addition robustoxin produced a significant increase in the repriming kinetics of the sodium channel when channels returned to the resting state following activation. This increase in the rate of recovery of sodium current appears to explain the use-dependent effects on peak sodium current amplitude at high stimulation frequencies. Finally 30 nM robustoxin caused an 11-mV hyperpolarising shift in the voltage dependence of the channel but did not markedly modify tail current kinetics. These actions suggest that robustoxin inhibits conversion of the open state to the inactivated state of TTX-S sodium channels, thus allowing a fraction of the sodium current to remain at membrane potentials at which inactivation is normally complete. Given the recent

  7. Differential effect of culture temperature and specific growth rate on CHO cell behavior in chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Mauricio; Becerra, Silvana; Berrios, Julio; Osses, Nelson; Reyes, Juan; Rodríguez-Moyá, María; Gonzalez, Ramon; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Mild hypothermia condition in mammalian cell culture technology has been one of the main focuses of research for the development of breeding strategies to maximize productivity of these production systems. Despite the large number of studies that show positive effects of mild hypothermia on specific productivity of r-proteins, no experimental approach has addressed the indirect effect of lower temperatures on specific cell growth rate, nor how this condition possibly affects less specific productivity of r-proteins. To separately analyze the effects of mild hypothermia and specific growth rate on CHO cell metabolism and recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator productivity as a model system, high dilution rate (0.017 h(-1)) and low dilution rate (0.012 h(-1)) at two cultivation temperatures (37 and 33 °C) were evaluated using chemostat culture. The results showed a positive effect on the specific productivity of r-protein with decreasing specific growth rate at 33 °C. Differential effect was achieved by mild hypothermia on the specific productivity of r-protein, contrary to the evidence reported in batch culture. Interestingly, reduction of metabolism could not be associated with a decrease in culture temperature, but rather with a decrease in specific growth rate.

  8. Antitumor mechanisms when pRb and p53 are genetically inactivated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Lu, Z; Zhao, H

    2015-08-27

    pRb and p53 are the two major tumor suppressors. Their inactivation is frequent when cancers develop and their reactivation is rationale of most cancer therapeutics. When pRb and p53 are genetically inactivated, cells irreparably lose the antitumor mechanisms afforded by them. Cancer genome studies document recurrent genetic inactivation of RB1 and TP53, and the inactivation becomes more frequent in more advanced cancers. These findings may explain why more advanced cancers are more likely to resist current therapies. Finding successful treatments for more advanced and multi-therapy-resistant cancers will depend on finding antitumor mechanisms that remain effective when pRb and p53 are genetically inactivated. Here, we review studies that have begun to make progress in this direction.

  9. Treatment with hydrogen molecules prevents RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation associated with inhibition of ROS formation and inactivation of MAPK, AKT and NF-kappa B pathways in murine RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Zhu; Zhang, Qing-Xiang; Dong, Xiao-Xian; Li, Huai-Dong; Ma, Xin

    2014-09-01

    The bone protective effects of the hydrogen molecule (H2) have been demonstrated in several osteoporosis models while the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Osteoclast differentiation is an important factor related to the pathogenesis of bone-loss related diseases. In this work, we evaluated the effects of incubation with H2 on receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation. We found that treatment with H2 prevented RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells and BMMs. Treatment with H2 inhibits the ability to form resorption pits of BMMs stimulated by RANKL. Treatment with H2 reduced mRNA levels of osteoclast-specific markers including tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, metalloproteinase-9, carbonic anhydrase typeII, and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase. Treatment with H2 decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, suppressed NADPH oxidase activity, down-regulated Rac1 activity and Nox1 expression, reduced mitochondrial ROS formation, and enhanced nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 nuclear translocation and heme oxygenase-1 activity. In addition, treatment with H2 suppressed RANKL-induced expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 and c-Fos. Furthermore, treatment with H2 suppressed NF-κB activation and reduced phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, and protein kinases B (AKT) stimulated with RANKL. In conclusion, hydrogen molecules prevented RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation associated with inhibition of reactive oxygen species formation and inactivation of NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT pathways.

