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Sample records for cell inactivation rates

  1. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  2. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  3. Calculation of Heavy Ion Inactivation and Mutation Rates in Radial Dose Model of Track Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shavers, Mark R.; Katz, Robert

    1997-01-01

    In the track structure model, the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated by using the dose response of the system to gamma rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters. We apply the track structure model to recent data with heavy ion beams irradiating biological samples of E. Coli, B. Subtilis spores, and Chinese hamster (V79) cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections for inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutations in V79 cells, and good agreement is found. Calculations show the high probability for mutation by relativistic ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta rays. The effects of inactivation on mutation rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET (linear energy transfer) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  4. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  5. Pathogen Inactivation of red cells: challenges and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen J. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Virus inactivation methods for blood have been explored as a means to further reduce the risk from tested agents and to decrease the risk of emerging or variant agents for whom no deferral or effective screening methods are available. Although inactivation methods promise to reduce transfusion-related infectious disease risk, these methods are not perfect. Most techniques for pathogen reduction will not kill bacterial spores, or inactivate bacterial endotoxin, prion protein, or certain non-enveloped viruses whose tightly packed capsid proteins prevent access of the virucidal agent to its nucleic acid target. In addition,various inactivation methods have been known to decrease blood cell yield, affect blood cell recovery or survival, and may pose risk to recipients or blood center workers. My presentation today will review two methods for pathogen inactivation of red cells.

  6. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  7. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing.

  8. Determining the Solar Inactivation Rate of BK Polyomavirus by Molecular Beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reano, Dane C; Yates, Marylynn V

    2016-07-01

    The application of molecular beacons (MB) that bind to precise sequences of mRNA provides a near-universal approach in detecting evidence of viral replication. Here, we demonstrate the detection of BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV), an emerging indicator of microbiological water quality, by a quantum dot-based MB. The MB allowed us to rapidly characterize the inactivation rate of BKPyV following exposure to a solar simulator (kobs = 0.578 ± 0.024 h(-1), R(2) = 0.92). Results were validated through a traditional cell-culture assay with immunofluorescence detection (kobs = 0.568 ± 0.011 h(-1), R(2) = 0.97), which exhibited a strong correlation to MB data (R(2) = 0.93). Obtaining solar inactivation rates for BKPyV demonstrates the first use of a MB in characterizing a microbiological inactivation profile and helps assess the appropriateness of adopting BKPyV as an indicator organism for water quality. PMID:27269231

  9. Inactivation of cell-associated fructosyltransferase in Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, N A; Wittenberger, C L

    1981-01-01

    In stationary phase, 95% of the fructosyltransferase (FTase) activity of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 was found associated with the cells. Within the first 15 min after inoculation into fresh medium, the specific activity of cell-associated FTase decreased by 92% of its initial value. After this period of initial loss, the enzyme was synthesized during exponential growth until a maximum level equivalent to that present before inoculation was obtained. The inactivation of FTase was also demonstrated in a nongrowing system. Washed cell suspensions incubated at 37 degrees C in 200 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.5) containing 10 microM Cu2+ lost 80 to 95% of their FRase activity after 30 min. This loss could be prevented by the addition of histidine, cysteine, or Ca2+ to the suspension mixture. A factor(s) essential for the inactivation of cell-associated FTase could itself be preferentially inactivated by heating cells at 40 degrees C for periods of up to 3 h, or by storage of cells at 0 to 4 degrees C for several days in a low-ionic-strength, low-pH, potassium phosphate buffer. Treatment of cells with the N-acetylmuramidase enzyme M-1, in the presence of 0.5 M melezitose, resulted in the release of FTase from the cell. The released enzyme was recovered in the supernatant fraction after centrifugation at 160,000 x g for 90 min. Comparison of solubilized active and inactivated FTase preparations by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the inactivation of cell-associated FTase activity was associated with the loss of specific protein bands. PMID:7309680

  10. Voltage dependence of rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation within a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of a Na+ channel occurs when the activation of the charged S4 segment of domain IV, with rate functions $\\alpha_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i}$, is followed by the binding of an intracellular hydrophobic motif which blocks conduction through the ion pore, with rate functions $\\gamma_{i}$ and $\\delta_{i}$. During a voltage clamp of the Na+ channel, the solution of the master equation for inactivation reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation when the binding of the inactivation motif is rate limiting ($\\alpha_{i} \\gg \\gamma_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i} \\gg \\delta_{i}$). The voltage dependence of the derived forward rate function for Na+ channel inactivation has an exponential dependence on the membrane potential for small depolarizations and approaches a constant value for larger depolarizations, whereas the voltage dependence of the backward rate function is exponential, and each rate has a similar form to the Hodgkin-Huxley empirical rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation in the squid axon.

  11. Inactivation cross section of yeast cells irradiated by heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain211a have been calculated as 1-hit detector based on the tracktheory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation ofradial dose distribution. In the calculations, characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42 Gy, and "radius"of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5μm which is about the sizeof nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement withexperimental cross sections. The results of the calculations are inagreement with the experimental data in high LET (linear energy transfer) including the thindown region.

  12. Inactivation cross section of yeast cells irradiation by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain 211a have been calculated as 1-hit detector based on the track theory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation of radial dose distribution. In the calculations, characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42 Gy, and 'radius' of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5 μm which is about the size of nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement with experimental cross sections. The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental data in high LET (linear energy transfer) including the thin down region

  13. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Song, Ying; Sun, Yue; Yang, Si-ze

    2013-05-01

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  14. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu, Dongping [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, Ying [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Yue [School of Physics, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  15. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  16. Inactivation of Rb in stromal fibroblasts promotes epithelial cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Adam; Cichon, Ann-Christin; Barry, Anna; Kieran, Declan; Patel, Daksha; Hamilton, Peter; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; James, Jacqueline; McCance, Dennis J

    2012-07-18

    Stromal-derived growth factors are required for normal epithelial growth but are also implicated in tumour progression. We have observed inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), through phosphorylation, in cancer-associated fibroblasts in oro-pharyngeal cancer specimens. Rb is well known for its cell-autonomous effects on cancer initiation and progression; however, cell non-autonomous functions of Rb are not well described. We have identified a cell non-autonomous role of Rb, using three-dimensional cultures, where depletion of Rb in stromal fibroblasts enhances invasive potential of transformed epithelia. In part, this is mediated by upregulation of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is produced by the depleted fibroblasts. KGF drives invasion of epithelial cells through induction of MMP1 expression in an AKT- and Ets2-dependent manner. Our data identify that stromal fibroblasts can alter the invasive behaviour of the epithelium, and we show that altered expression of KGF can mediate these functions. PMID:22643222

  17. Biophysical mechanism of cell inactivation by ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiobiological mechanism it is possible to distinguish the sequence of three different phases which can be denoted as physical, physico-chemical and biological. Mathematical models of the individual phases and their mutual interrelations are discussed. A special accent is given to the relation between the models of two non-biological phases and that of the biological one. Some detailed characteristics concerning DSB formation and repair and inactivation mechanisms in cells are analyzed with the help of the considered model chain. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Influence of temperature and drying rate on the dehydration inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linders, L.J.M.; Meerdink, G.; Riet, van 't K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of drying temperature and drying rate on the dehydration inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum. Drying methods with different temperatures and different characteristic drying times were used. Residual activities of 70-85% were realized after co

  19. Heavy ion effects on mammalian cells: Inactivation measurements with different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In track segment experiments, the inactivation of different mammalian cells by heavy charged particles between helium and uranium in the energy range between 1 and 1000 MeV/u has been measured at the heavy ion accelerator Unilac, Darmstadt, the Tandem Van de Graaf, Heidelberg and the Bevalac, Berkeley. The inactivation cross sections calculated from the final slope of the dose effect curves are given as a function of the particle energy and the LET. (orig.)

  20. Cancer cell uptake behavior of Au nanoring and its localized surface plasmon resonance induced cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au nanorings (NRIs), which have the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength around 1058 nm, either with or without linked antibodies, are applied to SAS oral cancer cells for cell inactivation through the LSPR-induced photothermal effect when they are illuminated by a laser of 1065 nm in wavelength. Different incubation times of cells with Au NRIs are considered for observing the variations of cell uptake efficiency of Au NRI and the threshold laser intensity for cell inactivation. In each case of incubation time, the cell sample is washed for evaluating the total Au NRI number per cell adsorbed and internalized by the cells based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement. Also, the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane are etched with KI/I2 solution to evaluate the internalized Au NRI number per cell. The threshold laser intensities for cell inactivation before washout, after washout, and after KI/I2 etching are calibrated from the circular area sizes of inactivated cells around the illuminated laser spot center with various laser power levels. By using Au NRIs with antibodies, the internalized Au NRI number per cell increases monotonically with incubation time up to 24 h. However, the number of Au NRI remaining on cell membrane reaches a maximum at 12 h in incubation time. The cell uptake behavior of an Au NRI without antibodies is similar to that with antibodies except that the uptake NRI number is significantly smaller and the incubation time for the maximum NRI number remaining on cell membrane is delayed to 20 h. By comparing the threshold laser intensities before and after KI/I2 etching, it is found that the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane cause more effective cancer cell inactivation, when compared with the internalized Au NRIs. (paper)

  1. Inactivation cross sectiopn of yeast cells irradiated by heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGChunxiang; LUODaling

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain 211a have been calculated as 1-ht detector based on the track theory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation of radial dose distribution.In the calculations,characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42Gy,and “radius” of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5μm which is about the size of nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement with experimental cross sections.The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental data in igh LEF(linear energy transfer)including the thindown region.

  2. Specific inactivation of glucose metabolism from eucaryotic cells by pentalenolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszenko, M; Balla, H; Mecke, D

    1982-02-01

    Pentalenolactone, an antibiotic related to the class of the sesquiterpene-lactones and produced by the strain Streptomyces arenae Tü-469, inhibits specifically the glucose metabolism by inactivation of the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD oxidoreductase (phosphorylating) ED 1.2.1.1.2). The sensitivity of several eucaryotic cell-systems for pentalenolactone was shown under in vivo conditions. The glycolytic as well as the gluconeogenetic pathway of mammalian cells can be completely inhibited with low concentrations of the antibiotic. In all cases, the minimum inhibitory concentration is dependent on cell density. The inhibitory effect in vivo and in vitro does not seem to be species-specific. In erythrocytes from rats, in Ehrlich-ascites tumor cells and in Plasmodium vinckei infected erythrocytes from mice glycolysis can be inhibited with concentrations of 18--90 micrometers pentalenolactone. In hepatocytes, glycolysis as well as gluconeogenesis in prevented by the same concentrations. In contrast to these results, in yeast the inhibition depends on growth conditions. The inhibition in glucose medium is cancelled by precultivation on acetate-containing medium. PMID:7034785

  3. Estimation of radiation cell inactivation probability model parameters by experimental survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method of estimation of probability irradiated cells inactivation model parameters ''a'' and ''b'' is described. The examples of this estimation are considered for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells

  4. Sodium channel gating in clonal pituitary cells. The inactivation step is not voltage dependent

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the time course of Na channel inactivation in clonal pituitary (GH3) cells by comparing records before and after the enzymatic removal of inactivation. The cells were subjected to whole- cell patch clamp, with papain included in the internal medium. Inactivation was slowly removed over the course of 10 min, making it possible to obtain control records before the enzyme acted. Papain caused a large (4-100x) increase in current magnitude for small depolarizations (near -40 mV...

  5. Comparative evaluation for safety & potency of inactivated Cell Culture Rabies Vaccines from four Indian manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Chand, Subhash; Bindra, Gurminder; Vaishnav, Saurabh; Pandey, Anupama; Karol, Ayush; Sheikh, Faraz; Meena, Jaipal; Tewari, Shalini; Kiran, Manjula; Malik, Neeraj; Yadav, Shikha; Soni, G. R.; Singh, Surinder

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal but preventable disease. Various cell culture rabies vaccines (CCRV) are recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for pre- exposure prophylaxis and post-exposure therapeutic application. In the present study, we have evaluated seventy batches of inactivated CCRV, for safety and potency by test for Virus Inactivation and National Institute of Health (NIH) potency test respectively in Swiss albino mice, produced by four manufacturers of India, using different cell substr...

  6. Living with an imperfect cell wall: compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierbaum Gabriele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. femAB mutants show a reduced growth rate and are hypersusceptible to virtually all antibiotics, including methicillin, making FemAB a potential target to restore β-lactam susceptibility in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Cis-complementation with wild type femAB only restores synthesis of the pentaglycine interpeptide and methicillin resistance, but the growth rate remains low. This study characterizes the adaptations that ensured survival of the cells after femAB inactivation. Results In addition to slow growth, the cis-complemented femAB mutant showed temperature sensitivity and a higher methicillin resistance than the wild type. Transcriptional profiling paired with reporter metabolite analysis revealed multiple changes in the global transcriptome. A number of transporters for sugars, glycerol, and glycine betaine, some of which could serve as osmoprotectants, were upregulated. Striking differences were found in the transcription of several genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and the arginine-deiminase pathway, an alternative for ATP production. In addition, microarray data indicated enhanced expression of virulence factors that correlated with premature expression of the global regulators sae, sarA, and agr. Conclusion Survival under conditions preventing normal cell wall formation triggered complex adaptations that incurred a fitness cost, showing the remarkable flexibility of S. aureus to circumvent cell wall damage. Potential FemAB inhibitors would have to be used in combination with other antibiotics to prevent selection of resistant survivors.

  7. Detailed analysis of the cell-inactivation mechanism by accelerated protons and light ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P

    2006-01-01

    Published survival data for V79 cells irradiated by monoenergetic protons, helium-3, carbon, and oxygen ions and for CHO cells irradiated by carbon ions have been analyzed using the probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation. Three different classes of DNA damages formed by traversing particles have been distinguished, namely severe single-track damages which might lead to cell inactivation directly, less severe damages where cell inactivation is caused by their combinations, and damages of negligible severity that can be repaired easily. Probabilities of single ions to form these damages have been assessed in dependence on their linear energy transfer (LET) values. Damage induction probabilities increase with atomic number and LET. While combined damages play crucial role at lower LET values, single-track damages dominate in high-LET regions. The yields of single-track lethal damages for protons have been compared with the Monte Carlo estimates of complex DNA lesions, indicating that lethal events co...

  8. Control of insulin receptor level in 3T3 cells: effect of insulin-induced down-regulation and dexamethasone-induced up-regulation on rate of receptor inactivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Knutson, V P; Ronnett, G V; Lane, M D

    1982-01-01

    Chronic exposure of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts to insulin or to the glucocorticoid dexamethasone induces down-regulation and up-regulation, respectively, of cell-surface and total cellular insulin binding capacity. Both processes are reversed upon withdrawal of the inducer. Scatchard analysis of insulin binding for receptors in the down- and up-regulated states indicates that the changes in binding capacity result primarily from alterations in insulin receptor level. That these alterations in tota...

  9. Cell-Type Specific Inactivation of Hippocampal CA1 Disrupts Location-Dependent Object Recognition in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettig, Jakob; Sun, Yanjun; Wood, Marcelo A.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2013-01-01

    The allatostatin receptor (AlstR)/ligand inactivation system enables potent regulation of neuronal circuit activity. To examine how different cell types participate in memory formation, we have used this system through Cre-directed, cell-type specific expression in mouse hippocampal CA1 in vivo and examined functional effects of inactivation of…

  10. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays

  11. Epigenetic inactivation and aberrant transcription of CSMD1 in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholnick Steven B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p23.2 region of human chromosome 8 is frequently deleted in several types of epithelial cancer and those deletions appear to be associated with poor prognosis. Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1 was positionally cloned as a candidate for the 8p23 suppressor but point mutations in this gene are rare relative to the frequency of allelic loss. In an effort to identify alternative mechanisms of inactivation, we have characterized CSMD1 expression and epigenetic modifications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Results Only one of the 20 cell lines examined appears to express a structurally normal CSMD1 transcript. The rest express transcripts which either lack internal exons, terminate abnormally or initiate at cryptic promoters. None of these truncated transcripts is predicted to encode a functional CSMD1 protein. Cell lines that express little or no CSMD1 RNA exhibit DNA methylation of a specific region of the CpG island surrounding CSMD1's first exon. Conclusion Correlating methylation patterns and expression suggests that it is modification of the genomic DNA preceding the first exon that is associated with gene silencing and that methylation of CpG dinucleotides further 3' does not contribute to inactivation of the gene. Taken together, the cell line data suggest that epigenetic silencing and aberrant splicing rather than point mutations may be contributing to the reduction in CSMD1 expression in squamous cancers. These mechanisms can now serve as a focus for further analysis of primary squamous cancers.

  12. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. ► Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). ► Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. ► RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I–III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumindomainIII (R-III) and albumindomainI-RBP-albuminIII (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises of stellate cell inactivation-inducing moiety and targeting moiety, which may lead to the development of effective anti

  13. Inactivation, DNA double strand break induction and their rejoining in bacterial cells irradiated with heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, M.; Zimmermann, H.; Schmitz, C.

    1994-01-01

    Besides inactivation one of the major interests in our experiments is to study the primary damage in the DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after heavy ion irradiation. These damages lead not only to cell death but also under repair activities to mutations. In further experiments we have investigated the inactivation with two different strains of Deinococcus radiodurans (R1, Rec 30) and the induction of DSB as well as the rejoining of DSB in stationary cells of E. coli (strain B/r) irradiated with radiations of different quality. In the latter case irradiations were done so that the cell survival was roughly at the same level. We measured the DSB using the pulse field gelelectrophoresis which allows to separate between intact (circular) and damaged (linear) DNA. The irradiated cells were transferred to NB medium and incubated for different times to allow rejoining.

  14. One pyrimidine dimer inactivates expression of a transfected gene in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have developed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair utilizing UV-treated plasmid vectors. The assay primarily reflects cellular repair of transcriptional activity of damaged DNA measured indirectly as enzyme activity of the transfected genes. They studied three plasmids (pSV2cat, 5020 base pairs; pSV2catSVgpt, 7268 base pairs; and pRSVcat, 5027 base pairs) with different sizes and promoters carrying the bacterial cat gene (CAT, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) in a construction that permits cat expression in human cells. All human simian virus 40-transformed cells studied expressed high levels of the transfected cat gene. UV treatment of the plasmids prior to transfection resulted in differential decrease in CAT activity in different cell lines. With pSV2catSVgpt, UV inactivation of CAT expression was greater in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and D lines than in the other human cell lines tested. The D0 of the CAT inactivation curve was 50 J X m-2 for pSV2cat and for pRSVcat in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. The similarity of the D0 data in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells for three plasmids of different size and promoters implies they all have similar UV-inactivation target size. UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plasmids was quantified by assay of the number of UV-induced T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites. In the most sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum cells, with all three plasmids, one UV-induced pyrimidine dimer inactivates a target of about 2 kilobases, close to the size of the putative CAT mRNA

  15. Insertional Transformation of Hematopoietic Cells by Self-inactivating Lentiviral and Gammaretroviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Modlich, Ute; Navarro, Susana; Zychlinski, Daniela; Maetzig, Tobias; Knoess, Sabine; Brugman, Martijn H; Schambach, Axel; Charrier, Sabine; Galy, Anne; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Bueren, Juan; Baum, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors may cause clonal imbalance and even malignant cell transformation by insertional upregulation of proto-oncogenes. Lentiviral vectors (LV) with their preferred integration in transcribed genes are considered less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors (GV) with their preference for integration next to transcriptional start sites and regulatory gene regions. Using a sensitive cell culture assay and a series of self-inactivating (SIN) vectors, we found that the lentiviral i...

  16. NG2 targets tumorigenic Rb inactivation in Pit1-lineage pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Toru; Nakano-Tateno, Tae; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-05-01

    The proteoglycan neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) is expressed by oligodendrocyte progenitors, pericytes, and some cancerous cells where it is implicated in tumor development. We examined mice with NG2-driven pRb inactivation. Unexpectedly, NG2-Cre:pRb(flox/flox) mice developed pituitary tumors with high penetrance. Adenohypophysial neoplasms developed initially as multifocal lesions; by 1 year, large tumors showed brain invasion. Immunohistochemistry identified these as Pit1-lineage neoplasms, with variable immunoreactivity for growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin, and α-subunit of glycoprotein hormones. Other than modest hyperprolactinemia, circulating hormone levels were not elevated. To determine the role of NG2 in the pituitary, we investigated NG2 expression. Immunoreactivity was identified in anterior and posterior lobes but not in the intermediate lobe of the mouse pituitary; in the adenohypophysis, folliculostellate cells had the strongest NG2 immunoreactivity but showed no proliferation in response to Rb inactivation. Pit1-positive adenohypophysial cells were positive for NG2, but corticotroph and gonadotroph cells were negative. RT-PCR revealed NG2 expression in normal human pituitary and human pituitary tumors; immunohistochemistry localized NG2 in nontumorous human adenohypophysis with strongest positivity in folliculostellate cells, and in tumors of all types except corticotrophs. Functional studies in GH4 mammosomatotrophs showed that NG2 increases prolactin (PRL), reduces growth hormone (GH) expression, and enhances cell adhesion without influencing proliferation. In conclusion, NG2-driven pRb inactivation results in pituitary tumors that mimic endocrinologically inactive Pit1-lineage human pituitary tumors. This model identifies a role for NG2 in pituitary cell-type-specific functions and unmasks a protective role from Rb inactivation in folliculostellate cells; it can be used for further research, including preclinical testing of novel therapies

  17. Frequent inactivation of the retinoblastoma anti-oncogene is restricted to a subset of human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have used polyclonal anti-synthetic peptide serum to study the role of retinoblastoma gene (RB) inactivation in a variety of human tumor cell lines. The analysis indicates that inactivation of the RB protein, p105-Rb, is universal in retinoblastoma cells, vindicating the predictions of the Knudson two-hit hypothesis. In addition, the analysis has shown that inactivations of the RB gene are nearly as frequent in a more common human tumor, small cell lung carcinoma. One-third of bladder carcinomas surveyed also carry altered or absent p105-Rb. Other human tumors by contrast demonstrate only infrequent inactivation of the RB gene. These results suggest that inactivation of the RB gene is a critical step in the pathogenesis of a subset of human tumors

  18. Photosensitized inactivation of Chinese hamster cells by phthalocyanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chloroaluminum phthalocyanine was found to sensitize cultured Chinese hamster cells upon exposure to white fluorescent light. Elimination of wavelengths below 370 nm did not reduce the effect significantly, indicating that the effective wavelengths were those absorbed by the Q band (600-700 nm) of phthalocyanine. The magnitude of the photosensitizing effect increased with the dye concentration and the time of its contact with the cells prior to light exposure. Although photosensitization was drastically reduced in the absence of oxygen, the lack of effect of glycerol and D2O during exposure suggests that neither hydroxyl radicals nor 1O2 are responsible for the cytotoxic response. The efficiency of the photosensitized induced cell killing did not vary with the position of the cells in the cell cycle, in contrast to exposure to X-rays. The improved spectral properties, the reported low toxicity and the selective retention by neoplasms, make phthalocyanines promising candidates for use in photodynamic therapy of cancer. (author)

  19. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the cells, response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  20. Real time, in situ observation of the photocatalytic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingtao [School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Xiaoxin [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Qi, E-mail: qili@imr.ac.cn [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shang, Jian Ku [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    An in situ microscopy technique was developed to observe in real time the photocatalytic inactivation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) cells by palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (TiON/PdO) under visible light illumination. The technique was based on building a photocatalytic micro-reactor on the sample stage of a fluorescence/phase contrast microscopy capable of simultaneously providing the optical excitation to activate the photocatalyst in the micro-reactor and the illumination to acquire phase contrast images of the cells undergoing the photocatalytic inactivation process. Using TiON/PdO as an example, the technique revealed for the first time the vacuolar activities inside S. cerevisiae cells subjected to a visible light photocatalytic inactivation. The vacuoles responded to the photocatalytic attack by the first expansion of the vacuolar volume and then contraction, before the vacuole disappeared and the cell structure collapsed. Consistent with the aggregate behavior observed from the cell culture experiments, the transition in the vacuolar volume provided clear evidence that photocatalytic disinfection of S. cerevisiae cells started with an initiation period in which cells struggled to offset the photocatalytic damage and moved rapidly after the photocatalytic damage overwhelmed the defense mechanisms of the cells against oxidative attack. - Highlights: • Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxidephotocatalyst (TiON/PdO) • Effective visible-light photocatalytic disinfection of yeast cells by TiON/PdO • Real time, in situ observation technique was developed for photocatalytic disinfection. • The fluorescence/phase contrast microscope with a photocatalytic micro-reactor • Yeast cell disinfection happened before the cell structure collapsed.

  1. Real time, in situ observation of the photocatalytic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ microscopy technique was developed to observe in real time the photocatalytic inactivation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) cells by palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (TiON/PdO) under visible light illumination. The technique was based on building a photocatalytic micro-reactor on the sample stage of a fluorescence/phase contrast microscopy capable of simultaneously providing the optical excitation to activate the photocatalyst in the micro-reactor and the illumination to acquire phase contrast images of the cells undergoing the photocatalytic inactivation process. Using TiON/PdO as an example, the technique revealed for the first time the vacuolar activities inside S. cerevisiae cells subjected to a visible light photocatalytic inactivation. The vacuoles responded to the photocatalytic attack by the first expansion of the vacuolar volume and then contraction, before the vacuole disappeared and the cell structure collapsed. Consistent with the aggregate behavior observed from the cell culture experiments, the transition in the vacuolar volume provided clear evidence that photocatalytic disinfection of S. cerevisiae cells started with an initiation period in which cells struggled to offset the photocatalytic damage and moved rapidly after the photocatalytic damage overwhelmed the defense mechanisms of the cells against oxidative attack. - Highlights: • Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxidephotocatalyst (TiON/PdO) • Effective visible-light photocatalytic disinfection of yeast cells by TiON/PdO • Real time, in situ observation technique was developed for photocatalytic disinfection. • The fluorescence/phase contrast microscope with a photocatalytic micro-reactor • Yeast cell disinfection happened before the cell structure collapsed

  2. CSR1 induces cell death through inactivation of CPSF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z-H; Yu, Y P; Shi, Y-K; Nelson, J B; Luo, J-H

    2009-01-01

    CSR1 (cellular stress response 1), a newly characterized tumor-suppressor gene, undergoes hypermethylation in over 30% of prostate cancers. Re-expression of CSR1 inhibits cell growth and induces cell death, but the mechanism by which CSR1 suppresses tumor growth is not clear. In this study, we screened a prostate cDNA library using a yeast two-hybrid system and found that the cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 3 (CPSF3), an essential component for converting heteronuclear RNA to mRNA, binds with high affinity to the CSR1 C terminus. Further analyses determined that the binding motifs for CPSF3 are located between amino acids 440 and 543. The interaction between CSR1 and CPSF3 induced CPSF3 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of polyadenylation both in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of CPSF3 using small interfering RNA induced cell death in a manner similar to CSR1 expression. A CSR1 mutant unable to bind to CPSF3 did not alter CPSF3 subcellular distribution, did not inhibit its polyadenylation activity and did not induce cell death. In summary, CSR1 appears to induce cell death through a novel mechanism by hijacking a critical RNA processing enzyme. PMID:18806823

  3. Inactivation of ultraviolet repair in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells by methyl methanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excision repair of ultraviolet damage in the DNA of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (Groups C, D, and variant) cells was inactivated by exposure of cells to methyl methanesulfonate immediately before irradiation independent of the presence of 0 to 10% fetal calf serum. The inactivation could be represented by a semilog relationship between the amount of repair and methyl methanesulfonate concentration up to approximately 5 mM. The inactivation can be considered to occur as the result of alkylation of a large (about 10(6) daltons) repair enzyme complex, and the dose required to reduce repair to 37% for most cells types was between 4 and 7 mM. No consistent, large difference in sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate was found in any xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group compared to normal cells, implying that reduced repair in these groups may be caused by small inherited changes in the amino acid composition (i.e., point mutations or small deletions) rather than by losses of major components of the repair enzyme complex

  4. CSR1 induces cell death through inactivation of CPSF3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z-H; Yu, YP; Shi, Y-K; Nelson, JB; Luo, J-H

    2008-01-01

    CSR1 (cellular stress response 1), a newly characterized tumor-suppressor gene, undergoes hypermethylation in over 30% of prostate cancers. Re-expression of CSR1 inhibits cell growth and induces cell death, but the mechanism by which CSR1 suppresses tumor growth is not clear. In this study, we screened a prostate cDNA library using a yeast two-hybrid system and found that the cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 3 (CPSF3), an essential component for converting heteronuclear RNA to mRN...

  5. Probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation by ionizing particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P

    2004-01-01

    Model of biological effects of ionizing particles, especially of protons and other ions, is proposed. The model is based on distinguishing the single-particle and collective effects of the underlying radiobiological mechanism. The probabilities of individual particles to form severe damages to DNA, their synergetic or saturation combinations, and the effect of cellular repair system are taken into account. The model enables to describe linear, parabolic and more complex curves, including those exhibiting low-dose hypersensitivity phenomena, in a systematic way. Global shape as well as detailed structure of survival curves might be represented, which is crucial if different fractionation schemes in radiotherapy should be assessed precisely. Experimental cell-survival data for inactivation of V79 cells by low-energy protons have been analyzed and corresponding detailed characteristics of the inactivation mechanism have been derived for this case.

  6. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells. PMID:26870061

  7. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells. PMID:26870061

  8. Living with an imperfect cell wall: compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bierbaum Gabriele; Harris Llinos G; Majcherczyk Paul A; Schäfer Juliane; Kotte Oliver; Jansen Andrea; Hübscher Judith; Heinemann Matthias; Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. femAB mutants show a reduced growth rate and are hypersusceptible to virtually all antibiotics, including methicillin, making FemAB a potential target to restore β-lactam susceptibility in met...

  9. Denbinobin induces apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells via Akt inactivation, Bad activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chen-Tzu; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Bing-Chang; Chen, Chien-Chih; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lin, Chien-Huang

    2008-02-28

    Increasing evidence demonstrated that denbinobin, isolated from Ephemerantha lonchophylla, exert cytotoxic effects in cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether denbinobin induces apoptosis and the apoptotic mechanism of denbinobin in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Denbinobin (1-20microM) caused cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis and annexin V labeling demonstrated that denbinobin increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. A549 cells treated with denbinobin showed typical characteristics of apoptosis including morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. Denbinobin induced caspase 3 activation, and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk), a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, prevented denbinobin-induced cell death. Denbinobin induced the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins including cytochrome c, second mitochondria derived activator of caspase (Smac), and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). In addition, denbinobin-induced Bad activation was accompanied by the dissociation of Bad with 14-3-3 and the association of Bad with Bcl-xL. Furthermore, denbinobin induced Akt inactivation in a time-dependent manner. Transfection of A549 cells with both wild-type and constitutively active Akt significantly suppressed denbinobin-induced Bad activation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Akt inactivation, followed by Bad activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase 3 activation, and AIF release, contributes to denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:18262737

  10. Psoralen/UV inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells for use in cytologic and immunologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid procedure for the inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells using psoralen and ultraviolet (UV) light is described. Exposure of HIV-1-infected cells to 5 micrograms/ml psoralen followed by UV irradiation (320-380 nm) for 5 minutes yields cells that are noninfectious as assessed by extended infectivity assays. The psoralen/UV inactivation procedure described is effective with cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 and is unaffected by cell densities up to 12 x 10(6)/ml. At 5 micrograms/ml psoralen does little damage to cellular permeability as shown by the ability of treated cells to exclude trypan blue and propidium iodide. Psoralen/UV treatment of HIV-1-infected cells does not cause a significant decrease in the reactivity of HIV-1 core and envelope antigens or cellular antigens to monoclonal antibodies. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of these cells for flow cytometry studies and for cell surface labeling using the lactoperoxidase 125I iodination procedure

  11. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study

  12. Metabolomics reveals that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 is a novel target for oxidative inactivation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoyama, Daiki; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative dysfunction in the metabolism has long been implicated in diverse biological disorders. Although a substantial number of metabolic enzymes are targeted for inactivation by oxidative stress, identifying those targets remains difficult due to a lack of comprehensive observations of the metabolism acting through the stress response. We herein developed a metabolomics strategy using integrative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and observing rapid metabolomic changes in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Among the many metabolite changes detected, the most characteristic metabolites uniquely indicated carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), the critical enzyme for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, to be a target for oxidative inactivation. We showed that the enzymatic activity of CPT1 significantly declined by H2 O2 in several human cells. Interestingly, the inactivation was shown to be a direct effect of H2 O2 in vitro, but substantially occurred when cells were cultured with some reagents that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, our results suggest the generality of CPT1 inhibition under various stress conditions associated with ROS generation, providing an insight into a mechanism for oxidative dysfunction in mitochondrial metabolism. Our metabolome data additionally suggest that certain methyltransferase(s) may be targets of oxidative stress as well. PMID:24118240

  13. Immunomodulation of Selective Naive T Cell Functions by p110δ Inactivation Improves the Outcome of Mismatched Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Doisne

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT can treat certain hematologic malignancies due to the graft versus leukemia (GvL effect but is complicated by graft versus host disease (GvHD. Expression of the p110δ catalytic subunit of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway is restricted to leukocytes, where it regulates proliferation, migration, and cytokine production. Here, in a mouse model of fully mismatched hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT, we show that genetic inactivation of p110δ in T cells leads to milder GvHD, whereas GvL is preserved. Inactivation of p110δ in human lymphocytes reduced T cell allorecognition. We demonstrate that both allostimulation and granzyme B expression were dependent on p110δ in naive T cells, which are the main mediators of GvHD, whereas memory T cells were unaffected. Strikingly, p110δ is not mandatory for either naive or memory T cells to mediate GvL. Therefore, immunomodulation of selective naive T cell functions by p110δ inactivation improves the outcome of allogeneic HSCT.

  14. Inactivation of glutathione peroxidase activity contributes to UV-induced squamous cell carcinoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Jennifer; Serewko-Auret, Magdalena M; Teakle, Ngari; Cameron, Sarina; Minto, Kelly; Smith, Louise; Burcham, Philip C; Russell, Terry; Strutton, Geoffrey; Griffin, Anthony; Chu, Fong-Fong; Esworthy, Stephen; Reeve, Vivienne; Saunders, Nicholas A

    2007-05-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) are a common malignancy of keratinocytes that arise in sites of the skin exposed to excessive UV radiation. In the present study, we show that human SCC cell lines, preneoplastic solar keratoses (SK), and CSCC are associated with perturbations in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and peroxide levels. Specifically, we found that two of three SKs and four of five CSCCs, in vivo, were associated with decreased GPX activity and all SKs and CSCCs were associated with an elevated peroxide burden. Given the association of decreased GPX activity with CSCC, we examined the basis for the GPX deficiency in the CSCCs. Our data indicated that GPX was inactivated by a post-translational mechanism and that GPX could be inactivated by increases in intracellular peroxide levels. We next tested whether the decreased peroxidase activity coupled with an elevated peroxidative burden might contribute to CSCC formation in vivo. This was tested in Gpx1(-/-) and Gpx2(-/-) mice exposed to solar-simulated UV radiation. These studies showed that Gpx2 deficiency predisposed mice to UV-induced CSCC formation. These results suggest that inactivation of GPX2 in human skin may be an early event in UV-induced SCC formation. PMID:17510403

  15. Inhibition of oxidative metabolism leads to p53 genetic inactivation and transformation in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, Stefano; Graziano, Vincenzo; Galavotti, Sara; Henriquez, Nick V; Betts, Joanne; Saxena, Jayeta; Minieri, Valentina; A, Deli; Karlsson, Anna; Martins, L Miguel; Capasso, Melania; Nicotera, Pierluigi; Brandner, Sebastian; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Salomoni, Paolo

    2015-01-27

    Alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and genomic instability have been implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple tissues. High-grade glioma (HGG), one of the most lethal human neoplasms, displays genetic modifications of Krebs cycle components as well as electron transport chain (ETC) alterations. Furthermore, the p53 tumor suppressor, which has emerged as a key regulator of mitochondrial respiration at the expense of glycolysis, is genetically inactivated in a large proportion of HGG cases. Therefore, it is becoming evident that genetic modifications can affect cell metabolism in HGG; however, it is currently unclear whether mitochondrial metabolism alterations could vice versa promote genomic instability as a mechanism for neoplastic transformation. Here, we show that, in neural progenitor/stem cells (NPCs), which can act as HGG cell of origin, inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism leads to p53 genetic inactivation. Impairment of respiration via inhibition of complex I or decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number leads to p53 genetic loss and a glycolytic switch. p53 genetic inactivation in ETC-impaired neural stem cells is caused by increased reactive oxygen species and associated oxidative DNA damage. ETC-impaired cells display a marked growth advantage in the presence or absence of oncogenic RAS, and form undifferentiated tumors when transplanted into the mouse brain. Finally, p53 mutations correlated with alterations in ETC subunit composition and activity in primary glioma-initiating neural stem cells. Together, these findings provide previously unidentified insights into the relationship between mitochondria, genomic stability, and tumor suppressive control, with implications for our understanding of brain cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25583481

  16. Identification of antiviralrelevant genes in the cultured fish cells induced by UV-inactivated virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    UV-inactivated grass carp hemorrhage virus (GCHV) can induce high titer of interferon in cultured CAB (crucian carp (Carassius auratus L.) blastulae) cells, and thus defend host cells against the virus invasion. The mechanism is proposed that an antiviral state should be established in the host cells by activating expression of a set of antivi-ral-relevant genes. In this study, suppressive subtractive hy-bridization is applied to constructing a subtracted cDNA library with mRNAs isolated from UV-inactivated GCHV infected and mock-infected CAB cells. 272 differential cDNA fragments are identified by both PCR and dot blot from the subtractive cDNA library. Sequencing analysis reveals 69 genes, including 46 known gene homologues, and 23 unknown putative genes. The known genes include the genes involved in interferon signaling pathways, such as Stat1 and Jak1, the antiviral genes, such as Mx and Viperin, and a set of interferon-stimulated genes observed in mammalian cells. Most of the unknown putative genes contain AU-rich ele-ment in their sequences. Differential expressions of these genes are further confirmed by virtual Northern blot and RT-PCR. The data imply that UV-inactivated GCHV is not only able to induce production of interferon in the infected CAB cells, but also leads to the expression of a series of antiviral-relevant genes or immune-relevant genes, and therefore reveals that the signaling pathway of interferon system and antiviral mechanism in fish are similar to those in mammals.