  10. Inactivation of agmatinase expressed in vegetative cells alters arginine catabolism and prevents diazotrophic growth in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Mireia; Flores, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Arginine decarboxylase produces agmatine, and arginase and agmatinase are ureohydrolases that catalyze the production of ornithine and putrescine from arginine and agmatine, respectively, releasing urea. In the genome of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ORF alr2310 putatively encodes an ureohydrolase. Cells of Anabaena supplemented with [(14) C]arginine took up and catabolized this amino acid generating a set of labeled amino acids that included ornithine, proline, and glutamate. In an alr2310 deletion mutant, an agmatine spot appeared and labeled glutamate increased with respect to the wild type, suggesting that Alr2310 is an agmatinase rather than an arginase. As determined in cell-free extracts, agmatinase activity could be detected in the wild type but not in the mutant. Thus, alr2310 is the Anabaena speB gene encoding agmatinase. The ∆alr2310 mutant accumulated large amounts of cyanophycin granule polypeptide, lacked nitrogenase activity, and did not grow diazotrophically. Growth tests in solid media showed that agmatine is inhibitory for Anabaena, especially under diazotrophic conditions, suggesting that growth of the mutant is inhibited by non-metabolized agmatine. Measurements of incorporation of radioactivity from [(14) C]leucine into macromolecules showed, however, a limited inhibition of protein synthesis in the ∆alr2310 mutant. Analysis of an Anabaena strain producing an Alr2310-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion showed expression in vegetative cells but much less in heterocysts, implying compartmentalization of the arginine decarboxylation pathway in the diazotrophic filaments of this heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

  11. Applicability of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy as an alternative to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrojado, Cátia; Pereira, Carla; Tomé, João P C; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-10-01

    Aquaculture activities are increasing worldwide, stimulated by the progressive reduction of natural fish stocks in the oceans. However, these activities also suffer heavy production and financial losses resulting from fish infections caused by microbial pathogens, including multidrug resistant bacteria. Therefore, strategies to control fish infections are urgently needed, in order to make aquaculture industry more sustainable. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has emerged as an alternative to treat diseases and prevent the development of antibiotic resistance by pathogenic bacteria. The aim of this work was to evaluate the applicability of aPDT to inactivate pathogenic fish bacteria. To reach this objective a cationic porphyrin Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF was tested against nine pathogenic bacteria isolated from a semi-intensive aquaculture system and against the cultivable bacteria of the aquaculture system. The ecological impact of aPDT in the aquatic environment was also tested on the natural bacterial community, using the overall bacterial community structure and the cultivable bacteria as indicators. Photodynamic inactivation of bacterial isolates and of cultivable bacteria was assessed counting the number of colonies. The impact of aPDT in the overall bacterial community structure of the aquaculture water was evaluated by denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that, in the presence of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF, the growth of bacterial isolates was inhibited, resulting in a decrease of ≈7-8 log after 60-270 min of irradiation. Cultivable bacteria were also considerably affected, showing decreases up to the detection limit (≈2 log decrease on cell survival), but the inactivation rate varied significantly with the sampling period. The DGGE fingerprint analyses revealed changes in the bacterial community structure caused by the combination of aPDT and light. The results indicate that aPDT can be regarded as a new approach to control fish

  12. Membrane-DNA attachment sites in Streptococcus faecalis cells grown at different rates.

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, L C; Rigney, D; Daneo-Moore, L; Higgins, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The M-band technique was used to assess the number of attachment points of DNA to the cell membrane of Streptococcus faecalis grown at three different rates. Cells were X irradiated in liquid nitrogen and then analyzed simultaneously for the introduction of double-strand breaks into the chromosome and the degree of removal of DNA from the cell membrane (M band). Consideration of the data from these experiments and of the topology of the bacterial chromosome resulted in a reevaluation of forme...

  13. Population differences in the rate of proliferation of international HapMap cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Tong; O'Donnell, Peter H; Beiswanger, Christine M; Huang, R Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2010-12-10

    The International HapMap Project is a resource for researchers containing genotype, sequencing, and expression information for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from populations across the world. The expansion of the HapMap beyond the four initial populations of Phase 2, referred to as Phase 3, has increased the sample number and ethnic diversity available for investigation. However, differences in the rate of cellular proliferation between the populations can serve as confounders in phenotype-genotype studies using these cell lines. Within the Phase 2 populations, the JPT and CHB cell lines grow faster (p HapMap panels into discovery and replication sets must take this into consideration.

  14. Cytotoxic effect of the immunotoxin constructed of the ribosome-inactivating protein curcin and the monoclonal antibody against Her2 receptor on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Quintero, Lidia Patricia; Contis Montes de Oca, Arturo; Romero Rojas, Andrés; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Martínez-Ayala, Alma Leticia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of the curcin on cancer cells allows to consider this protein as the toxic component of an immunotoxin directed to Her2, which is associated with cancer. Reductive amination was proposed to conjugate curcin and an anti-Her2; the binding was tested using Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The in vitro cytotoxicity of curcin and the immunotoxin was assessed on breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 (Her2(+)) and MDA-MB-231 (Her2(-)). IC50 values for curcin were 15.5 ± 8.3 and 18.6 ± 2.4 μg/mL, respectively, statistically equivalent (p SK-BR-3 and 147.6 ± 2.5 μg/mL for MDA-MB-231. These values showed that the immunotoxin was seven times more toxic to the SK-BR-3 than curcin and eight times less toxic to the MDA-MB-231. The immunotoxin composed of curcin and an antibody against Her2 and constructed by reductive amination could be a therapeutic candidate against Her2(+) cancer.

  15. Kinsenoside screening with a microfluidic chip attenuates gouty arthritis through inactivating NF-κB signaling in macrophages and protecting endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiao; Bing, Wang; Di, Yin; Hua, Li; Shi-he, Li; Yu-hua, Zheng; Xiu-guo, Han; Yu-gang, Wang; Qi-ming, Fan; Shih-mo, Yang; Ting-ting, Tang

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is a rheumatic disease that is characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) in synovial joints cause by the increased serum hyperuricemia. This study used a three-dimensional (3D) flowing microfluidic chip to screen the effective candidate against MSU-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) damage, and found kinsenoside (Kin) to be the leading active component of Anoectochilus roxburghi, one of the Chinese medicinal plant widely used in the treatment of gouty arthritis clinically. Cell viability and apoptosis of HUVECs were evaluated, indicating that direct Kin stimulation and conditioned medium (CM) from Kin-treated macrophages both negatively modulated with MSU crystals. Additionally, Kin was capable of attenuating MSU-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (NF-κB/MAPK) signaling, targeting IκB kinase-α (IKKα) and IKKβ kinases of macrophages and influencing the expressions of NF-κB downstream cytokines and subsequent HUVEC bioactivity. Inflammasome NLR pyrin domain-containing 3 (NALP3) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) were also inhibited after Kin treatment. Also, Kin downregulated CD14-mediated MSU crystals uptake in macrophages. In vivo study with MSU-injected ankle joints further revealed the significant suppression of inflammatory infiltration and endothelia impairment coupled with alleviation of ankle swelling and nociceptive response via Kin treatments. Taken together, these data implicated that Kin was the most effective candidate from Anoectochilus roxburghi to treat gouty arthritis clinically. PMID:27584788

  16. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.

  17. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  18. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN Ⅱ RECEPTOR SUBTYPE Ⅰ ON THE FIRING RATE IN CATECHOLAMINERGIC TUMOR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Jianqing(杜剑青); Sun Chengwen(孙成文); Tang Jingshi (唐敬师); Colin Sumners; Mohan K Raizada

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the action of brain angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) receptors and underlying intracellular mechanism in the catecholaminergic system(CATH) Methods Action potentials (APs) of the primary co-cultured catecholaminergic tumor (CATH.a) cells were recorded with the whole-cell patch clamp configuration in current clamp mode. Expression of Ang Ⅱ receptors subtypes (AT1 and AT2) was detected by RT-PCR technique. Results The differentiated CATH.a cells represented a neuron-like characterization. All CATH.a cells expressed mRNA encoding both Ang Ⅱ AT1 and AT2 receptor subtypes. Ang Ⅱ increased the firing rate in the CATH.a cells, which was inhibited completely by addition administration of the AT1 but not AT2 receptor antagonist, and partially by using the inhibitors of signal molecules, U73122 (10 μmol*L-1), or KN-93 (10 μmol*L-1), or calphostin C (10 μmol*L-1). Conclusion Ang Ⅱ increases firing rate in CATH.a cells via AT1 receptor. The CATH.a cells expressing functional AT1 and AT2 receptor subtypes may be of general utility for the study of the Ang Ⅱ receptor-induced modulation of brain catecholaminergic system.

  19. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects.

  20. Effects of Glutamic Acid on C-type Inactivation of Kvl.4△N Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Ye; Xiaoyan Li; Zhouwu Shu; Xuejun Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Acidosis has an inhibitory effect on the inactivation of Kvl.4 AN channel through the position H508.So in order to show the effects of glutamic acid on the mutant Kv 1.4 channel that lacks N-type inactivation(Kvl.4A2-146),we studied in the expression system of the Xenopus oocytes.Methods The two-electrode voltage-clamp technique(TEV)was used to record the currents.Results Acidosis increased fKvl.4 △2-146 C-type inactivation.After application of glutamic acid(1 mmol/L) to Kvl.4 △2-146 increased C-type inactivation further,changed inactivation time constants from (2.02±0.39s)to(1.71±0.23 s)(P<0.05)at +50my,and shifted the steadystate inactivation curves of Kvl.4 △N to positive potential,which was from(-44.30±0.59 mV) to(-39.88±0.29 mV)(P<0.05 ).and slowed the rate of recovery from inactivation,which was from(1.64±0.19s) to (1.91±0.23 s)(P<0.05).Conclusions Together,these results suggest that 1 mmol/L glutamic acid accelerates the Ctype inactivation of Kvl.4 AN in pH 6.8.