  17. Epigenetic inactivation of TCF2 in ovarian cancer and various cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Terasawa, K.; Toyota, M; Sagae, S.; Ogi, K; Suzuki, H.; Sonoda, T.; Akino, K; Maruyama, R.; Nishikawa, N.; Imai, K; Shinomura, Y; T. Saito; Tokino, T

    2006-01-01

    Transcription factor 2 gene (TCF2) encodes hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β), a transcription factor associated with development and metabolism. Mutation of TCF2 has been observed in renal cell cancer, and by screening aberrantly methylated genes, we have now identified TCF2 as a target for epigenetic inactivation in ovarian cancer. TCF2 was methylated in 53% of ovarian cancer cell lines and 26% of primary ovarian cancers, resulting in loss of the gene's expression. TCF2 expression was res...

  18. Fast Inactivation of Delayed Rectifier K Conductance in Squid Giant Axon and Its Cell Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Mathes, Chris; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.; Armstrong, Clay M.; Gilly, William F.

    1997-01-01

    Inactivation of delayed rectifier K conductance (gK) was studied in squid giant axons and in the somata of giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons. Axon measurements were made with an axial wire voltage clamp by pulsing to VK (∼−10 mV in 50–70 mM external K) for a variable time and then assaying available gK with a strong, brief test pulse. GFL cells were studied with whole-cell patch clamp using the same prepulse procedure as well as with long depolarizations. Under our experimental conditions (12–18...

  19. p31comet-Induced Cell Death Is Mediated by Binding and Inactivation of Mad2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Mad2, a key component of the spindle checkpoint, is closely associated with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis in cancer. p31comet is a Mad2-interacting protein that serves as a spindle checkpoint silencer at mitosis. In this study, we showed that p31comet-induced apoptosis and senescence occur via counteraction of Mad2 activity. Upon retroviral transduction of p31comet, the majority of human cancer cell lines tested lost the ability to form colonies in a low-density seeding assay. Cancer cells with p31comet overexpression underwent distinct apoptosis and/or senescence, irrespective of p53 status, confirming the cytotoxicity of p31comet. Interestingly, both cytotoxic and Mad2 binding activities were eliminated upon deletion of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of p31comet. Point mutation or deletion of the region affecting Mad2 binding additionally abolished cytotoxic activity. Consistently, wild-type Mad2 interacting with p31comet, but not its non-binding mutant, inhibited cell death, indicating that the mechanism of p31comet-induced cell death involves Mad2 inactivation. Our results clearly suggest that the regions of p31comet affecting interactions with Mad2, including the C-terminus, are essential for induction of cell death. The finding that p31comet-induced cell death is mediated by interactions with Mad2 that lead to its inactivation is potentially applicable in anticancer therapy.

  20. Recovery of prostacyclin synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells following self-inactivation and requirement for growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cyclooxygenase enzyme system is a prime example of a metabolic pathway that is regulated by self inactivation. This is believed to occur in part via the irreversible reaction of the endoperoxide intermediate species with the cyclooxygenase enzyme. This inactivation and recovery of activity is similar to the inactivation observed with aspirin which irreversibly acetylates the enzyme. Self inactivation was studied in cultured rat and bovine aorta smooth muscle cells. The production of the prostanoid PGI2 was demonstrated by incubation of a monolayer of cells with 12 μM C-14 labeled arachidonic acid. Products were analyzed by thin layer chromatography and identified by their comigration with authentic standards and confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Preincubation of the cells for 10 minutes with arachidonic acid at concentrations as low as 1 μg/mL inactivated the cells to a second challenge with radiolabeled arachidonic acid. Recovery from self inactivation took place over a three hour time period and was similar to the recovery observed with aspirin pretreatment. Recovery was inhibited by addition of 10 μg/mL cycloheximide to the medium indicating that it involves synthesis of cyclooxygenase protein. Epidermal growth factor was identified as a serum factor responsible for the rapid recovery of cyclooxygenase activity in rat and bovine aorta smooth muscle cells

  1. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation of different quality and their relevance for cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By investigation of the production of DNA strand breaks and of DNA release from the nuclear membrane complex in Chinese hamster cells using different radiation qualities from 1 to 360 keV/μm, partly also under hypoxic conditions, and by relating the results to the induction of chromosome aberrations and to cell inactivation it has become possible to find connections between the induction of molecular lesions and the expression of this damage on the cellular level. From the studies follows that DNA pieces are cut off from the nuclear membrane complex by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The share and size of the released pieces depends on radiation dose and quality as well as on the oxygen conditions. The lesions can partly be repaired. In connection with the DSB rates the results of the DNA release studies led to the conclusion that the DNA in the cells must be organized in superstructure units (MASSUs) with a DNA mass of about 2 x 109 g/mol, which are associated to the nuclear membrane in attachment points. The numerical relations show that for a 37% survival probability about 90 DSB per genome are required with sparsely ionizing radiation; this number declines to about 40 by use of more densely ionizing radiation up to 150 keV/μm, and increases again with further rise of the ionization density. Hence, for cell inactivation not simply a certain number of DSB per cell is required but rather seems their cooperation within a small structure section of the DNA to be relevant. These critical structures are with high probability the MASSUs. An irrepairable release of DNA from such a structure unit can bring about a chromosome break detectable in the metaphase and finally lead to cell inactivation. DSB turned out to be the essential lethal events in bacteria as well. The relatively small differences to the eukaryotic cells in the position of the maximum of radiation sensitivity on the LET scale and in the lesion sensitivity towards DSB let suggest that a common critical

  2. Effect of using heat-inactivated serum with the Abbott human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III antibody test.

    OpenAIRE

    Jungkind, D. L.; DiRenzo, S A; Young, S J

    1986-01-01

    The Abbott enzyme immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) antibody was evaluated to determine the effect of using heat-inactivated (56 degrees C for 30 min) serum as the sample. Each of 58 nonreactive serum samples gave a higher A492 value when tested after heat inactivation. Ten of the samples became reactive after heating. Heat-inactivated serum should not be used in the current Abbott HTLV-III antibody test, because thi...

  3. Glycolysis inhibition inactivates ABC transporters to restore drug sensitivity in malignant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Nakano

    Full Text Available Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABC transporter-expressing, RPMI8226 (ABCG2, KG-1 (ABCB1 and HepG2 cells (ABCB1 and ABCG2. Interestingly, although side population (SP cells isolated from RPMI8226 cells exhibited higher levels of glycolysis with an increased expression of genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, 3BrPA abolished Hoechst 33342 exclusion in SP cells. 3BrPA also disrupted clonogenic capacity in malignant cell lines including RPMI8226, KG-1, and HepG2. Furthermore, 3BrPA restored cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin and doxorubicin on KG-1 and RPMI8226 cells, and markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with doxorubicin in RPMI8226-implanted mice. These results collectively suggest that the inhibition of glycolysis is able to overcome drug resistance in ABC transporter-expressing malignant cells through the inactivation of ABC transporters and impairment of SP cells with enhanced glycolysis as well as clonogenic cells.

  4. SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. ► Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. ► SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-κB activation. ► The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-κB activation. ► SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-κB activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-κB activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and is implicated in decreased 5′-AMP activated kinase (AMPK) activation, leading to the impairment of autophagy. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, abolishes

  5. SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan); Koya, Daisuke, E-mail: koya0516@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-{kappa}B activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and

  6. Cell inactivation and induction of DNA double strand breaks by heavy ions near the bragg peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHO-K1 cells were irradiated with protons and C, N, and O ions near the Bragg peak at the Medium Energy Beam (MEXP) Course. C, N, O ions were transported to MEXP course at 6 MeV/n and led into air, and then irradiated to the cells. Ion energy (or the LETs) was selected by changing the distance between the beam exit and the sample position. For protons, the ion energy was decreased to 4.3 MeV from 6 MeV by controlling linac accelerators. For measurement of cell inactivation, 4.3 MeV protons were decreased its energy by air as an absorber to 3.4, 2.6, and 2.0 and cell inactivation cross-section (σ) was higher with low energy protons. For N ion, the σ values were obtained at two different positions of Bragg curves, which showed lower σ at higher LET. These may be due to drastic thin down of ion track radius at near the Bragg peak. (author)

  7. Effect of dose rate on inactivation of microorganisms in spices by electron-beams and gamma-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total aerobic bacteria in spices used in this study were determined to be 1 x 106 to 6 x 107 per gram. A study on the inactivation of microorganisms in spices showed that doses of 6-9 kGy of EB (electron-beams) or γ-irradiation were required to reduce the total aerobic bacteria to below 103 per gram. However, a little increase of resistance was observed on the inactivation of total aerobic bacteria in many spices in case of EB irradiation. These differences of radiation sensitivities between EB and γ-rays was explained by dose rate effect on oxidation damage to microorganisms from the results of radiation sensitivities of Bacillus pumilus and B. megaterium spores at dry conditions. On the other hand, these high dose rate of EB irradiation suppressed the increase of peroxide values in spices at high dose irradiation up to 80 kGy. However, components of essential oils in spices were not changed even irradiated up to 50 kGy with EB and γ-rays. (author)

  8. Culture of human cell lines by a pathogen-inactivated human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Mariotti, A; Fioravanti, D; Procoli, A; Cicchetti, E; Scambia, G; Bonanno, G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-01

    Alternatives to the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) have been investigated to ensure xeno-free growth condition. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of human platelet lysate (PL) as a substitute of FBS for the in vitro culture of some human cell lines. PL was obtained by pools of pathogen inactivated human donor platelet (PLT) concentrates. Human leukemia cell lines (KG-1, K562, JURKAT, HL-60) and epithelial tumor cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7) were cultured with either FBS or PL. Changes in cell proliferation, viability, morphology, surface markers and cell cycle were evaluated for each cell line. Functional characteristics were analysed by drug sensitivity test and cytotoxicity assay. Our results demonstrated that PL can support growth and expansion of all cell lines, although the cells cultured in presence of PL experienced a less massive proliferation compared to those grown with FBS. We found a comparable percentage of viable specific marker-expressing cells in both conditions, confirming lineage fidelity in all cultures. Functionality assays showed that cells in both FBS- and PL-supported cultures maintained their normal responsiveness to adriamycin and NK cell-mediated lysis. Our findings indicate that PL is a feasible serum substitute for supporting growth and propagation of haematopoietic and epithelial cell lines with many advantages from a perspective of process standardization, ethicality and product safety. PMID:25944665

  9. Expression of essential genes for biosynthesis of antimicrobial peptides of Bacillus is modulated by inactivated cells of target microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leães, Fernanda Leal; Velho, Renata Voltolini; Caldas, Danielle Gregório Gomes; Ritter, Ana Carolina; Tsai, Siu Mui; Brandelli, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Certain Bacillus strains are important producers of antimicrobial peptides with great potential for biological control. Antimicrobial peptide production by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens P11 was investigated in the presence of heat-inactivated cells of bacteria and fungi. B. amyloliquefaciens P11 exhibited higher antimicrobial activity in the presence of inactivated cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus parasiticus compared to other conditions tested. Expression of essential genes related to biosynthesis of the antimicrobial peptides surfactin (sfp), iturin A (lpa-14 and ituD), subtilosin A (sboA) and fengycin (fenA) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The genes lpa-14 and ituD were highly expressed in the presence of S. aureus (inactivated cells), indicating induction of iturin A production by B. amyloliquefaciens P11. The other inducing condition (inactivated cells of A. parasiticus) suppressed expression of lpa-14, but increased expression of ituD. A twofold increase in fenA expression was observed for both conditions, while strong suppression of sboA expression was observed in the presence of inactivated cells of S. aureus. An increase in antimicrobial activity was observed, indicating that synthesis of antimicrobial peptides may be induced by target microorganisms. PMID:26577655

  10. Differential analysis of the inactivation of yeast cells induced by irradiation with various ionization densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative investigation is presented on the radiation-induced inactivation of yeast cells in the first generations as a function of dose, repair, and various ionization densities. The study has been made to solve two main questions, i.e.: How do these cells reproduce, and how do they look like at the end of the investigation. Finding the answer to these questions, it was hoped, would lead to a description of survival in the colony test by defining the final fate of the cells which represent the stationary end state. The experiments were to clarify to what extent the dose-response curve yields only relatively general information on radiation-induced damage, or what kind of damage is mainly and best described. This supplementary information will help to improve the interpretation of many experiments having been made with this strain. (orig./MG)

  11. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  12. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells by gastric acid and bile during in vitro gastrointestinal transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceuppens Siele

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus can cause diarrhoeal food poisoning by production of enterotoxins in the small intestine. The prerequisite for diarrhoeal disease is thus survival during gastrointestinal passage. Methods Vegetative cells of 3 different B. cereus strains were cultivated in a real composite food matrix, lasagne verde, and their survival during subsequent simulation of gastrointestinal passage was assessed using in vitro experiments simulating transit through the human upper gastrointestinal tract (from mouth to small intestine. Results No survival of vegetative cells was observed, despite the high inoculum levels of 7.0 to 8.0 log CFU/g and the presence of various potentially protective food components. Significant fractions (approx. 10% of the consumed inoculum of B. cereus vegetative cells survived gastric passage, but they were subsequently inactivated by bile exposure in weakly acidic intestinal medium (pH 5.0. In contrast, the low numbers of spores present (up to 4.0 log spores/g showed excellent survival and remained viable spores throughout the gastrointestinal passage simulation. Conclusion Vegetative cells are inactivated by gastric acid and bile during gastrointestinal passage, while spores are resistant and survive. Therefore, the physiological form (vegetative cells or spores of the B. cereus consumed determines the subsequent gastrointestinal survival and thus the infective dose, which is expected to be much lower for spores than vegetative cells. No significant differences in gastrointestinal survival ability was found among the different strains. However, considerable strain variability was observed in sporulation tendency during growth in laboratory medium and food, which has important implications for the gastrointestinal survival potential of the different B. cereus strains.

  13. Role of p53 and CDKN2A Inactivation in Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Pacifico

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most commonly mutated gene in human and mouse cancers. Disruption of the p53 and Rb pathways is a fundamental trend of most human cancer cells. Inactivation of CDKN2A can lead to deregulation of these two pathways. Genetic abnormalities in CDKN2A gene have been well documented in human melanoma but their involvement in human nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC and in particular in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is less clear. Several studies have shown that human SCCs harbour unique mutations in the p53 gene as well as inactivation of the CDKN2A gene. While mutations in the p53 gene are induced by UV radiation and represent tumor initiating events, the majority of alterations detected in the CDKN2A gene do not appear to be UV-dependent. In conclusion, in addition to p53 mutations, silencing of the CDKN2A gene might play a significant role in SCC development.

  14. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N; DiStasi, Matthew R; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1(+/-) neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1(+/-) mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1(+/-) mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease. PMID:23197650

  15. Inactivation of nucleolin leads to nucleolar disruption, cell cycle arrest and defects in centrosome duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiry Marc

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleolin is a major component of the nucleolus, but is also found in other cell compartments. This protein is involved in various aspects of ribosome biogenesis from transcription regulation to the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles; however, many reports suggest that it could also play an important role in non nucleolar functions. To explore nucleolin function in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation we used siRNA to down regulate the expression of nucleolin. Results We found that, in addition to the expected effects on pre-ribosomal RNA accumulation and nucleolar structure, the absence of nucleolin results in a cell growth arrest, accumulation in G2, and an increase of apoptosis. Numerous nuclear alterations, including the presence of micronuclei, multiple nuclei or large nuclei are also observed. In addition, a large number of mitotic cells showed a defect in the control of centrosome duplication, as indicated by the presence of more than 2 centrosomes per cell associated with a multipolar spindle structure in the absence of nucleolin. This phenotype is very similar to that obtained with the inactivation of another nucleolar protein, B23. Conclusion Our findings uncovered a new role for nucleolin in cell division, and highlight the importance of nucleolar proteins for centrosome duplication.

  16. Photodynamic pathogen inactivation in red cell concentrates with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Chan, Wai-Shun; Yim, Zachary; Zuk, Maria M.; Dayal, Vinay; Roth, Nathan; Heldman, Eli; Lazlo, A.; Valeri, C. R.; Horowitz, Bernard

    2000-03-01

    The silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, a photosensitizer activated with red light, has been studied for pathogen inactivation in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Pc 4 targets the envelope of pathogenic viruses such as HIV. To protect RBC during the process two main approaches are used: 1) Inclusion of quenches of reactive oxygen species produced during treatment. Tocopherol succinate was found to be most effective for this purpose. 2) Formulation of Pc 4, a lipophilic compound, in liposomes that reduce its binding to RBC but not to viruses. As a light source we used a light emitting diode array emitting at 660-680 nm. An efficient mixing device ensures homogeneous light exposure during treatment of intact RBCC. Treatment of RBCC with 5 (mu) M Pc 4 a d light results in the inactivation of >= 5.5 log10 HIV, >= 6.6 log10 VSV, and >= 5 log10 of PRV and BVDV. Parasites that can be transmitted by blood transfusion are even more sensitive than viruses. Following treatment, RBCC can be stored for 28 days at 4 degrees C with hemolysis below 1 percent. Baboon RBC circulate with an acceptable 24 hour recovery and half-life. Genetic toxicological studies of Pc 4 with or without light exposure are negative. We conclude that a process using Pc 4 and red light can potentially reduce the risk of transmitting pathogens in RBCC used for transfusion.

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of an inactivated vaccine from Anaplasma marginale derived from tick cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmar, Pedro Veloso Facury; Carvalho, Antônio Último de; Facury Filho, Elias Jorge; Bastos, Camila Valgas; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    The protective efficacy of an inactivated vaccine from Anaplasma marginale that was cultured in tick cells (IDE8) for use against bovine anaplasmosis was evaluated. Five calves (Group 1) were inoculated subcutaneously, at 21-day intervals, with three doses of vaccine containing 3 × 10(9) A. marginale initial bodies. Five control calves received saline solution alone (Group 2). Thirty-two days after the final inoculation, all the calves were challenged with approximately 3 × 10(5) erythrocytes infected with A. marginale high-virulence isolate (UFMG2). The Group 1 calves seroconverted 14 days after the second dose of vaccine. After the challenge, all the animals showed patent rickettsemia. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the Group 1 and 2 calves during the incubation period, patency period or convalescence period. All the animals required treatment to prevent death. The results suggest that the inactivated vaccine from A. marginale produced in IDE8 induced seroconversion in calves, but was not effective for preventing anaplasmosis induced by the UFMG2 isolate under the conditions of this experiment. PMID:22832750

  18. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation in tolerant and nontolerant HeLa S3 cells: role of DNA polymerase inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of DNA polymerase α and β were measured in tolerant and nontolerant HeLa S3 suspension cells. The heat-inactivation of the enzymes and their recovery when cells were incubated at 370C after the heat challenge was compared to the synergistic action of heat and x-radiation and its disappearance at the level of cell survival. Thermotolerant cells were radiosensitized by heat similarly to nontolerant cells, but the sensitization decreased more rapidly in the tolerant cells when time at 370C was allowed between the two treatments. For polymerase activities the extent of inactivation, as well as the kinetics of recovery, were similar in tolerant and nontolerant cells. (author)

  19. Selective inhibition of a slow-inactivating voltage-dependent K+ channel in rat PC12 cells by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1997-07-15

    1. Electrophysiological (single-channel patch clamp) and molecular biological experiments (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) were performed to attempt to identify the O2-sensitive K+ channel in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. 2. Four types of K+ channels were recorded in PC12 cells: a small-conductance K+ channel (14 pS), a calcium-activated K+ channel (KCa; 102 pS) and two K+ channels with similar conductance (20 pS). These last two channels differed in their time-dependent inactivation: one was a slow-inactivating channel, while the other belonged to the family of fast transient K+ channels. 3. The slow-inactivating 20 pS K+ channel was inhibited by hypoxia. Exposure to hypoxia produced a 50% reduction in channel activity (number of active channels in the patch x open probability). Hypoxia had no effect on the 20 pS transient K+ channels, whereas reduced O2 stimulated the KCa channels. 4. The genes encoding the alpha-subunits of slow-inactivating K+ channels for two members of the Shaker subfamily of K+ channels (Kv1.2 and Kv1.3) together with the Kv2.1, Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channel genes were identified in PC12 cells. 5. The expression of the Shaker Kv1.2, but none of the other K+ channel genes, increased in cells exposed to prolonged hypoxia (18 h). The same cells were more responsive to a subsequent exposure to hypoxia (35% inhibition of K+ current measured in whole-cell voltage clamp) compared with the cells maintained in normoxia (19% inhibition). 6. These results indicate that the O2-sensitive K+ channel in PC12 cells is a 20 pS slow-inactivating K+ channel that is upregulated by hypoxia. This channel appears to belong to the Shaker subfamily of voltage-gated K+ channels. PMID:9263911

  20. Variations of X chromosome inactivation occur in early passages of female human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Dvash

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is a dosage compensation mechanism essential for embryonic development and cell physiology. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs derived from inner cell mass (ICM of blastocyst stage embryos have been used as a model system to understand XCI initiation and maintenance. Previous studies of undifferentiated female hESCs at intermediate passages have shown three possible states of XCI; 1 cells in a pre-XCI state, 2 cells that already exhibit XCI, or 3 cells that never undergo XCI even upon differentiation. In this study, XCI status was assayed in ten female hESC lines between passage 5 and 15 to determine whether XCI variations occur in early passages of hESCs. Our results show that three different states of XCI already exist in the early passages of hESC. In addition, we observe one cell line with skewed XCI and preferential expression of X-linked genes from the paternal allele, while another cell line exhibits random XCI. Skewed XCI in undifferentiated hESCs may be due to clonal selection in culture instead of non-random XCI in ICM cells. We also found that XIST promoter methylation is correlated with silencing of XIST transcripts in early passages of hESCs, even in the pre-XCI state. In conclusion, XCI variations already take place in early passages of hESCs, which may be a consequence of in vitro culture selection during the derivation process. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out the possibility that XCI variations in hESCs may reflect heterogeneous XCI states in ICM cells that stochastically give rise to hESCs.

  1. DNA double strand breaks as the critical type of damage with regard to inactivation of cells through ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the effects of ionizing radiation on eukaryotic cells, aimed at revealing the molecular mechanisms leading to cell inactivation as a result of ionizing radiation. The quantitative determination of radiation-induced double strand breaks (DSB) is done via sedimentation of the DNA released from the cells in a neutral saccharose gradient in a preparative ultracentrifuge. The 'experimental mass spectrum' of DNA molecules thus obtained, the mean number of DSB per cell is calculated using a special computer program which simulates the stochastic induction of DSB in the DNA of non-irradiated cells and links the 'simulated' mass spectrum with the 'experimental' one on the basis of the least square fit. The experimental and theoretical studies with the eukaryote yeast on the whole allow insight into the relation between energy absorption and the inactivation of irradiated cells. (orig./MG)

  2. Pdx1 inactivation restricted to the intestinal epithelium in mice alters duodenal gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin; Fang, Rixun; Davis, Corrine; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Null mutant mice lacking the transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) are apancreatic and survive only a few days after birth. The role of Pdx1 in regulating intestinal gene expression has therefore yet to be determined in viable mice with normal pancreatic development. We hypothesized that conditional inactivation of Pdx1 restricted to the intestinal epithelium would alter intestinal gene expression and cell differentiation. Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice with intestine-specific Pdx1 inactivation were generated by crossing a transgenic mouse strain expressing Cre recombinase, driven by a mouse villin 1 gene promoter fragment, with a mutant mouse strain homozygous for loxP site-flanked Pdx1. Pdx1 protein is undetectable in all epithelial cells in the intestinal epithelium of Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice. Goblet cell number and mRNA abundance for mucin 3 and mucin 13 genes in the proximal small intestine are comparable between Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre and control mice. Similarly, Paneth cell number and expression of Paneth cell-related genes Defa1, Defcr-rs1, and Mmp7 in the proximal small intestine remain statistically unchanged by Pdx1 inactivation. Although the number of enteroendocrine cells expressing chromogranin A/B, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip), or somatostatin (Sst) is unaffected in the Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice, mRNA abundance for Gip and Sst is significantly reduced in the proximal small intestine. Conditional Pdx1 inactivation attenuates intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity in the duodenal epithelium, consistent with an average 91% decrease in expression of the mouse enterocyte IAP gene, alkaline phosphatase 3 (a novel Pdx1 target candidate), in the proximal small intestine following Pdx1 inactivation. We conclude that Pdx1 is necessary for patterning appropriate gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells of the proximal small intestine. PMID:19808654

  3. Extending Bragg peak of heavy ion beam and melanoma cell inactivation measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiQiang; WeiZeng-Quan; 等

    1998-01-01

    A rotating range modulator was designed and manufactured.which is applied to extend Bragg peak of heavy ion beam.Bragg curves of 75MeV/u 16O and 75MeV/u 12C ion beams through this range modulator were measured respectively and two evident spread-out Bragg peaks corresponding to the modulated beams above are shown.In addition,inactivation effect of the modulated 75MeV/u 16O ion beam at nine different penetration depths on melanoma cells(B16) was measured.Results indicate that lethal effects at the spread-out Bragg peak region are larger than at the plateau of the particle beam entrance.

  4. Measurement of DNA strand break repair and survival rate after X-irradiation of synchronized CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the induction and repair of DNA strand breaks and the survival rate of CHO cells after X-radiation at different stages of the cell cycle. His particular concern was the interdependence between cell inactivation and double strand break repair. (orig./AJ)

  5. Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor gene induces Neuromedin U expression in renal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla Deepa; Esteban Miguel A; Harten Sarah K; Ashcroft Margaret; Maxwell Patrick H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background 209 000 new cases of renal carcinoma are diagnosed each year worldwide and new therapeutic targets are urgently required. The great majority of clear cell renal cancer involves inactivation of VHL, which acts as a gatekeeper tumour suppressor gene in renal epithelial cells. However how VHL exerts its tumour suppressor function remains unclear. A gene expression microarray comparing RCC10 renal cancer cells expressing either VHL or an empty vector was used to identify novel...

  6. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  7. Inhibition of telomere recombination by inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 promotes cell longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Peng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB is one of the major damages that cause genome instability and cellular aging. The homologous recombination (HR-mediated repair of DSBs plays an essential role in assurance of genome stability and cell longevity. Telomeres resemble DSBs and are competent for HR. Here we show that in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomere recombination elicits genome instability and accelerates cellular aging. Inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 specifically inhibits telomere recombination, and significantly extends cell longevity in both telomerase-positive and pre-senescing telomerase-negative cells. Deletion of CGI121 in the short-lived yku80(tel mutant restores lifespan to cgi121Δ level, supporting the function of Cgi121 in telomeric single-stranded DNA generation and thus in promotion of telomere recombination. Strikingly, inhibition of telomere recombination is able to further slow down the aging process in long-lived fob1Δ cells, in which rDNA recombination is restrained. Our study indicates that HR activity at telomeres interferes with telomerase to pose a negative impact on cellular longevity.

  8. Cytotoxicity of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation on epithelial cells when co-cultured with Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissari, Claudia Viviane Guimarães; Pavarina, Ana Claudia; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Jorge, Janaina Habib

    2016-05-11

    This study assessed the cytotoxicity of antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation (aPDI), mediated by curcumin, using human keratinocytes co-cultured with Candida albicans. Cells and microorganisms were grown separately for 24 hours and then kept in contact for an additional 24 hours. After this period, aPDI was applied. The conditions tested were: P+L+ (experimental group aPDI); P-L+ (light emitting diode [LED] group); P+L- (curcumin group); and P-L- (cells in co-culture without curcumin nor LED). In addition, keratinocytes and C. albicans were grown separately, were not placed in the co-culture and did not receive aPDI (control group). Cell proliferation was assessed using Alamar Blue, MTT, XTT and CFU tests. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to the survival percentages of cells compared to the control group (considered as 100% viability), complemented by multiple comparisons using Tukey's test. A 5% significance level was adopted. The results of this study showed no interference in the metabolism of the cells in co-culture, since no differences were observed between the control group (cultured cells by themselves) and the P-L- group (co-culture cells without aPDI). The aPDI group reached the highest reduction (p = 0.009), which was equivalent to 1.7 log10 when compared to the control group. The P+L-, P-L+, P-L- and control groups were not statistically different (ρ > 0.05). aPDI inhibited the growth of keratinocytes and C. albicans in all tests, so the therapy was considered slightly (inhibition between 25 and 50% compared to the control group) to moderately (inhibition between 50 and 75% compared to the control group) cytotoxic. PMID:27110908

  9. Kinetic model of Nav1.5 channel provides a subtle insight into slow inactivation associated excitability in cardiac cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 has been linked to the cardiac cell excitability and a variety of arrhythmic syndromes including long QT, Brugada, and conduction abnormalities. Nav1.5 exhibits a slow inactivation, corresponding to a duration-dependent bi-exponential recovery, which is often associated with various arrhythmia syndromes. However, the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and the physiological role of slow inactivation in cardiac cells remain elusive. Here a 12-state two-step inactivation Markov model was successfully developed to depict the gating kinetics of Nav1.5. This model can simulate the Nav1.5 channel in not only steady state processes, but also various transient processes. Compared with the simpler 8-state model, this 12-state model is well-behaved in simulating and explaining the processes of slow inactivation and slow recovery. This model provides a good framework for further studying the gating mechanism and physiological role of sodium channel in excitable cells.

  10. Noggin inactivation affects the number and differentiation potential of muscle progenitor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Mommaerts, Hendrik; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Tylzanowski, Przemko

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of Noggin, a secreted antagonist of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs), in mice leads, among others, to severe malformations of the appendicular skeleton and defective skeletal muscle fibers. To determine the molecular basis of the phenotype, we carried out a histomorphological and molecular analysis of developing muscles Noggin(-/-) mice. We show that in 18.5 dpc embryos there is a marked reduction in muscle fiber size and a failure of nuclei migration towards the cell membrane. Molecularly, the absence of Noggin results in an increased BMP signaling in muscle tissue as shown by the increase in SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation, concomitant with the induction of BMP target genes such as Id1, 2, 3 as well as Msx1. Finally, upon removal of Noggin, the number of mesenchymal Pax7(+) muscle precursor cells is reduced and they are more prone to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Thus, our results highlight the importance of Noggin/BMP balance for myogenic commitment of early fetal progenitor cells. PMID:27573479

  11. Inactivation of encapsulated cells and their therapeutic effects by means of TGL triple-fusion reporter/biosafety gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Edorta; Larzabal, Leyre; Calvo, Alfonso; Orive, Gorka; Pedraz, José Luis; Hernández, Rosa Ma

    2013-01-01

    The immobilization of cells within alginate-poly-l-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules has been demonstrated to be an effective technology design for long term delivery of therapeutic products. Despite promising advances, biosafety aspects still remain to be improved. Here, we describe a complete characterization of the strategy based on TGL triple-fusion reporter gene--which codifies for Herpes Simplex virus type 1 thymidine-kinase (HSV1-TK), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Firefly Luciferase--(SFG(NES)TGL) to inactivate encapsulated cells and their therapeutic effects. Myoblasts genetically engineered to secrete erythropoietin (EPO) were retroviraly transduced with the SFG(NES)TGL plasmid to further characterize their ganciclovir (GCV)-mediated inactivation process. GCV sensitivity of encapsulated cells was 100-fold lower when compared to cells plated onto 2D surfaces. However, the number of cells per capsule and EPO secretion decayed to less than 15% at the same time that proliferation was arrested after 14 days of GCV treatment in vitro. In vivo, ten days of GCV treatment was enough to restore the increased hematocrit levels of mice implanted with encapsulated TGL-expressing and EPO-secreting cells. Altogether, these results show that TGL triple-fusion reporter gene may be a good starting point in the search of a suitable biosafety strategy to inactivate encapsulated cells and control their therapeutic effects. PMID:23174140

  12. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Petruzzi; Antonietta Baiano; Antonio De Gianni; Milena Sinigaglia; Maria Rosaria Corbo; Antonio Bevilacqua

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45), previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments w...

  13. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M C; Casey, G; MacConmara, M; Lederer, J A; Soden, D; Collins, J K; Tangney, M; O'Sullivan, G C

    2010-07-01

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development. PMID:20186173

  14. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  15. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 μs) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of ˜ 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  16. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzichemi, M. [Physics Department, University of Milano - Bicocca (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 mus) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of approx 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  17. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 μs) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of ∼ 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  18. X-chromosome inactivation in Rett Syndrome human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron YL Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects girls due primarily to heterozygous mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2. Random X-chromosome inactivation (XCI results in cellular mosaicism in which some cells express wild-type MECP2 while other cells express mutant MECP2. The generation of patient-specific human induced Pluripotent Stem cells (hiPSCs facilitates the production of RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro to investigate disease mechanisms and identify novel drug treatments. The generation of RTT-hiPSCs has been reported by many laboratories, however, the XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs has been inconsistent. Some report RTT-hiPSCs retain the inactive X-chromosome (post-XCI of the founder somatic cell allowing isogenic RTT-hiPSCs that express only the wild-type or mutant MECP2 allele to be isolated from the same patient. Post-XCI RTT-hiPSCs-derived neurons retain this allele-specific expression pattern of wild-type or mutant MECP2. Conversely, others report RTT-hiPSCs in which the inactive X-chromosome of the founder somatic cell reactivates (pre-XCI upon reprogramming into RTT-hiPSCs. Pre-XCI RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons exhibit random XCI resulting in cellular mosaicism with respect to wild-type and mutant MECP2 expression. Here we review and attempt to interpret the inconsistencies in XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs generated to date by comparison to other pluripotent systems in vitro and in vivo and the methods used to analyze XCI. Finally, we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of post- and pre-XCI hiPSCs in the context of RTT, and other X-linked and autosomal disorders for translational medicine.

  19. A model for the induction of DNA damages and their evolution into cell clonogenic inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the initial production of DNA damages on radiation quality was examined by using a proposed new model on the basis of target theory. For the estimation of DNA damage-production by different radiation qualities, five possible modes of radiation action, including both direct and indirect effects, were assumed inside a target the molecular structure of which was defined to consist of 10 base-pairs of DNA surrounded by water molecules. The induction of DNA damage was modeled on the basis of comparisons between the primary ionization mean free path and the distance between pairs of ionized atoms, such distance being characteristic on the mode of radiation action. The OH radicals per average energy to produce an ion pair on the nanosecond time scale was estimated and used for indirect action. Assuming a relation between estimated yields of DNA damages and experimental inactivation cross sections for AT-cells, the present model enabled the quantitative reproduction of experimental results for AT-cell killing under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. The results suggest a higher order organization of DNA in a way that there will be at least two types of water environment, one filling half the space surrounding DNA with a depth of 3.7-4.3 nm and the other filling all space with a depth 4.6-4.9 nm. (author)

  20. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  1. Mechanism of photocatalytic bacterial inactivation on TiO2 films involving cell-wall damage and lysis

    OpenAIRE

    C. Pulgarin; Kiwi, J.; Nadtochenko, V.

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the cell wall damage of Escherichia coil (from now on E. coil) by TiO2 suspensions. The dynamics of TiO2 photocatalysis by thin films layers is described. The films were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The E coil complete inactivation is shown to be due to the partial damage of the cell-wall components (peroxidation). A small increase in the cell wall disorder concomitant with a decrease of the cell wall functional groups leads to h...

  2. Aldehydes with high and low toxicities inactivate cells by damaging distinct cellular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming-Zhang; Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I; Salem, Amir M H; Oba, Shunya; Goda, Mizuki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Aldehydes are genotoxic and cytotoxic molecules and have received considerable attention for their associations with the pathogenesis of various human diseases. In addition, exposure to anthropogenic aldehydes increases human health risks. The general mechanism of aldehyde toxicity involves adduct formation with biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. Although the genotoxic effects of aldehydes such as mutations and chromosomal aberrations are directly related to DNA damage, the role of DNA damage in the cytotoxic effects of aldehydes is poorly understood because concurrent protein damage by aldehydes has similar effects. In this study, we have analysed how saturated and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes exert cytotoxic effects through DNA and protein damage. Interestingly, DNA repair is essential for alleviating the cytotoxic effect of weakly toxic aldehydes such as saturated aldehydes but not highly toxic aldehydes such as long α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Thus, highly toxic aldehydes inactivate cells exclusively by protein damage. Our data suggest that DNA interstrand crosslinks, but not DNA-protein crosslinks and DNA double-strand breaks, are the critical cytotoxic DNA damage induced by aldehydes. Further, we show that the depletion of intracellular glutathione and the oxidation of thioredoxin 1 partially account for the DNA damage-independent cytotoxicity of aldehydes. On the basis of these findings, we have proposed a mechanistic model of aldehyde cytotoxicity mediated by DNA and protein damage. PMID:26917342

  3. Spontaneous squamous cell carcinoma induced by the somatic inactivation of retinoblastoma and Trp53 tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cruz, Ana Belén; Santos, Mirentxu; Lara, M Fernanda; Segrelles, Carmen; Ruiz, Sergio; Moral, Marta; Lorz, Corina; García-Escudero, Ramón; Paramio, Jesús M

    2008-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) represent the most aggressive type of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Although little is known about the causal alterations of SCCs, in organ-transplanted patients the E7 and E6 oncogenes of human papillomavirus, targeting the p53- and pRb-dependent pathways, have been widely involved. Here, we report the functional consequences of the simultaneous elimination of Trp53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) genes in epidermis using Cre-loxP system. Loss of p53, but not pRb, produces spontaneous tumor development, indicating that p53 is the predominant tumor suppressor acting in mouse epidermis. Although the simultaneous inactivation of pRb and p53 does not aggravate the phenotype observed in Rb-deficient epidermis in terms of proliferation and/or differentiation, spontaneous SCC development is severely accelerated in doubly deficient mice. The tumors are aggressive and undifferentiated and display a hair follicle origin. Detailed analysis indicates that the acceleration is mediated by premature activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/Akt pathway, resulting in increased proliferation in normal and dysplastic hair follicles and augmented tumor angiogenesis. The molecular characteristics of this model provide valuable tools to understand epidermal tumor formation and may ultimately contribute to the development of therapies for the treatment of aggressive squamous cancer. PMID:18245467

  4. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  5. Α-MMC and MAP30, two ribosome-inactivating proteins extracted from Momordica charantia, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 human lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang; He, Lingli; Meng, Yao; Li, Gangrui; Li, Linli; Meng, Yanfa

    2015-05-01

    α‑Momorcharin (α‑MMC) and momordica anti‑human immunodeficiency virus protein (MAP30), produced by Momordica charantia, are ribosome‑inactivating proteins, which have been reported to exert inhibitory effects on cultured tumor cells. In order to further elucidate the functions of these agents, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of α‑MMC and MAP30 on cell viability, the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA integrity and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. α‑MMC and MAP30 were purified from bitter melon seeds using ammonium sulfate precipitation in combination with sulfopropyl (SP)‑sepharose fast flow, sephacryl S‑100 and macro‑Cap‑SP chromatography. MTT, flow cytometric and DNA fragmentation analyses were then used to determine the effects of α‑MMC and MAP30 on human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. The results revealed that A549 cells were sensitive to α‑MMC and MAP30 cytotoxicity assays in vitro. Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed following α‑MMC and MAP30 treatment in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner; in addition, the results indicated that MAP30 had a more potent anti‑tumor activity compared with that of α‑MMC. Cell cycle arrest in S phase and a significantly increased apoptotic rate were observed following treatment with α‑MMC and MAP30. Furthermore, DNA integrity analysis revealed that the DNA of A549 cells was degraded following treatment with α‑MMC and MAP30 for 48 h. The pyrogallol autoxidation method and nitrotetrazolium blue chloride staining were used to determine SOD activity, the results of which indicated that α‑MMC and MAP30 did not possess SOD activity. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that α‑MMC and MAP30 may have potential as novel therapeutic agents for the prophylaxis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25573293

  6. C3b covalently bound to IgG demonstrates a reduced rate of inactivation by factors H and I

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    We have prepared C3b covalently linked to IgG via a hydroxylamine- sensitive bond between the C3b alpha' chain and sites predominantly, but not exclusively, located in the IgG heavy chain. This C3b species displays relative resistance to inactivation by factors H and I when compared with free C3b. This resistance appears to be due entirely to reduced affinity of C3b-IgG for factor H. Resistance to inactivation is not conferred on C3b by binding to another serum glycoprotein of similar size, c...