  1. A cross-species comparison of escape from X inactivation in Eutheria: implications for evolution of X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nadaf, Shafagh; Deakin, Janine E; Gilbert, Clément; Robinson, Terence J; Graves, Jennifer A M; Waters, Paul D

    2012-02-01

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation in both eutherian and marsupial mammals is achieved by X chromosome inactivation (XCI)--transcriptional repression that silences one of the two X chromosomes in the somatic cells of females. We recently used RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to show, in individual nuclei, that marsupial X inactivation (in the absence of XIST) occurs on a gene-by-gene basis, and that escape from inactivation is stochastic and independent of gene location. In the absence of similar data from fibroblast cell lines of eutherian representatives, a meaningful comparison is lacking. We therefore used RNA-FISH to examine XCI in fibroblast cell lines obtained from three distantly related eutherian model species: African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana), mouse (Mus musculus) and human (Homo sapiens). We show that, unlike the orthologous marsupial X, inactivation of the X conserved region (XCR) in eutherians generally is complete. Two-colour RNA-FISH on female human, mouse and elephant interphase nuclei showed that XCR loci have monoallelic expression in almost all nuclei. However, we found that many loci located in the evolutionarily distinct recently added region (XAR) displayed reproducible locus-specific frequencies of nuclei with either one or two active X alleles. We propose that marsupial XCI retains features of an ancient incomplete silencing mechanism that was augmented by the evolution of the XIST gene that progressively stabilized the eutherian XCR. In contrast, the recently added region of the eutherian X displays an incomplete inactivation profile similar to that observed on the evolutionarily distinct marsupial X and the independently evolved monotreme X chromosomes.

  2. Inactivation of dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea in synthetic ballast water by reactive species generated from dielectric barrier discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Qiong; Jiang Wenju; Yang Zhishan [Institute of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhang Yi; Lim Tuti Mariana, E-mail: TMLim@ntu.edu.s [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technology University, Innovation Center, Block 2, Unit 237, 18 Nanyang Drive, 637723 Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-05-07

    The inactivation of dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea in synthetic ballast water by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system was investigated. The OH{sup .} radical, ozone and hydrogen peroxide generated from the DBD system were measured. Before and after the treatment, the viability of dinoflagellate S. trochoidea was evaluated by analyzing chlorophyll a, protein and saccharide content and morphology of the cells, as well as the pH of the cell culture media. The results show OH{sup .} radical was the major reactive species when humid air was used. The inactivation of S. trochoidea was found to be dependent on the applied voltage and the gas flow rate, and was completed within 4 min at a gas flow rate of 7 L min{sup -1} and an applied voltage of 20 kV. The change of chlorophyll a, protein and saccharide concentrations of S. trochoidea and the morphology of the cells indicates that the reactive species generated from the DBD system can break up the cells via oxidation.

  3. Identification of biomolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters in living cells by inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirmohammadi Adel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of in-vivo biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters from experimental data obtained by Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP is becoming more important. Methods and results The Osborne-Moré extended version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was coupled with the experimental data obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP protocol, and the numerical solution of a set of two partial differential equations governing macromolecule mass transport and reaction in living cells, to inversely estimate optimized values of the molecular diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor. The results indicate that the FRAP protocol provides enough information to estimate one parameter uniquely using a nonlinear optimization technique. Coupling FRAP experimental data with the inverse modeling strategy, one can also uniquely estimate the individual values of the binding rate coefficients if the molecular diffusion coefficient is known. One can also simultaneously estimate the dissociation rate parameter and molecular diffusion coefficient given the pseudo-association rate parameter is known. However, the protocol provides insufficient information for unique simultaneous estimation of three parameters (diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters owing to the high intercorrelation between the molecular diffusion coefficient and pseudo-association rate parameter. Attempts to estimate macromolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters simultaneously from FRAP data result in misleading conclusions regarding concentrations of free macromolecule and bound complex inside the cell, average binding time per vacant site, average time for diffusion of macromolecules from one site to the next, and slow or rapid mobility of biomolecules in cells. Conclusion To obtain unique values for molecular diffusion coefficient and

  4. MAOA and GYG2 are submitted to X chromosome inactivation in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabellini, Raquel; Vasques, Luciana R; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Hernandes, Lys Molina; Pereira, Lygia V

    2009-08-16

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a comprehensively studied phenomenon that helped to highlight the heritable nature of epigenetic modifications. Although it consists of the transcriptional inactivation of a whole X chromosome in females, some genes escape this process and present bi-allelic expression. Using human fibroblasts with skewed inactivation, we determined allele-specific expression of two X-linked genes previously described to escape XCI in rodent/human somatic cell hybrids, MAOA and GYG2, and the pattern of DNA methylation of their 5' end. Results from these complementary methodologies let us to conclude that both genes are subjected to X inactivation in normal human fibroblasts, indicating that hybrid cells are not an adequate system for studying epigenotypes. We emphasize the need of an analysis of XCI in normal human cell lines, helping us to determine more precisely which X-linked genes contribute to differences among genders and to the phenotypes associated with sex chromosomes aneuploidies.

  5. Inactivation of the β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase and the α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase genes in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Cells by a Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 Strategy Results in Glycoproteins without Plant-Specific Glycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercx, Sébastien; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Chaumont, François; De Pauw, Edwin; Boutry, Marc; Navarre, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Plants or plant cells can be used to produce pharmacological glycoproteins such as antibodies or vaccines. However these proteins carry N-glycans with plant-typical residues [β(1,2)-xylose and core α(1,3)-fucose], which can greatly impact the immunogenicity, allergenicity, or activity of the protein. Two enzymes are responsible for the addition of plant-specific glycans: β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) and α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT). Our aim consisted of knocking-out two XylT genes and four FucT genes (12 alleles altogether) in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Three XylT and six FucT sgRNAs were designed to target conserved regions. After transformation of N. tabacum BY-2 cells with genes coding for sgRNAs, Cas9, and a selectable marker (bar), transgenic lines were obtained and their extracellular as well as intracellular protein complements were analyzed by Western blotting using antibodies recognizing β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose. Three lines showed a strong reduction of β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose, while two lines were completely devoid of them, indicating complete gene inactivation. The absence of these carbohydrates was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteins. PCR amplification and sequencing of the targeted region indicated small INDEL and/or deletions between the target sites. The KO lines did not show any particular morphology and grew as the wild-type. One KO line was transformed with genes encoding a human IgG2 antibody. The IgG2 expression level was as high as in a control transformant which had not been glycoengineered. The IgG glycosylation profile determined by mass spectrometry confirmed that no β(1,2)-xylose or α(1,3)-fucose were present on the glycosylation moiety and that the dominant glycoform was the GnGn structure. These data represent an important step toward humanizing the glycosylation of pharmacological proteins expressed in N. tabacum BY-2 cells.

  6. Recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins and related risk factors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Fernanda; Santamaría, Jesus Rodriguez; Garbers, Luiz Eduardo Fabricio de Melo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The best way to approach surgically removed basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins is a controversial issue. Some authors believe that the more appropriate treatment is an immediate reoperation while others prefer a periodic follow up. The rates of recurrence are variable in literature, between 10% and 67%. OBJECTIVE To define the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive margins after surgery. Secondarily, identify morphological aspects that can suggest a more frequent tumoral recurrence. METHODS This was a retrospective and observational study made by analysis of medical records of 487 patients between January 2003 and December 2009 in Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná (HC-UFPR). From 402 basal cell carcinomas surgically treated, 41 fulfilled inclusion criteria and were evaluated for five years or more. Recurrence rate of these tumors was analyzed in all patients and clinical characteristics such as sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, ulceration, and histological type were evaluated in order to find if they were related to more common tumoral recurrence. RESULTS The rate of positive margins after surgery was 12.18%. There were five cases of tumoral recurrence in the observation group and three cases in the re-excision group. Tumor size, site, histological type, ulceration and type of positive margin did not differ statistically between groups. It was not possible to consider if these factors were important in recurrence rates. STUDY LIMITATIONS Ideally, a prospective study with a larger sample would be more accurate. CONCLUSION The treatment of choice in basal cell carcinoma with positive margins must be individualized to reduce recurrence rates. PMID:28225958

  7. Effectiveness and economic analysis of the whole cell/recombinant B subunit (WC/rbs inactivated oral cholera vaccine in the prevention of traveller's diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diez-Diaz Rosa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays there is a debate about the indication of the oral whole-cell/recombinant B-subunit cholera vaccine (WC/rBS in traveller's diarrhoea. However, a cost-benefit analysis based on real data has not been published. Methods A cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit study of the oral cholera vaccine (WC/rBS, Dukoral® for the prevention of traveller's diarrhoea (TD was performed in subjects travelling to cholera risk areas. The effectiveness of WC/rBS vaccine in the prevention of TD was analyzed in 362 travellers attending two International Vaccination Centres in Spain between May and September 2005. Results The overall vaccine efficacy against TD was 42,6%. Direct healthcare-related costs as well as indirect costs (lost vacation days subsequent to the disease were considered. Preventive vaccination against TD resulted in a mean saving of 79.26 € per traveller. Conclusion According to the cost-benefit analysis performed, the recommendation for WC/rBS vaccination in subjects travelling to zones at risk of TD is beneficial for the traveller, regardless of trip duration and visited continent.