  7. Peripheral blood complete remission after splenic irradiation in Mantle-Cell Lymphoma with 11q22-23 deletion and ATM inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galliano Marco

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL is a well-known histological and clinical subtype of B-cell non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas. It is usually characterized by an aggressive disease course, presenting with advanced stage disease at diagnosis and with low response rates to therapy. However few cases of indolent course MCL have been described. We herein report a case of MCL with splenomegaly and peripheral blood involvement as main clinical features. The patient underwent moderate dose splenic radiation therapy and achieved spleen downsizing and peripheral blood complete remission. Splenic irradiation has been extensively used in the past as palliative treatment in several lymphoproliferative disorders and a systemic effect and sometimes peripheral blood complete remissions have been observed. Mainly advocated mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are considered direct radiation-induced apoptotic cell death, immune modulation via proportional changes of lymphocyte subsets due to known differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity and a radiation-induced cytokine release. The peculiar intrinsic radiosensitivity pattern of lymphoid cells could probably be explained by well-defined individual genetic and molecular features. In this context, among NHLs, MCL subtype has the highest rate of ATM (Ataxia Teleangiectasia Mutated inactivation. While the ATM gene is thought to play a key-role in detecting radiation-induced DNA damage (expecially Double Strand Breaks, recent in vitro data support the hypothesis that ATM loss may actually contribute to the radiosensitivity of MCL cells. ATM status was retrospectively investigated in our patient, with the tool of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization, showing a complete inactivation of a single ATM allele secondary to the deletion of chromosomal region 11q22-23. The presence of this kind of cytogenetic aberration may be regarded in the future as a potential predictive marker of radiation response.

  8. Peripheral blood complete remission after splenic irradiation in Mantle-Cell Lymphoma with 11q22-23 deletion and ATM inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) is a well-known histological and clinical subtype of B-cell non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas. It is usually characterized by an aggressive disease course, presenting with advanced stage disease at diagnosis and with low response rates to therapy. However few cases of indolent course MCL have been described. We herein report a case of MCL with splenomegaly and peripheral blood involvement as main clinical features. The patient underwent moderate dose splenic radiation therapy and achieved spleen downsizing and peripheral blood complete remission. Splenic irradiation has been extensively used in the past as palliative treatment in several lymphoproliferative disorders and a systemic effect and sometimes peripheral blood complete remissions have been observed. Mainly advocated mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are considered direct radiation-induced apoptotic cell death, immune modulation via proportional changes of lymphocyte subsets due to known differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity and a radiation-induced cytokine release. The peculiar intrinsic radiosensitivity pattern of lymphoid cells could probably be explained by well-defined individual genetic and molecular features. In this context, among NHLs, MCL subtype has the highest rate of ATM (Ataxia Teleangiectasia Mutated) inactivation. While the ATM gene is thought to play a key-role in detecting radiation-induced DNA damage (expecially Double Strand Breaks), recent in vitro data support the hypothesis that ATM loss may actually contribute to the radiosensitivity of MCL cells. ATM status was retrospectively investigated in our patient, with the tool of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization, showing a complete inactivation of a single ATM allele secondary to the deletion of chromosomal region 11q22-23. The presence of this kind of cytogenetic aberration may be regarded in the future as a potential predictive marker of radiation response

  9. Combination of photothermal and photodynamic inactivation of cancer cells through surface plasmon resonance of a gold nanoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chih-Ken; Tu, Yi-Chou; Hsiao, Jen-Hung; Yu, Jian-He; Yu, Chih-Kang; Chen, Shih-Yang; Tseng, Po-Hao; Chen, Shuai; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, C. C.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate effective inactivation of oral cancer cells SAS through a combination of photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) effects based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) around 1064 nm in wavelength of a Au nanoring (NRI) under femtosecond (fs) laser illumination. The PTT effect is caused by the LSPR-enhanced absorption of the Au NRI. The PDT effect is generated by linking the Au NRI with the photosensitizer of sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanines (AlPcS) for producing singlet oxygen through the LSPR-enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA) excitation of AlPcS. The laser threshold intensity for cancer cell inactivation with the applied Au NRI linked with AlPcS is significantly lower when compared to that with the Au NRI not linked with AlPcS. The comparison of inactivation threshold intensity between the cases of fs and continuous laser illuminations at the same wavelength and with the same average power confirms the crucial factor of TPA under fs laser illumination for producing the PDT effect.

  10. Inactivation of Fam20C in cells expressing type I collagen causes periodontal disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihong Liu

    Full Text Available FAM20C is a kinase that phosphorylates secretory proteins. Previous studies have shown that FAM20C plays an essential role in the formation and mineralization of bone, dentin and enamel. The present study analyzed the loss-of-function effects of FAM20C on the health of mouse periodontal tissues.By crossbreeding 2.3 kb Col 1a1-Cre mice with Fam20Cfl/fl mice, we created 2.3 kb Col 1a1-Cre;Fam20Cfl/fl (cKO mice, in which Fam20C was inactivated in the cells that express Type I collagen. We analyzed the periodontal tissues in the cKO mice using X-ray radiography, histology, scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry approaches.The cKO mice underwent a remarkable loss of alveolar bone and cementum, along with inflammation of the periodontal ligament and formation of periodontal pockets. The osteocytes and lacuno-canalicular networks in the alveolar bone of the cKO mice showed dramatic abnormalities. The levels of bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialoprotein were reduced in the Fam20C-deficient alveolar bone and/or cementum, while periostin and fibrillin-1 were decreased in the periodontal ligament of the cKO mice.Loss of Fam20C function leads to periodontal disease in mice. The reduced levels of bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, dentin matrix protein 1, dentin sialoprotein, periostin and fibrillin-1 may contribute to the periodontal defects in the Fam20C-deficient mice.

  11. Incompatibility of lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine with liquid pentavalent whole-cell-pertussis-containing vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Heleen; Ten Have, Rimko; van der Maas, Larissa; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-31

    A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick injuries, and (iii) ensure better protection against pertussis as compared to vaccines containing acellular pertussis antigens. An approach to obtain a hexavalent vaccine might be reconstituting lyophilized polio vaccine (IPV-LYO) with liquid pentavalent vaccine just before intramuscular delivery. The potential limitations of this approach were investigated including thermostability of IPV as measured by D-antigen ELISA and rat potency, the compatibility of fluid and lyophilized IPV in combination with thimerosal and thimerosal containing hexavalent vaccine. The rat potency of polio type 3 in IPV-LYO was 2 to 3-fold lower than standardized on the D-antigen content, suggesting an alteration of the polio type 3 D-antigen particle by lyophilization. Type 1 and 2 had unaffected antigenicity/immunogenicity ratios. Alteration of type 3 D-antigen could be detected by showing reduced thermostability at 45°C compared to type 3 in non-lyophilized liquid controls. Reconstituting IPV-LYO in the presence of thimerosal (TM) resulted in a fast temperature dependent loss of polio type 1-3 D-antigen. The presence of 0.005% TM reduced the D-antigen content by ∼20% (polio type 2/3) and ∼60% (polio type 1) in 6h at 25°C, which are WHO open vial policy conditions. At 37°C, D-antigen was diminished even faster, suggesting that very fast, i.e., immediately after preparation, intramuscular delivery of the conceived hexavalent vaccine would not be a feasible option. Use of the TM-scavenger, l-cysteine, to bind TM (or mercury containing TM degradation products), resulted in a hexavalent vaccine mixture in which polio D-antigen was more stable. PMID:27470209

  12. Inactivation of TGFβ receptors in stem cells drives cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammareri, Patrizia; Rose, Aidan M; Vincent, David F; Wang, Jun; Nagano, Ai; Libertini, Silvana; Ridgway, Rachel A; Athineos, Dimitris; Coates, Philip J; McHugh, Angela; Pourreyron, Celine; Dayal, Jasbani H S; Larsson, Jonas; Weidlich, Simone; Spender, Lindsay C; Sapkota, Gopal P; Purdie, Karin J; Proby, Charlotte M; Harwood, Catherine A; Leigh, Irene M; Clevers, Hans; Barker, Nick; Karlsson, Stefan; Pritchard, Catrin; Marais, Richard; Chelala, Claude; South, Andrew P; Sansom, Owen J; Inman, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma patients treated with oncogenic BRAF inhibitors can develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) within weeks of treatment, driven by paradoxical RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway activation. Here we identify frequent TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 mutations in human vemurafenib-induced skin lesions and in sporadic cSCC. Functional analysis reveals these mutations ablate canonical TGFβ Smad signalling, which is localized to bulge stem cells in both normal human and murine skin. MAPK pathway hyperactivation (through Braf(V600E) or Kras(G12D) knockin) and TGFβ signalling ablation (through Tgfbr1 deletion) in LGR5(+ve) stem cells enables rapid cSCC development in the mouse. Mutation of Tp53 (which is commonly mutated in sporadic cSCC) coupled with Tgfbr1 deletion in LGR5(+ve) cells also results in cSCC development. These findings indicate that LGR5(+ve) stem cells may act as cells of origin for cSCC, and that RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway hyperactivation or Tp53 mutation, coupled with loss of TGFβ signalling, are driving events of skin tumorigenesis. PMID:27558455

  13. (1) H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors. PMID:26620126

  14. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M;

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines often deliver simultaneous, yet distinct, cell growth and cell survival signals. The 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) is known to regulate cell growth by inducing protein synthesis components. We purified membrane-based p70S6K as a kinase responsible for site......-specific phosphorylation of BAD, which inactivates this proapoptotic molecule. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial-based p70S6K, which prevented phosphorylation of Ser-136 on BAD and blocked cell survival induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Moreover, IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of BAD Ser-136 was abolished in...... p70S6K-deficient cells. Thus, p70S6K is itself a dual pathway kinase, signaling cell survival as well as growth through differential substrates which include mitochondrial BAD and the ribosomal subunit S6, respectively....

  15. MECHANISM OF FUSARIUM TRICINCTUM (CORDA) SACC. SPORE INACTIVATION BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Chen

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of Fusarium tricinctum (Corda) Sacc. spore inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) was investigated. During F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2, protein, DNA, and metal ion leakage, enzyme activity, and cell ultrastructure were examined. Protein and DNA leakages were not detected, while there were metal ion leakages of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, which were well-correlated with the inactivation rate. The enzyme activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and ...

  16. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Petruzzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45, previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments were conducted using Nero di Troia red wine contaminated with 2 μg/L OTA and supplemented with yeast biomass (20 g/L. The samples were analyzed periodically to assess mycotoxin concentration, chromatic characteristics, and total anthocyanins over 84 days of aging. Yeast cell walls revealed the highest OTA-adsorption in comparison to thermally-inactivated cells (50% vs. 43% toxin reduction, whilst no significant differences were found for the amount of adsorbed anthocyanins in OTA-contaminated and control wines. OTA and anthocyanins adsorption were not competitive phenomena. Unfortunately, the addition of yeast cells to wine could cause color loss; therefore, yeast selection should also focus on this trait to select the best strain.

  17. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Baiano, Antonietta; De Gianni, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Bevilacqua, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45), previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments were conducted using Nero di Troia red wine contaminated with 2 μg/L OTA and supplemented with yeast biomass (20 g/L). The samples were analyzed periodically to assess mycotoxin concentration, chromatic characteristics, and total anthocyanins over 84 days of aging. Yeast cell walls revealed the highest OTA-adsorption in comparison to thermally-inactivated cells (50% vs. 43% toxin reduction), whilst no significant differences were found for the amount of adsorbed anthocyanins in OTA-contaminated and control wines. OTA and anthocyanins adsorption were not competitive phenomena. Unfortunately, the addition of yeast cells to wine could cause color loss; therefore, yeast selection should also focus on this trait to select the best strain. PMID:26516913

  18. Par-3 partitioning defective 3 homolog (C. elegans) and androgen-induced prostate proliferative shutoff associated protein genes are mutationally inactivated in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene identification by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay inhibition (GINI) has proven its usefulness in identifying mutant genes in cancer cell lines. An increase in transcription in response to NMD inhibition of a subset of genes is a major cause of false positives when genes are selected for sequencing analysis. To distinguish between mRNA accumulations caused by stress response-induced transcription and nonsense-containing mRNA stabilizations is a challenge in identifying mutant genes using GINI. To identify potential tumor-suppressor genes mutated in prostate cancer cell lines, we applied a version of GINI that involves inhibition of NMD in two steps. In the first step, NMD is inhibited in duplicate tissue-culture plates. During this step, both the substrate for NMD and stress-response mRNA transcripts are accumulated in cells. In the second step, transcription is inhibited in both plates and NMD is inhibited in one plate and released in the second plate. Microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in both plates after the second step detects only the differences in mRNA degradation but not in mRNA accumulation. Analyzing gene expression profile alterations in 22RV1 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells following NMD inhibition we selected candidates for sequencing analysis in both cell lines. Sequencing identified inactivating mutations in both alleles of the PARD3 and AS3 genes in the LNCaP and 22RV1 cells, respectively. Introduction of a wild-type PARD3 cDNA into the LNCaP cells resulted in a higher proliferation rate in tissue culture, a higher adhesion of LNCaP cells to the components of extracellular matrix and impaired the growth of the LNCaP cells in soft agar and in a three-dimensional cell-culture. The mutational inactivation in a prostate cancer cell line of the PARD3 gene involved in asymmetric cell division and maintenance of cell-polarity suggests that the loss of cell-polarity contributes to prostate carcinogenesis

  19. Living with an imperfect cell wall : compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hübscher, Judith; Jansen, Andrea; Kotte, Oliver; Schäfer, Juliane; Majcherczyk, Paul A.; Harris, Llinos G.; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Heinemann, Matthias; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Background: Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. fem

  20. Degradation and Turnover of Peroxisomes in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha Induced by Selective Inactivation of Peroxisomal Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhuis, Marten; Douma, Anneke; Harder, Willem; Osumi, Masako

    1983-01-01

    Inactivation of peroxisomal enzymes in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha was studied following transfer of cells into cultivation media in which their activity was no longer required for growth. After transfer of methanol-grown cells into media containing glucose - a substrate that fully represses alcohol oxidase synthesis - the rapid inactivation of alcohol oxidase and catalase was paralleled by a disappearance of alcohol oxidase and catalase protein. The rate and extent of this inactivation wa...

  1. Production of DNA strand breaks by ionizing radiation of different quality and their consequences for cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of single- and double-strand breaks (DSB) in the DNA of Chinese hamster cells (V 79) was studied by use of 11 radiation qualities, with some also under hypoxic conditions. The aim was to find relations between the induction of lesions on the molecular level and the expression of this damage on the cellular level. The results suggest that release of DNA from the nuclear-membrane complex, induction of chromosome breaks, and cell inactivation are triggered by DSB. However, not simply a certain number of DSB in the DNA of the nucleus, but their cooperation within a small structural section of DNA is required for cell inactivation. Such sections may be the membrane-associated superstructure units. DSB produced under hypoxic conditions show a greater effectiveness than those produced under oxic conditions. The investigations with eukaryotic cells and bacteria suggest that not the entire DNA of all organisms but a structural unit common to them represents the critical target for radiation action. (author)

  2. DNA fork displacement rates in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA fork displacement rates were measured in 20 human cell lines by a bromodeoxyuridine-313 nm photolysis technique. Cell lines included representatives of normal diploid, Fanconi's anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, xeroderma pigmentosum, trisomy-21 and several transformed lines. The average value for all the cell lines was 0.53 +- 0.08 μm/min. The average value for individual cell lines, however, displayed a 30% variation. Less than 10% of variation in the fork displacement rate appears to be due to the experimental technique; the remainder is probably due to true variation among the cell types and to culture conditions. (Auth.)

  3. Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor gene induces Neuromedin U expression in renal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Deepa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 209 000 new cases of renal carcinoma are diagnosed each year worldwide and new therapeutic targets are urgently required. The great majority of clear cell renal cancer involves inactivation of VHL, which acts as a gatekeeper tumour suppressor gene in renal epithelial cells. However how VHL exerts its tumour suppressor function remains unclear. A gene expression microarray comparing RCC10 renal cancer cells expressing either VHL or an empty vector was used to identify novel VHL regulated genes. Findings NMU (Neuromedin U is a neuropeptide that has been implicated in energy homeostasis and tumour progression. Here we show for the first time that VHL loss-of-function results in dramatic upregulation of NMU expression in renal cancer cells. The effect of VHL inactivation was found to be mediated via activation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF. Exposure of VHL expressing RCC cells to either hypoxia or dimethyloxalylglycine resulted in HIF activation and increased NMU expression. Conversely, suppression of HIF in VHL defective RCC cells via siRNA of HIF-α subunits or expression of Type 2C mutant VHLs reduced NMU expression levels. We also show that renal cancer cells express a functional NMU receptor (NMUR1, and that NMU stimulates migration of renal cancer cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that NMU may act in an autocrine fashion, promoting progression of kidney cancer. Hypoxia and HIF expression are frequently observed in many non-renal cancers and are associated with a poor prognosis. Our study raises the possibility that HIF may also drive NMU expression in non-renal tumours.

  4. NIH 3T3 cells malignantly transformed by mot—2 show inactivation and cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WADHWA; SYUICHITAKANO; 等

    1999-01-01

    In previous studies we have reported that a high level of expression of mot-2 protein results in malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as analyzed by anchorage independent growth and nude mice assays [Kaul et al.,Oncogene,17,907-11,1998].Mot-2 was found to interact with tumor suppressor protein p53.The transient overexpression of mot-2 was inhibitory to transcriptional activation function of p53 [Wadhwa et al.,J.Biol.Chem.,273,2958691,1998].We demonstrate here that mot-2 transfected stable clone of NIH 3T3 that showed malignant properties indeed show inactivation of p53 function as assayed by exogenous p53 dependent reporter.The expression level of p53 in response to UV-irradiation was lower in NIH 3T3/mot-2 as compared to NIH 3T3 cells and also exhibited delay in reachingpeak.Furthermore,upon serum starvation p53 was seen to translocate to the nucleus in NIH 3T3,but not in its mot-3 derivative.The data suggests that mot-2 mediated cytoplasmic sequestration and inactivation of p53 may operate,at least in part,for malignant phenotype of NIH 3T3/mot-2 cells.

  5. Photodynamic inactivation of rubella virus enhances recombination with a latent virus of a baby hamster kidney cell line BHK21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro (Hahnemann Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Rubella virus is very sensitive to photodynamic action. When tested with 1.2 x 10{sup -5} M toluidine blue and 8 W fluorescent lamp at a fluence of 11 W/m{sup 2}, inactivation kinetics showed a linear single hit curve with a k value of 1.48 min{sup -1}. Photodynamic inactivation of rubella virus greatly enhanced recombination with a latent virus (R-virus) of baby hamster kidney BHK21 cells. In contrast, no hybrids were detected in lysates of the cells infected with either UV-treated or untreated rubella virus. Therefore, hybrid viruses were readily detected only in lysates of BHK21 cells infected with photodynamically treated rubella virus. Photodynamic damage of rubella virus genomes generated a new hybrid type (hybrid type 3) in addition to a previously described type 2 hybrid (formerly designated as HPV-RV variant). Although both of these hybrid types carry the CF antigens of rubella virus, plaque forming ability of type 3 hybrid is neutralized neither by anti-rubella serum nor by anti-latent virus serum while type 2 hybrid is neutralized by anti-latent virus serum. (author).

  6. High-pressure inactivation of dried microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinasse, V; Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Marecat, A; Gervais, P

    2008-01-01

    Dried microorganisms are particularly resistant to high hydrostatic pressure effects. In this study, the survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied under pressure applied in different ways. Original processes and devices were purposely developed in our laboratory for long-term pressurization. Dried and wet yeast powders were submitted to high-pressure treatments (100-150 MPa for 24-144 h at 25 degrees C) through liquid media or inert gas. These powders were also pressurized after being vacuum-packed. In the case of wet yeasts, the pressurization procedure had little influence on the inactivation rate. In this case, inactivations were mainly due to hydrostatic pressure effects. Conversely, in the case of dried yeasts, inactivation was highly dependent on the treatment scheme. No mortality was observed when dried cells were pressurized in a non-aqueous liquid medium, but when nitrogen gas was used as the pressure-transmitting fluid, the inactivation rate was found to be between 1.5 and 2 log for the same pressure level and holding time. Several hypotheses were formulated to explain this phenomenon: the thermal effects induced by the pressure variations, the drying resulting from the gas pressure release and the sorption and desorption of the gas in cells. The highest inactivation rates were obtained with vacuum-packed dried yeasts. In this case, cell death occurred during the pressurization step and was induced by shear forces. Our results show that the mechanisms at the origin of cell death under pressure are strongly dependent on the nature of the pressure-transmitting medium and the hydration of microorganisms. PMID:17573691

  7. Live and inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium stimulate similar but distinct transcriptome profiles in bovine macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kirsty; Gallagher, Iain J; Kaliszewska, Anna; Zhang, Chen; Abejide, Oluyinka; Gallagher, Maurice P; Werling, Dirk; Glass, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a major cause of gastroenteritis in cattle and humans. Dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (Mø) are major players in early immunity to Salmonella, and their response could influence the course of infection. Therefore, the global transcriptional response of bovine monocyte-derived DC and Mø to stimulation with live and inactivated S. Typhimurium was compared. Both cell types mount a major response 2 h post infection, with a core common response conserved across cell-type and stimuli. However, three of the most affected pathways; inflammatory response, regulation of transcription and regulation of programmed cell death, exhibited cell-type and stimuli-specific differences. The expression of a subset of genes associated with these pathways was investigated further. The inflammatory response was greater in Mø than DC, in the number of genes and the enhanced expression of common genes, e.g., interleukin (IL) 1B and IL6, while the opposite pattern was observed with interferon gamma. Furthermore, a large proportion of the investigated genes exhibited stimuli-specific differential expression, e.g., Mediterranean fever. Two-thirds of the investigated transcription factors were significantly differentially expressed in response to live and inactivated Salmonella. Therefore the transcriptional responses of bovine DC and Mø during early S. Typhimurium infection are similar but distinct, potentially due to the overall function of these cell-types. The differences in response of the host cell will influence down-stream events, thus impacting on the subsequent immune response generated during the course of the infection. PMID:27000047

  8. Targeted light-inactivation of the Ki-67 protein using theranostic liposomes leads to death of proliferating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin; Rai, Prakash; Gerdes, Johannes; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-02-01

    Nanomedicine is beginning to impact the treatment of several diseases and current research efforts include development of integrated nano-constructs (theranostics) which serve as probes for imaging and therapy in addition to delivering macromolecules intracellularly. In cancer, there is a vital unmet need for effective alternative treatments with high specificity and low systemic toxicity. This can be achieved by targeting key molecular markers associated with cancer cells with reduced effective drug doses. Here, we show an innovative proof-of-principle approach for efficient killing of proliferating ovarian cancer cells by inactivating a protein associated with cell proliferation namely, the nuclear Ki-67 protein (pKi-67), using nanotechnology-based photodynamic therapy (PDT). Antibodies against pKi-67 are widely used as prognostic tools for tumor diagnosis. In this work, anti pKi-67 antibodies were first conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and then encapsulated inside liposomes. After incubation of OVCAR-5 ovarian cancer cells with these liposomes, confocal microscopy confirmed the localization of the antibodies to the nucleoli of the cells. Irradiation with a 488 nm laser led to a significant loss of cell viability. The specificity of this approach for pKi-67 positive cells was demonstrated in confluent human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) where only a small population of cells stain positive for pKi-67 and only minimal cell death was observed. Taken together, our findings suggest that pKi-67 targeted with nano-platform is an attractive therapeutic target in cancer therapy.

  9. p53功能失活在食管鳞癌中的表达及意义%Significance of Functional Inactivation of p53 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小东; 戎铁华; 傅剑华; 龙浩

    2001-01-01

    目的:建立一种评价肿瘤生物学特性的新方法棗p53功能失活检测法,并探讨p53功能失活与食管鳞癌TNM分期(tumor,nodes,metastasisstaging)和组织学分级的关系。方法:采用p53功能测定法对45例新鲜食管鳞癌组织和正常食管组织进行p53功能检测(p53基因突变检测作为对照),将检测结果与患者的TNM分期和组织学分级进行统计学分析。结果:p53功能失活率为64%,明显高于p53基因突变率49%。p53功能失活和食管鳞癌的TNM分期有关,分期越高,p53功能失活率越高;p53功能失活和食管鳞癌的组织学分级有关,分级越高,p53功能失活率越高。结论:p53功能失活有望成为一种评价食管鳞癌生物学特性的新指标;p53功能失活与食管鳞癌的TNM分期和组织学分级有关。%Objective: The current study was designed to establish a new method to evaluate biological activity of carcinoma— functional status of p53, and investigate the relationship between functional inactivation of p53 and the TNM(tumor,nodes,metastasis) staging or histological classification of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. Methods: A total of 45 samples of fresh esophageal tissues of squamous cell carcinoma and normal esophageal tissues were examined for functional inactivation of p53 by detection of functional inactivation of p53 ( comparison with detection of p53 gene mutation ) . Then the analyses of detected results and the TNM stagings or the histological classifications of the carcinoma were statistically analyzed in SPSS. Results: The rate of functional inactivation of p53 (64% ) seemed to be obviously higher than that of p53 gene mutation (49% ) with a significant difference (P=0.046). There was a significant relationship between functional inactivation of p53 and the TNM staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Its rate tended to be increased with the advance of the TNM staging; there was a significant

  10. Arsenic Trioxide Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis through Inactivation of Notch Signaling Pathway in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic trioxide has been reported to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptotic cell death in many human cancer cells including breast cancer. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activity of arsenic trioxide are still largely unknown. In the present study, we assessed the effects of arsenic trioxide on cell viability and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. For mechanistic studies, we used multiple cellular and molecular approaches such as MTT assay, apoptosis ELISA assay, gene transfection, RT-PCR, Western blotting, and invasion assays. For the first time, we found a significant reduction in cell viability in arsenic trioxide-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was consistent with induction of apoptosis and also associated with down-regulation of Notch-1 and its target genes. Taken together, our findings provide evidence showing that the down-regulation of Notch-1 by arsenic trioxide could be an effective approach, to cause down-regulation of Bcl-2, and NF-κB, resulting in the inhibition of cell growth and invasion as well as induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that the anti-tumor activity of arsenic trioxide is in part mediated through a novel mechanism involving inactivation of Notch-1 and its target genes. We also suggest that arsenic trioxide could be further developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  11. Ionizing irradiation not only inactivates clonogenic potential in primary normal human diploid lens epithelial cells but also stimulates cell proliferation in a subset of this population.

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    Yuki Fujimichi

    Full Text Available Over the past century, ionizing radiation has been known to induce cataracts in the crystalline lens of the eye, but its mechanistic underpinnings remain incompletely understood. This study is the first to report the clonogenic survival of irradiated primary normal human lens epithelial cells and stimulation of its proliferation. Here we used two primary normal human cell strains: HLEC1 lens epithelial cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts. Both strains were diploid, and a replicative lifespan was shorter in HLEC1 cells. The colony formation assay demonstrated that the clonogenic survival of both strains decreases similarly with increasing doses of X-rays. A difference in the survival between two strains was actually insignificant, although HLEC1 cells had the lower plating efficiency. This indicates that the same dose inactivates the same fraction of clonogenic cells in both strains. Intriguingly, irradiation enlarged the size of clonogenic colonies arising from HLEC1 cells in marked contrast to those from WI-38 cells. Such enhanced proliferation of clonogenic HLEC1 cells was significant at ≥2 Gy, and manifested as increments of ≤2.6 population doublings besides sham-irradiated controls. These results suggest that irradiation of HLEC1 cells not only inactivates clonogenic potential but also stimulates proliferation of surviving uniactivated clonogenic cells. Given that the lens is a closed system, the stimulated proliferation of lens epithelial cells may not be a homeostatic mechanism to compensate for their cell loss, but rather should be regarded as abnormal. This is because these findings are consistent with the early in vivo evidence documenting that irradiation induces excessive proliferation of rabbit lens epithelial cells and that suppression of lens epithelial cell divisions inhibits radiation cataractogenesis in frogs and rats. Thus, our in vitro model will be useful to evaluate the excessive proliferation of primary normal human lens

  12. Differential inhibitory potencies and mechanisms of the type I ribosome inactivating protein marmorin on estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen Liang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Chan, Yau Sang; Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer with a high incidence rate worldwide. One of the promising therapeutic approaches on breast cancer is to use the drugs that target the estrogen receptor (ER). In the present investigation, marmorin, a type I ribosome inactivating protein from the mushroom Hypsizigus marmoreus, inhibited the survival of breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. It evinced more potent cytotoxicity toward estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF7 breast cancer cells than ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Further study disclosed that marmorin undermined the expression level of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells induced by 17β-estradiol. Knockdown of ERα in MCF7 cells significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of marmorin on proliferation, suggesting that the ERα-mediated pathway was implicated in the suppressive action of marmorin on ER-positive breast cancer cells. Moreover, marmorin induced time-dependent apoptosis in both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. It brought about G2/M-phase arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and caspase-9 activation in MCF7 cells, and to a lesser extent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Marmorin triggered the death receptor apoptotic pathway (e.g. caspase-8 activation) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS, as evidenced by phosphorylation of PERK and IRE1α, cleavage of caspase-12, and up-regulation of CHOP expression) in both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In summary, marmorin exhibited inhibitory effect on breast cancer partially via diminution of ERα and apoptotic pathways mediated by mitochondrial, death receptor and ERS. The results advocate that marmorin is a potential candidate for breast cancer therapy. PMID:23274857

  13. Akt/Protein Kinase B-Dependent Phosphorylation and Inactivation of WEE1Hu Promote Cell Cycle Progression at G2/M Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Naoya; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt is known to promote cell growth by regulating the cell cycle in G1 phase through activation of cyclin/Cdk kinases and inactivation of Cdk inhibitors. However, how the G2/M phase is regulated by Akt remains unclear. Here, we show that Akt counteracts the function of WEE1Hu. Inactivation of Akt by chemotherapeutic drugs or the phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase inhibitor LY294002 induced G2/M arrest together with the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Because the...

  14. Inactivation of Bacteria using Combined Effects of Magnetic Field, Low Pressure and Ultra Low Frequency Plasma Discharges (ULFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactivating viable cells at very short application times has been studied using Ultra Low Frequency Plasma (ULFP) at one Kilo Hertz, using an RF source. The targeted fashion is to inactivate Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Adding oxygen (O2) to argon (Ar) in the discharge leads to a complete bacterial inactivation, where the inactivation rate increased as the concentration of O2 increases. Analyses of the experimental data of the initial and final densities of viable cells, using survival curves, showed a dramatic inhibitory effect of plasma discharge to the residual survival of microbial ratio due to the influence of the magnetic field.

  15. Production of inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccines from MDCK cells in serum-free medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Yung-Chih Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly pathogenic influenza viruses pose a constant threat which could lead to a global pandemic. Vaccination remains the principal measure to reduce morbidity and mortality from such pandemics. The availability and surging demand for pandemic vaccines needs to be addressed in the preparedness plans. This study presents an improved high-yield manufacturing process for the inactivated influenza H5N1 vaccines using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells grown in a serum-free (SF medium microcarrier cell culture system. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The current study has evaluated the performance of cell adaptation switched from serum-containing (SC medium to several commercial SF media. The selected SF medium was further evaluated in various bioreactor culture systems for process scale-up evaluation. No significant difference was found in the cell growth in different sizes of bioreactors studied. In the 7.5 L bioreactor runs, the cell concentration reached to 2.3 × 10(6 cells/mL after 5 days. The maximum virus titers of 1024 Hemagglutinin (HA units/50 µL and 7.1 ± 0.3 × 10(8 pfu/mL were obtained after 3 days infection. The concentration of HA antigen as determined by SRID was found to be 14.1 µg/mL which was higher than those obtained from the SC medium. A mouse immunogenicity study showed that the formalin-inactivated purified SF vaccine candidate formulated with alum adjuvant could induce protective level of virus neutralization titers similar to those obtained from the SC medium. In addition, the H5N1 viruses produced from either SC or SF media showed the same antigenic reactivity with the NIBRG14 standard antisera. CONCLUSIONS: The advantages of this SF cell-based manufacturing process could reduce the animal serum contamination, the cost and lot-to-lot variation of SC medium production. This study provides useful information to manufacturers that are planning to use SF medium for cell-based influenza vaccine production.

  16. Inactivation of E. Coli cell viability and DNA Photo-breakage by Pulsed Nitrogen Laser Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic and lethal effect of nitrogen laser radiation: 337.1 nm wave length, 1.5 millijoul pulse energy, 10 nanosecond pulse with and pulse repetition rate range from 1 to 50 Pulse/ second was evaluated on E. Coli cells. Results indicated that irradiation of E. coli JMP39 with pulse repetition of 8 , 16 , 32 pulse/sec, for 1, 5 , 10, 25 min respectively led to a significant decrease in cell count proportional to irradiation dose with significant increase in lacmutation frequency accompanied with some mutations in pattern of antibiotic resistance. The effect of nitrogen laser on the genomic content of the strain JMP39 was also studied by irradiating the total DNA with 30 pulse/second for 1 ,5, 15 , 30 min then subjected to both agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning spectrophotometry. The first technique revealed to DNA photo breakage and significant decrease in DNA absorbency was noticed by scanning spectrophotometry. This could be attributed to photo-decomposition resulted from multi-photo-excitation of UV-Laser pulses

  17. The SKINT1-like gene is inactivated in hominoids but not in all primate species: implications for the origin of dendritic epidermal T cells.

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    Rania Hassan Mohamed

    Full Text Available Dendritic epidermal T cells, which express an invariant Vγ5Vδ1 T-cell receptor and account for 95% of all resident T cells in the mouse epidermis, play a critical role in skin immune surveillance. These γδ T cells are generated by positive selection in the fetal thymus, after which they migrate to the skin. The development of dendritic epidermal T cells is critically dependent on the Skint1 gene expressed specifically in keratinocytes and thymic epithelial cells, suggesting an indispensable role for Skint1 in the selection machinery for specific intraepithelial lymphocytes. Phylogenetically, rodents have functional SKINT1 molecules, but humans and chimpanzees have a SKINT1-like (SKINT1L gene with multiple inactivating mutations. In the present study, we analyzed SKINT1L sequences in representative primate species and found that all hominoid species have a common inactivating mutation, but that Old World monkeys such as olive baboons, green monkeys, cynomolgus macaques and rhesus macaques have apparently functional SKINT1L sequences, indicating that SKINT1L was inactivated in a common ancestor of hominoids. Interestingly, the epidermis of cynomolgus macaques contained a population of dendritic-shaped γδ T cells expressing a semi-invariant Vγ10/Vδ1 T-cell receptor. However, this population of macaque T cells differed from rodent dendritic epidermal T cells in that their Vγ10/Vδ1 T-cell receptors displayed junctional diversity and expression of Vγ10 was not epidermis-specific. Therefore, macaques do not appear to have rodent-type dendritic epidermal T cells despite having apparently functional SKINT1L. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis indicates that SKINT1L emerged in an ancestor of placental mammals but was inactivated or lost multiple times in mammalian evolution and that Skint1 arose by gene duplication in a rodent lineage, suggesting that authentic dendritic epidermal T cells are presumably unique to rodents.