  8. Ecology and thermal inactivation of microbes in and on interplanetary space vehicle components. [heat sensitivity of bacterial spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.; Reyes, A. L.; Wehby, A. J.; Crawford, R. G.; Wimsatt, J. C.; Peeler, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism for thermal inactivation of bacterial spores under moist or dry heat was studied. Experimental conditions were established relating to spore loss of heat resistance and loss of optical density as a measure of the rate and extent of germination in spore suspensions. Events occurring during germination were correlated with phase darkening (refractility and non-refractility of spores), stainability characteristics of heat and non-heat treated spores, morphological characteristics, and studies on swelling of spores by an increase in packed cell volume.

  9. Multi-Cell Random Beamforming: Achievable Rate and Degrees of Freedom Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hieu Duy; Hui, Hon Tat

    2012-01-01

    Random beamforming (RBF) is a practically favorable transmission scheme for multiuser multi-antenna downlink systems since it requires only partial channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter. Under the conventional single-cell setup, RBF is known to achieve the optimal sum-capacity scaling law as the number of users goes to infinity, thanks to the multiuser diversity effect that eliminates the inter-user interference. In this paper, we extend the study on RBF to a more practical multi-cell downlink system subject to the additional inter-cell interference (ICI). First, we consider the case of finite user's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We derive a closed-form expression of the achievable sum rate with the multi-cell RBF, based upon which we show the asymptotic sum-rate scaling law as the number of users goes to infinity. Next, we consider the high-SNR regime and for a tractable analysis assume that the number of users in each cell scales in a certain order with the per-cell SNR. Under this setup, we cha...

  10. Specific heat flow rate: an on-line monitor and potential control variable of specific metabolic rate in animal cell culture that combines microcalorimetry with dielectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y; Evans, P M; Kemp, R B

    1998-06-05

    One of the requirements for enhanced productivity by the animal culture systems used in biotechnology is the direct assessment of the metabolic rate by on-line biosensors. Based on the fact that cell growth is associated with an enthalpy change, it is shown that the specific heat flow rate is stoichiometrically related to the net specific rates of substrates, products, and indeed to specific growth rate, and therefore a direct reflection of metabolic rate. Heat flow rate measured by conduction calorimetry has a technical advantage over estimates for many material flows which require assays at a minimum of two discrete times to give the rate. In order to make heat flow rate specific to the amount of the living cellular system, it would be advantageous to divide it by viable biomass. This requirement has been fulfilled by combining a continuous flow microcalorimeter ex situ with a dielectric spectroscope in situ, the latter measuring the viable cell mass volume fraction. The quality of the resulting biosensor for specific heat flow rate was illustrated using batch cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO 320) producing recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) during growth in a stirred tank bioreactor under fully aerobic conditions. The measuring scatter of the probe was decreased significantly by applying the moving average technique to the two participant signals. It was demonstrated that the total metabolic rate of the cells, as indicated by the specific heat flow rate sensor, decreased with increasing time in batch culture, coincident with the decline in the two major substrates, glucose and glutamine, and the accumulation of the by-products, ammonia and lactate. Furthermore, the specific heat flow rate was an earlier indicator of substrate depletion than the flow rate alone. The calorimetric-respirometric ratio showed the intensive participation of anaerobic processes during growth and the related IFN-gamma production. Specific heat flow rate was

  11. BHK cell lines with increased rates of gene amplification are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giulotto, E.; Bertoni, L.; Attolini, C.; Rainaldi, G.; Anglana, M. (Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia Adriano Buzzati-Traverso, Pavia (Italy))

    1991-04-15

    Four cell lines (MP1, -4, -5, -7), isolated from baby hamster kidney cells after simultaneous selection with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate and methotrexate, have previously been shown to amplify their DNA at an increased rate. We now show that all four lines are hypersensitive to killing by UV light and mitomycin C. At high doses of UV light or mitomycin C, the MP lines survived less than 10% or less than 5% as well as parental cells, respectively. After UV irradiation, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was greater in MP than in parental cells, and recovery was slower or absent. A 2- to 3.5-fold increase in the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange was also seen in the four cell lines. In MP5, unscheduled DNA replication after treatment with UV light was only approximately 70% as great as in parental cells and the other MP lines. In MP4 and MP7 cells S phase was elongated. Although their individual properties confirm that the four cell lines are independent, their common properties suggest a relationship between tolerance of DNA damage and gene amplification.