  18. Induction of Apoptosis in Hormone-resistant Human Prostate Cancer PC3 Cells by Inactivated Sendai Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hui; GONG Xiao Cheng; CHEN Ze Dong; XU Xiao Shuang; ZHANG Quan; XU Xiang Ming

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveInactivated Sendai virus particle [hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E)] has a potential oncolytic effect due to its ability to induce apoptosis in tumor cells. However, the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induction in cancer cellsmediated by HVJ-E has not been fully elucidated.This paper aims to investigate the underlying mechanism of apoptosis induction by HVJ-E in prostate cancer cells (PC3). MethodsPC3 cells were treated with HVJ-E at various MOI, and theninterferon-β (IFN-β) production, and the cell viability and apoptosis were detected by ELISA, MTT-based assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Next, the roles of Jak-Stat, MAPK and Akt pathways played in HVJ-E-induced apoptosis in PC3 cells were analyzed by immunoblot assay. To further evaluate the cytotoxic effect of HVJ-E on PC3 cells, HVJ-E was intratumorally injected into prostate cancers on BALB/c-nude mice, and the tumor volume was monitored for 36 days. ResultsHVJ-E induced IFN-β production and activatedJak-Stat signaling pathway, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-3, and PARP in PC3 prostate cancer cells post HVJ-E treatment. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that p38 and Jnk MAPKs in PC3 cells contributed to HVJ-E-induced apoptosis. In addition,intratumoralHVJ-E treatmentdisplayed a directinhibitoryeffect in anin vivo BALB/cnude mouseprostate cancermodel. ConclusionOur findingshaveprovided novel insights into the underlying mechanismsby whichHVJ-E induces apoptosisin tumor cells.

  19. Antihepatic Fibrosis Effect of Active Components Isolated from Green Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Involves the Inactivation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunge; Jiang, Chunyu; Xia, Xichun; Mu, Teng; Wei, Lige; Lou, Yuntian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Yuqing; Bi, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a vegetable with numerous nutritional properties. In the current study, a total of 23 compounds were isolated from green asparagus, and 9 of these compounds were obtained from this genus for the first time. Preliminary data showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-extracted fraction of green asparagus exerted a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, giving an IC50 value of 45.52 μg/mL. The biological activities of the different compounds isolated from the EtOAc-extracted fraction with respect to antihepatic fibrosis were investigated further. Four compounds, C3, C4, C10, and C12, exhibited profound inhibitory effect on the activation of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells induced by TNF-α. The activation t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, which led to the production of fibrotic matrix (TGF-β1, activin C) and accumulation of TNF-α, was dramatically decreased by these compounds. The mechanisms by which these compounds inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells appeared to be associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the ERK phosphorylation cascade. PMID:26089141

  20. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl3COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 200C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl3COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl3COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  1. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min-1. The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  2. MECHANISM OF FUSARIUM TRICINCTUM (CORDA SACC. SPORE INACTIVATION BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of Fusarium tricinctum (Corda Sacc. spore inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2 was investigated. During F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2, protein, DNA, and metal ion leakage, enzyme activity, and cell ultrastructure were examined. Protein and DNA leakages were not detected, while there were metal ion leakages of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, which were well-correlated with the inactivation rate. The enzyme activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and phosphofructokinase were inhibited and were also well-correlated with the inactivation rate. Electron micrographs showed the ultrastructural modifications of spores and demonstrated that spores were heavily distorted and collapsed from their regular structure. Spore surface damage and disruption in inner components was also severe. The metal ion leakage, the inhibition of enzyme activities, and the damage of spore structure were significant in F. tricinctum spore inactivation by ClO2.

  3. Effects of inactivated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and intestinal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Zhao, Shanshan; Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a serious infection in neonatal piglets. As the causative agent of PED, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) results in acute diarrhea and dehydration with high mortality rates in swine. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly effective antigen-presenting cells to uptake and present viral antigens to T cells, which then initiate a distinct immune response. In this study, our results show that the expression of Mo-DCs surface markers such as SWC3a(+)CD1a(+), SWC3a(+)CD80/86(+) and SWC3a(+)SLA-II-DR(+) is increased after incubation with UV-PEDV for 24h. Mo-DCs incubated with UV-PEDV produce higher levels of IL-12 and INF-γ compared to mock-infected Mo-DCs. Interactions between Mo-DCs and UV-PEDV significantly stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. Consistent with these results, there is an enhancement in the ability of porcine intestinal DCs to activate T-cell proliferation in vivo. We conclude that UV-PEDV may be a useful and safe vaccine to trigger adaptive immunity. PMID:27234553

  4. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  5. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie; Charbonneau, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX. PMID:26055325

  6. Comparison of glycerolisation with cryopreservation methods on HIV-1 inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryopreservation and glycerolisation are two successful long-term preservation methods for human cadaveric donor skin, which is used in the treatment of bum patients. High concentrations of glycerol has been shown to be antibacterial and virucidal. Because fear of possible transmission of HIV-1 following allograft transplantation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether HIV can be effectively eliminated from skin explants. HIV-1 Ba-L, which has been shown to infect monocytes in skin explants and also dendritic cells, was. For the experiments we used cell-free virus, exogenously HIV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and exogenously HIV infected cadaver split skin. Different concentrations of glycerol at various temperatures and the glycerolisation procedure as used by the Euro Skin Bank were used to determine the effects on HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity. For the cryopreservation technique we used 10% DMSO and a controlled rate freezer. HIV-1 Ba-L transfer was determined by adding uninfected PBMCs to the infected material and reverse transcriptase was measured. Cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by 50% glycerol but was effectively inactivated within 30 minutes by 70% and 85% glycerol at 4 degree C, room temperature and 37 degree C. In contrast, cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by cryopreservation. Most importantly, we have shown that HIV-1 Ba-L present in split skin is inactivated by incubating skin in 70% glycerol for three hours at 37-C. HIV in exogenously infected skin was not inactivated by cryopreservation. High concentrations of glycerol effectively inactivates free HIV-1 Ba-L and intracellular HIV-1 Ba-L. Also the current glycerolisation procedure carried out by the Euro Skin Bank effectively inactivates infectious virus. However, the cryopreservation technique did not show any reduction in HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity

  7. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2-4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0-6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0-6.0.

  8. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 induces dendritic cell maturation and enhances the immune response against inactivated avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lulu; Qin, Tao; Yin, YinYan; Gao, Xue; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stimulatory effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 on dendritic cells (DCs) and to verify its ability to enhance the immune response by modulating DC maturation. The results demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can adhere to the nasal epithelium and be taken up by DCs in the nasal mucosa, thereby inducing DC maturation and resulting in increased CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHCII expression and cytokine secretion. The frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD69+ memory T cells were increased in spleens after nasal immunization with virus plus B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 compared to immunization with inactivated H9N2 AIV alone. Moreover, the levels of sIgA in the nasal cavity, the trachea, and the lung and the levels of IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a in serum were significantly increased in mice administered WIV plus SQR9 compared to mice administered H9N2 WIV alone. The results of this study demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can stimulate DC maturation to effectively induce an immune response. In conclusion, an effective immune response may result from the uptake of H9N2 by DCs in the nasal mucosa, thereby stimulating DC maturation and migration to cervical lymph nodes to initiate immune response. PMID:26892720

  9. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 induces dendritic cell maturation and enhances the immune response against inactivated avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lulu; Qin, Tao; Yin, YinYan; Gao, Xue; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stimulatory effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 on dendritic cells (DCs) and to verify its ability to enhance the immune response by modulating DC maturation. The results demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can adhere to the nasal epithelium and be taken up by DCs in the nasal mucosa, thereby inducing DC maturation and resulting in increased CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHCII expression and cytokine secretion. The frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and CD69(+) memory T cells were increased in spleens after nasal immunization with virus plus B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 compared to immunization with inactivated H9N2 AIV alone. Moreover, the levels of sIgA in the nasal cavity, the trachea, and the lung and the levels of IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a in serum were significantly increased in mice administered WIV plus SQR9 compared to mice administered H9N2 WIV alone. The results of this study demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can stimulate DC maturation to effectively induce an immune response. In conclusion, an effective immune response may result from the uptake of H9N2 by DCs in the nasal mucosa, thereby stimulating DC maturation and migration to cervical lymph nodes to initiate immune response. PMID:26892720

  10. Retinoic acid facilitates inactivated transmissible gastroenteritis virus induction of CD8(+) T-cell migration to the porcine gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Tu, Chongzhi; Qin, Tao; Zhu, Liqi; Yin, Yinyan; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The digestive tract is the entry site for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). TGEV transmission can be prevented if local immunity is established with increased lymphocytes. The current parenteral mode of vaccination stimulates systemic immunity well, but it does not induce sufficient mucosal immunity. Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the induction of cells that imprint gut-homing molecules. We examined whether RA assist parenteral vaccination of pigs could improve mucosal immunity. We demonstrated that elevated numbers of gut-homing CD8(+) T cells (which express α4β7 and CCR9 molecules) were presented in porcine inguinal lymph nodes and were recruited to the small intestine by RA. Intestinal mucosal immunity (IgA titre) and systemic immunity (serum IgG titre) were enhanced by RA. Therefore, we hypothesized that RA could induce DCs to form an immature mucosal phenotype and could recruit them to the small intestinal submucosa. Porcine T-cells expressed β7 integrin and CCR9 receptors and migrated to CCL25 by a mechanism that was dependent of activation by RA-pretreated DCs, rather than direct activation by RA. Together, our results provide powerful evidence that RA can assist whole inactivated TGEV (WI-TGEV) via subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization to generate intestinal immunity, and offer new vaccination strategies against TGEV. PMID:27080036

  11. Glycolysis Inhibition Inactivates ABC Transporters to Restore Drug Sensitivity in Malignant Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ayako Nakano; Daisuke Tsuji; Hirokazu Miki; Qu Cui; Salah Mohamed El Sayed; Akishige Ikegame; Asuka Oda; Hiroe Amou; Shingen Nakamura; Takeshi Harada; Shiro Fujii; Kumiko Kagawa; Kyoko Takeuchi; Akira Sakai; Shuji Ozaki

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA) suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubic...

  12. Neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibits cell growth through inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiufang; Zhao, Fengbo; Huo, Xisong; Tang, Weidong; Hu, Baoying; Gong, Xiu; Yang, Juan; Shen, Qiujin; Qin, Wenxin

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) broadly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system. It participates in multiple physiological and pathological processes through specific receptors. Evidences are accumulating that NPY is involved in development and progression in neuro- or endocrine-related cancers. However, little is known about the potential roles and underlying mechanisms of NPY receptors in HCC. In this study, we analyzed the expression of NPY receptors by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical staining. Correlation between NPY1R levels and clinicopathological characteristics, and survival of HCC patients were explored, respectively. Cell proliferation was researched by CCK-8 in vitro, and tumor growth was studied by nude mice xenografts in vivo. We found that mRNA and protein level of NPY receptor Y1 subtype (NPY1R) significantly decreased in HCC tissues. Low expression of NPY1R closely correlated with poor prognosis in HCC patients. Proliferation of HCC cells was significantly inhibited by recombinant NPY protein in vitro. This inhibitory effect could be blocked by selected NPY1R antagonist BIBP3226. Furthermore, overexpression of NPY1R could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation. Knockdown of NPY1R promoted cell multiplication in vitro and increased tumorigenicity and tumor growth in vivo. NPY1R was found to participate in the inhibition of cell proliferation via inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in HCC cells. Collectively, NPY1R plays an inhibitory role in tumor growth and may be a promising therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:27262566

  13. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  14. Implication of p16 inactivation in tumorigenic activity of respiratory epithelial cell lines and adenocarcinoma cell line established from plutonium-induced lung tumor in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether p16 inactivation is involved in the development of rat pulmonary tumors, we compared the p16 status and tumorigenicity of cell lines which indicated different p16 status. The tumor cell line (PuD2) was established from lung adenocarcinoma induced in plutonium dioxide-inhaled rat in this study. The virus-immortalized SV40T2 cells, benzo[a]pyrene-induced BP cells, BP-derived BP(P)Tu cells, and gamma ray-transformed RTiv3 cells were utilized as the respiratory epithelial cell lines. A tumorigenicity assay-inoculating cells into nude mice revealed that PuD2, BP, and BP(P)Tu cells were tumorigenic, but SV40T2 and RTiv3 cells were not. Methylation-specific PCR of the p16 promoter region revealed that SV40T2 cells were unmethylated, BP cells displayed heterogeneous methylation, and BP(P)Tu and RTiv3 cells were completely methylated. Methylation-specific PCR and PCR of genomic DNA in the p16 region did not amplify product in PuD2 cells, indicating deletion of p16. Banded karyotypes prepared from PuD2 cells exhibited trisomy of chromosome 4, inversion in chromosome 11, and partial deletion of chromosomes 4 and 5. The de-methylating agent 5Aza2dC partially demethylated the p16 promoter region of BP(P)Tu, BP and RTiv3 cells, increasing expression of the p16 transcript and decreasing growth of the cells. These results indicate that hyper-methylation of the p16 promoter region occurs early in neoplastic transformation before acquisition of tumorigenicity in rat respiratory epithelium. Loss of genes located on chromosomes 4 and 5 may be important for tumor progression and acquisition of high tumorigenic activity in the Pu-induced rat lung tumor. (authors)

  15. Graptopetalum paraguayense ameliorates chemical-induced rat hepatic fibrosis in vivo and inactivates stellate cells and Kupffer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jen Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4-induced liver injury rats. METHODS: Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. RESULTS: Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl(4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis.

  16. Susceptibility of Glucokinase-MODY Mutants to Inactivation by Oxidative Stress in Pancreatic β-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Kirsty S.; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Agius, Loranne; Arden, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The posttranslational regulation of glucokinase (GK) differs in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. We tested the hypothesis that GK mutants that cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (GK-MODY) show compromised activity and posttranslational regulation in β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Activity and protein expression of GK-MODY and persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) mutants were studied in β-cell (MIN6) and non–β-cell (H4IIE) models. Binding of GK ...

  17. A critical appraisal of Ixiaro® – a cell-derived inactivated vaccine for Japanese encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taff Jones

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Taff JonesClinical Testing Laboratories, Medimmune, Mountain View, CA, USAAbstract: Japanese encephalitis is a disease prevalent across a huge swathe of southeast Asia. The number of reported cases of the disease is increasing in countries that do not have a vaccination program, but in contrast, is decreasing in countries that have implemented mass vaccination programs. Clearly vaccination is having some impact, and although visitors to the area are generally thought to be at low risk, vaccination is recommended for those staying 1 month or longer. Until recently, the only licensed vaccine available to them, JE-VAX®, was made from virus propagated in mouse brain, and among Western Hemisphere recipients of this vaccine, many side effects and adverse events were reported, and production of the vaccine was discontinued in 2007. A new vaccine, Ixiaro®, has recently been licensed. The vaccine comprises inactivated virus, previously propagated in Vero cells, adsorbed onto an alum adjuvant. In extensive clinical trials in both adult and pediatric populations, Ixiaro® has proven non-inferior to JE-VAX® in terms of immunogenicity and seroconversion, but with an improved safety and tolerability profile compared with JE-VAX®.Keywords: vero cells, JEV, vaccine

  18. Requirement of mitoses for the reversal of X-inactivation in cell hybrids between murine embryonal carcinoma cells and normal female thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of a 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and acridine orange fluorescence staining method the authors studied reactivation of the inactivated X chromosome (Xi) in newly formed cell hybrids between the near-diploid HPRT-deficient OTF9-63 murine embryonal carcinoma cell (ECC) with an XO sex chromosome constitution and the normal female mouse thymocyte. Synchronization of the late replicating S chromosome in such hybrid cells, indicative of reactivation, was found for the first time on Day 3, and the frequency of reactivation was attained 90% on Day 5. Inhibition of cell cycle progression either by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of polyamine metabolism, or by isoleucine-deficient medium after cell fusion delayed reactivation of the Xi, which implied that the number of cell division cycles traversed by individual cells rather than the length of time after cell fusion is critical for the reactivation. Double-labeling experiments using [3H]thymidine and BrdU indicated that hybrid cells had undergone three or four mitoses before reactivation of the Xi. Most probably reactivation of the Xi is consequent to reversion of the thymocyte genome to an undifferentiated state under the influence of OTF9 genome. DNA demethylation or dilution of Xi-specific factors by mitoses may be involved in this process

  19. Reactivation of UV and γ-inactivated herpes virus in BHK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-repair capabilities of baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells were investigated by comparing the reactivation of irradiated herpes simplex virus type I (HSV1) in BHK cells with its reactivation in mouse fibroblasts and in normal and repair-deficient human diploid fibroblasts. BHK cells were found to have an intermediate ability to reactivate UV-irradiated HSV1 (the viral D0 was 14 J/m2) relative to normal human fibroblasts (viral D0 = 19 J/m2) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A cells (viral D0 = 4.5 J/m2). With mouse L 929 cells as the host, the response of the UV-irradiated virus was biphasic with D0s of 4.6 and 30 J/m2 for the low- and high-dose components respectively. In contrast to the response following UV radiation, γ-irradiated HSV1 was similarly reactivated by BHK and normal human cells (the D0s for the irradiated virus in BHK and CRL 1106 were 55 and 51 krad, respectively, whereas xeroderma pigmentosum cells were slightly less efficient in the repair of γ-irradiated virus (D0 = 45 krad)). UV irradiation of BHK host cells 0-48 h prior to infection enhanced the reactivation of UV-irradiated HSV. (orig.)

  20. Epigenetic inactivation of SPINT2 is associated with tumor suppressive function in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Dongli [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Fan, Qingxia [The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Chen, Xinfeng; Li, Feng [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Wang, Liping [The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Huang, Lan [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Xiaoqi [The Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Zhang, Zhen [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Liu, Jinyan; Wang, Fei [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The School of Life Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Wang, Meng [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); Zhang, Bin [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan (China); The Department of Hematology/Oncology, School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago 60611 (United States); and others

    2014-03-10

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type 2 (SPINT2), a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor, has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter methylation. We aimed to investigate whether SPINT2 might act as an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tumor suppressor gene. Four ESCC cell lines, Fifty-two ESCC tissues and twenty-nine neighboring non-cancerous tissues were included in this study. The expression of SPINT2 was monitored by real time PCR. Bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylation-specific PCR were used to analyze methylation status. The effect of SPINT2 on cell proliferation and apoptosis in EC109 and EC9706 cells was observed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. We found that silencing of SPINT2 was associated with promoter methylation in ESCC cell lines. The densely methylated SPINT2 promoter region was confirmed by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Ectopic expression of SPINT2 inhibited cell proliferation through inducing cell apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, methylation-specific PCR analysis revealed that SPINT2 promoter methylation was prominent in carcinoma tissues (52.08%) compared with neighboring non-cancerous tissues (22.58%). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with SPINT2 hypermethylation had shorter survival time. The tumor suppressor gene of SPINT2 is commonly silenced by promoter hypermethylation in human ESCC and SPINT2 hypermethylation is correlated with poor overall survival, implicating SPINT2 is an underlying prognostic marker for human ESCC. - Highlights: • We firstly found SPINT2 gene may be transcriptionally repressed by promoter hypermethylation in ESCC cells. • SPINT2 overexpressing cells induced proliferation inhibition through promoting apoptosis. • mRNA expression of SPINT2 was significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in neighboring non-cancerous tissues. • Promoter hypermethylation of SPINT2 is significantly linked to TNM stage and poor overall survival.

  1. PARD3 Inactivation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinomas Impairs STAT3 and Promotes Malignant Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Bonastre, Ester; Verdura, Sara; Zondervan, Ilse; Facchinetti, Federica; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Chiara, Maria Dolores; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Carretero, Julian; Condom, Enric; Vidal, Agustin; Sidransky, David; Villanueva, Alberto; Roz, Luca; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Savola, Suvi

    2015-01-01

    Correct apicobasal polarization and intercellular adhesions are essential for the appropriate development of normal epithelia. Here, we investigated the contribution of the cell polarity regulator PARD3 to the development of lung squamous cell carcinomas (LSCC). Tumor-specific PARD3 alterations were found in 8% of LSCCs examined, placing PARD3 among the most common tumor suppressor genes in this malignancy. Most PAR3-mutant proteins exhibited a relative reduction in the ability to mediate for...

  2. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  3. Conditional inactivation of PDCD2 induces p53 activation and cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine J. Granier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available PDCD2 (programmed cell death domain 2 is a highly conserved, zinc finger MYND domain-containing protein essential for normal development in the fly, zebrafish and mouse. The molecular functions and cellular activities of PDCD2 remain unclear. In order to better understand the functions of PDCD2 in mammalian development, we have examined PDCD2 activity in mouse blastocyst embryos, as well as in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs and embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We have studied mice bearing a targeted PDCD2 locus functioning as a null allele through a splicing gene trap, or as a conditional knockout, by deletion of exon2 containing the MYND domain. Tamoxifen-induced knockout of PDCD2 in MEFs, as well as in ESCs, leads to defects in progression from the G1 to the S phase of cell cycle, associated with increased levels of p53 protein and p53 target genes. G1 prolongation in ESCs was not associated with induction of differentiation. Loss of entry into S phase of the cell cycle and marked induction of nuclear p53 were also observed in PDCD2 knockout blastocysts. These results demonstrate a unique role for PDCD2 in regulating the cell cycle and p53 activation during early embryonic development of the mouse.

  4. Sanguinarine Induces Apoptosis of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma KB Cells via Inactivation of the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Kyung; Park, Cheol; Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical Research Sanguinarine, an alkaloid isolated from the root of Sanguinaria canadensis and other plants of the Papaveraceae family, selectively induces apoptotic cell death in a variety of human cancer cells, but its mechanism of action requires further elaboration. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effects of sanguinarine in human oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cells. Sanguinarine treatment increased DR5/TRAILR2 (death receptor 5/TRAIL receptor 2) expression and enhanced the activation of caspase-8 and cleavage of its substrate, Bid. Sanguinarine also induced the mitochondrial translocation of pro-apoptotic Bax, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release to the cytosol, and activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, reversed the growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by sanguinarine. Sanguinarine also suppressed the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in KB cells, while co-treatment of cells with sanguinarine and a PI3K inhibitor revealed synergistic apoptotic effects. However, pharmacological inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases did not reduce or enhance sanguinarine-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Collectively, these findings indicate that the pro-apoptotic effects of sanguinarine in KB cells may be regulated by a caspase-dependent cascade via activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways and inactivation of PI3K/Akt signaling. Drug Dev Res 77 : 227-240, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27363951

  5. Systems biology modeling reveals a possible mechanism of the tumor cell death upon oncogene inactivation in EGFR addicted cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ping Zhou

    Full Text Available Despite many evidences supporting the concept of "oncogene addiction" and many hypotheses rationalizing it, there is still a lack of detailed understanding to the precise molecular mechanism underlying oncogene addiction. In this account, we developed a mathematic model of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR associated signaling network, which involves EGFR-driving proliferation/pro-survival signaling pathways Ras/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT, and pro-apoptotic signaling pathway apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1/p38. In the setting of sustained EGFR activation, the simulation results show a persistent high level of proliferation/pro-survival effectors phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT, and a basal level of pro-apoptotic effector phospho-p38. The potential of p38 activation (apoptotic potential due to the elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS is largely suppressed by the negative crosstalk between PI3K/AKT and ASK1/p38 pathways. Upon acute EGFR inactivation, the survival signals decay rapidly, followed by a fast increase of the apoptotic signal due to the release of apoptotic potential. Overall, our systems biology modeling together with experimental validations reveals that inhibition of survival signals and concomitant release of apoptotic potential jointly contribute to the tumor cell death following the inhibition of addicted oncogene in EGFR addicted cancers.

  6. Inactivation of CDK2 is synthetically lethal to MYCN over-expressing cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Molenaar; M.E. Ebus; D. Geerts; J. Koster; F. Lamers; L.J. Valentijn; E.M. Westerhout; R. Versteeg; H.N. Caron

    2009-01-01

    Two genes have a synthetically lethal relationship when the silencing or inhibiting of 1 gene is only lethal in the context of a mutation or activation of the second gene. This situation offers an attractive therapeutic strategy, as inhibition of such a gene will only trigger cell death in tumor cel

  7. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-01

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. PMID:26731189

  8. Repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells made UV light resistant by fusion with X-ray-inactivated Chinese hamster cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Karentz, D; Cleaver, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive human disease, characterized by an extreme sensitivity to sunlight, caused by the inability of cells to repair UV light-induced damage to DNA. Cell fusion was used to transfer fragments of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) chromosomes into XP cells. The hybrid cells exhibited UV resistance and DNA repair characteristics comparable to those expressed by CHO cells, and their DNA had greater homology with CHO DNA than did the DNA from XP cells. Cont...

  9. T cell-specific inactivation of mouse CD2 by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil-Wagner, Jane; Dössinger, Georg; Schober, Kilian; vom Berg, Johannes; Tresch, Achim; Grandl, Martina; Palle, Pushpalatha; Mair, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Becher, Burkhard; Busch, Dirk H; Buch, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to mutate target sequences by introduction of double-strand breaks followed by imprecise repair. To test its use for conditional gene editing we generated mice transgenic for CD4 promoter-driven Cas9 combined with guide RNA targeting CD2. We found that within CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes from lymph nodes and spleen 1% and 0.6% were not expressing CD2, respectively. T cells lacking CD2 carryied mutations, which confirmed that Cas9 driven by cell-type specific promoters can edit genes in the mouse and may thus allow targeted studies of gene function in vivo. PMID:26903281

  10. T cell-specific inactivation of mouse CD2 by CRISPR/Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil-Wagner, Jane; Dössinger, Georg; Schober, Kilian; vom Berg, Johannes; Tresch, Achim; Grandl, Martina; Palle, Pushpalatha; Mair, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Becher, Burkhard; Busch, Dirk H.; Buch, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to mutate target sequences by introduction of double-strand breaks followed by imprecise repair. To test its use for conditional gene editing we generated mice transgenic for CD4 promoter-driven Cas9 combined with guide RNA targeting CD2. We found that within CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from lymph nodes and spleen 1% and 0.6% were not expressing CD2, respectively. T cells lacking CD2 carryied mutations, which confirmed that Cas9 driven by cell-type specific promoters can edit genes in the mouse and may thus allow targeted studies of gene function in vivo. PMID:26903281

  11. Heat Inactivation of Garlic (Allium sativum) Extract Abrogates Growth Inhibition of HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintapalli, Renuka; Murray, Matthew J J; Murray, James T

    2016-07-01

    The potential anticancer properties of garlic (Allium sativum) may depend on the method of preparation and its storage. Storage of garlic has not been thoroughly investigated to determine whether anticancer properties are retained. Garlic was prepared and processed to mimic normal options for storage and preparation for consumption. Cytotoxicity was determined by crystal violet assay and mechanisms of cytotoxicity were established by microscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western immunoblotting. Significant (P garlic. Depending on the method of storage, garlic extract induced either type I or type II programmed cell death, detectable by caspase 9 cleavage, or Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and LC3-II accumulation, respectively. The conflicting literature on the anticancer properties of garlic may be explained by differences in processing and storage. This study has highlighted that the potency of the antiproliferative properties of cooked garlic, compared to the uncooked form, is diminished in HeLa cells. PMID:27176674

  12. Modelling the mechanism of cell inactivation by light ions at different energy values

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrát, P; Lokajícek, M; Kundrat, Pavel; Hromcikova, Hana; Lokajicek, Milos

    2004-01-01

    For efficient application of protons and light ions in radiotherapy, detailed knowledge and realistic models of the corresponding radiobiological mechanism are necessary. Basic characteristics of this mechanism have been represented within a probabilistic two-stage model. The processes that occur immediately after the traversals of individual particles and the response of cell to the total damage formed by all the particles have been distinguished. The model involves a probabilistic description of DNA damage formation and repair processes, too.

  13. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase activity inactivates the CXC chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuibban, G A; Butler, G S; Gong, J H; Bendall, L; Power, C; Clark-Lewis, I; Overall, C M

    2001-11-23

    Chemokines provide directional cues for leukocyte migration and activation that are essential for normal leukocytic trafficking and for host responses during processes such as inflammation, infection, and cancer. Recently we reported that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) modulate the activity of the CC chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 by selective proteolysis to release the N-terminal tetrapeptide. Here we report the N-terminal processing, also at position 4-5, of the CXC chemokines stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha and beta by MMP-2 (gelatinase A). Robustness of the MMP family for chemokine cleavage was revealed from identical cleavage site specificity of MMPs 1, 3, 9, 13, and 14 (MT1-MMP) toward SDF-1; selectivity was indicated by absence of cleavage by MMPs 7 and 8. Efficient cleavage of SDF-1alpha by MMP-2 is the result of a strong interaction with the MMP hemopexin C domain at an exosite that overlaps the monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 binding site. The association of SDF-1alpha with different glycosaminoglycans did not inhibit cleavage. MMP cleavage of SDF-1alpha resulted in loss of binding to its cognate receptor CXCR-4. This was reflected in a loss of chemoattractant activity for CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor stem cells and pre-B cells, and unlike full-length SDF-1alpha, the MMP-cleaved chemokine was unable to block CXCR-4-dependent human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection of CD4(+) cells. These data suggest that MMPs may be important regulatory proteases in attenuating SDF-1 function and point to a deep convergence of two important networks, chemokines and MMPs, to regulate leukocytic activity in vivo. PMID:11571304

  15. Inactivation of the phosphoglucomutase gene pgm in Corynebacterium glutamicum affects cell shape and glycogen metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In Corynebacterium glutamicum formation of glc-1-P (α-glucose-1-phosphate) from glc-6-P (glucose-6-phosphate) by α-Pgm (phosphoglucomutase) is supposed to be crucial for synthesis of glycogen and the cell wall precursors trehalose and rhamnose. Furthermore, Pgm is probably necessary for glycogen degradation and maltose utilization as glucan phosphorylases of both pathways form glc-1-P. We here show that C. glutamicum possesses at least two Pgm isoenzymes, the cg2800 (pgm) encoded enzyme contr...

  16. Cell adhesion-dependent inactivation of a soluble protein kinase during fertilization in Chlamydomonas.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Luo, Y.; Emmett, K; Snell, W J

    1996-01-01

    Within seconds after the flagella of mt+ and mt- Chlamydomonas gametes adhere during fertilization, their flagellar adenylyl cyclase is activated several fold and preparation for cell fusion is initiated. Our previous studies indicated that early events in this pathway, including control of adenylyl cyclase, are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we describe a soluble, flagellar protein kinase activity that is regulated by flagellar adhesion. A 48-kDa, soluble flagellar...

  17. Ozone exposure of human tracheal epithelial cells inactivates cyclooxygenase and increases 15-HETE production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, S E; Walenga, R W

    1995-12-01

    We assessed the immediate and prolonged effects of ozone on arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by primary cultured human tracheal epithelial (TE) cells. TE monolayers were exposed at a gas-fluid interface to air or 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ppm ozone (15 min air, then 45 min air/ozone), and serially collected effluents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. Release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and AA, but not 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) or its metabolites, was detected from cultures prelabeled with [14C]AA. PGE2 production, measured by immunoassay, was nearly constant during air exposure. In contrast, PGE2 increased two- to threefold during the first 15-min exposure to all concentrations of ozone, but then progressively declined to 78 +/- 17, 57 +/- 12 (P ozone. Ozone did not induce a new spectrum of AA metabolites; only PGE2, lesser amounts of PGF2 alpha, and 15-HETE were present in media and cell extracts of air- or ozone-exposed cultures provided with 30 microM exogenous AA. However, cyclooxygenase (CO) activity (PGE2 produced from 30 microM AA) decreased to 82 +/- 9, 53 +/- 8 (P ozone, whereas 15-HETE production was unimpaired. When cells exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone were maintained for up to 6 h in 5% CO2-air, spontaneous PGE2 production remained decreased and recovery of CO activity was extremely slow. TLC analysis of lipid extracts from [14C]AA-labeled cells revealed a nearly twofold increase in free intracellular 15-HETE, and hydrolysis of phospholipids demonstrated increased esterified 15-HETE. Exposure of human TE cells to ozone leads to a transient increase followed by prolonged decrease in PGE2 production and increased intracellular retention of 15-HETE. Loss of the bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory properties of epithelial PGE2, with or without increased 15-HETE, might contribute to ozone-induced airway dysfunction. PMID:8572235

  18. Akt/Protein Kinase B-Dependent Phosphorylation and Inactivation of WEE1Hu Promote Cell Cycle Progression at G2/M Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Naoya; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt is known to promote cell growth by regulating the cell cycle in G1 phase through activation of cyclin/Cdk kinases and inactivation of Cdk inhibitors. However, how the G2/M phase is regulated by Akt remains unclear. Here, we show that Akt counteracts the function of WEE1Hu. Inactivation of Akt by chemotherapeutic drugs or the phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase inhibitor LY294002 induced G2/M arrest together with the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Because the increased Cdc2 phosphorylation was completely suppressed by wee1hu gene silencing, WEE1Hu was associated with G2/M arrest induced by Akt inactivation. Further analyses revealed that Akt directly bound to and phosphorylated WEE1Hu during the S to G2 phase. Serine-642 was identified as an Akt-dependent phosphorylation site. WEE1Hu kinase activity was not affected by serine-642 phosphorylation. We revealed that serine-642 phosphorylation promoted cytoplasmic localization of WEE1Hu. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation was mediated by phosphorylation-dependent WEE1Hu binding to 14-3-3θ but not 14-3-3β or -σ. These results indicate that Akt promotes G2/M cell cycle progression by inducing phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3θ binding and cytoplasmic localization of WEE1Hu. PMID:15964826

  19. Phytochemicals in lowbush wild blueberry inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 by damaging its cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Alison; Tadepalli, Shravani; Hwang, Chen-An; Wu, Vivian C H

    2013-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity and model of action of polyphenolic compounds extracted from lowbush wild blueberries (LWB) were studied against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Polyphenols in LWB were extracted using 80% vol/vol methanol and designated as total blueberry phenolics (TBP). The fraction was further separated by a C-18 Sep-Pak cartridge into monomeric phenolics acids (MPA) and anthocyanins plus proanthocyanidins (A&P). The A&P fraction was further separated into anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins using a LH-20 Sephadex column. Each fraction was diluted in 0.85% wt/vol NaCl, inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 to achieve 8 log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, and incubated at 25 °C for 1 h. The survival populations of E. coli O157:H7 in the phenolic fractions were determined by a viable cell counts method. The permeability of the cell membrane of E. coli O157:H7 was determined using LIVE/DEAD viability assay, and the damage was visualized by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significant (pproanthocyanidins (0.15 g/L GAE), A&P (0.45 g/L GAE), anthocyanins (0.65 g/L GAE), and TBP (0.14 g/L GAE). TEM confirmed the inactivation and increased membrane permeability of E. coli O157:H7. This study demonstrated the antimicrobial effect of polyphenols from LWB against E. coli O157:H7 and the probable mode of action. PMID:23944751

  20. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T;

    2006-01-01

    mechanism underlying this transcriptional repression by glucose remains unclear. Here we report that glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in INS-1E cells is independent of beta-cell excitation and insulin secretion but requires activation of protein phosphatase 2A in a process involving...... AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....

  1. Inactivation of chromatin remodeling factors sensitizes cells to selective cytotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Miles D Freeman, Tryphon Mazu, Jana S Miles, Selina Darling-Reed, Hernan Flores-Rozas College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL, USA Abstract: The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex plays an essential role in several cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and DNA repair. Loss of normal function of the SWI/SNF complex because of mutations in its subunits correlates with tumorigenesis in humans. For many of these cancers, cytotoxic chemotherapy is the primary, and sometimes the only, therapeutic alternative. Among the antineoplastic agents, anthracyclines are a common treatment option. Although effective, resistance to these agents usually develops and serious dose-related toxicity, namely, chronic cardiotoxicity, limits its use. Previous work from our laboratory showed that a deletion of the SWI/SNF factor SNF2 resulted in hypersensitivity to doxorubicin. We further investigated the contribution of other chromatin remodeling complex components in the response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Our results indicate that, of the eight SWI/SNF strains tested, snf2, taf14, and swi3 were the most sensitive and displayed distinct sensitivity to different cytotoxic agents, while snf5 displayed resistance. Our experimental results indicate that the SWI/SNF complex plays a critical role in protecting cells from exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy and other cytotoxic agents. Our findings may prove useful in the development of a strategy aimed at targeting these genes to provide an alternative by hypersensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Keywords: chromatin remodeling, cancer, DNA damage/repair, heat-shock response, oxidative stress

  2. p31comet-Induced Cell Death Is Mediated by Binding and Inactivation of Mad2

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Yun, Sun-Hee; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Jung, Won-Hee; Woo, Seon Rang; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Jang, Su Hwa; Chung, Hee Yong; Hong, Sung Hee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Joong-Jean; Yun, Miyong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mad2, a key component of the spindle checkpoint, is closely associated with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis in cancer. p31comet is a Mad2-interacting protein that serves as a spindle checkpoint silencer at mitosis. In this study, we showed that p31comet-induced apoptosis and senescence occur via counteraction of Mad2 activity. Upon retroviral transduction of p31comet, the majority of human cancer cell lines tested lost the ability to form colonies in a low-density seeding assay. Ca...

  3. TRAIL-induced cleavage and inactivation of SPAK sensitizes cells to apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) has been linked to various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and ion transport regulation. Recently, we showed that SPAK mediates signaling by the TNF receptor, RELT. The presence of a caspase cleavage site in SPAK prompted us to study its involvement in apoptotic signaling induced by another TNF member, TRAIL. We show that TRAIL stimulated caspase 3-like proteases that cleaved SPAK at two distinct sites. Cleavage had little effect on the activity of SPAK but removed its substrate-binding domain. In addition, TRAIL reduced the activity of SPAK in HeLa cells in a caspase-independent manner. Thus, TRAIL inhibited SPAK by two mechanisms: activation of caspases, which removed its substrate-binding domain, and caspase-independent down-regulation of SPAK activity. Furthermore, reducing the amount of SPAK by siRNA increased the sensitivity of HeLa cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Thus, TRAIL down-regulation of SPAK is an important event that enhances its apoptotic effects

  4. The inactivation of Arx in pancreatic α-cells triggers their neogenesis and conversion into functional β-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Courtney

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it was demonstrated that pancreatic new-born glucagon-producing cells can regenerate and convert into insulin-producing β-like cells through the ectopic expression of a single gene, Pax4. Here, combining conditional loss-of-function and lineage tracing approaches, we show that the selective inhibition of the Arx gene in α-cells is sufficient to promote the conversion of adult α-cells into β-like cells at any age. Interestingly, this conversion induces the continuous mobilization of duct-lining precursor cells to adopt an endocrine cell fate, the glucagon(+ cells thereby generated being subsequently converted into β-like cells upon Arx inhibition. Of interest, through the generation and analysis of Arx and Pax4 conditional double-mutants, we provide evidence that Pax4 is dispensable for these regeneration processes, indicating that Arx represents the main trigger of α-cell-mediated β-like cell neogenesis. Importantly, the loss of Arx in α-cells is sufficient to regenerate a functional β-cell mass and thereby reverse diabetes following toxin-induced β-cell depletion. Our data therefore suggest that strategies aiming at inhibiting the expression of Arx, or its molecular targets/co-factors, may pave new avenues for the treatment of diabetes.

  5. Inactivation and reactivation of B. megatherium phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORTHROP, J H

    1955-11-20

    Preparation of Reversibly Inactivated (R.I.) Phage.- If B. megatherium phage (of any type, or in any stage of purification) is suspended in dilute salt solutions at pH 5-6, it is completely inactivated; i.e., it does not form plaques, or give rise to more phage when mixed with a sensitive organism (Northrop, 1954). The inactivation occurs when the phage is added to the dilute salt solution. If a suspension of the inactive phage in pH 7 peptone is titrated to pH 5 and allowed to stand, the activity gradually returns. The inactivation is therefore reversible. Properties of R.I. Phage.- The R.I. phage is adsorbed by sensitive cells at about the same rate as the active phage. It kills the cells, but no active phage is produced. The R.I. phage therefore has the properties of phage "ghosts" (Herriott, 1951) or of colicines (Gratia, 1925), or phage inactivated by ultraviolet light (Luria, 1947). The R.I. phage is sedimented in the centrifuge at the same rate as active phage. It is therefore about the same size as the active phage. The R.I. phage is most stable in pH 7, 5 per cent peptone, and may be kept in this solution for weeks at 0 degrees C. The rate of digestion of R.I. phage by trypsin, chymotrypsin, or desoxyribonuclease is about the same as that of active phage (Northrop, 1955 a). Effect of Various Substances on the Formation of R.I. Phage.- There is an equilibrium between R.I. phage and active phage. The R.I. form is the stable one in dilute salt solution, pH 5 to 6.5 and at low temperature (6.5, in dilute salt solution, the R.I. phage changes to the active form. The cycle, active right harpoon over left harpoon inactive phage, may be repeated many times at 0 degrees C. by changing the pH of the solution back and forth between pH 7 and pH 6. Irreversible inactivation is caused by distilled water, some heavy metals, concentrated urea or quanidine solutions, and by l-arginine. Reversible inactivation is prevented by all salts tested (except those causing

  6. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. PMID:27016770

  7. Inactivation efficiencies of radical reactions with biologically active DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, M. V. M.; Retèl, J.; Loman, H.

    Dilute aqueous solutions of biologically active θX174 DNA may serve as a simplified model system of the cell. Damage to the DNA after irradiation with γ-rays, may be ascribed to reactions with .OH, .H and e -aq or secondary radicals, arising from reactions of water radicals with added scavengers. Conversion of primary (water) radicals into secondary (scavenger) radicals leads to a considerable protection of the DNA, which, however, would have been larger if these secondary radicals did not contribute to DNA inactivation. The inactivation yield due to isopropanol or formate (secondary) radicals depends on dose rate as well as DNA concentration. Furthermore the inactivation efficiencies of the reactions of both the primary and the secondary radicals with single-stranded DNA could be established.

  8. Inactivation efficiencies of radical reactions with biologically active DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilute aqueous solutions of biologically active ΦX174 DNA may serve as a simplified model system of the cell. Damage to the DNA after irradiation with γ-rays, may be ascribed to reactions with radical OH, radical H and esub(aq)- or secondary radicals, arising from reactions of water radicals with added scavengers. Conversion of primary (water) radicals into secondary (scavenger) radicals leads to a considerable protection of the DNA, which however, would have been larger if these secondary radicals did not contribute to DNA inactivation. The inactivation yield due to isopropanol or formate (secondary) radicals depends on dose rate as well as DNA concentration. Furthermore the inactivation efficiencies of the reactions of both the primary and the secondary radicals with single-stranded DNA could be established. (author)

  9. X-Chromosome Inactivation Analysis in Different Cell Types and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Elucidates the Disease Mechanism in a Rare Case of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II in a Female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řeboun, M; Rybová, J; Dobrovolný, R; Včelák, J; Veselková, T; Štorkánová, G; Mušálková, D; Hřebíček, M; Ledvinová, J; Magner, M; Zeman, J; Pešková, K; Dvořáková, L

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficiency of iduronate-2-sulphatase activity. The disease manifests almost exclusively in males; only 16 symptomatic heterozygote girls have been reported so far. We describe the results of X-chromosome inactivation analysis in a 5-year-old girl with clinically severe disease and heterozygous mutation p.Arg468Gln in the IDS gene. X inactivation analysed at three X-chromosome loci showed extreme skewing (96/4 to 99/1) in two patient's cell types. This finding correlated with exclusive expression of the mutated allele. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) generated from the patient's peripheral blood demonstrated characteristic pluripotency markers, deficiency of enzyme activity, and mutation in the IDS gene. These cells were capable of differentiation into other cell types (cardiomyocytes, neurons). In MPS II iPSC clones, the X inactivation ratio remained highly skewed in culture conditions that led to partial X inactivation reset in Fabry disease iPSC clones. Our data, in accordance with the literature, suggest that extremely skewed X inactivation favouring the mutated allele is a crucial condition for manifestation of MPS II in females. This suggests that the X inactivation status and enzyme activity have a prognostic value and should be used to evaluate MPS II in females. For the first time, we show generation of iPSC from a symptomatic MPS II female patient that can serve as a cellular model for further research of the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27187040

  10. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  11. The Inactivation of Arx in Pancreatic alpha-Cells Triggers Their Neogenesis and Conversion into Functional beta-Like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Courtney; Elisabet Gjernes; Noémie Druelle; Christophe Ravaud; Andhira Vieira; Nouha Ben-Othman; Anja Pfeifer; Fabio Avolio; Gunter Leuckx; Sandra Lacas-Gervais; Fanny Burel-Vandenbos; Damien Ambrosetti; Jacob Hecksher-Sorensen; Philippe Ravassard; Harry Heimberg

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pancreatic new-born glucagon-producing cells can regenerate and convert into insulinproducing beta-like cells through the ectopic expression of a single gene, Pax4. Here, combining conditional loss-of-function and lineage tracing approaches, we show that the selective inhibition of the Arx gene in alpha-cells is sufficient to promote the conversion of adult alpha-cells into beta-like cells at any age. Interestingly, this conversion induces the continuous mob...

  12. Repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells made UV light resistant by fusion with X-ray-inactivated Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive human disease, characterized by an extreme sensitivity to sunlight, caused by the inability of cells to repair UV light-induced damage to DNA. Cell fusion was used to transfer fragments of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) chromosomes into XP cells. The hybrid cells exhibited UV resistance and DNA repair characteristics comparable to those expressed by CHO cells, and their DNA had greater homology with CHO DNA than did the DNA from XP cells. Control experiments consisted of fusion of irradiated and unirradiated XP cells and repeated exposure of unfused XP cells to UV doses used for hybrid selection. These treatments did not result in an increase in UV resistance, repair capability, or homology with CHO DNA. The hybrid cell lines do not, therefore, appear to be XP revertants. The establishment of these stable hybrid cell lines is an initial step toward identifying and cloning CHO DNA repair genes that complement the XP defect in human cells. The method should also be applicable to cloning genes for other diseases, such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Fanconi's anemia

  13. Cell inactivation and membrane damage after long-term treatments at sub-zero temperature in the supercooled and frozen states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Marwen; Dumont, Frédéric; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2008-12-15

    The survival of cells subjected to cooling at sub-zero temperature is of paramount concern in cryobiology. The susceptibility of cells to cryopreservation processes, especially freeze-thawing, stimulated considerable interest in better understanding the mechanisms leading to cell injury and inactivation. In this study, we assessed the viability of cells subjected to cold stress, through long-term supercooling experiments, versus freeze-thawing stress. The viability of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and leukemia cells were assessed over time. Supercooled conditions were maintained for 71 days at -10 degrees C, and for 4 h at -15 degrees C, and -20 degrees C, without additives or emulsification. Results showed that cells could be inactivated by the only action of sub-zero temperature, that is, without any water crystallization. The loss of cell viability upon exposure to sub-zero temperatures is suggested to be caused by exposure to cold shock which induced membrane damage. During holding time in the supercooled state, elevated membrane permeability results in uncontrolled mass transfer to and from the cell maintained at cold conditions and thus leads to a loss of viability. With water crystallization, cells shrink suddenly and thus are exposed to cold osmotic shock, which is suggested to induce abrupt loss of cell viability. During holding time in the frozen state, cells remain suspended in the residual unfrozen fraction of the liquid and are exposed to cold stress that would cause membrane damage and loss of viability over time. However, the severity of such a stress seems to be moderated by the cell type and the increased solute concentration in the unfrozen fraction of the cell suspension. PMID:18814283

  14. Observations on the Inactivation Efficacy of a MALDI-TOF MS Chemical Extraction Method on Bacillus anthracis Vegetative Cells and Spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Weller

    Full Text Available A chemical (ethanol; formic acid; acetonitrile protein extraction method for the preparation of bacterial samples for matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS identification was evaluated for its ability to inactivate bacterial species. Initial viability tests (with and without double filtration of the extract through 0.2 μM filters, indicated that the method could inactivate Escherichia coli MRE 162 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 35657, with or without filtration, but that filtration was required to exclude viable, avirulent, Bacillus anthracis UM23CL2 from extracts. Multiple, high stringency, viability experiments were then carried out on entire filtered extracts prepared from virulent B. anthracis Vollum vegetative cells and spores ranging in concentration from 10(6-10(8 cfu per extract. B. anthracis was recovered in 3/18 vegetative cell extracts and 10/18 spore extracts. From vegetative cell extracts B. anthracis was only recovered from extracts that had undergone prolonged Luria (L-broth (7 day and L-agar plate (a further 7 days incubations. We hypothesise that the recovery of B. anthracis in vegetative cell extracts is due to the escape of individual sub-lethally injured cells. We discuss our results in view of working practises in clinical laboratories and in the context of recent inadvertent releases of viable B. anthracis.

  15. Observations on the Inactivation Efficacy of a MALDI-TOF MS Chemical Extraction Method on Bacillus anthracis Vegetative Cells and Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Simon A; Stokes, Margaret G M; Lukaszewski, Roman A

    2015-01-01

    A chemical (ethanol; formic acid; acetonitrile) protein extraction method for the preparation of bacterial samples for matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification was evaluated for its ability to inactivate bacterial species. Initial viability tests (with and without double filtration of the extract through 0.2 μM filters), indicated that the method could inactivate Escherichia coli MRE 162 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 35657, with or without filtration, but that filtration was required to exclude viable, avirulent, Bacillus anthracis UM23CL2 from extracts. Multiple, high stringency, viability experiments were then carried out on entire filtered extracts prepared from virulent B. anthracis Vollum vegetative cells and spores ranging in concentration from 10(6)-10(8) cfu per extract. B. anthracis was recovered in 3/18 vegetative cell extracts and 10/18 spore extracts. From vegetative cell extracts B. anthracis was only recovered from extracts that had undergone prolonged Luria (L)-broth (7 day) and L-agar plate (a further 7 days) incubations. We hypothesise that the recovery of B. anthracis in vegetative cell extracts is due to the escape of individual sub-lethally injured cells. We discuss our results in view of working practises in clinical laboratories and in the context of recent inadvertent releases of viable B. anthracis. PMID:26633884

  16. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N; Moses, H L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Skovgaard Poulsen, H

    cancer (SCLC). The purpose of this study was to examine the cause of absent RII expression in SCLC cell lines. Northern blot analysis showed that RII RNA expression was very weak in 16 of 21 cell lines. To investigate if the absence of RII transcript was due to mutations, we screened the poly-A tract for...... hypermethylation. Southern blot analysis of the RII promoter did not show altered methylation patterns. The restriction endonuclease pattern of the RII gene was altered in two SCLC cell lines when digested with Smal. However, treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine did not induce expression of RII mRNA. Our results...

  17. The release of dipicolinic acid--the rate-limiting step of Bacillus endospore inactivation during the high pressure thermal sterilization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Kai; Schlumbach, Karl; Baier, Daniel; Mathys, Alexander; Knorr, Dietrich

    2013-03-01

    High pressure combined with elevated temperatures can produce low acid, commercially sterile and shelf-stable foods. Depending on the temperature and pressure levels applied, bacterial endospores pass through different pathways, which can lead to a pressure-induced germination or inactivation. Regardless of the pathway, Bacillus endospores first release pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), which contributes to the low amount of free water in the spore core and is consequently responsible for the spore's high resistance against wet and dry heat. This is therefore the rate-limiting step in the high pressure sterilization process. To evaluate the impact of a broad pressure, temperature and time domain on the DPA release, Bacillus subtilis spores were pressure treated between 0.1 and 900 MPa at between 30 and 80 °C under isothermal isobaric conditions during dwell time. DPA quantification was assessed using HPLC, and samples were taken both immediately and 2 h after the pressure treatment. To obtain a release kinetic for some pressure-temperature conditions, samples were collected between 1s and 60 min after decompression. A multiresponse kinetic model was then used to derive a model covering all kinetic data. The isorate lines modeled for the DPA release in the chosen pressure-temperature landscape enabled the determination of three distinct zones. (I) For pressures temperatures >50 °C, a 90% DPA release was achievable in less than 5 min and no difference in the amount of DPA was found immediately 2 h after pressurization. This may indicate irreversible damage to the inner spore membrane or membrane proteins. (II) Above 600 MPa the synergism between pressure and temperature diminished, and the treatment temperature alone dominated DPA release. (III) Pressures temperatures <50 °C resulted in a retarded release of DPA, with strong increased differences in the amount of DPA released after 2 h, which implies a pressure-induced physiological like germination with

  18. Differential inactivation analysis of diploid yeast exposed to radiation of various LET. I. Computerized single-cell observation and preliminary application to x-ray-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of investigations was designed to observe growth and division of single, diploid yeast cells within the first four generations after irradiation with ionizing radiation. Evidence exists that cell reactions important for the final cell fate occur during this period, and therefore the analysis of cell kinetics and of stationary forms of inactivated cells can be performed. A large number of experiments is necessary to obtain statistically confirmed results of single-cell observation. An automatically steered microphotographic registration device has been developed to facilitate the collection of large numbers of observations. Optical data scanned by a TV camera and digitally stored in a computer are processed by pattern recognizing programs to achieve the correct correlation of newly built cells to existing ones and to deliver a pedigree over four generations of at least eight cells for every irradiated single cell. The pooled data of many pedigrees of this kind allow the analysis of the differential behavior of a total population. From the analysis of x-irradiated cells one can conclude that a single cell that produces at least a microcolony of five cells is eventually able to form a macrocolony and thus can be considered a survivor. That means the division probability of cells to go from generation zero to three corresponds to the survival curve of the colony-forming ability test. Therefore this method is suitable for the differential description of the important phenomenological cell reactions after irradiation

  19. Immunomodulation of Selective Naive T Cell Functions by p110δ Inactivation Improves the Outcome of Mismatched Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Marc Doisne; Christian M. Hüber; Klaus Okkenhaug; Francesco Colucci

    2015-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can treat certain hematologic malignancies due to the graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect but is complicated by graft versus host disease (GvHD). Expression of the p110δ catalytic subunit of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway is restricted to leukocytes, where it regulates proliferation, migration, and cytokine production. Here, in a mouse model of fully mismatched hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we show that geneti...

  20. Effect of adrenalectomy on recipients of allogeneic lymphocytes on inactivation of endogenous colony-forming cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study of the killer functions of lymph node cells directed against endogenous colony-forming cells in adrenalectomized recipients in a genetic system with one-way incompatibility: parental line - F1 hybrid. Mice were irradiated with Co 60 gamma rays on the EGO-2 apparatus with dose rate from 200 to 250 R/min. The results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's test. It can be tentatively suggested that the killer action of T lymphocytes on endogenous colonies was intensified in adrenal-ectomized recipients with endogenous hypocorticism, as a result of cooperation with the cortisol-sensitive subpopulation of T helper cells, of a change in the properties of the antigen-recognizing receptors, or an increase in the sensitivity of target cells to the killer action of T lymphocytes

  1. How reduction of theta rhythm by medial septum inactivation may covary with disruption of entorhinal grid cell responses due to reduced cholinergic transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K. Pilly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in the coordinated firing of brain neurons have been proposed to play important roles in perception, cognition, attention, learning, navigation, and sensory-motor control. The network theta rhythm has been associated with properties of spatial navigation, as has the firing of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells. Two recent studies reduced the theta rhythm by inactivating the medial septum (MS and demonstrated a correlated reduction in the characteristic hexagonal spatial firing patterns of grid cells. These results, along with properties of intrinsic membrane potential oscillations (MPOs in slice preparations of entorhinal cells, have been interpreted to support oscillatory interference models of grid cell firing. The current article shows that an alternative self-organizing map model of grid cells can explain these data about intrinsic and network oscillations without invoking oscillatory interference. In particular, the adverse effects of MS inactivation on grid cells can be understood in terms of how the concomitant reduction in cholinergic inputs may increase the conductances of leak potassium (K+ and slow and medium after-hyperpolarization (sAHP and mAHP channels. This alternative model can also explain data that are problematic for oscillatory interference models, including how knockout of the HCN1 gene in mice, which flattens the dorsoventral gradient in MPO frequency and resonance frequency, does not affect the development of the grid cell dorsoventral gradient of spatial scales, and how hexagonal grid firing fields in bats can occur even in the absence of theta band modulation. These results demonstrate how models of grid cell self-organization can provide new insights into the relationship between brain learning, oscillatory dynamics, and navigational behaviors.

  2. Genetic inactivation of Cdk7 leads to cell cycle arrest and induces premature aging due to adult stem cell exhaustion

    OpenAIRE

    Ganuza, Miguel; Sáiz-Ladera, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Gómez, Gonzalo; Schneider, Ralph; Blasco, María A.; Pisano, David; Paramio, Jesús M.; Santamaría, David; Barbacid, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Employing a conditionally inactive gene trap allele, Cdk7's function in regulating cellular proliferation by Cdk1/2-phosphorylation is convincingly dissected from alternative notions on CTD-phosphorylation of RNA Pol II. Premature aging phenotypes caused by stem cell depletion lend the necessary functional support.

  3. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM INACTIVATION AND REMOVAL RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench- and pilot-scale tests were performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment, ozonation and chlorine dioxide to remove and inactivate Cryptosporidium oocysts. The impacts of coagulant type, coagulant dose, raw water quality, filter loading rates and filter media w...

  4. RhoE interferes with Rb inactivation and regulates the proliferation and survival of the U87 human glioblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho GTPases are important regulators of actin cytoskeleton, but they are also involved in cell proliferation, transformation and oncogenesis. One of this proteins, RhoE, inhibits cell proliferation, however the mechanism that regulates this effect remains poorly understood. Therefore, we undertook the present study to determine the role of RhoE in the regulation of cell proliferation. For this purpose we generated an adenovirus system to overexpress RhoE in U87 glioblastoma cells. Our results show that RhoE disrupts actin cytoskeleton organization and inhibits U87 glioblastoma cell proliferation. Importantly, RhoE expressing cells show a reduction in Rb phosphorylation and in cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, RhoE inhibits ERK activation following serum stimulation of quiescent cells. Based in these findings, we propose that RhoE inhibits ERK activation, thereby decreasing cyclin D1 expression and leading to a reduction in Rb inactivation, and that this mechanism is involved in the RhoE-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, we also demonstrate that RhoE induces apoptosis in U87 cells and also in colon carcinoma and melanoma cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and survival, and suggest that this protein may be considered as an oncosupressor since it is capable to induce apoptosis in several tumor cell lines

  5. Axons, but not cell bodies, are activated by electrical stimulation in cortical gray matter. II. Evidence from selective inactivation of cell bodies and axon initial segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, L G; Bullier, J

    1998-02-01

    The results presented in the companion paper showed that extracellular electrical stimulation of the gray matter directly activates axons, but not cell bodies. The second set of experiments presented here was designed to separate the contribution of the axon initial segments and cell bodies from that of the axonal branches to the pool of presynaptic neuronal elements activated by electrical stimulation. For that purpose, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) iontophoresis was used to induce a selective inactivation of the cell body and of the adjoining portion of the axon by depolarization block, without affecting axonal branches that lack NMDA receptors. After NMDA iontophoresis, the neurons located near the iontophoresis electrode became unable to generate action potentials in an irreversible manner. When the NMDA-induced depolarization block was performed at the site of electrical stimulation, an unexpected increase in the amplitude of the orthodromic responses was observed. Several control experiments suggested that the field potential increase was due to changes of the local environment in the vicinity of the iontophoresis pipette, which led to an increased excitability of the axons. After the period of superexcitability, the orthodromic responses displayed an amplitude that was 15-20% lower than that observed before the NMDA-induced depolarization block, even though cell bodies and axon initial segment at the site of stimulation could not be activated by electrical stimulation. This result shows a low contribution for axon initial segments to the pool of neuronal elements activated by the electrical stimulation. Altogether, these experiments demonstrate that the postsynaptic responses obtained after electrical stimulation of the cortical gray matter result almost exclusively from the activation of axonal branches. Since the neocortex is organised as a network of local and long-range reciprocal connections, great attention must be paid to the interpretation of data

  6. Inactivation in ShakerB K+ channels: a test for the number of inactivating particles on each channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Lagunas, F; Armstrong, C M

    1995-01-01

    Fast inactivation in ShakerB K channels results from pore-block caused by "ball peptides" attached to the inner part of each K channel. We have examined the question of how many functional inactivating balls are on each channel and how this number affects inactivation and recovery from inactivation. To that purpose we expressed ShakerB in the insect cell line Sf9 and gradually removed inactivation by perfusing the cell interior with the hydrolytic enzyme papain under whole cell patch clamp. I...

  7. Comparative study of the immunogenicity in mice and monkeys of an inactivated CA16 vaccine made from a human diploid cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Erxia; Cheng, Chen; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jingjing; Che, Yanchun; Pu, Jing; Dong, Chenghong; Liu, Longding; He, Zhanlong; Lu, Shuaiyao; Zhao, Yuan; Jiang, Li; Liao, Yun; Shao, Congwen; Li, Qihan

    2014-01-01

    The coxsackie A16 virus (CA16), along with enterovirus 71 (EV71), is a primary pathogen that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). To control HFMD, CA16, and EV71 vaccines are needed. In this study, an experimental inactivated CA16 vaccine was prepared using human diploid cells, and the vaccine’s immunogenicity was analyzed in mice and rhesus monkeys. The results showed that the neutralizing antibody was developed in a dose-dependent manner, and was sustained for 70 days with an average GMT (geometric mean titer) level of 80 to 90 in immunized mouse and for 56 days with GMT of higher than 300 in monkeys. The neutralizing antibody had a cross-neutralizing activity against different viral strains (genotype A and B), and the specific IFN-γ-secreting cell response was activated by these virus strains in an ELISPOT assay. This study provides evidence for the potential use of inactivated CA16 as a candidate for use in vaccines. PMID:24583556

  8. Inactivated E. coli transformed with plasmids that produce dsRNA against infectious salmon anemia virus hemagglutinin show antiviral activity when added to infected ASK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eGarcía

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV has caused great losses to the Chilean salmon industry, and the success of prevention and treatment strategies is uncertain. The use of RNA interference (RNAi is a promising approach because during the replication cycle, the ISAV genome must be transcribed to mRNA in the cytoplasm. We explored the capacity of E. coli transformed with plasmids that produce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA to induce antiviral activity when added to infected ASK cells. We transformed the non-pathogenic Escherichia coli HT115 (DE3 with plasmids that expressed highly conserved regions of the ISAV genes encoding the nucleoprotein (NP, fusion (F, hemagglutinin (HE and matrix (M proteins as dsRNA, which is the precursor of the RNAi mechanism. The inactivated transformed bacteria carrying dsRNA were tested for their capacity to silence the target ISAV genes, and the dsRNA that were able to inhibit gene expression were subsequently tested for their ability to attenuate the cytopathic effect (CPE and reduce the viral load. Of the four target genes tested, inactivated E. coli transformed with plasmids producing dsRNA targeting HE showed antiviral activity when added to infected ASK cells.

  9. Evaluation of the matrix effect of thermophilic anaerobic digestion on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus using real-time PCR and viral cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tiejun; Bowlby, Evelyn; Tong, Yupin; Wu, John T Y; Wong, Lester; Tower, Robert J; Pang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaomei

    2012-04-01

    The matrix effect of the thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) process on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) was evaluated. Viral cell culture and real-time PCR were used for assessing removal of the viral infectivity and degradation of viral DNA, respectively. Results showed that the TAD-derived matrix alone can inactivate the virus and destroy the nucleic acid helix core of ILTV in a time-and- dose-dependent manner. No cytopathogenic effect (CPE) was observed in the cells exposed to ILTV pre-treated with TAD matrix for 1.5h in experiment 1 and for 16h in experiment 2. There was a significant statistical difference between TAD matrix treated and non-treated cultures (p<0.001, Chi-test). Amplifiable ILT viral DNA was reduced 2.27 log by 1.5h-treatment and was not present by 16h-treatment with TAD matrix, indicating complete viral DNA fragmentation. The TAD process is an environmentally friendly way for disposing of poultry biowaste and carcasses. PMID:22349192

  10. Generation of ROS by CAY10598 leads to inactivation of STAT3 signaling and induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, I G; Kim, D-H; Kundu, J; Jeong, C-H; Kundu, J K; Chun, K-S

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been reported to play critical roles in cell fate decision by interacting with four types of prostanoid receptors such as EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of the EP4-specific agonist CAY10598 in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Our study revealed that treatment with CAY10598 significantly reduced the cell viability and induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells, as evidenced by the induction of p53 and Bax, release of cytochrome c, cleavage of caspase-9, -7, and -3, and PARP, and the inhibition of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin expression. Moreover, treatment with CAY10598 diminished the phosphorylation of JAK2, leading to the attenuation of STAT3 activation in HCT116 cells. CAY10598-induced apoptosis in cells which were transiently transfected with EP4 siRNA or treated with an EP4 antagonist prior to incubation with the compound remained unaffected, suggesting an EP4-independent mechanism of apoptosis induction by CAY10598. We found that treatment with CAY10598 generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pretreatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine rescued cells from apoptosis by abrogating the inhibitory effect of CAY10598 on the activation of JAK2/STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, CAY10598 induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells in an EP4-independent manner, but through the generation of ROS and inactivation of JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:25096910

  11. Diallyl trisulfide inhibits angiogenic features of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by causing Akt inactivation and down-regulation of VEGF and VEGF-R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Li, Mengfeng; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Xiao, Hui; Lew, Karen L; Zeng, Yan; Marynowski, Stanley W; Singh, Shivendra V

    2006-01-01

    We have shown recently that diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a cancer-chemopreventive constituent of garlic, inactivates Akt to trigger mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic protein BAD in human prostate cancer cells. Because Akt activation is implicated in the promotion of endothelial cell survival and angiogenesis, we hypothesized that DATS may inhibit angiogenesis. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model. Survival of HUVECs was reduced significantly in the presence of DATS in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 of approximately 4 microM. The DATS-mediated suppression of HUVEC survival was associated with apoptosis induction characterized by accumulation of subdiploid cells, cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. The DATS-induced DNA fragmentation was significantly attenuated in the presence of pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk and specific inhibitors of caspase-9 (zLEHD-fmk) and caspase-8 (zIETD-fmk). DATS treatment inhibited the formation of capillary-like tube structure and migration by HUVECs in association with suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and VEGF receptor-2 protein level and inactivation of Akt kinase. DATS treatment also caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) but not c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK).DATS-mediatedapoptosis induction and inhibition of HUVEC tube formation was partially but statistically significantly attenuated by pharmacologic inhibition of ERK1/2 but not JNK or p38MAPK. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that DATS has the ability to inhibit angiogenic features of human endothelial cells. PMID:16965246

  12. Rate of death of hypoxic cells in multicell spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of death of hypoxic cells was measured in multicell spheroids, which are considered to model in vitro the microenvironments surrounding such cells within solid tumors. Two types of experiments were performed: (1) All of the cells in spheroids were made hypoxic (less than 100 ppM O2) and the total number of viable cells was determined by clonogenic assay at later times up to 7 days. The rate of death of cells appeared biphasic. At least 15% of the cells died within the first 6 hr. The rate of development of histological changes in the spheroids suggested that the innermost cells were most sensitive. The more peripheral layers of cells died much more slowly so that there was still about 5% survival and a significant number of histologically normal cells at 6 days. Changes in the glucose concentration in the medium (from one-third to three times normal) during exposure to hypoxia had little effect on the survival time of these outer cells. (2) The cells in the inner half of spheroids grown in 20% O2 were made hypoxic by equilibrating the growth medium with 5% O2, and the number of resistant hypoxic cells at different times later was determined after a radiation dose of 3500 rad. The number of surviving clonogenic cells after this dose of radiation decreased with a half-time for cell death of 3 hr. These results indicate that the rate of death of hypoxic cells in the central regions of spheroids is much more rapid than has been reported for monolayer cultures, although the resistance of the outer cells is similar to or greater than monolayers. Since spheroids may model the necrosis and other microenvironments near chronically hypoxic cells in tumors, the relatively rapid rate of death of hypoxic cells demonstrated here must be considered in evaluating their contribution to the size of the radiation-resistant hypoxic fraction and possible mechanisms which might contribute to the phenomenon of reoxygenation

  13. Effect of formaldehyde inactivation on poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Thomas; Dunn, Glynis; Eastwood, David; Minor, Philip D; Martin, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Inactivated polio vaccines, which have been used in many countries for more than 50 years, are produced by treating live poliovirus (PV) with formaldehyde. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying virus inactivation are not well understood. Infection by PV is initiated by virus binding to specific cell receptors, which results in viral particles undergoing sequential conformational changes that generate altered structural forms (135S and 80S particles) and leads to virus cell entry. We have analyzed the ability of inactivated PV to bind to the human poliovirus receptor (hPVR) using various techniques such as ultracentrifugation, fluorescence-activated cell sorting flow cytometry and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The results showed that although retaining the ability to bind to hPVR, inactivated PV bound less efficiently in comparison to live PV. We also found that inactivated PV showed resistance to structural conversion in vitro, as judged by measuring changes in antigenicity, the ability to bind to hPVR, and viral RNA release at high temperature. Furthermore, viral RNA from inactivated PV was shown to be modified, since cDNA yields obtained by RT-PCR amplification were severely reduced and no infectious virus was recovered after RNA transfection into susceptible cells. Importance: This study represents a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for poliovirus inactivation. We show that inactivation with formaldehyde has an effect on early steps of viral replication as it reduces the ability of PV to bind to hPVR, decreases the sensitivity of PV to convert to 135S particles, and abolishes the infectivity of its viral RNA. These changes are likely responsible for the loss of infectivity shown by PV following inactivation. Techniques used in this study represent new approaches for the characterization of inactivated PV products and could be useful in developing improved methods for the production and quality control testing of

  14. Up-regulating the abscisic acid inactivation gene ZmABA8ox1b contributes to seed germination heterosis by promoting cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangyang; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Xinye; Song, Jian; Li, Hongjian; Sui, Zhipeng; Zhang, Ming; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Xin, Mingming; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2016-04-01

    Heterosis has been widely used in agriculture, but the underlying molecular principles are still largely unknown. During seed germination, we observed that maize (Zea mays) hybrid B73/Mo17 was less sensitive than its parental inbred lines to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), and endogenous ABA content in hybrid embryos decreased more rapidly than in the parental inbred lines. ZmABA8ox1b, an ABA inactivation gene, was consistently more highly up-regulated in hybrid B73/Mo17 than in its parental inbred lines at early stages of seed germination. Moreover, ectopic expression of ZmABA8ox1b obviously promoted seed germination in Arabidopsis Remarkably, microscopic observation revealed that cell expansion played a major role in the ABA-mediated maize seed germination heterosis, which could be attributed to the altered expression of cell wall-related genes. PMID:27034328

  15. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdur Rakib

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly enhanced GJIC of MCF-7 cells at 40 μM concentration, whereas CLA inhibited cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. CLA increased connexin43 (Cx43 expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels. CLA inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activity and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. No significant difference was observed in the efficacy of c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA. These results suggest that the anticancer effect of CLA is associated with upregulation of GJIC mediated by enhanced Cx43 expression through inactivation of NF-κB and generation of ROS in MCF-7 cells.

  16. The Rate of Oxygen Utilization by Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Brett A.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Buettner, Garry R.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of oxygen is considered by some to be the most important scientific discovery of all time – from both physical-chemical/astrophysics and biology/evolution viewpoints. One of the major developments during evolution is the ability to capture dioxygen in the environment and deliver it to each cell in the multicellular, complex mammalian body -- on demand, i.e. just-in-time. Humans use oxygen to extract approximately 2550 Calories (10.4 MJ) from food to meet daily energy requirement...

  17. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid inhibits invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells through the inactivation of p70S6K and Akt activity: Involvement of p53 in differential regulation of signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Oh, Joa Sub; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanism of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Ligularia fischeri, on cell invasion, proliferation and adhesion in p53 wild-type A549 and p53-deficient H1299 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. 5-CQA abrogated mitogen-stimulated invasion, but not proliferation, in both A549 and H1299 cells. In addition, 5-CQA inhibited mitogen-stimulated adhesion in A549 cells only. Anti-invasive activity of 5-CQA in A549 cells was mediated by the inactivation of p70S6K-dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, in H1299 cells the inactivation of Akt was found to be involved in 5-CQA-mediated inhibition of cell invasion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the pharmacological roles and molecular targets of 5-CQA in regulating NSCLC cell fate, and suggest further evaluation and development of 5-CQA as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment and prevention of lung cancer. PMID:26984670

  18. Skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In female mammals, dosage compensation for X-linked genes is accomplished by inactivation of one of two X chromosomes. The X-inactivation ratio (a percentage of the cells with inactivated maternal X chromosomes in the whole cells) is skewed as a consequence of various genetic mutations, and has been observed in a number of X-linked disorders. We previously reported that phenotypically normal full-term cloned mouse fetuses had loci with inappropriate DNA methylation. Thus, cloned mice are excellent models to study abnormal epigenetic events in mammalian development. In the present study, we analyzed X-inactivation ratios in adult female cloned mice (B6C3F1). Kidneys of eight naturally produced controls and 11 cloned mice were analyzed. Although variations in X-inactivation ratio among the mice were observed in both groups, the distributions were significantly different (Ansary-Bradley test, P < 0.01). In particular, 2 of 11 cloned mice showed skewed X-inactivation ratios (19.2% and 86.8%). Similarly, in intestine, 1 of 10 cloned mice had a skewed ratio (75.7%). Skewed X-inactivation was observed to various degrees in different tissues of different individuals, suggesting that skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice is the result of secondary cell selection in combination with stochastic distortion of primary choice. The present study is the first demonstration that skewed X-inactivation occurs in cloned animals. This finding is important for understanding both nuclear transfer technology and etiology of X-linked disorders

  19. Guizhi Fuling Wan, a Traditional Chinese Herbal Formula, Sensitizes Cisplatin-Resistant Human Ovarian Cancer Cells through Inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the possible mechanisms that Guizhi Fuling Wan (GFW enhances the sensitivity of the SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells and the resistant xenograft tumours to cisplatin. Rat medicated sera containing GFW were prepared by administering GFW to rats, and the primary bioactive constituents of the sera were gallic acid, paeonol, and paeoniflorin analysed by HPLC/QqQ MS. Cell counting kit-8 analysis was shown that coincubation of the sera with cisplatin/paclitaxel enhanced significantly the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin or paclitaxel in SKOV3/DDP cells. The presence of the rat medicated sera containing GFW resulted in an increase in rhodamine 123 accumulation by flow cytometric assays and a decrease in the protein levels of P-gp, phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, and mTOR in a dose-dependent manner in SKOV3/DDP cells by western blot analysis, but the sera had no effect on the protein levels of PI3K p110α and total AKT. The low dose of GFW enhanced the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin and paclitaxel treatment in resistant SKOV3/DDP xenograft tumours. GFW could sensitize cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells by inhibiting the protein level and function of P-gp, which may be medicated through inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.

  20. Guizhi Fuling Wan, a Traditional Chinese Herbal Formula, Sensitizes Cisplatin-Resistant Human Ovarian Cancer Cells through Inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Bian, Hua; Yang, Lei; Chen, Zhong; Zang, Wenhua; Yang, Jingke

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possible mechanisms that Guizhi Fuling Wan (GFW) enhances the sensitivity of the SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells and the resistant xenograft tumours to cisplatin. Rat medicated sera containing GFW were prepared by administering GFW to rats, and the primary bioactive constituents of the sera were gallic acid, paeonol, and paeoniflorin analysed by HPLC/QqQ MS. Cell counting kit-8 analysis was shown that coincubation of the sera with cisplatin/paclitaxel enhanced significantly the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin or paclitaxel in SKOV3/DDP cells. The presence of the rat medicated sera containing GFW resulted in an increase in rhodamine 123 accumulation by flow cytometric assays and a decrease in the protein levels of P-gp, phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, and mTOR in a dose-dependent manner in SKOV3/DDP cells by western blot analysis, but the sera had no effect on the protein levels of PI3K p110α and total AKT. The low dose of GFW enhanced the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin and paclitaxel treatment in resistant SKOV3/DDP xenograft tumours. GFW could sensitize cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells by inhibiting the protein level and function of P-gp, which may be medicated through inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.