  12. Growth and thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in cabbage and cabbage juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E; Hao, D Y; Conner, D E

    1986-10-01

    Studies were done to determine the interacting effects of pH, NaCl, temperature, and time on growth, survival, and death of two strains of Listeria monocytogenes. Viable population of the organism steadily declined in heat-sterilized cabbage stored at 5 degrees C for 42 days. In contrast, the organism grew on raw cabbage during the first 25 days of a 64-day storage period at 5 degrees C. Growth was observed in heat-sterilized unclarified cabbage juice containing less than or equal to 5% NaCl and tryptic phosphate broth containing less than or equal to 10% NaCl. Rates of thermal inactivation increased as pH of clarified cabbage juice heating medium was decreased from 5.6 to 4.0. At 58 degrees C (pH 5.6), 4 X 10(6) cells/mL were reduced to undetectable levels within 10 min. Thermal inactivation rates in clarified cabbage juice (pH 5.6) were not significantly influenced by the presence of up to 2% NaCl; however, heat-stressed cells had increased sensitivity to NaCl in tryptic soy agar recovery medium. Cold enrichment of heat-stressed cells at 5 degrees C for 21 days enhanced resuscitation. Results indicate that L. monocytogenes can proliferate on refrigerated (5 degrees C) raw cabbage which, in turn, may represent a hazard to health of the consumer. Heat pasteurization treatments normally given to cabbage juice or sauerkraut would be expected to kill any L. monocytogenes cells which may be present.

  13. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, G.A.; Kapila, S.; Kelkar, V.B.; Negi, S.; Modi, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The survival of certain bacterial cultures suspended in sewage sludge and exposed to gamma-radiation was studied. The inactivation patterns of most of the organisms were significantly different when irradiation was performed using sewage samples collected in the summer and monsoon seasons. The summer sample collected from the anaerobic digester afforded significant protection to both Gram negative and Gram positive organisms. This was evident by the increase in dose required to bring about a 6 log cycle reduction in viable count of the bacterial cultures, when suspended in sewage samples instead of phosphate buffer. The observations made using monsoon digester samples were quite different. This sewage sludge greatly enhanced inactivation by gamma-radiation in most cases. The effects of certain chemicals on the inactivation patterns of two organisms - Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri - were examined. Arsenate, mercury and lead salts sensitised S. typhi, while barium acetate and sodium sulphide protected this culture against gamma-radiation. In the case of Sh. flexneri, barium acetate and iodacetamide proved to be radioprotectors. The effects of some chemicals on the inactivation pattern of Sh. flexneri cells irradiated in sludge are also discussed.

  14. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by dense phase carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungmin; Jeong, Jin-Seong; Kim, Jaeeun; Lee, Youn-Woo; Yoon, Jeyong

    2009-01-01

    Dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD) is one of the most promising techniques available to control microorganisms as a non-thermal disinfection method. However, no study on the efficiency of biofilm disinfection using DPCD has been reported. The efficiency of DPCD in inactivating Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, which is known to have high antimicrobial resistance, was thus investigated. P. aeruginosa biofilm, which was not immersed in water but was completely wet, was found to be more effectively inactivated by DPCD treatment, achieving a 6-log reduction within 7 min. The inactivation efficiency increased modestly with increasing pressure and temperature. This study also reports that the water-unimmersed condition is one of the most important operating parameters in achieving efficient biofilm control by DPCD treatment. In addition, observations by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that DPCD treatment not only inactivated biofilm cells on the glass coupons but also caused detachment of the biofilm following weakening of its structure as a result of the DPCD treatment; this is an added benefit of DPCD treatment.

  15. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene.

  16. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  17. Investigation of Battery/Ultracapacitor Energy Storage Rating for a Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaltz, Erik; Khaligh, A.; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2008-01-01

    Combining high energy density batteries and high power density ultracapacitors in Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles (FCHEV) results in a high efficient, high performance, low size, and light system. Often the batteries are rated with respect to their energy requirement in order to reduce...... their volume and mass. This does not prevent deep discharges of the batteries, which is critical to their lifetime. In this paper, the ratings of the batteries and ultracapacitors in a FCHEV are investigated. Comparison of system volume, mass, efficiency, and battery lifetime due to the rating of the energy...... storage devices are presented. It is concluded, that by sufficient rating of the battery or ultracapacitors, an appropriate balance between system volume, mass, efficiency, and battery lifetime is achievable....