  1. Alpharetroviral self-inactivating vectors produced by a superinfection-resistant stable packaging cell line allow genetic modification of primary human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenski, Verena; Suerth, Julia D; Barczak, Elke; Heckl, Dirk; Levy, Camille; Bernadin, Ornellie; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Williams, David A; Fehse, Boris; Verhoeyen, Els; Schambach, Axel

    2016-08-01

    Primary human T lymphocytes represent an important cell population for adoptive immunotherapies, including chimeric-antigen and T-cell receptor applications, as they have the capability to eliminate non-self, virus-infected and tumor cells. Given the increasing numbers of clinical immunotherapy applications, the development of an optimal vector platform for genetic T lymphocyte engineering, which allows cost-effective high-quality vector productions, remains a critical goal. Alpharetroviral self-inactivating vectors (ARV) have several advantages compared to other vector platforms, including a more random genomic integration pattern and reduced likelihood for inducing aberrant splicing of integrated proviruses. We developed an ARV platform for the transduction of primary human T lymphocytes. We demonstrated functional transgene transfer using the clinically relevant herpes-simplex-virus thymidine kinase variant TK.007. Proof-of-concept of alpharetroviral-mediated T-lymphocyte engineering was shown in vitro and in a humanized transplantation model in vivo. Furthermore, we established a stable, human alpharetroviral packaging cell line in which we deleted the entry receptor (SLC1A5) for RD114/TR-pseudotyped ARVs to prevent superinfection and enhance genomic integrity of the packaging cell line and viral particles. We showed that superinfection can be entirely prevented, while maintaining high recombinant virus titers. Taken together, this resulted in an improved production platform representing an economic strategy for translating the promising features of ARVs for therapeutic T-lymphocyte engineering. PMID:27162078

  2. Preferential amplification of CD8 effector-T cells after transcutaneous application of an inactivated influenza vaccine: a randomized phase I trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behazine Combadière

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current conventional vaccination approaches do not induce potent CD8 T-cell responses for fighting mostly variable viral diseases such as influenza, avian influenza viruses or HIV. Following our recent study on vaccine penetration by targeting of vaccine to human hair follicular ducts surrounded by Langerhans cells, we tested in the first randomized Phase-Ia trial based on hair follicle penetration (namely transcutaneous route the induction of virus-specific CD8 T cell responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We chose the inactivated influenza vaccine - a conventional licensed tetanus/influenza (TETAGRIP vaccine - to compare the safety and immunogenicity of transcutaneous (TC versus IM immunization in two randomized controlled, multi-center Phase I trials including 24 healthy-volunteers and 12 HIV-infected patients. Vaccination was performed by application of inactivated influenza vaccine according to a standard protocol allowing the opening of the hair duct for the TC route or needle-injection for the IM route. We demonstrated that the safety of the two routes was similar. We showed the superiority of TC application, but not the IM route, to induce a significant increase in influenza-specific CD8 cytokine-producing cells in healthy-volunteers and in HIV-infected patients. However, these routes did not differ significantly for the induction of influenza-specific CD4 responses, and neutralizing antibodies were induced only by the IM route. The CD8 cell response is thus the major immune response observed after TC vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This Phase Ia clinical trial (Manon05 testing an anti-influenza vaccine demonstrated that vaccines designed for antibody induction by the IM route, generate vaccine-specific CD8 T cells when administered transcutaneously. These results underline the necessity of adapting vaccination strategies to control complex infectious diseases when CD8 cellular responses are crucial. Our work opens up a key area for the

  3. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of [1-14C]trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and 14CO2 release. At this point, reduction by NaB3H4 and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes

  4. Inactivation of certain insect pathogens by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UV-sensitivity of two baculoviruses (granulosis virus, nuclear polyhedrosis virus) and two entomopathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana) was determined by radiation tests. In the far UV (254 nm) the stability, measured at an inactivation rate of 99%, was in declining order: nuclear polyhedra >= conidia of B. bassiana > granula > spores of B. thuringiensis >= vegetative cells of B. thuringiensis. In the near UV (285-380 nm) the following order could be found: conidia of B. bassiana >= nuclear polyhedra > spores of B. thuringiensis >= granula > vegetative cells of B. thuringiensis. Far UV had a much higher germicidal effect for all pathogens tested than near UV. (orig.)

  5. Inactivation by oxidation and recruitment into stress granules of hOGG1 but not APE1 in human cells exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of mutations in mammalian cells exposed to cadmium has been associated with the oxidative stress triggered by the metal. There is increasing evidence that the mutagenic potential of Cd is not restricted to the induction of DNA lesions. Cd has been shown to inactivate several DNA repair enzymes. Here we show that exposure of human cells to sub-lethal concentrations of Cd leads to a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in hOGG1 activity, the major DNA glycosylase activity responsible for the initiation of the base excision repair (BER) of 8-oxoguanine, an abundant and mutagenic form of oxidized guanine. Although there is a slight effect on the level of hOGG1 transcripts, we show that the inhibition of the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase activity is mainly associated with an oxidation of the hOGG1 protein and its disappearance from the soluble fraction of total cell extracts. Confocal microscopy analyses show that in cells exposed to Cd hOGG1-GFP is recruited to discrete structures in the cytoplasm. These structures were identified as stress granules. Removal of Cd from the medium allows the recovery of the DNA glycosylase activity and the presence of hOGG1 in a soluble form. In contrast to hOGG1, we show here that exposure to Cd does not affect the activity of the second enzyme of the pathway, the major AP endonuclease APE1.

  6. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species perturb AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling via oxidative inactivation of PP2A in lowdose irradiated human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Sasatani, Megumi; Kamiya, Kenji; Kawai, Hidehiko; Inaba, Yohei; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigated the cellular response of normal human fibroblasts to repeated exposure to low-dose radiation. In contrast to acute single radiation, low-dose fractionated radiation (FR) with 0.01 Gy/fraction or 0.05 Gy/fraction for 31 days increased in mitochondrial mass, decreased cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione and caused persistent accumulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excess ROS promoted oxidative inactivation of protein phosphatase PP2A which in turn led to disruption of normal negative feed-back control of AKT/cyclin D1 signaling in cells treated with long-term FR. The resulting abnormal nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 causes growth retardation, cellular senescence and genome instability in low-dose irradiated cells. Thus, loss of redox control and subsequently elevated levels of ROS perturb signal transduction as a result of oxidative stress. Our study highlights a specific role of mitochondrial ROS in perturbation of AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling after low-dose long-term FR. The antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine, TEMPO and mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant Mito-TEMPO provided protection against the harmful cell cycle perturbations induced by low-dose long-term FR. PMID:26657292

  7. Effects of Bacterial Inactivation Methods on Downstream Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α = 1.71x10-2 for E. coli, α = 4.97x10-4 for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α = 9.43x10-7 for E. coli, α = 1.21x10-5 for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  8. Downregulation of RSK2 influences the biological activities of human osteosarcoma cells through inactivating AKT/mTOR signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Quanhe; Jiang, Jing; Lin, Liangbo; Cheng, Si; Xin, Daqi; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Jieliang; Hu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    RSK2 (90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase) is a downstream effector of the Ras/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway that has major functions in cell biological activities, including regulating nuclear signaling, cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell growth, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell survival, and is expressed in most types of human malignant tumors, including lung cancer, prostate and breast tumors, skin cancer and osteosarcomas (OS). RSK2 was found to be essential for osteosarcoma formation. To investigate whether RSK2 is expressed at high levels in human osteosarcome tissues and whether its expression is correlated with the aggressive biological behavior of osteosarcoma cell line (OCLs), we assessed the association between RSK2 expression and OS cell progression, as well as the effects of RSK2 inhibition on the biological activities of osteosarcoma cells. We performed immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of RSK2 in specimens from 30 humans with osteosarcoma, and 15 normal tissues. RSK2 gene expression levels in 30 specimens with osteosarcoma were significantly higher than those of normal tissues. We performed RNA interference on three OCLs to evaluate cell apoptosis, cell growth, cell proliferation, cell motility, chemosensitivity and oncogenicity. After transfection with RSK2 shRNA, increased cell apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, cell cycle progression, weaker cell proliferation, cell migration and weaker tumor formation were observed in all OCLs. These results suggested that RSK2 expression may mediate the biological activities of OS cells and RSK2 may be an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of osteosarcomas. The AKT/mTOR, MAPK/ERK/c-Fos and Bcl2/Bax pathways were analysed to clarify the mechanisms involved. PMID:27082640

  9. Toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid to Escherichia coli: Membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gesheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are two widely used polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and are persistent in the environment. This study for the first time systematically investigated their toxicities and the underlying mechanisms to Escherichia coli. Much higher toxicity was observed for PFOA than PFOS, with the 3 h half growth inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined to be 10.6 ± 1.0 and 374 ± 3 mg L(-1), respectively, while the bacterial accumulation of PFOS was much greater than that of PFOA. The PFC exposures disrupted cell membranes as evidenced by the dose-dependent variations of cell structures (by transmission electron microscopy observations), surface properties (electronegativity, hydrophobicity, and membrane fluidity), and membrane compositions (by gas chromatogram and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses). The increases in the contents of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde and the activity of superoxide dismutase indicated the increment of oxidative stress induced by the PFCs in the bacterial cells. The fact that the cell growth inhibition was mitigated by the addition of ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine) further evidenced the important role of oxidative damage in the toxicities of PFOS and PFOA. Eighteen genes involved in cell division, membrane instability, oxidative stress, and DNA damage of the exposed cells were up or down expressed, indicating the DNA damage by the PFCs. The toxicities of PFOS and PFOA to E. coli were therefore ascribed to the membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death. The difference in the bactericidal effect between PFOS and PFOA was supposed to be related to their different dominating toxicity mechanisms, i.e., membrane disruption and oxidative damage, respectively. The outcomes will shed new light on the assessment of ecological effects of PFCs. PMID:27155098

  10. Investigation of high-rate lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Catherine A.; Gust, Steven; Farrington, Michael D.; Lockwood, Judith A.; Donaldson, George J.

    Chemical analysis of a commercially produced high-rate D-size lithium-thionyl cell was carried out, as a function of rate of discharge (1 ohm and 5 ohms), depth of discharge, and temperature (25 C and -40 C), using specially developed methods for identifying suspected minor cell products or impurities which may effect cell performance. These methods include a product-retrieval system which involves solvent extraction to enhance the recovery of suspected semivolatile minor chemicals, and methods of quantitative GC analysis of volatile and semivolatile products. The nonvolatile products were analyzed by wet chemical methods. The results of the analyses indicate that the predominant discharge reaction in this cell is 4Li + 2SOCl2 going to 4LiCl + S + SO2, with SO2 formation decreasing towards the end of cell life (7 to 12 Ah). The rate of discharge had no effect on the product distribution. Upon discharge of the high-rate cell at -40 C, one cell exploded, and all others exhibited overheating and rapid internal pressure rise when allowed to warm up to room temperature.

  11. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus From Inactivation of Prolactin Receptor and MafB in Islet β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ronadip R; Cyphert, Holly A; Walker, Emily M; Chakravarthy, Harini; Peiris, Heshan; Gu, Xueying; Liu, Yinghua; Conrad, Elizabeth; Goodrich, Lisa; Stein, Roland W; Kim, Seung K

    2016-08-01

    β-Cell proliferation and expansion during pregnancy are crucial for maintaining euglycemia in response to increased metabolic demands placed on the mother. Prolactin and placental lactogen signal through the prolactin receptor (PRLR) and contribute to adaptive β-cell responses in pregnancy; however, the in vivo requirement for PRLR signaling specifically in maternal β-cell adaptations remains unknown. We generated a floxed allele of Prlr, allowing conditional loss of PRLR in β-cells. In this study, we show that loss of PRLR signaling in β-cells results in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), reduced β-cell proliferation, and failure to expand β-cell mass during pregnancy. Targeted PRLR loss in maternal β-cells in vivo impaired expression of the transcription factor Foxm1, both G1/S and G2/M cyclins, tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), and islet serotonin production, for which synthesis requires Tph1. This conditional system also revealed that PRLR signaling is required for the transient gestational expression of the transcription factor MafB within a subset of β-cells during pregnancy. MafB deletion in maternal β-cells also produced GDM, with inadequate β-cell expansion accompanied by failure to induce PRLR-dependent target genes regulating β-cell proliferation. These results unveil molecular roles for PRLR signaling in orchestrating the physiologic expansion of maternal β-cells during pregnancy. PMID:27217483

  12. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Drives T-bet-Mediated Downregulation of Co-receptor PD-1 to Enhance CD8+ Cytolytic T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison; Harker, James A.; Chanthong, Kittiphat; Stevenson, Philip G.; Zuniga, Elina I.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Despite the importance of the co-receptor PD-1 in T cell immunity, the upstream signaling pathway that regulates PD-1 expression has not been defined. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3, isoforms α and β) is a serine-threonine kinase implicated in cellular processes. Here, we identified GSK-3 as a key upstream kinase that regulated PD-1 expression in CD8+ T cells. GSK-3 siRNA downregulation, or inhibition by small molecules, blocked PD-1 expression, resulting in increased CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. Mechanistically, GSK-3 inactivation increased Tbx21 transcription, promoting enhanced T-bet expression and subsequent suppression of Pdcd1 (encodes PD-1) transcription in CD8+ CTLs. Injection of GSK-3 inhibitors in mice increased in vivo CD8+ OT-I CTL function and the clearance of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 and lymphocytic choriomeningitis clone 13 and reversed T cell exhaustion. Our findings identify GSK-3 as a regulator of PD-1 expression and demonstrate the applicability of GSK-3 inhibitors in the modulation of PD-1 in immunotherapy. PMID:26885856

  13. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Drives T-bet-Mediated Downregulation of Co-receptor PD-1 to Enhance CD8(+) Cytolytic T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison; Harker, James A; Chanthong, Kittiphat; Stevenson, Philip G; Zuniga, Elina I; Rudd, Christopher E

    2016-02-16

    Despite the importance of the co-receptor PD-1 in T cell immunity, the upstream signaling pathway that regulates PD-1 expression has not been defined. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3, isoforms α and β) is a serine-threonine kinase implicated in cellular processes. Here, we identified GSK-3 as a key upstream kinase that regulated PD-1 expression in CD8(+) T cells. GSK-3 siRNA downregulation, or inhibition by small molecules, blocked PD-1 expression, resulting in increased CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. Mechanistically, GSK-3 inactivation increased Tbx21 transcription, promoting enhanced T-bet expression and subsequent suppression of Pdcd1 (encodes PD-1) transcription in CD8(+) CTLs. Injection of GSK-3 inhibitors in mice increased in vivo CD8(+) OT-I CTL function and the clearance of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 and lymphocytic choriomeningitis clone 13 and reversed T cell exhaustion. Our findings identify GSK-3 as a regulator of PD-1 expression and demonstrate the applicability of GSK-3 inhibitors in the modulation of PD-1 in immunotherapy. PMID:26885856

  14. The epigenetic modifier CHD5 functions as a novel tumor suppressor for renal cell carcinoma and is predominantly inactivated by promoter CpG methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenfang; Li, Lili; Huang, Xin; Jin, Jie; Huang, Suming; Zhang, Qian; Tao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common urological cancer with steadily increasing incidence. A series of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified methylated in RCC as potential epigenetic biomarkers. We identified a 1p36.3 TSG candidate CHD5 as a methylated target in RCC through epigenome study. As the role of CHD5 in RCC pathogenesis remains elusive, we further studied its expression and molecular functions in RCC cells. We found that CHD5 was broadly expressed in most normal genitourinary tissues including kidney, but frequently silenced or downregulated by promoter CpG methylation in 78% of RCC cell lines and 44% (24/55) of primary tumors. In addition, CHD5 mutations appear to be rare in RCC tumors through genome database mining. In methylated/silenced RCC cell lines, CHD5 expression could be restored with azacytidine demethylation treatment. Ectopic expression of CHD5 in RCC cells significantly inhibited their clonogenicity, migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that CHD5, as a chromatin remodeling factor, suppressed the expression of multiple targets including oncogenes (MYC, MDM2, STAT3, CCND1, YAP1), epigenetic master genes (Bmi-1, EZH2, JMJD2C), as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell markers (SNAI1, FN1, OCT4). Further chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the binding of CHD5 to target gene promoters. Thus, we demonstrate that CHD5 functions as a novel TSG for RCC, but is predominantly inactivated by promoter methylation in primary tumors. PMID:26943038

  15. Inactivation of human osteosarcoma cells in vitro by {sup 211}At-TP-3 monoclonal antibody: Comparison with astatine-211 and external-beam X rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R.H. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)]|[Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); Bruland, O.S. [Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); Hoff, P.; Alstad, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Lindmo, T. [Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); Rofstad, E.K. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1994-08-01

    The potential usefulness of {alpha}-particle radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma was studied in vitro by using the monoclonal antibody TP-3 and cells of three human osteosarcoma cell lines (OHS, SAOS and KPDX) differing in antigen expression. Cell survival curves were established after treatment with (a) {sup 211}At-TP-3 of different specific activities, (b) {sup 211}At-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA), (c) free {sup 211}At and (d) external-beam X rays. The three osteosarcoma cell lines showed similar survival curves, whether treated with external-beam X rays, {sup 211}At-BSA or free {sup 211}At. The D{sub o}`s were lower for free {sup 211}At than for {sup 211}At-BSA. The survival curves for {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment, on the other hand, differed significantly among the cell lines, suggesting that sensitivity to {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment was governed by cellular properties other than sensitivity to external-beam X rays. The cellular property most important for sensitivity to {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment was the antigen expression. Cell inactivation after {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment increased substantially with increasing specific activity of the {sup 211}At-TP-3. At high specific activities, the cytotoxic effect of {sup 211}At-TP-3 was significantly higher than that of {sup 211}At-BSA. In conclusion, {sup 211}At-TP-3 has the potential to give clinically favorable therapeutic ratios in the treatment of osteosarcoma. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with oth...

  17. Detailed probabilistic modelling of cell inactivation by ionizing radiations of different qualities: The model and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrat, Pavel, E-mail: Pavel.Kundrat@fzu.cz

    2009-03-15

    The probabilistic two-stage model of cell killing by ionizing radiation enables to represent both damage induction by radiation and its repair by the cell. The model properties and applications as well as possible interpretation of the underlying damage classification are discussed. Analyses of published survival data for V79 hamster cells irradiated by protons and He, C, O, and Ne ions are reported, quantifying the variations in radiation quality with increasing charge and linear energy transfer of the ions.

  18. Prevention of allergic rhinitis by ginger and the molecular basis of immunosuppression by 6-gingerol through T cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yuki; Nakahashi, Emiko; Obayashi, Momoko; Sugihara, Kento; Qiao, Shanlou; Iida, Machiko; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yajima, Ichiro; Goto, Yuji; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kato, Masashi; Takeda, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of allergies has recently been increasing worldwide. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity is central to the pathogenesis of asthma, hay fever and other allergic diseases. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its extracts have been valued for their medical properties including antinausea, antiinflammation, antipyresis and analgesia properties. In this study, we investigated the antiallergic effects of ginger and 6-gingerol, a major compound of ginger, using a mouse allergy model and primary/cell line culture system. In mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis, oral administration of 2% ginger diet reduced the severity of sneezing and nasal rubbing by nasal sensitization of OVA and suppressed infiltration of mast cells in nasal mucosa and secretion of OVA-specific IgE in serum. 6-Gingerol inhibited the expression of not only Th2 cytokines but also Th1 cytokines in OVA-sensitized spleen cells. Accordingly, 6-gingerol suppressed in vitro differentiation of both Th1 cells and Th2 cells from naïve T cells. In addition, 6-gingerol suppressed both superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)- and anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation. 6-Gingerol also abrogated PMA plus ionomycin- and SEB-induced IL-2 production in T cells, suggesting that 6-gingerol affected T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction rather than the antigen-presentation process. Indeed, 6-gingerol inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, calcium release and nuclear localization of c-fos and NF-κB by PMA and ionomycin stimulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that 6-gingerol suppresses cytokine production for T cell activation and proliferation, thereby not causing B cell and mast cell activation and resulting in prevention or alleviation of allergic rhinitis symptoms. PMID:26403321

  19. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  20. Brazilein Suppresses Inflammation through Inactivation of IRAK4-NF-κB Pathway in LPS-Induced Raw264.7 Macrophage Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui-Jin Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal herbal plant has been commonly used for prevention and intervention of disease and health promotions worldwide. Brazilein is a bioactive compound extracted from Caesalpinia sappan Linn. Several studies have showed that brazilein exhibited the immune suppressive effect and anti-oxidative function. However, the molecular targets of brazilein for inflammation prevention have remained elusive. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of brazilein on LPS-induced inflammatory response in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. We demonstrated that brazilein decreased the expression of IRAK4 protein led to the suppression of MAPK signaling and IKKβ, and subsequent inactivation of NF-κB and COX2 thus promoting the expression of the downstream target pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, MCP-1, MIP-2, and IL-6 in LPS-induced Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Moreover, we observed that brazilein reduced the production of nitrite compared to the control in LPS-induced Raw264.7. Thus, we suggest that brazilein might be a useful bioactive compound for the prevention of IRAK-NF-κB pathway associated chronic diseases.

  1. A self-inactivating retrovector incorporating the IL-2 promoter for activation-induced transgene expression in genetically engineered T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejeune Laurence

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cell activation leads to signaling pathways that ultimately result in induction of gene transcription from the interleukin-2 (IL-2 promoter. We hypothesized that the IL-2 promoter or its synthetic derivatives can lead to T-cell specific, activation-induced transgene expression. Our objective was to develop a retroviral vector for stable and activation-induced transgene expression in T-lymphocytes. Results First, we compared the transcriptional potency of the full-length IL-2 promoter with that of a synthetic promoter composed of 3 repeats of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells (NFAT element following activation of transfected Jurkat T-cells expressing the large SV40 T antigen (Jurkat TAg. Although the NFAT3 promoter resulted in a stronger induction of luciferase reporter expression post stimulation, the basal levels of the IL-2 promoter-driven reporter expression were much lower indicating that the IL-2 promoter can serve as a more stringent activation-dependent promoter in T-cells. Based on this data, we generated a self-inactivating retroviral vector with the full-length human IL-2 promoter, namely SINIL-2pr that incorporated the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP fused to herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase as a reporter/suicide "bifunctional" gene. Subsequently, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-G Protein pseudotyped retroparticles were generated for SINIL-2pr and used to transduce the Jurkat T-cell line and the ZAP-70-deficient P116 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that EGFP expression was markedly enhanced post co-stimulation of the gene-modified cells with 1 μM ionomycin and 10 ng/ml phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. This activation-induced expression was abrogated when the cells were pretreated with 300 nM cyclosporin A. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the SINIL-2pr retrovector leads to activation-inducible transgene expression in Jurkat T-cell lines. We propose that this design can be

  2. Turnover rates of B cells, T cells, and NK cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Mohri, H.; Ho, D.D.; Perelson, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We determined average cellular turnover rates by fitting mathematical models to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine measurements in SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. The daily turnover rates of CD4(+) T cells, CD4(-) T cells, CD20(+) B cells, and CD16(+) NK cells in normal uninfected rhesus macaques

  3. The action of microsecond-pulsed plasma-activated media on the inactivation of human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Jeon, Su Nam; Park, Bong Sang; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we have generated reactive species (RS) through microsecond-pulsed plasma (MPP) in the cell culture media using a Marx generator with point-point electrodes of approximately 0.06 J discharge energy/pulse. RS generated in culture media through MPP have a selective action between growth of the H460 lung cancer cells and L132 normal lung cells. We observed that MPP-activated media (MPP-AM) induced apoptosis on H460 lung cancer cells through an oxidative DNA damage cascade. Additionally, we studied the apoptosis-related mRNA expression, DNA oxidation and polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleaved analysis from treated cancer cells. The result proves that radicals generated through MPP play a pivotal role in the activation of media that induces the selective killing effect.

  4. The biological effect of large single doses: a possible role for non-targeted effects in cell inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon R Veldwijk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Novel radiotherapy techniques increasingly use very large dose fractions. It has been argued that the biological effect of large dose fractions may differ from that of conventional fraction sizes. The purpose was to study the biological effect of large single doses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clonogenic cell survival of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was determined after direct X-ray irradiation, irradiation of feeder cells, or transfer of conditioned medium (CM. Cell-cycle distributions and the apoptotic sub-G1 fraction were measured by flow cytometry. Cytokines in CM were quantified by a cytokine antibody array. γH2AX foci were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: The surviving fraction of MCF7 cells irradiated in vitro with 12 Gy showed an 8.5-fold decrease (95% c.i.: 4.4-16.3; P<0.0001 when the density of irradiated cells was increased from 10 to 50×10(3 cells per flask. Part of this effect was due to a dose-dependent transferrable factor as shown in CM experiments in the dose range 5-15 Gy. While no effect on apoptosis and cell cycle distribution was observed, and no differentially expressed cytokine could be identified, the transferable factor induced prolonged expression of γH2AX DNA repair foci at 1-12 h. CONCLUSIONS: A dose-dependent non-targeted effect on clonogenic cell survival was found in the dose range 5-15 Gy. The dependence of SF on cell numbers at high doses would represent a "cohort effect" in vivo. These results support the hypothesis that non-targeted effects may contribute to the efficacy of very large dose fractions in radiotherapy.

  5. From beat rate variability in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived pacemaker cells to heart rate variability in human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barad, Lili; Novak, Atara; Ben-Ari, Erez; Lorber, Avraham; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Rosen, Michael R; Weissman, Amir; Binah, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported that induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) manifest beat rate variability (BRV) resembling heart rate variability (HRV) in human sinoatrial node (SAN). We now hypothesized the BRV-HRV continuum originates in pacemaker cells. Objective To investigate whether cellular BRV is a source of HRV dynamics, we hypothesized three-levels of interaction among different cardiomyocyte entities: (1) single pacemaker cells, (2) networks of electrically coupled pacemaker cells and (3) in situ SAN. Methods We measured BRV/HRV properties in single pacemaker cells, iPSC-derived contracting embryoid bodies (EBs) and electrocardiograms from the same individual. Results Pronounced BRV/HRV were present at all three levels. Coefficient of variance (COV) of inter-beat intervals (IBI) and Poincaré plot SD1 and SD2 in single cells were 20x > EBs (P0.05). We also compared BRV magnitude among single cells, small (~5-10 cells) and larger EBs (>10 cells): BRV indices progressively increased (P<0.05) as cell number decreased. Disrupting intracellular Ca2+ handling markedly augmented BRV magnitude, revealing a unique bi-modal firing pattern, suggesting intracellular mechanisms contribute to BRV/HRV and the fractal behavior of heart rhythm. Conclusions The decreased BRV magnitude in transitioning from single cell to EB suggests HRV of hearts in situ originates from summation and integration of multiple cell-based oscillators. Hence, complex interactions among multiple pacemaker cells and intracellular Ca2+ handling determine HRV in humans and isolated cardiomyocyte networks. PMID:25052725

  6. Protein kinase C-delta inactivation inhibits the proliferation and survival of cancer stem cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subpopulation of tumor cells with distinct stem-like properties (cancer stem-like cells, CSCs) may be responsible for tumor initiation, invasive growth, and possibly dissemination to distant organ sites. CSCs exhibit a spectrum of biological, biochemical, and molecular features that are consistent with a stem-like phenotype, including growth as non-adherent spheres (clonogenic potential), ability to form a new tumor in xenograft assays, unlimited self-renewal, and the capacity for multipotency and lineage-specific differentiation. PKCδ is a novel class serine/threonine kinase of the PKC family, and functions in a number of cellular activities including cell proliferation, survival or apoptosis. PKCδ has previously been validated as a synthetic lethal target in cancer cells of multiple types with aberrant activation of Ras signaling, using both genetic (shRNA and dominant-negative PKCδ mutants) and small molecule inhibitors. In contrast, PKCδ is not required for the proliferation or survival of normal cells, suggesting the potential tumor-specificity of a PKCδ-targeted approach. shRNA knockdown was used validate PKCδ as a target in primary cancer stem cell lines and stem-like cells derived from human tumor cell lines, including breast, pancreatic, prostate and melanoma tumor cells. Novel and potent small molecule PKCδ inhibitors were employed in assays monitoring apoptosis, proliferation and clonogenic capacity of these cancer stem-like populations. Significant differences among data sets were determined using two-tailed Student’s t tests or ANOVA. We demonstrate that CSC-like populations derived from multiple types of human primary tumors, from human cancer cell lines, and from transformed human cells, require PKCδ activity and are susceptible to agents which deplete PKCδ protein or activity. Inhibition of PKCδ by specific genetic strategies (shRNA) or by novel small molecule inhibitors is growth inhibitory and cytotoxic to multiple types of human

  7. Inactivation of GDP-fucose transporter gene (Slc35c1) in CHO cells by ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR-Cas9 for production of fucose-free antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kah Fai; Shahreel, Wahyu; Wan, Corrine; Teo, Gavin; Hayati, Noor; Tay, Shi Jie; Tong, Wen Han; Yang, Yuansheng; Rudd, Pauline M; Zhang, Peiqing; Song, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Removal of core fucose from N-glycans attached to human IgG1 significantly enhances its affinity for the receptor FcγRIII and thereby dramatically improves its antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity. While previous works have shown that inactivation of fucosyltransferase 8 results in mutants capable of producing fucose-free antibodies, we report here the use of genome editing techniques, namely ZFNs, TALENs and the CRISPR-Cas9, to inactivate the GDP-fucose transporter (SLC35C1) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A FACS approach coupled with a fucose-specific lectin was developed to rapidly isolate SLC35C1-deficient cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that both EPO-Fc produced in mutants arising from CHO-K1 and anti-Her2 antibody produced in mutants arising from a pre-existing antibody-producing CHO-HER line lacked core fucose. Lack of functional SLC35C1 in these cells does not affect cell growth or antibody productivity. Our data demonstrate that inactivating Slc35c1 gene represents an alternative approach to generate CHO cells for production of fucose-free antibodies. PMID:26471004

  8. RASSF1A Suppresses Cell Migration through Inactivation of HDAC6 and Increase of Acetylated α-Tubulin

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Hae-Yun; Jung, Jun Seok; Whang, Young Mi; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The RAS association domain family protein 1 (RASSF1) has been implicated in a tumor-suppressive function through the induction of acetylated α-tubulin and modulation of cell migration. However, the mechanisms of how RASSF1A is associated with acetylation of α-tubulin for controlling cell migration have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we found that RASSF1A regulated cell migration through the regulation of histon deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which functions as a tubulin deacetylase. ...

  9. Dimethyl sulfoxide inactivates the anticancer effect of cisplatin against human myelogenous leukemia cell lines in in vitro assays

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Raghavan; Sanith Cheriyamundath; Joseph Madassery

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of DMSO on cisplatin induced cytotoxicity (invitro) against K562 (Human mylogenous leukemia) cell line and to study the cisplatin-DMSO adduct formation using UV-spectrophotometer. Materials and methods: Effect of DMSO on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin was studied in K562 (Chronic mylogenous leukemia) cell line by MTT assay. Cisplatin-DMSO adduct formation was studied by continuously monitoring the increase in absorption peaks for 30 minutes using UV-s...

  10. Inactivation of a GAL4-Like Transcription Factor Improves Cell Fitness and Product Yield in Glycoengineered Pichia pastoris Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Bo; Argyros, Rebecca; Bukowski, John; Nelson, Stephanie; Sharkey, Nathan; Kim, Sehoon; Copeland, Victoria; Davidson, Robert C.; Chen, Ronghua; Zhuang, Jun; Sethuraman, Natarajan; Stadheim, Terrance A

    2014-01-01

    With a completely reengineered and humanized glycosylation pathway, glycoengineered Pichia pastoris has emerged as a promising production host for the manufacture of therapeutic glycoproteins. However, the extensive genetic modifications have also negatively affected the overall fitness levels of the glycoengineered host cells. To make glycoengineered Pichia strains more compatible with a scalable industrial fermentation process, we sought to identify genetic solutions to broadly improve cell...

  11. Intestinal trefoil factor induces inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kanai, Michiyuki; Mullen, Colleen; Podolsky, Daniel K.

    1998-01-01

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), a small, compact protease-resistant peptide, is abundantly expressed in goblet cells of large and small intestine. Although several biological activities of ITF have been identified, including promotion of wound healing, stimulation of epithelial cell migration, and protection of intestinal epithelial barrier, little is known about signaling events through which ITF mediates its physiological function. In this study, the effects of exogenous ITF on mitogen-act...

  12. Study of messenger RNA inactivation and protein degradation in an Escherichia coli cell-free expression system

    OpenAIRE

    Noireaux Vincent; Shin Jonghyeon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A large amount of recombinant proteins can be synthesized in a few hours with Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems based on bacteriophage transcription. These cytoplasmic extracts are used in many applications that require large-scale protein production such as proteomics and high throughput techniques. In recent years, cell-free systems have also been used to engineer complex informational processes. These works, however, have been limited by the current availabl...

  13. Development of an Inactivated Iridovirus Vaccine Against Turbot Viral Reddish Body Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Tingjun; HU Xiuzhong; WANG Liyan; GENG Xiaofen; JIANG Guojian; YANG Xiuxia; YU Miaomiao

    2012-01-01

    Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was propagated in turbot fin cells (TF cells) and inactivated as the TRBIV vaccine with its protection efficiency evaluated in this study.TF cells were cultured in 10% bovine calf serum (BCS)-containing MEM medium (pH7.0) at 22 ℃,in which TRBIV propagated to a titer as high as 105.6 TCID50 mL-1.The TRBIV was inactivated with 0.1% formalin and formulated with 0.5% aluminum hydroxide.The inactivated vaccine caused neither cytopathogenic effect (CPE) on TF cells nor pathogenic effect on turbots.After being administered with the vaccine twice via muscle injection,the turbot developed high-tittered TRBIV neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner.The vaccine protected the turbot from dying with an immunoprotection rate of 83.3% as was determined via subcutaneous vaccination in the laboratory and 90.5% via bath vaccination in turbot farms,respectively.The inactivated vaccine was very immunogenic,efficiently preventing turbot from death.It holds the potential of being applied in aquaculture.

  14. Carnosic acid induces apoptosis through inactivation of Src/STAT3 signaling pathway in human renal carcinoma Caki cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Eun; Park, Byoungduck; Chae, In Gyeong; Kim, Do-Hee; Kundu, Juthika; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), the major bioactive compound of Rosmarinus officinalis L., has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of CA remain poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated that CA significantly reduced the viability of human renal carcinoma Caki cells. CA-induced apoptosis was connected with the cleavage of caspase-9, -7 and -3, and that of PARP. Moreover, CA increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and diminished the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, thereby releasing cytochrome c into the cytosol. Treatment with CA in Caki cells also induced the expression of p53 and its target gene product, p27, through down-regulation of Murine double minute-2 (Mdm2). Furthermore, CA generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) abrogated CA-induced cleavage of PARP and expression of p53. One of the key oncogenic signals is mediated through signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), which promotes abnormal cell proliferation. Incubation of cells with CA markedly diminished the phosphorylation of STAT3 and its upstream, Src, and reduced the expression of STAT3 responsive gene products, such as D-series of cyclins and survivin. Taken together, the present study revealed that CA induced apoptosis in Caki cells by induction of p53 and suppression of STAT3 signaling. PMID:26936454

  15. Berberine and a Berberis lycium extract inactivate Cdc25A and induce {alpha}-tubulin acetylation that correlate with HL-60 cell cycle inhibition and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Musa [Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Giessrigl, Benedikt; Vonach, Caroline; Madlener, Sibylle [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prinz, Sonja [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Herbaceck, Irene; Hoelzl, Christine [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Bauer, Sabine; Viola, Katharina [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mikulits, Wolfgang [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Quereshi, Rizwana Aleem [Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Knasmueller, Siegfried; Grusch, Michael [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Kopp, Brigitte [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Krupitza, Georg, E-mail: georg.krupitza@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-01-05

    Berberis lycium Royle (Berberidacea) from Pakistan and its alkaloids berberine and palmatine have been reported to possess beneficial pharmacological properties. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic activities of different B. lycium root extracts and the major constituting alkaloids, berberine and palmatine were investigated in p53-deficient HL-60 cells. The strongest growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects were found in the n-butanol (BuOH) extract followed by the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-, and the water (H{sub 2}O) extract. The chemical composition of the BuOH extract was analyzed by TLC and quantified by HPLC. 11.1 {mu}g BuOH extract (that was gained from 1 mg dried root) contained 2.0 {mu}g berberine and 0.3 {mu}g/ml palmatine. 1.2 {mu}g/ml berberine inhibited cell proliferation significantly, while 0.5 {mu}g/ml palmatine had no effect. Berberine and the BuOH extract caused accumulation of HL-60 cells in S-phase. This was preceded by a strong activation of Chk2, phosphorylation and degradation of Cdc25A, and the subsequent inactivation of Cdc2 (CDK1). Furthermore, berberine and the extract inhibited the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1. Berberine and the BuOH extract induced the acetylation of {alpha}-tubulin and this correlated with the induction of apoptosis. The data demonstrate that berberine is a potent anti-neoplastic compound that acts via anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms independent of genotoxicity.

  16. Berberine and a Berberis lycium extract inactivate Cdc25A and induce α-tubulin acetylation that correlate with HL-60 cell cycle inhibition and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berberis lycium Royle (Berberidacea) from Pakistan and its alkaloids berberine and palmatine have been reported to possess beneficial pharmacological properties. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic activities of different B. lycium root extracts and the major constituting alkaloids, berberine and palmatine were investigated in p53-deficient HL-60 cells. The strongest growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects were found in the n-butanol (BuOH) extract followed by the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-, and the water (H2O) extract. The chemical composition of the BuOH extract was analyzed by TLC and quantified by HPLC. 11.1 μg BuOH extract (that was gained from 1 mg dried root) contained 2.0 μg berberine and 0.3 μg/ml palmatine. 1.2 μg/ml berberine inhibited cell proliferation significantly, while 0.5 μg/ml palmatine had no effect. Berberine and the BuOH extract caused accumulation of HL-60 cells in S-phase. This was preceded by a strong activation of Chk2, phosphorylation and degradation of Cdc25A, and the subsequent inactivation of Cdc2 (CDK1). Furthermore, berberine and the extract inhibited the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1. Berberine and the BuOH extract induced the acetylation of α-tubulin and this correlated with the induction of apoptosis. The data demonstrate that berberine is a potent anti-neoplastic compound that acts via anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms independent of genotoxicity.

  17. Targeting EMP3 suppresses proliferation and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells through inactivation of PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Yang, Shun-Fa; Cheng, Chun-Wen; Tang, Meng-Ju; Lin, Chia-Liang; Lin, Chu-Liang; Chou, Ruey-Hwang

    2015-10-27

    Epithelial membrane protein-3 (EMP3), a typical member of the epithelial membrane protein (EMP) family, is epigenetically silenced in some cancer types, and has been proposed to be a tumor suppressor gene. However, its effects on tumor suppression are controversial and its roles in development and malignancy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In the present study, we found that EMP3 was highly expressed in the tumorous tissues comparing to the matched normal tissues, and negatively correlated with differentiated degree of HCC patients. Knockdown of EMP3 significantly reduced cell proliferation, arrested cell cycle at G1 phase, and inhibited the motility and invasiveness in accordance with the decreased expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in HCC cells. The in vivo tumor growth of HCC was effectively suppressed by knockdown of EMP3 in a xenograft mouse model. The EMP3 knockdown-reduced cell proliferation and invasion were attenuated by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or knockdown of Akt, and rescued by overexpression of Akt in HCC cells. Clinical positive correlations of EMP3 with p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, p-Akt, uPA, as well as MMP-9 were observed in the tissue sections from HCC patients. Here, we elucidated the tumor progressive effects of EMP3 through PI3K/Akt pathway and uPA/MMP-9 cascade in HCC cells. The findings provided a new insight into EMP3, which might be a potential molecular target for diagnosis and treatment of HCC. PMID:26472188

  18. Induction of apoptosis by aqueous extract of Cordyceps militaris through activation of caspases and inactivation of Akt in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng-Yun; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2008-12-01

    Cordyceps militaris is well known as a traditional medicinal mushroom and has been shown to exhibit immunostimulatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the apoptosis induced by an aqueous extract of C. militaris (AECM) via the activation of caspases and altered mitochondrial membrane permeability in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Exposure to AECM induced apoptosis, as demonstrated by a quantitative analysis of nuclear morphological change and a flow cytometric analysis. AECM increased hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and promoted the activation of caspases. Both the cytotoxic effect and apoptotic characteristics induced by AECM treatment were significantly inhibited by z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 inhibitor, which demonstrates the important role of caspase-3 in the observed cytotoxic effect. AECM-induced apoptosis was associated with the inhibition of Akt activation in a time-dependent manner, and pretreatment with LY294002, a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, significantly increased AECM-induced apoptosis. The results indicated that AECM-induced apoptosis may relate to the activation of caspase-3 and mitochondria dysfunctions that correlate with the inactivation of Akt. PMID:19131705

  19. Inactivation of the srtA Gene in Streptococcus gordonii Inhibits Cell Wall Anchoring of Surface Proteins and Decreases In Vitro and In Vivo Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolken, Tové C.; Franke, Christine A.; Jones, Kevin F.; Zeller, Gloria O.; Jones, C. Hal; Dutton, Emma K.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2001-01-01

    The srtA gene product, SrtA, has been shown to be required for cell wall anchoring of protein A as well as virulence in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. There are five major mechanisms for displaying proteins at the surface of gram-positive bacteria (P. Cossart and R. Jonquieres, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:5013–5015, 2000). However, since many of the known surface proteins of gram-positive bacteria are believed to be exported and anchored via the sortase pathway, it was of interest to determine if srtA plays a similar role in other gram-positive bacteria. To that end, the srtA gene in the human oral commensal organism Streptococcus gordonii was insertionally inactivated. The srtA mutant S. gordonii exhibited a marked reduction in quantity of a specific anchored surface protein. Furthermore, the srtA mutant had reduced binding to immobilized human fibronectin and had a decreased ability to colonize the oral mucosa of mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the activity of SrtA plays an important role in the biology of nonpathogenic as well as pathogenic gram-positive cocci. PMID:11119491

  20. Effect of Deep-Frying or Conventional Oven Cooking on Thermal Inactivation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Cells of Escherichia coli in Meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto-Fett, Anna C S; Oliver, Michelle; Daniel, Marciauna; Shoyer, Bradley A; Stahler, Laura J; Shane, Laura E; Kassama, Lamin S; Jackson-Davis, Armitra; Luchansky, John B

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the effects of deep-frying or oven cooking on inactivation of Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia coli (STEC) in meatballs. Finely ground veal and/or a finely ground beef-pork-veal mixture were inoculated (ca. 6.5 log CFU/g) with an eight-strain, genetically marked cocktail of rifampin-resistant STEC strains (STEC-8; O111:H, O45:H2, O103:H2, O104:H4, O121:H19, O145:NM, O26:H11, and O157:H7). Inoculated meat was mixed with liquid whole eggs and seasoned bread crumbs, shaped by hand into 40-g balls, and stored at -20°C (i.e., frozen) or at 4°C (i.e., fresh) for up to 18 h. Meatballs were deep-fried (canola oil) or baked (convection oven) for up to 9 or 20 min at 176.7°C (350°F), respectively. Cooked and uncooked samples were homogenized and plated onto sorbitol MacConkey agar with rifampin (100 μg/ml) followed by incubation of plates at 37°C for ca. 24 h. Up to four trials and three replications for each treatment for each trial were conducted. Deep-frying fresh meatballs for up to 5.5 min or frozen meatballs for up to 9.0 min resulted in reductions of STEC-8 ranging from ca. 0.7 to ≥6.1 log CFU/g. Likewise, reductions of ca. 0.7 to ≥6.1 log CFU/g were observed for frozen and fresh meatballs that were oven cooked for 7.5 to 20 min. This work provides new information on the effect of prior storage temperature (refrigerated or frozen), as well as subsequent cooking via deep-frying or baking, on inactivation of STEC-8 in meatballs prepared with beef, pork, and/or veal. These results will help establish guidelines and best practices for cooking raw meatballs at both food service establishments and in the home. PMID:27296418

  1. Phosphorylation and inactivation of PTEN at residues Ser380/Thr382/383 induced by Helicobacter pylori promotes gastric epithelial cell survival through PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Xie, Chuan; Xu, Wenting; Liu, Gongmeizi; Cao, Ximei; Li, Wei; Chen, Jiang; Zhu, Yin; Luo, Shiwen; Luo, Zhijun; Lu, Nonghua

    2015-10-13

    Phosphorylation of PTEN at residues Ser380/Thr382/383 leads to loss of phosphatase activity and tumor suppressor function. Here, we found that phosphorylation of PTEN at residues Ser380/Thr382/383 was increased with gastric carcinogenesis, and more importantly, Helicobacter pylori was a trigger of this modification in chronic non-atrophic gastritis. H. pylori could phosphorylate and inactivate PTEN in vivo and in vitro, resulting in survival of gastric epithelial cells. Furthermore, stable expression of dominant-negative mutant PTEN or inhibition of Akt prevented the enhanced survival induced by H. pylori. These results indicate that PTEN phosphorylation at residues Ser380/Thr382/383 is a novel mechanism of PTEN inactivation in gastric carcinogenesis, and H. pylori triggers this modification, resulting in activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and promotion of cell survival. PMID:26376616

  2. Dose dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in radiation inactivation of Chinese hamster V79-171 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) has been examined through multiple measurements of the response of Chinese hamster V79-171 cells to low and high doses of radiation under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. In this series of experiments the cells were maintained at 37 degrees C throughout the gassing and irradiation periods, to simulate normal physiological conditions. Flow cytometry and cell sorting techniques were used to facilitate accurate measurement of cell survival throughout the dose range, but particularly at low dose. The OER was found to decrease significantly at low dose, qualitatively confirming earlier reports from this laboratory, though the decrease was somewhat smaller in the present series. This difference may be a temperature effect since in the earlier experiments irradiation was at 0 degree C. This report shows that the OER decreases from a value of 2.87 ± 0.16 (standard deviation of mean) at S = 0.01 to 2.36 ± 0.19 at S = 0.80. Both alpha and beta are altered by the presence of oxygen. The OER is presented as a function of dose in nitrogen

  3. Carnosic acid induces apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and Akt inactivation in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qisen; Ma, Yunfang; Dong, Jilin; Shen, Ruiling

    2015-02-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary, shows potential benefits in health promotion and disease prevention. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic-inducing effects of CA on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells were investigated. The MTT assay results indicated that CA decreased cell viability in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with CA caused a rapid Caspase-3 activation and subsequently proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), both of which were markers of cells undergoing apoptosis. CA also dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein, which mediated cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, CA reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, which was partially inhibited by insulin, an activator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling pathway. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction and deactivation of Akt may contribute to the apoptosis-inducing effects of CA. PMID:25265205

  4. Pomolic acid inhibits metastasis of HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells through inactivation of the ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Buyun; Kim, Yu Chul; Park, Byoungduck

    2016-08-01

    Expression of the CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4), a G protein-coupled receptor, and HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase, strongly correlates with tumor progression and metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. We report the identification of pomolic acid (PA) as a novel regulator of HER2 and CXCR4 expression. We found that PA downregulated the expression of HER2 and CXCR4 in SKBR3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. When investigated for the molecular mechanism(s), it was found that the downregulation of HER2 and CXCR4 was not due to proteolytic degradation but rather to transcriptional regulation as indicated by downregulation of mRNA expression. Moreover, we show that PA inhibits phosphorylation of ERK and reduces NF-κB activation. Suppression of CXCR4 expression by PA correlated with the inhibition of CXCL12-induced invasion of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time that PA is a novel inhibitor of HER2 and CXCR4 expression via kinase pathways and may play a critical role in determining the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. PMID:27277173

  5. Evaluation of X-Inactivation Status and Cytogenetic Stability of Human Dermal Fibroblasts after Long-Term Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Gang Xue; Zhan-Ping Shi; Juan Dong; Ting-Ting Liao; Yan-Peng Wang; Xue-Ping Sun; Zheng-Jie Yan; Xiao-Qiao Qian; Yu-Gui Cui; Juan Chen; Jia-Yin Liu; Guoping Fan

    2010-01-01

    Human primary fibroblasts are a popular type of somatic cells for the production of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Here we characterized biological properties of primary fibroblasts in terms of cell-growth rate, cytogenetic stability, and the number of inactive X chromosomes during long-term passaging. We produced eight lines of female human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and found normal karyotype and expected pattern of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) at low passages (Passage P1-5). Howev...

  6. Mechanism of Inactivation in Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawali, V S; Todt, H

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) initiate action potentials thereby giving rise to rapid transmission of electrical signals along cell membranes and between cells. Depolarization of the cell membrane causes VGSCs to open but also gives rise to a nonconducting state termed inactivation. Inactivation of VGSCs serves a critical physiologic function as it determines the extent of excitability of neurons and of muscle cells. Depending on the time course of development and removal of inactivation both "fast-" and "slow"-inactivated states have been described. Evidence from mutagenesis studies suggests that fast inactivation is produced by a block of the internal vestibule by a tethered inactivation particle that has been mapped to the internal linker between domains III and IV. The motion of this linker may be regulated by parts of the internal C-terminus. The molecular mechanism of slow inactivation is less clear. However, aside from a high number of mutagenesis studies, the recent availability of 3D structures of crystallized prokaryotic VGSCs offers insights into the molecular motions associated with slow inactivation. One possible scenario is that slow movements of the voltage sensors are transmitted to the external vestibule giving rise to a conformational change of this region. This molecular rearrangement is transmitted to the S6 segments giving rise to collapse of the internal vestibule. PMID:27586291

  7. Ultraviolet inactivation of papain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flash photolysis transient spectra (lambda > 250 nm) of aqueous papain showed that the initial products are the neutral tryptophan radical Trp (lambdasub(max) 510 nm), the tryptophan triplet state 3Trp (lambdasub(max) 460 nm), the disulfide bridge electron adduct -SS-- (lambdasub(max) 420 nm) and the hydrated electron esub(aq)-. The -SS-- yield was not altered by nitrous oxide or air, indicating that the formation of this product does not involve electrons in the external medium. The original papain preparation was activated by irradiating under nitrogen. The action spectrum supports previous work attributing the low initial activity to blocking of cysteinyl site 25 with a mixed disulfide. Flask lamp irradiation in nitrogen led to activation at low starting activities and inactivation at higher starting activities, while only inactivation at the same quantum yield was observed with air saturation. The results are consistent with photoionization of an essential tryptophyl residue as the key inactivating step. (author)

  8. Retinoic acid facilitates inactivated transmissible gastroenteritis virus induction of CD8+ T-cell migration to the porcine gut

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojuan Chen; Chongzhi Tu; Tao Qin; Liqi Zhu; Yinyan Yin; Qian Yang

    2016-01-01

    The digestive tract is the entry site for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). TGEV transmission can be prevented if local immunity is established with increased lymphocytes. The current parenteral mode of vaccination stimulates systemic immunity well, but it does not induce sufficient mucosal immunity. Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the induction of cells that imprint gut-homing molecules. We examined whether RA assist parenteral vaccination of pigs could improve mucosa...

  9. Unproductive cleavage and the inactivation of protease-activated receptor-1 by trypsin in vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Tetsuzo; Hirano, Katsuya; Shintani, Yoshinobu; Nishimura, Junji; Nakatsuka, Akio; Kuga, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Shosuke; Kanaide, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Using fura-2 fluorometry of [Ca2+]i in response to thrombin, trypsin and protease-activated receptor activating peptides (PAR-APs), we determined whether trypsin cleaves protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and activates it in the endothelial cells of the porcine aortic valves and human umbilical vein.Once stimulated with thrombin, the subsequent application of trypsin induced a [Ca2+]i elevation similar to that obtained without the preceding stimulation with thrombin in the valvular endothel...

  10. Met inactivation by S-allylcysteine suppresses the migration and invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer cells induced by hepatocyte growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, O Yeon; Hwang, Hye Sook; Lee, Bok Soon; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Chul Ho; Chun, Mi Son [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Past studies have reported that S-allylcysteine (SAC) inhibits the migration and invasion of cancer cells through the restoration of E-cadherin, the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and Slug protein expression, and inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, evidence is emerging that shows that ROS induced by radiation could increase Met activation. Following on these reports of SAC and Met, we investigated whether SAC could suppress Met activation. Wound healing, invasion, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT), soft agar colony forming, western blotting, and gelatin zymography assays were performed in the human nasopharyngeal cancer cell lines HNE1 and HONE1 treated with SAC (0, 10, 20, or 40 mM) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). This study showed that SAC could suppress the migration and invasion of HNE1 and HONE1 cell lines by inhibiting p-Met. An increase of migration and invasion induced by HGF and its decrease in a dose dependent manner by SAC in wound healing and invasion assays was observed. The reduction of p-Met by SAC was positively correlated with p-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK) and p-extracellular related kinase (p-ERK in both cell lines). SAC reduced Slug, MMP2, and MMP9 involved in migration and invasion with the inhibition of Met-FAK signaling. These results suggest that SAC inhibited not only Met activation but also the downstream FAK, Slug, and MMP expression. Finally, SAC may be a potent anticancer compound for nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy.

  11. Effectiveness of ultrasound, UV-C, and photocatalysis on inactivation kinetics of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjeet; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy; Pillai, Suresh D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, bactericidal effects of 24 kHz ultrasound, ultraviolet (UV-C) irradiation, and titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst were studied on inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila, an emerging pathogen listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) candidate contaminant list. Metabolic activity (using the AlamarBlue dye) assays were performed to assess the residual activity of the microbial cells after the disinfection treatments along with culture-based methods. A faster inactivation rate of 1.52 log min(-1) and inactivation of 7.62 log10 was observed within 5 min of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound treated cells repaired by 1.4 log10 in contrast to 5.3 log10 repair for UV-C treated cells. Ultrasound treatment significantly lowered the reactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila in comparison to UV-C- and UV-C-induced photocatalysis. Ultrasound appeared to be an effective means of inactivating Aeromonas hydrophila and could be used as a potential disinfection method for water and wastewater reuse. PMID:26301848

  12. Control of aerosol contaminants in indoor air: combining the particle concentration reduction with microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Honda, Takeshi; Kim, Ki Youn; Toivola, Mika; Rao, K S Ramchander; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-01-15

    An indoor air purification technique, which combines unipolar ion emission and photocatalytic oxidation (promoted by a specially designed RCI cell), was investigated in two test chambers, 2.75 m3 and 24.3 m3, using nonbiological and biological challenge aerosols. The reduction in particle concentration was measured size selectively in real-time, and the Air Cleaning Factor and the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) were determined. While testing with virions and bacteria, bioaerosol samples were collected and analyzed, and the microorganism survival rate was determined as a function of exposure time. We observed that the aerosol concentration decreased approximately 10 to approximately 100 times more rapidly when the purifier operated as compared to the natural decay. The data suggest that the tested portable unit operating in approximately 25 m3 non-ventilated room is capable to provide CADR-values more than twice as great than the conventional closed-loop HVAC system with a rating 8 filter. The particle removal occurred due to unipolar ion emission, while the inactivation of viable airborne microorganisms was associated with photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 90% of initially viable MS2 viruses were inactivated resulting from 10 to 60 min exposure to the photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 75% of viable B. subtilis spores were inactivated in 10 min, and about 90% or greater after 30 min. The biological and chemical mechanisms that led to the inactivation of stress-resistant airborne viruses and bacterial spores were reviewed. PMID:17310729

  13. Ovarian small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type - evidence of germline origin and SMARCA4 gene inactivation. a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupryjańczyk, J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A; Moes-Sosnowska, J; Plisiecka-Hałasa, J; Szafron, L; Podgórska, A; Rzepecka, I K; Konopka, B; Budziłowska, A; Rembiszewska, A; Grajkowska, W; Spiewankiewicz, B

    2013-12-01

    Ovarian tumors from two patients, compatible by histological and immunohistochemical criteria with small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type (SCCHT) (WT1+, EMA dispersed+, synaptophysin+ or dispersed+), were extensively sampled in order to find clues to their histogenesis. Subsequently, small foci of immature teratoma were found in both of them (in 1/122 and in 3/80 tumor sections). In one case, microfoci of yolk sac tumor were also present within the teratoma area as well as in the background of the small cell tumor population - in the primary tumor and in omental metastasis. We found a resemblance of the microscopic patterns of SCCHT and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system, and this prompted us to evaluate INI-1 and SMARCA4 immunohistochemical expression, because their alternative loss is regarded as a molecular hallmark of AT/RT. INI-1 expression was retained, while that of SMARCA4 was lost. We therefore analyzed tumor DNA by PCR amplification and sequencing for mutations in the SMARCA4 gene (NG_011556.1), which were identified in both tumors (c.2184_2206del; nonsense c.3277C>T - both in one tumor; nonsense c.3760G>T in another tumor). These data suggest that SCCHT is most likely an embryonal tumor originating from immature teratoma and related to malignant rhabdoid tumor. Further analyses are necessary to determine whether the tumors diagnosed as SCCHT constitute a homogeneous group or represent more than one entity. PMID:24375037

  14. High Rate Laser Pitting Technique for Solar Cell Texturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans J. Herfurth; Henrikki Pantsar

    2013-01-10

    High rate laser pitting technique for solar cell texturing Efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells can be improved by creating a texture on the surface to increase optical absorption. Different techniques have been developed for texturing, with the current state-of-the-art (SOA) being wet chemical etching. The process has poor optical performance, produces surfaces that are difficult to passivate or contact and is relatively expensive due to the use of hazardous chemicals. This project shall develop an alternative process for texturing mc-Si using laser micromachining. It will have the following features compared to the current SOA texturing process: -Superior optical surfaces for reduced front-surface reflection and enhanced optical absorption in thin mc-Si substrates -Improved surface passivation -More easily integrated into advanced back-contact cell concepts -Reduced use of hazardous chemicals and waste treatment -Similar or lower cost The process is based on laser pitting. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a high rate laser pitting process which will exceed the rate of former laser texturing processes by a factor of ten. The laser and scanning technologies will be demonstrated on a laboratory scale, but will use inherently technologies that can easily be scaled to production rates. The drastic increase in process velocity is required for the process to be implemented as an in-line process in PV manufacturing. The project includes laser process development, development of advanced optical systems for beam manipulation and cell reflectivity and efficiency testing. An improvement of over 0.5% absolute in efficiency is anticipated after laser-based texturing. The surface textures will be characterized optically, and solar cells will be fabricated with the new laser texturing to ensure that the new process is compatible with high-efficiency cell processing. The result will be demonstration of a prototype process that is suitable for scale-up to a

  15. Mutual inactivation of Notch receptors and ligands facilitates developmental patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sprinzak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental patterning requires juxtacrine signaling in order to tightly coordinate the fates of neighboring cells. Recent work has shown that Notch and Delta, the canonical metazoan juxtacrine signaling receptor and ligand, mutually inactivate each other in the same cell. This cis-interaction generates mutually exclusive sending and receiving states in individual cells. It generally remains unclear, however, how this mutual inactivation and the resulting switching behavior can impact developmental patterning circuits. Here we address this question using mathematical modeling in the context of two canonical pattern formation processes: boundary formation and lateral inhibition. For boundary formation, in a model motivated by Drosophila wing vein patterning, we find that mutual inactivation allows sharp boundary formation across a broader range of parameters than models lacking mutual inactivation. This model with mutual inactivation also exhibits robustness to correlated gene expression perturbations. For lateral inhibition, we find that mutual inactivation speeds up patterning dynamics, relieves the need for cooperative regulatory interactions, and expands the range of parameter values that permit pattern formation, compared to canonical models. Furthermore, mutual inactivation enables a simple lateral inhibition circuit architecture which requires only a single downstream regulatory step. Both model systems show how mutual inactivation can facilitate robust fine-grained patterning processes that would be difficult to implement without it, by encoding a difference-promoting feedback within the signaling system itself. Together, these results provide a framework for analysis of more complex Notch-dependent developmental systems.

  16. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2 Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhao

    Full Text Available Ferredoxin (Fd protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1 mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice.

  17. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar “Nipponbare” subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT’s. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice. PMID:26598971

  18. Validation of γ-radiation and ultraviolet as a new inactivators for foot and mouth disease virus in comparison with the traditional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Safy El din; Hassanin, Amr Ismail; Gamal El-Din, Wael Mossad; Ibrahim, Ehab El-Sayed; Fakhry, Hiam Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present work deals with different methods for foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) inactivation for serotypes O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012 by heat, gamma radiation, and ultraviolet (UV) in comparison with the traditional methods and their effects on the antigenicity of viruses for production of inactivated vaccines. Materials and Methods: FMDV types O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012 were propagated in baby hamster kidney 21 (BHK21) and titrated then divided into five parts; the first part inactivated with heat, the second part inactivated with gamma radiation, the third part inactivated with UV light, the fourth part inactivated with binary ethylamine, and the last part inactivated with combination of binary ethylamine and formaldehyde (BEI+FA). Evaluate the method of inactivation via inoculation in BHK21, inoculation in suckling baby mice and complement fixation test then formulate vaccine using different methods of inactivation then applying the quality control tests to evaluate each formulated vaccine. Results: The effect of heat, gamma radiation, and UV on the ability of replication of FMDV “O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012” was determined through BHK cell line passage. Each of the 9 virus aliquots titer 108 TCID50 (3 for each strain) were exposed to 37, 57, and 77°C for 15, 30, and 45 min. Similarly, another 15 aliquots (5 for each strain) contain 1 mm depth of the exposed samples in petri-dish was exposed to UV light (252.7 nm wavelength: One foot distance) for 15, 30, 45, 60, and 65 min. Different doses of gamma radiation (10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 KGy) were applied in a dose rate 0.551 Gy/s for each strain and repeated 6 times for each dose. FMDV (O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012) were inactivated when exposed to heat ≥57°C for 15 min. The UV inactivation of FMDV (O/pan Asia and SAT-2) was obtained within 60 min and 65 min for type A/Iran05. The ideal dose for inactivation of FMDV (O/pan Asia, A/Iran05

  19. Validation of γ-radiation and ultraviolet as a new inactivators for foot and mouth disease virus in comparison with the traditional methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safy El din Mahdy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present work deals with different methods for foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV inactivation for serotypes O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012 by heat, gamma radiation, and ultraviolet (UV in comparison with the traditional methods and their effects on the antigenicity of viruses for production of inactivated vaccines. Materials and Methods: FMDV types O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012 were propagated in baby hamster kidney 21 (BHK21 and titrated then divided into five parts; the first part inactivated with heat, the second part inactivated with gamma radiation, the third part inactivated with UV light, the fourth part inactivated with binary ethylamine, and the last part inactivated with combination of binary ethylamine and formaldehyde (BEI+FA. Evaluate the method of inactivation via inoculation in BHK21, inoculation in suckling baby mice and complement fixation test then formulate vaccine using different methods of inactivation then applying the quality control tests to evaluate each formulated vaccine. Results: The effect of heat, gamma radiation, and UV on the ability of replication of FMDV "O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012" was determined through BHK cell line passage. Each of the 9 virus aliquots titer 108 TCID50 (3 for each strain were exposed to 37, 57, and 77°C for 15, 30, and 45 min. Similarly, another 15 aliquots (5 for each strain contain 1 mm depth of the exposed samples in petri-dish was exposed to UV light (252.7 nm wavelength: One foot distance for 15, 30, 45, 60, and 65 min. Different doses of gamma radiation (10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 KGy were applied in a dose rate 0.551 Gy/s for each strain and repeated 6 times for each dose. FMDV (O/pan Asia, A/Iran05, and SAT-2/2012 were inactivated when exposed to heat ≥57°C for 15 min. The UV inactivation of FMDV (O/pan Asia and SAT-2 was obtained within 60 min and 65 min for type A/Iran05. The ideal dose for inactivation of FMDV (O/pan Asia, A

  20. Covariation of metabolic rates and cell size in coccolithophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisi, G.

    2015-08-01

    Coccolithophores are sensitive recorders of environmental change. The size of their coccosphere varies in the ocean along gradients of environmental conditions and provides a key for understanding the fate of this important phytoplankton group in the future ocean. But interpreting field changes in coccosphere size in terms of laboratory observations is hard, mainly because the marine signal reflects the response of multiple morphotypes to changes in a combination of environmental variables. In this paper I examine the large corpus of published laboratory experiments with coccolithophores looking for relations between environmental conditions, metabolic rates and cell size (a proxy for coccosphere size). I show that growth, photosynthesis and, to a lesser extent, calcification covary with cell size when pCO2, irradiance, temperature, nitrate, phosphate and iron conditions change. With the exception of phosphate and temperature, a change from limiting to non-limiting conditions always results in an increase in cell size. An increase in phosphate or temperature (below the optimum temperature for growth) produces the opposite effect. The magnitude of the coccosphere-size changes observed in the laboratory is comparable to that observed in the ocean. If the biological reasons behind the environment-metabolism-size link are understood, it will be possible to use coccosphere-size changes in the modern ocean and in marine sediments to investigate the fate of coccolithophores in the future ocean. This reasoning can be extended to the size of coccoliths if, as recent experiments are starting to show, coccolith size reacts to environmental change proportionally to coccosphere size. The coccolithophore database is strongly biased in favour of experiments with the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi; 82 % of database entries), and more experiments with other species are needed to understand whether these observations can be extended to coccolithophores in general. I

  1. Determination of in vitro oxygen consumption rates for tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine pO2 at the surface of a monolayer of confluent HCT 116 cells, and to then determine consumption rate in vitro by examining the pO2 profile in media above the cells. Materials and Methods: A recessed-tip polarographic oxygen microelectrode (diameter ∼10μm) was used to measure pO2 profiles of media above a confluent monolayer of HCT 116 human colon adenocarcinoma cells in a T25 flask exposed to a 95% air, 5% CO2 mixture. A two-dimensional finite element analysis of the diffusion equation was used to fit the data, thereby extracting a steady-state O2 consumption rate. The diffusion equation was solved for zeroth and first-order expressions. No-flux boundary conditions were imposed on its bottom and side boundaries and experimental data was used for boundary conditions at the gas-media boundary. All flasks show an O2 gradient in the media, with a mean (SE) media layer of 1677 (147) μm and a mean pO2 at the cell layer/media interface of 44 (8) mm Hg (n=9). pO2 gradient over the entire media layer is 630 (90) mm Hg/cm, equivalent to a consumption rate of 6.3 x 10-4 (9.0 x 10-5) mm Hg/s. The mean values for the zeroth and first order rate constants are 8.1 x 10-9(1.3 x 10-9) g mol O2/cm3s and 1.0 x 103(0.46 x 103) /s, respectively. Control experiments in flasks containing no cells show slight gradients in pO2 of 38 (12) mm Hg/cm, resulting from some O2 diffusion through the flask into the surrounding water bath. An addition of 10-3M NaCN to the media results in a dramatic increase in pO2 at the cell layer, consistent with a shut-down in respiration. Under normal cell culture conditions there is an O2 gradient present in the media of cull culture systems, resulting in physiologic O2 concentrations at the cell layer, despite the non-physiologic O2 concentration of the gas mixture to which the cell culture system is exposed. This significant (p-6) O2 gradient in the media of cell culture systems is a result of cell O2 consumption and should be considered in

  2. Mucosal SIV vaccines comprising inactivated virus particles and bacterial adjuvants induce CD8+T-regulatory cells that suppress SIV positive CD4+cell activation and prevent SIV infection in the macaque model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marie eAndrieu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against HIV infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated SIVmac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette & Guerin bacillus, lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastic route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies nor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes but induced a previously unrecognized population of non-cytolytic MHCIb/E-restricted CD8+T regulatory cells that suppressed the activation of SIV positive CD4+ T-lymphocytes. SIV reverse transcription was thereby blocked in inactivated CD4+ T-cells; the initial burst of virus replication was prevented and the vaccinated macaques were protected from a challenge infection. Three to 14 months after intragastric immunization, 24 macaques were challenged intrarectally with a high dose of SIVmac239 or with the heterologous strain SIV B670 (both strains grown on macaques PBMC. Twenty-three of these animals were found to be protected for up to 48 months while all 24 control macaques became infected. This protective effect against SIV challenge together with the concomitant identification of a robust ex-vivo correlate of protection suggests a new approach for developing an HIV vaccine in humans. The induction of this new class of CD8+ T regulatory cells could also possibly be used therapeutically for suppressing HIV replication in infected patients and this novel tolerogenic vaccine paradigm may have potential applications for treating a wide range of immune disorders and is likely to may have profound implications across immunology generally.

  3. Catalase improves saccharification of lignocellulose by reducing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase-associated enzyme inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Brian R.; Huang, Hong Zhi; Frickman, Jesper; Halvorsen, Rune; Johansen, Katja S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Efficient enzymatic saccharification of plant cell wall material is key to industrial processing of agricultural and forestry waste such as straw and wood chips into fuels and chemicals. Results Saccharification assays were performed on steam-pretreated wheat straw under ambient and O2-deprived environments and in the absence and presence of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) and catalase. A kinetic model was used to calculate catalytic rate and first-order inactivation ra...

  4. Evaluation of the Safety, Tolerability, and Immunogenicity of an Oral, Inactivated Whole-Cell Shigella flexneri 2a Vaccine in Healthy Adult Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Harro, Clayton; DeNearing, Barbara; Bream, Jay; Bauers, Nicole; Dally, Len; Flores, Jorge; Van de Verg, Lillian; Sack, David A; Walker, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Shigellacauses high morbidity and mortality worldwide, but there is no licensed vaccine for shigellosis yet. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a formalin-inactivated whole-cellShigella flexneri2a vaccine, Sf2aWC, given orally to adult volunteers. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 82 subjects were randomized to receive three doses of vaccine in dose escalation (2.6 ± 0.8 × 10(8), × 10(9), × 10(10), and × 10(11)vaccine particles/ml). Vaccine safety was actively monitored, and antigen-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses were determined in serum, antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS), and fecal samples. Cytokines were measured in the serum. Sf2aWC was well tolerated and generally safe at all four dose levels. The vaccine resulted in a dose-dependent immune response. At the highest dose, the vaccine induced robust responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in both serum and ALS samples. The highest magnitude and frequency of responses occurred after the first dose in almost all samples but was delayed for IgG in serum. Fifty percent of the vaccinees had a >4-fold increase in anti-LPS fecal antibody titers. Responses to invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa) were low. The levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-2, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-10 were increased, and IL-8 was decreased immediately after first dose, but these changes were very transient. This phase I trial demonstrated that the Sf2aWC vaccine, a relatively simple vaccine concept, was safe and immunogenic. The vaccine elicited immune responses which were comparable to those induced by a live, attenuatedShigellavaccine that was protective in prior human challenge studies. PMID:26865592

  5. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araten, David J., E-mail: david.araten@nyumc.org [Division of Hematology, Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System (United States); Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Krejci, Ondrej [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); DiTata, Kimberly [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Wunderlich, Mark [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Mulloy, James C. [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10{sup −7} per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10{sup −7} (range ∼3.6–23 × 10{sup −7}) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis.

  6. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10−7 per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10−7 (range ∼3.6–23 × 10−7) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis

  7. Place Cell Rate Remapping by CA3 Recurrent Collaterals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solstad, Trygve; Yousif, Hosam N.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic-like memory is thought to be supported by attractor dynamics in the hippocampus. A possible neural substrate for this memory mechanism is rate remapping, in which the spatial map of place cells encodes contextual information through firing rate variability. To test whether memories are stored as multimodal attractors in populations of place cells, recent experiments morphed one familiar context into another while observing the responses of CA3 cell ensembles. Average population activity in CA3 was reported to transition gradually rather than abruptly from one familiar context to the next, suggesting a lack of attractive forces associated with the two stored representations. On the other hand, individual CA3 cells showed a mix of gradual and abrupt transitions at different points along the morph sequence, and some displayed hysteresis which is a signature of attractor dynamics. To understand whether these seemingly conflicting results are commensurate with attractor network theory, we developed a neural network model of the CA3 with attractors for both position and discrete contexts. We found that for memories stored in overlapping neural ensembles within a single spatial map, position-dependent context attractors made transitions at different points along the morph sequence. Smooth transition curves arose from averaging across the population, while a heterogeneous set of responses was observed on the single unit level. In contrast, orthogonal memories led to abrupt and coherent transitions on both population and single unit levels as experimentally observed when remapping between two independent spatial maps. Strong recurrent feedback entailed a hysteretic effect on the network which diminished with the amount of overlap in the stored memories. These results suggest that context-dependent memory can be supported by overlapping local attractors within a spatial map of CA3 place cells. Similar mechanisms for context-dependent memory may also be found in

  8. Place cell rate remapping by CA3 recurrent collaterals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Solstad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Episodic-like memory is thought to be supported by attractor dynamics in the hippocampus. A possible neural substrate for this memory mechanism is rate remapping, in which the spatial map of place cells encodes contextual information through firing rate variability. To test whether memories are stored as multimodal attractors in populations of place cells, recent experiments morphed one familiar context into another while observing the responses of CA3 cell ensembles. Average population activity in CA3 was reported to transition gradually rather than abruptly from one familiar context to the next, suggesting a lack of attractive forces associated with the two stored representations. On the other hand, individual CA3 cells showed a mix of gradual and abrupt transitions at different points along the morph sequence, and some displayed hysteresis which is a signature of attractor dynamics. To understand whether these seemingly conflicting results are commensurate with attractor network theory, we developed a neural network model of the CA3 with attractors for both position and discrete contexts. We found that for memories stored in overlapping neural ensembles within a single spatial map, position-dependent context attractors made transitions at different points along the morph sequence. Smooth transition curves arose from averaging across the population, while a heterogeneous set of responses was observed on the single unit level. In contrast, orthogonal memories led to abrupt and coherent transitions on both population and single unit levels as experimentally observed when remapping between two independent spatial maps. Strong recurrent feedback entailed a hysteretic effect on the network which diminished with the amount of overlap in the stored memories. These results suggest that context-dependent memory can be supported by overlapping local attractors within a spatial map of CA3 place cells. Similar mechanisms for context-dependent memory may

  9. Enhanced Anti-Cancer Effect of Snake Venom Activated NK Cells on Lung Cancer Cells by Inactivation of NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; Won, Do Hee; Hwang, Chul Ju; Jung, Yu Yeon; Yoon, Heui Seoung; Park, Mi Hee; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated anti-cancer effect of snake venom activated NK cells (NK-92MI) in lung cancer cell lines. We used snake venom (4 μg/ml) treated NK-92MI cells to co-culture with lung cancer cells. There was a further decrease in cancer cell growth up to 65% and 70% in A549 and NCI-H460 cell lines respectively, whereas 30–40% was decreased in cancer cell growth by snake venom or NK-92MI alone treatment. We further found that the expression of various apoptotic proteins suc...

  10. Measurement of blowdown flow rates using load cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish a reliable method for measuring two-phase flow, experiments were planned for measurement of transient single phase flow rates from vessels using load cells. Suitability of lead-zirconate-titanate piezoelectric ceramic discs was examined. Discharge time constant of the disc used was low, leading to large measurement errors. Subsequently, experiments were carried out using strain gauge load cells and these were found satisfactory. The unsteady flow equation has been derived for the system under investigation. The equation has been solved numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method and also by integrating it analytically. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical results and presented in this report. (auth.)