  18. Rate equation model of phototransduction into the membranous disks of mouse rod cells

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Rei; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to investigate the rod phototransduction process in the mouse. In particular, we explored the biochemical reactions of several chemical components that contribute to the signaling process into/around the membranous disks in the outer segments of the rod cells. We constructed a rate equation model incorporating the molecular crowding effects of rhodopsin according to experimental results, which may hinder the diffusion of molecules on the disk mem- brane. The present model could effectively reproduce and explain the mechanisms of the following phenomena observed in experiments. First, the activations and relaxation of the wild-type mouse rod cell progressed more slowly than those of mutant cells containing half the amount of rhodopsin on the disk membrane. Second, the strong photoactivated state of the cell was sustained for a longer period when the light stimuli were strong. Finally, the lifetime of photoactivation exhibited a logarithmic increase with increasing light streng...

  19. INFLUENCE OF THE PHYSICAL STATE OF THE BACTERIAL CELL MEMBRANE UPON THE RATE OF RESPIRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HENNEMAN, D H; UMBREIT, W W

    1964-06-01

    Henneman, Dorothy H. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), and W. W. Umbreit. Influence of the physical state of the bacterial cell membrane upon the rate of respiration. J. Bacteriol. 87:1274-1280. 1964.-NaCl and KCl in concentrations of the order of 0.2 to 0.5 m inhibit the respiration of Escherichia coli B and other gram-negative organisms. Cell-free enzymes concerned in respiration and prepared from the same organisms are not inhibited by these salts, whereas these same enzymes tested in intact cells are. The physical state of the cell membrane appears to be a factor controlling its respiratory activity.

  20. Local Entropy Production Rates in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemer, Marc; Marquardt, Tobias; Huerta, Gerardo Valadez; Kabelac, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A modeling study on a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by means of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is presented. The developed model considers a one-dimensional cell in steady-state operation. The temperature, concentration and electric potential profiles are calculated for every domain of the cell. While the gas diffusion and the catalyst layers are calculated with established classical modeling approaches, the transport processes in the membrane are calculated with the phenomenological equations as dictated by the non-equilibrium thermodynamics. This approach is especially instructive for the membrane as the coupled transport mechanisms are dominant. The needed phenomenological coefficients are approximated on the base of conventional transport coefficients. Knowing the fluxes and their intrinsic corresponding forces, the local entropy production rate is calculated. Accordingly, the different loss mechanisms can be detected and quantified, which is important for cell and stack optimization.

  1. Development of a 300 Amp-hr high rate lithium thionyl chloride cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Gerard H.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a high-rate lithium thionyl chloride cylindrical cell with parallel plate electrodes is discussed. The development was divided into three phases: phase 1, a 150 Amp/hour low rate (1 mA/sq cm) design; phase 2, a 25 Amp/hour high rate (5 mA/sq cm) design; and phase 3, a 300 Amp/hour high rate (5 mA/sq cm) design. The basic design is the same for all three cells. The electrodes are perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. Multiple electrodes are bussed up the side of the cylinder, 180 deg apart allowing excellent anode and cathode utilization. It is a lithium limited design with excess electrolyte. The cathode is Shawinigan or Gulf Acetylene black with no catalyst. The electrolyte is 1.8 Molar lithium tetrachloroaluminate (LiAlCl4) in thionyl chloride. All cell cases are 304L Stainless Steel with a BS&B burst disc.

  2. Video-rate processing in tomographic phase microscopy of biological cells using CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Habaza, Mor; Waller, Laura; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-05-30

    We suggest a new implementation for rapid reconstruction of three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) maps of biological cells acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The TPM computational reconstruction process is extremely time consuming, making the analysis of large data sets unreasonably slow and the real-time 3-D visualization of the results impossible. Our implementation uses new phase extraction, phase unwrapping and Fourier slice algorithms, suitable for efficient CPU or GPU implementations. The experimental setup includes an external off-axis interferometric module connected to an inverted microscope illuminated coherently. We used single cell rotation by micro-manipulation to obtain interferometric projections from 73 viewing angles over a 180° angular range. Our parallel algorithms were implemented using Nvidia's CUDA C platform, running on Nvidia's Tesla K20c GPU. This implementation yields, for the first time to our knowledge, a 3-D reconstruction rate higher than video rate of 25 frames per second for 256 × 256-pixel interferograms with 73 d