  11. Application of gaseous ozone for inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Ahmet; Gurol, Mirat D

    2006-02-01

    The effectiveness of gaseous ozone (O3) as a disinfectant was tested on Bacillus subtilis spores, which share the same physiological characteristics as Bacillus anthracis spores that cause the anthrax disease. Spores dried on surfaces of different carrier material were exposed to O3 gas in the range of 500-5000 ppm and at relative humidity (RH) of 70-95%. Gaseous O3 was found to be very effective against the B. subtilis spores, and at O3 concentrations as low as 3 mg/L (1500 ppm), approximately 3-log inactivation was obtained within 4 hr of exposure. The inactivation curves consisted of a short lag phase followed by an exponential decrease in the number of surviving spores. Prehydration of the bacterial spores has eliminated the initial lag phase. The inactivation rate increased with increasing O3 concentration but not >3 mg/L. The inactivation rate also increased with increase in RH. Different survival curves were obtained for various surfaces used to carry spores. Inactivation rates of spores on glass, a vinyl floor tile, and office paper were nearly the same. Whereas cut pile carpet and hardwood flooring surfaces resulted in much lower inactivation rates, another type of carpet (loop pile) showed significant enhancement in the inactivation of the spores. PMID:16568801

  12. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  13. Inflammation-induced radioresistance is mediated by ROS-dependent inactivation of protein phosphatase 1 in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanyeon; Youn, HyeSook; Kang, ChulHee; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in modulating the radiation responsiveness of tumors. We determined that an inflammation response prior to irradiation contributes to radiotherapy resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. In the clonogenic survival assay, activation of the inflammation response by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreased the degree of radiosensitivity in NCI-H460 cells (relatively radiosensitive cells), but had no effect in A549 cells (relatively radioresistant cells). LPS-induced radioresistance of NCI-H460 cells was also confirmed with a xenograft mouse model. The radioresistant effect observed in NCI-H460 cells was correlated with inhibition of apoptotic cell death due to reduced Caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, we found that the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were synergistically elevated in NCI-H460 cells by treatment with LPS and radiation. Increased ROS generation negatively affected the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Decreased PP1 activity did not lead to Bad dephosphorylation, consequently resulting in the inhibition of irradiation-induced mitochondrial membrane potential loss and apoptosis. We confirmed that pre-treatment with a PP1 activator and LPS sensitized NCI-H460 cells to radiation. Taken together, our findings provided evidence that PP1 activity is critical for radiosensitization in NSCLC cells and PP1 activators can serve as promising radiosensitizers to improve therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26033480

  14. Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Eun Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  15. Energy-dependent inactivation of citrate lyase in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, H; Gottschalk, G

    1977-12-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes was grown in continous culture with ammonia as the growth-limiting substrate, and changes in citrate lyase and citrate synthase activities were monitored after growth shifts from anaerobic growth on citrate to aerobic growth on citrate, aerobic growth on glucose, anaerobic growth on glucose, and anaerobic growth on glucose plus nitrate. Citrate lyase was inactivated during aerobic growth on glucose and during anaerobic growth with glucose plus nitrate. Inactivation did not occur during anaerobic growth on glucose, and as a result of the simultaneous presence of citrate lyase and citrate synthase, growth difficulties were observed. Citrate lyase inactivation consisted of deacetylation of the enzyme. The corresponding deacetylase could not be demonstrated in cell extracts, and it is concluded that, as in a number of other inactivations, electron transport to oxygen or nitrate was required for inactivation. PMID:924971

  16. Inactivation of Chikungunya virus by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Anuj

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthropod borne alphavirus of the family Togaviridae. CHIKV is a reemerging virus for which there is no safe prophylactic vaccine. A live attenuated strain of CHIKV, CHIK181/25, was previously demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in humans, however, it showed residual virulence causing transient arthralgia. Findings In this study, we demonstrate the complete inactivation of CHIKV181/25 by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide (INA. No cytopathic effect and virus replication was observed in cells infected with the INA-inactivated CHIKV. However, a reduction in the INA-inactivated CHIK virus-antibody binding capacity was observed by western blot analysis. Conclusion INA completely inactivated CHIKV and can further be explored for developing an inactivated-CHIKV vaccine.

  17. Inactivation of biologically active DNA by isopropanol and formate radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If OH and H radicals, produced by absorption of ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions, are scavenged with isopropanol or sodium formate, secondary radicals are formed which can inactivate phiX174 DNA. From experiments at various DNA concentrations and dose rates we were able to determine the rate constant and the inactivation efficiency of the reaction of these organic radicals with single stranded DNA. (author)

  18. PER.C6(®) cells as a serum-free suspension cell platform for the production of high titer poliovirus: a potential low cost of goods option for world supply of inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Custers, Jerome H H V; Koldijk, Martin H; Klaren, Vincent; Turk, Marije; Luitjens, Alfred; Bakker, Wilfried A M; Uytdehaag, Fons; Goudsmit, Jaap; Lewis, John A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2013-01-21

    There are two highly efficacious poliovirus vaccines: Sabin's live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) and Salk's inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). OPV can be made at low costs per dose and is easily administrated. However, the major drawback is the frequent reversion of the OPV vaccine strains to virulent poliovirus strains which can result in Vaccine Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccinees. Furthermore, some OPV revertants with high transmissibility can circulate in the population as circulating Vaccine Derived Polioviruses (cVDPVs). IPV does not convey VAPP and cVDPVs but the high costs per dose and insufficient supply have rendered IPV an unfavorable option for low and middle-income countries. Here, we explored whether the human PER.C6(®) cell-line, which has the unique capability to grow at high density in suspension, under serum-free conditions, could be used as a platform for high yield production of poliovirus. PER.C6(®) cells supported replication of all three poliovirus serotypes with virus titers ranging from 9.4 log(10) to 11.1 log(10)TCID(50)/ml irrespective of the volume scale (10 ml in shaker flasks to 2 L in bioreactors). This production yield was 10-30 fold higher than in Vero cell cultures performed here, and even 100-fold higher than what has been reported for Vero cell cultures in literature [38]. In agreement, the D-antigen content per volume PER.C6(®)-derived poliovirus was on average 30-fold higher than Vero-derived poliovirus. Interestingly, PER.C6(®) cells produced on average 2.5-fold more D-antigen units per cell than Vero cells. Based on our findings, we are exploring PER.C6(®) as an interesting platform for large-scale production of poliovirus at low costs, potentially providing the basis for global supply of an affordable IPV. PMID:23123018

  19. Ionizing Irradiation Not Only Inactivates Clonogenic Potential in Primary Normal Human Diploid Lens Epithelial Cells but Also Stimulates Cell Proliferation in a Subset of This Population

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimichi, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, ionizing radiation has been known to induce cataracts in the crystalline lens of the eye, but its mechanistic underpinnings remain incompletely understood. This study is the first to report the clonogenic survival of irradiated primary normal human lens epithelial cells and stimulation of its proliferation. Here we used two primary normal human cell strains: HLEC1 lens epithelial cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts. Both strains were diploid, and a replicative lifespan was...

  20. Astaxanthin down-regulates Rad51 expression via inactivation of AKT kinase to enhance mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, the molecular mechanism of astaxanthin-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination, and studies show that chemo-resistant carcinomas exhibit high levels of Rad51 expression. In this study, astaxanthin treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Astaxanthin treatment (2.5-20μM) decreased Rad51 expression and phospho-AKT(Ser473) protein level in a time and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vector rescued the decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels in astaxanthin-treated NSCLC cells. Combined treatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) further decreased the Rad51 expression in astaxanthin-exposed A549 and H1703 cells. Knockdown of Rad51 expression by transfection with si-Rad51 RNA or cotreatment with LY294002 further enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of astaxanthin. Additionally, mitomycin C (MMC) as an anti-tumor antibiotic is widely used in clinical NSCLC chemotherapy. Combination of MMC and astaxanthin synergistically resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced phospho-AKT(Ser473) level and Rad51 expression. Overexpression of AKT-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 reversed the astaxanthin and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in astaxanthin and MMC co-treated cells. In conclusion, astaxanthin enhances MMC-induced cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression and AKT activation. These findings may provide rationale to combine astaxanthin with MMC for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26921637

  1. Wogonin induced G1 cell cycle arrest by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and inactivating CDK8 in human colorectal cancer carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Wogonin inhibited HCT116 cells growth and arrested at G1 phase of the cell cycle. • Wogonin down-regulated the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • Wogonin interfered in the combination of β-catenin and TCF/Lef. • Wogonin limited the kinase activity of CDK8. - Abstract: Wogonin, a naturally occurring mono-flavonoid, has been reported to have tumor therapeutic potential and good selectivity both in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we investigated the anti-proliferation effects and associated mechanisms of wogonin in human colorectal cancer in vitro. The flow-cytometric analysis showed that wogonin induced a G1 phase cell cycle arrest in HCT116 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, the cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin A, E, D1, and CDK2, 4 were down-regulated in wogonin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we showed that the anti-proliferation and G1 arrest effect of wogonin on HCT116 cells was associated with deregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Wogonin-treated cells showed decreased intracellular levels of Wnt proteins, and activated degradation complex to phosphorylated and targeted β-catenin for proteasomal degradation. Wogonin inhibited β-catenin-mediated transcription by interfering in the transcriptional activity of TCF/Lef, and repressing the kinase activity of CDK8 which has been considered as an oncogene involving in the development of colorectal cancers. Moreover, CDK8 siRNA-transfected HCT116 cells showed similar results to wogonin treated cells. Thus, our data suggested that wogonin induced anti-proliferation and G1 arrest via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and it can be developed as a therapeutic agent against human colorectal cancer

  2. Absence of correlation between rates of cell wall turnover and autolysis shown by Bacillus subtilis mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitković, L; Cheung, H. Y.; Freese, E

    1984-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants with reduced rates of cell wall autolysis reached a constant rate of wall turnover after a longer lag than the standard strain but eventually showed the same turnover rate. In reverse, a turnover-deficient mutant autolysed at a slightly higher rate than the standard strain. Consequently, there is no correlation between the rates of cell wall turnover and autolysis.

  3. Origin and evolution of X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J Anton

    2012-06-01

    Evolution of the mammalian sex chromosomes heavily impacts on the expression of X-encoded genes, both in marsupials and placental mammals. The loss of genes from the Y chromosome forced a two-fold upregulation of dose sensitive X-linked homologues. As a corollary, female cells would experience a lethal dose of X-linked genes, if this upregulation was not counteracted by evolution of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) that allows for only one active X chromosome per diploid genome. Marsupials rely on imprinted XCI, which inactivates always the paternally inherited X chromosome. In placental mammals, random XCI (rXCI) is the predominant form, inactivating either the maternal or paternal X. In this review, we discuss recent new insights in the regulation of XCI. Based on these findings, we propose an X inactivation center (Xic), composed of a cis-Xic and trans-Xic that encompass all elements and factors acting to control rXCI either in cis or in trans. We also highlight that XCI may have evolved from a very small nucleation site on the X chromosome in the vicinity of the Sox3 gene. Finally, we discuss the possible evolutionary road maps that resulted in imprinted XCI and rXCI as observed in present day mammals. PMID:22425180

  4. Direct relationship between the level of p53 stabilization induced by rRNA synthesis-inhibiting drugs and the cell ribosome biogenesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, F; Brighenti, E; Govoni, M; Imbrogno, E; Fornari, F; Treré, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2016-02-25

    Many drugs currently used in chemotherapy work by hindering the process of ribosome biogenesis. In tumors with functional p53, the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may contribute to the efficacy of this treatment by inducing p53 stabilization. As the level of stabilized p53 is critical for the induction of cytotoxic effects, it seems useful to highlight those cancer cell characteristics that can predict the degree of p53 stabilization following the treatment with inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis. In the present study we exposed a series of p53 wild-type human cancer cell lines to drugs such as actinomycin D (ActD), doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and CX-5461, which hinder ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. We found that the amount of stabilized p53 was directly related to the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells before the drug treatment. This was due to different levels of inactivation of the ribosomal proteins-MDM2 pathway of p53 digestion. Inhibition of rRNA synthesis always caused cell cycle arrest, independent of the ribosome biogenesis rate of the cells, whereas apoptosis occurred only in cells with a high rDNA transcription rate. The level of p53 stabilization induced by drugs acting in different ways from the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, such as hydroxyurea (HU) and nutlin-3, was independent of the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells and always lower than that occurring after the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. Interestingly, in cells with a low ribosome biogenesis rate, the combined treatment with ActD and HU exerted an additive effect on p53 stabilization. These results indicated that (i) drugs inhibiting ribosome biogenesis may be highly effective in p53 wild-type cancers with a high ribosome biogenesis rate, as they induce apoptotic cell death, and (ii) the combination of drugs capable of stabilizing p53 through different mechanisms may be useful for treating cancers with a low ribosome biogenesis rate. PMID:25961931

  5. Effect of light irradiation wavelength on the inactivation of penicillium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of the Inactivation inactivity of Penicillium implicatum, one of the most common fungi in the environment, were examined under the specified light irradiation on the basis of the action spectrum. The Penicillium implicatum spores were spread on PDA plates. Each plate was irradiated using three kinds of light sources. Monochromatic light was simultaneously irradiated on the plates every 20 nm in the range of 260 to 500 nm. The irradiation energy was measured by wavelength. UVA and UVB fluorescent lamps were also used to irradiate the plates under the measurement of irradiation energy. After the exposure to light, the plates were cultivated for one week at 25 deg C. Viable fungal colonies were counted. Characteristic curbs of the inactivation rate of Penicillium implicatum versus irradiation energy showed the shortest wavelength of 260 nm was the most effective in the inactivation. It is due to the fact that the wavelength is close to the absorption of DNA. Moreover, from the examination of wavelength dependency of the inactivation rate under irradiation of a constant energy, 2 kJ/m2, it was observed that the wavelength in the visible light range was also effective in the inactivation to some extent. On the other hand, irradiation with a UVB fluorescent lamp resulted in inactivation of all Penicillium spores at about 3 kJ/m2. In the case of the UVA fluorescent lamp, about 80 kJ/m2 caused the inactivation of all the spores. (author)

  6. Chemotherapeutic drugs sensitize human renal cell carcinoma cells to ABT-737 by a mechanism involving the Noxa-dependent inactivation of Mcl-1 or A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantl Niko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human renal cell carcinoma (RCC is very resistant to chemotherapy. ABT-737 is a novel inhibitor of anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family that has shown promise in various preclinical tumour models. Results We here report a strong over-additive pro-apoptotic effect of ABT-737 and etoposide, vinblastine or paclitaxel but not 5-fluorouracil in cell lines from human RCC. ABT-737 showed very little activity as a single agent but killed RCC cells potently when anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 or, unexpectedly, A1 was targeted by RNAi. This potent augmentation required endogenous Noxa protein since RNAi directed against Noxa but not against Bim or Puma reduced apoptosis induction by the combination of ABT-737 and etoposide or vinblastine. At the level of mitochondria, etoposide-treatment had a similar sensitizing activity and allowed for ABT-737-induced release of cytochrome c. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic drugs can overcome protection afforded by Mcl-1 and A1 through endogenous Noxa protein in RCC cells, and the combination of such drugs with ABT-737 may be a promising strategy in RCC. Strikingly, A1 emerged in RCC cell lines as a protein of similar importance as the well-established Mcl-1 in protection against apoptosis in these cells.

  7. Evaluation of hydrolysis and fermentation rates in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B.; Yu, Eileen; Katuri, Krishna P.; Scott, Keith [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials; Head, Ian M.; Curtis, Tom P. [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences

    2011-04-15

    This study determined the influence of substrate degradation on power generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial community selection on the anode. Air cathode MFCs were fed synthetic medium containing different substrates (acetate, glucose and starch) using primary clarifier sewage as source of electroactive bacteria. The complexity of the substrate affected the MFC performance both for power generation and COD removal. Power output decreased with an increase in substrate complexity from 99 {+-} 2 mW m{sup -2} for acetate to 4 {+-} 2 mW m{sup -2} for starch. The organic matter removal and coulombic efficiency (CE) of MFCs with acetate and glucose (82% of COD removal and 26% CE) were greater than MFCs using starch (60% of COD removal and 19% of CE). The combined hydrolysis-fermentation rate obtained (0.0024 h{sup -1}) was considerably lower than the fermentation rate (0.018 h{sup -1}), indicating that hydrolysis of complex compounds limits current output over fermentation. Statistical analysis of microbial community fingerprints, developed on the anode, showed that microbial communities were enriched according to the type of substrate used. Microbial communities producing high power outputs (fed acetate) clustered separately from bacterial communities producing low power outputs (fed complex compounds). (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of hydrolysis and fermentation rates in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B; Yu, Eileen; Katuri, Krishna P; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Tom P; Scott, Keith

    2011-04-01

    This study determined the influence of substrate degradation on power generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial community selection on the anode. Air cathode MFCs were fed synthetic medium containing different substrates (acetate, glucose and starch) using primary clarifier sewage as source of electroactive bacteria. The complexity of the substrate affected the MFC performance both for power generation and COD removal. Power output decreased with an increase in substrate complexity from 99±2 mWm(-2) for acetate to 4±2 mWm(-2) for starch. The organic matter removal and coulombic efficiency (CE) of MFCs with acetate and glucose (82% of COD removal and 26% CE) were greater than MFCs using starch (60% of COD removal and 19% of CE). The combined hydrolysis-fermentation rate obtained (0.0024 h(-1)) was considerably lower than the fermentation rate (0.018 h(-1)), indicating that hydrolysis of complex compounds limits current output over fermentation. Statistical analysis of microbial community fingerprints, developed on the anode, showed that microbial communities were enriched according to the type of substrate used. Microbial communities producing high power outputs (fed acetate) clustered separately from bacterial communities producing low power outputs (fed complex compounds). PMID:21347728

  9. Efficacy of an inactivated genotype 2b porcine epidemic diarrhea virus vaccine in neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Pil-Soo; Choi, Hwan-Won; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, In-Joong; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Du Sik; Lee, Seungyoon; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Massive outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) recurred in South Korea in 2013-2014 and affected approximately 40% of the swine breeding herds across the country, incurring a tremendous financial impact on producers and consumers. Despite the nationwide use of commercially available attenuated and inactivated vaccines in South Korea, PEDV has continued to plague the domestic pork industry, raising concerns regarding their protective efficacies and the need for new vaccine development. In a previous study, we isolated and serially cultivated a Korean PEDV epidemic strain, KOR/KNU-141112/2014, in Vero cells. With the availability of a cell culture-propagated PEDV strain, we are able to explore vaccination and challenge studies on pigs. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to produce an inactivated PEDV vaccine using the KNU-141112 strain and evaluate its effectiveness in neonatal piglets. Pregnant sows were immunized intramuscularly with the inactivated adjuvanted monovalent vaccine at six and three weeks prior to farrowing. Six-day-old piglets born to vaccinated or unvaccinated sows were challenged with the homogeneous KNU-141112 virus. The administration of the inactivated vaccine to sows greatly increased the survival rate of piglets challenged with the virulent strain, from 0% to approximately 92% (22/24), and significantly reduced diarrhea severity including viral shedding in feces. In addition, litters from unvaccinated sows continued to lose body weight throughout the experiment, whereas litters from vaccinated sows started recovering their daily weight gain at 7 days after the challenge. Furthermore, strong neutralizing antibody responses to PEDV were verified in immunized sows and their offspring, but were absent in the unvaccinated controls. Altogether, our data demonstrated that durable lactogenic immunity was present in dams administrated with the inactivated vaccine and subsequently conferred critical passive immune protection to

  10. The New Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for Thalassemia Gene Therapy Combining Two HPFH Activating Elements Corrects Human Thalassemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Stamateris, Evangelos; Panetsos, Fottes; Karagiorga, Markisia; Tsaftaridis, Panagiotis; Graphakos, Stelios; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    To address how low titer, variable expression, and gene silencing affect gene therapy vectors for hemoglobinopathies, in a previous study we successfully used the HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin)-2 enhancer in a series of oncoretroviral vectors. On the basis of these data, we generated a novel insulated self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector, termed GGHI, carrying the Aγ-globin gene with the −117 HPFH point mutation and the HPFH-2 enhancer and exhibiting a pancellular patt...

  11. Live and Inactivated Influenza Vaccines Induce Similar Humoral Responses, but Only Live Vaccines Induce Diverse T-Cell Responses in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hoft, Daniel F.; Babusis, Elizabeth; Worku, Shewangizaw; Spencer, Charles T.; Lottenbach, Kathleen; Truscott, Steven M.; Abate, Getahun; Sakala, Isaac G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; CREECH, C. BUDDY; Gerber, Michael A.; Bernstein, David I.; Newman, Frances; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Two doses of either trivalent live attenuated or inactivated influenza vaccines (LAIV and TIV, respectively) are approved for young children (≥24 months old for LAIV and ≥6 months old for TIV) and induce protective antibody responses. However, whether combinations of LAIV and TIV are safe and equally immunogenic is unknown. Furthermore, LAIV is more protective than TIV in children for unclear reasons.

  12. Similarities in cellular inactivation by hyperthermia or by ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of how cells are inactivated by mild hyperthermia (41 to 450C) is difficult to resolve because heat stresses most (if not all) cellular organelles. As a result, studies showing correlations between cell death resulting from heat exposure and damage to specific subcellular units tend to be inconclusive. We have looked for a heat analog, i.e., another agent whose mode of cell inactivation closely resembles that of heat. Our hypothesis is that information about the mechanism of cell inactivation closely resembles that of heat. Our hypothesis is that information about the mechanism of cell inactivation by this agent should aid in identifying the targets for heat inactivation. Here we report results that we interpret as showing that ethanol may be such an analog. Exposure of cells to heat or ethanol induces tolerance to heat, ethanol, or adriamycin. The cytotoxicity of both ethanol and heat is enhanced by low pH and cysteamine; it is reduced by deuterium oxide. Finally, treating cells either before or after x irradiation with either agent enhances cell killing

  13. Viable versus inactivated lactobacillus strain GG in acute rotavirus diarrhoea.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaila, M; Isolauri, E; Saxelin, M.; Arvilommi, H; Vesikari, T

    1995-01-01

    The effect of viable or heat inactivated human Lactobacillus casei strain GG on rotavirus immune responses in patients with rotavirus diarrhoea was assessed. Rotavirus serum IgA enzyme immunoassay antibody responses were higher in infants treated with viable L casei strain GG than in those treated with inactivated L casei strain GG. There was a significant difference at convalescence with rotavirus specific IgA secreting cells found in 10/12 infants receiving viable but only 2/13 infants rece...

  14. Inactivation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 and prevention of cell-to-cell virus spread by Santolina insularis essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Logu, A; Loy, G; Pellerano, M L; Bonsignore, L; Schivo, M L

    2000-12-01

    The essential oil obtained in toto from Santolina insularis was investigated for its antiviral activity on herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) in vitro. The IC(50) values, determined by plaque reduction assays, were 0.88 and 0.7 microg/ml for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively, while the CC(50) determined by the MTT test on Vero cells was 112 microg/ml, indicating a CC(50)/IC(50) ratio of 127 for HSV-1 and 160 for HSV-2. Results obtained by plaque reduction assays also indicated that the antiviral activity of S. insularis was principally due to direct virucidal effects. Antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2 was not observed in a post-attachment assay, and attachment assays indicated that virus adsorption was not inhibited. Up to 80% inhibition of HSV-1 was achieved at the concentration of 40 microg/ml by yield reduction assay. Furthermore, reduction of plaque formation assays also showed that S. insularis essential oil inhibits cell-to-cell transmission of both HSV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:11164504

  15. γ-ray dose rate effect in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the dose rate effect and potentially lethal damage repair in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells (SCID) irradiated by γ-ray. Methods: The wild type (CB.17+/+) and SCID cells were exposed to γ-ray at high and low dose rates. The high dose rate exposure was fractionated into two equal doses at 24 h intervals. The survival rates of irradiated cells were calculated by clone-forming analysis. Results: When γ-ray was given to wild type (CB.17+/+) cells in two fractions at 24 h intervals, the survival rate was significantly higher than that when the same total dose was given singly. In contrast, there was no difference in the survival rates between the single and fractionated exposure in SCID cells. SCID cells were more sensitive than CB.17+/+ cells to both low and high dose rates γ-ray exposure for cell killing. The survival rate by low dose rate exposure was significantly higher than that by high dose rate exposure, not only in CB.17+/+ cells but also in SCID cells. Conclusions: SCID cells are deficient in repairing γ-ray induced double-strand breaks. There is dose rate effect in both SCID and CB.17+/+ cells

  16. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  17. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  18. Gamma-ray inactivation of biotin in dilute aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative roles of the radicals produced by water radiolysis in the inactivation of biotin in aqueous solution were investigated. The effects of nitrous oxide and isopropanol used as selective free radical scavengers allowed the inactivation efficiencies per unit G-value of OH, H, and esub(aq)- to be estimated; these efficiencies were 0.73, 0.10, and 0.02 in neutral solution, respectively. Hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide unaffected the activity of biotin. G0-Value for biotin inactivation in oxygen-free neutral solution was 2.08. Under these conditions the hydroxyl radical attack was found to be responsible for the large part of inactivation. On the other hand, in oxygenated neutral solution, G0-value was 4.16. This large increase of inactivation in oxygenated solution suggested that, although hydrated electrons were considerably ineffective as an inactivating species in oxygen-free solution, superoxide ions would be much more effective in causing inactivation of biotin in oxygenated solution. A rate constant for the reaction of biotin with hydroxyl radical was 1.34 x 1010M-1 sec-1 as determined by the PNDA method. (auth.)

  19. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis by Gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of Bacillus anthracis as a biological weapon heighlightened awareness of the need for validated methods for the inactivation of B. anthracis spores. Ionizing radiation is capable of causing a variety of chemical changes and biological effects on bacteria which can be due both to direct interactions with critical cell components and to indirect actions on bacteria by molecular entities formed as a result of radiolysis of other molecules in the bacterial cell. This study determined the gamma irradiation dose for inactivating B. anthracis spores and its biological effects on the bacterial characteristics. Gamma irradiation was conducted at the IRKA irradiator at the National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jakarta and cobalt-60 was used as the source of ionizing radiation (capacity of ca. 134,044 Kci. Freeze dried culture of B. anthracis in glass ampoules was irradiated using variable doses of 30, 20 and 10 KGy. Viability, biochemical and protease enzyme characteristics of B. anthracis were evaluated before and after irradiation. The ability of B. anthracis to degrade gelatin, haemoglobin and bovine immunoglobulin G was also tested. The results showed that ionizing radiation was able to inactivate or kill 11,05 x 108 cfu B. anthracis by 95.37%, 99.58% and 99.99 at respective doses of 10, 20 and 30 KGy. Bacterial spores appear to be less susceptible to irradiation than the vegetative cells, because of their specific structure. The survive spores irradiated at 30kGy shows some biochemical characteristic changes. The survivors failed to degrade methyl -D-glucopyranoside and arbutine. The ability of B. anthracis protease to degrade gelatin, haemoglobin and bovine immunoglobulin G was not affected by irradiation. These findings showed that a gamma irradiation at 30 KGy effectively inactivates B. anthracis spores without changing the protease activities.

  20. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of combined subzero temperature and high pressure on inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Marwen; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combined effects of subzero temperature and high pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli K12TG1 were investigated. Cells of this bacterial strain were exposed to high pressure (50 to 450 MPa, 10-min holding time) at two temperatures (-20 degrees C without freezing and 25 degrees C) and three water activity levels (a(w)) (0.850, 0.992, and ca. 1.000) achieved with the addition of glycerol. There was a synergistic interaction between subzero temperature and high pressure in their effects on microbial inactivation. Indeed, to achieve the same inactivation rate, the pressures required at -20 degrees C (in the liquid state) were more than 100 MPa less than those required at 25 degrees C, at pressures in the range of 100 to 300 MPa with an a(w) of 0.992. However, at pressures greater than 300 MPa, this trend was reversed, and subzero temperature counteracted the inactivation effect of pressure. When the amount of water in the bacterial suspension was increased, the synergistic effect was enhanced. Conversely, when the a(w) was decreased by the addition of solute to the bacterial suspension, the baroprotective effect of subzero temperature increased sharply. These results support the argument that water compression is involved in the antimicrobial effect of high pressure. From a thermodynamic point of view, the mechanical energy transferred to the cell during the pressure treatment can be characterized by the change in volume of the system. The amount of mechanical energy transferred to the cell system is strongly related to cell compressibility, which depends on the water quantity in the cytoplasm. PMID:16391037

  1. Cellular and biochemical responses induced by Biotherapics prepared from intact influenza A (H3N2 and inactivated influenza A (H3N2 virus at 12x and 30x in the MDCK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariah Marcondes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Biotherapics are homeopathic remedies prepared from organic products that are chemically undefined and can be used for treatment of diseases like influenza. There are several classes of biotherapics and, among these, there are some called "living biotherapics" or "Roberto Costa’s Biotherapics". This study aimed to compare the cellular and biochemical effects of biotherapics prepared from intact influenza virus diluted in water and the one obtained from the same viral sample inactivated by ethanol 70% (v / v, both in the potencies of 12x and 30x. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses were performed on both preparations to assess the integrity of viral particles, which showed that ethanol 70% (v/v induced a complete denaturation of viral particles. In contrast, the integrity of virus particles was preserved when water was used as the biotherapic solvent. Cellular and biochemical alterations induced by the preparations on MDCK cells were analyzed and compared with those induced by respective controls (water 30x-treated and untreated cells. Cellular viability analyzed by MTT method showed statistically significant differences (p <0.05 in MDCK cells treated with intact biotherapic for 5 (3 stimuli and 30 (18 stimuli days in comparison with untreated control. TEM analysis did not show significant cellular changes when the different experimental groups were compared. The enzymatic activity of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK, an important enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, presented a statistically significant increase (p <0.05 after 30 days of treatment when compared to control groups. The results obtained suggest that inactivation of viral sample with ethanol 70% induces lysis and disruption of viral particles. In addition, preliminary results indicated that treatment with intact biotherapic seems to induce higher variations on MDCK cells responses when compared to inactivated-biotherapic-treated cells. Further analyses are ongoing

  2. Synthesis of coronavirus mRNAs: kinetics of inactivation of infectious bronchitis virus RNA synthesis by UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of cells with the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus results in the synthesis of five major subgenomic RNAs. These RNAs and the viral genome form a 3' coterminal nested set. We found that the rates of inactivation of synthesis of the RNAs by UV light were different and increased with the length of the transcript. These results show that each RNA is transcribed from a unique promoter and that extensive processing of the primary transcripts probably does not occur

  3. Retraction: "Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways" by Wang et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on January 5, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Wang Z, Li Y, Banerjee S, Kong D, Ahmad A, Nogueira V, Hay N, Sarkar FH. 2010. Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. J Cell Biochem 109:726-736; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22451. PMID:27301887

  4. Scaling of number, size, and metabolic rate of cells with body size in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, M; Allen, Andrew P.; Brown, James H.; Gillooly, James F; Herman, Alexander B.; Woodruff, William H.; West, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    The size and metabolic rate of cells affect processes from the molecular to the organismal level. We present a quantitative, theoretical framework for studying relationships among cell volume, cellular metabolic rate, body size, and whole-organism metabolic rate that helps reveal the feedback between these levels of organization. We use this framework to show that average cell volume and average cellular metabolic rate cannot both remain constant with changes in body size because of the well ...

  5. Pretreatment With Inactivated Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Increases CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell Function and Decreases Functional and Structural Effects of Asthma Induction in a Rat Asthma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Li, Yun; Tan, Yu-Pin; Li, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to have therapeutic effects on asthma through CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We sought to assess pretreatment with inactivated BCG on CD4+CD25+ Tregs and its functional and structural effects in rat asthma model. The rat asthma model was established using ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge. Ten rats were pretreated with BCG prior to OVA and received continued BCG injections during OVA challenge (BCG+OVA group), 10 rats were treated with OVA alone (OVA group), and 10 rats were treated with saline (control group). After 9 weeks, histamine dihydrochloride effect on airway resistance was measured. Number of CD4+CD25+ Tregs was measured by flow cytometry, expression of Foxp3 and CTLA-4 mRNA was measured, and serum TGF-β levels were determined. Differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined, and lung tissue was processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and alcine blue and periodic acid Schiff's reaction to evaluate inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen deposition, and presence of goblet cells, respectively. BCG treatment led to an increase in CD4+CD25+ Tregs, as well as an increase in Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression and serum TGF-β levels. In addition, we observed a decrease in histamine dihydrochloride-induced airway resistance, a decrease in inflammatory leukocytes in BALF, and a decrease in airway remodeling indicators in BCG+OVA-treated rats compared with OVA-treated rats. Intradermally injected inactivated BCG has the potential to improve airway inflammation, airway resistance, and airway remodeling through a mechanism that may involve CD4+CD25+ Tregs. PMID:26495900

  6. Inactivation of E. Coli in Water Using Photocatalytic, Nanostructured Films Synthesized by Aerosol Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Biswas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanostructured films were synthesized by an aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD method with different controlled morphologies: columnar, granular, and branched structures for the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli in water. Effects of film morphology and external applied voltage on inactivation rate were investigated. As-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and UV-VIS. Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical inactivation of E. coli using as-prepared TiO2 films were performed under irradiation of UVA light (note: UVA has a low efficiency to inactivate E. coli. Inactivation rate constants for each case were obtained from their respective inactivation curve through a 2 h incubation period. Photocatalytic inactivation rate constants of E. coli are 0.02/min (using columnar films, and 0.08/min (using branched films. The inactivation rate constant for the columnar film was enhanced by 330% by applied voltage on the film while that for the branched film was increased only by 30%. Photocatalytic microbial inactivation rate of the columnar and the branched films were also compared taking into account their different surface areas. Since the majority of the UV radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface is UVA, this study provides an opportunity to use sunlight to efficiently decontaminate drinking water.

  7. Radiobiological responses for two cell lines following continuous low dose-rate (CLDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iso-effective irradiation of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation was compared with that of various schedules of pulsed dose rate (PDR) irradiation for cells of two established human lines, T-47D and NHIK 3025. Complete single-dose response curves were obtained for determination of parameters α and β by fitting of the linear quadratic formula. Sublethal damage repair constants μ and T1/2 were determined by split-dose recovery experiments. On basis of the acquired parameters of each cell type the relative effectiveness of the two regimens of irradiation (CLDR and PDR) was calculated by use of Fowler's radiobiological model for iso-effect irradiation for repeated fractions of dose delivered at medium dose rates. For both cell types the predicted and observed relative effectiveness was compared at low and high iso-effect levels. The results indicate that the effect of PDR irradiation predicted by Fowler's model is equal to that of CLDR irradiation for both small and large doses with T-47D cells. With NHIK 3025 cells PDR irradiation induces a larger effect than predicted by the model for small doses, while it induces the predicted effect for high doses. The underlying cause of this difference is unclear, but cell-cycle parameters, like G2-accumulation is tested and found to be the same for the two cell lines

  8. Low-Pressure Plasma Application for the Inactivation of the Seed-borne Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Mishima, Tomoko; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Tanimoto, Hideo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-pressure plasma treatment on seed disinfection and the possible mechanisms underlying this effect. Seed-borne disease refers to plant diseases that are transmitted by seeds; seed disinfection is an important technique for prevention of such diseases. In this study, the effectiveness of low-pressure plasma treatment in the inactivation of the seed-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, Xanthomonas campestris, inoculated on cruciferous seeds, was evaluated. The highest inactivation effect was observed when the treatment voltage and argon gas flow rate were 5.5 kV and 0.5 L/min, respectively. The viable cell number of X. campestris was 6.6 log cfu/seed before plasma treatment, and decreased by 3.9 log after 5 min of treatment and by 6.6 log after 40 min. Ethidium monoazide treatment and quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that both the cell membrane and target DNA region were damaged following 5 min of plasma treatment. Although both heat and ozone were generated during the plasma treatment, the contribution of both factors to the inactivation of X. campestris was small by itself in our low-pressure plasma system. Overall, we have shown that our low-pressure plasma system has great applicability to controlling plant pathogenic bacterium contamination of seeds. PMID:27009508

  9. Estimation of the rate of energy production of rat mast cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1983-01-01

    Rat mast cells were treated with glycolytic and respiratory inhibitors. The rate of adenosine triphosphate depletion of cells incubated with both types of inhibitors and the rate of lactate produced in presence of antimycin A and glucose were used to estimate the rate of oxidative and glycolytic...

  10. Early Telomerase Inactivation Accelerates Aging Independently of Telomere Length

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhengwei; Jay, Kyle A.; Smith, Dana L.; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Zairan; Zheng, Jiashun; Tian, Ruilin; Li, Hao; Blackburn, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is required for long-term telomere maintenance and protection. Using single budding yeast mother cell analyses we found that, even Early after Telomerase Inactivation (ETI), yeast mother cells show transient DNA Damage Response (DDR) episodes, stochastically altered cell cycle dynamics, and accelerated mother cell aging. The acceleration of ETI mother cell aging was not explained by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), Sir protein perturbation, or deprotected telomeres. ETI occ...

  11. Mechanism of inactivating microorganisms with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inactivation of microorganisms with a high dose of ionizing radiation is characterized by the exponential function of the dose N/sub D/=N0exp(-kD) where N0 is the number of microorganisms before irradiation and N/sub D/ the number of microorganisms after irradiation with dose D and k is the constant characterizing the strain resistance. Microorganisms differ by their sensitivity to radiation. Important for their inactivation are irradiation conditions (the presence of O2, temperature, pressure, pH, etc.). The efficiency of sterilization is assessed by the inactivation coefficient, t.e., the relation between the initial and the final concentration of cells irradiated with the given dose. The value of this coefficient is usually 104 to 108. For routine control of the sterilization process biological indicators are used, i.e., monitors, contaminated with a high number of germs of the standard resistant strain Bacillus sphaericus C/sub I/A. (E.F.)

  12. Inactivation of the KcsA potassium channel explored with heterotetramers

    OpenAIRE

    Rotem, Dvir; Mason, Amy; Bayley, Hagan

    2010-01-01

    The tetrameric prokaryotic potassium channel KcsA is activated by protons acting on the intracellular aspect of the protein and inactivated through conformational changes in the selectivity filter. Inactivation is modulated by a network of interactions within each protomer between the pore helix and residues at the external entrance of the channel. Inactivation is suppressed by the E71A mutation, which perturbs the stability of this network. Here, cell-free protein synthesis followed by prote...

  13. Imprinted X chromosome inactivation: evolution of mechanisms in distantly related mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Shafagh A.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI) ensures transcriptional silencing of one of the two Xs (either in a random or imprinted fashion) in somatic cells. Comparing this silencing between species has offered insight into different mechanisms of X inactivation, providing clues into the evolution of this epigenetic process in mammals. Long-noncoding RNAs have emerged as a common theme in XCI of therian mammals (eutherian and marsupial). Eutherian X inactivation is regulated by the noncoding...

  14. Dose-rate effect for DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dose rate on clonogenic cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) has been examined in a human bladder carcinoma cell line, RT112, treated with ionizing radiation. Cell survival changed markedly over the range of dose rates used (0.01-1.28 Gy/min) with the curves becoming shallower and straighter as the dose rate was lowered. Similarly, the number of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) immediately after irradiation varied with dose rate. Fewer DSBs were detectable after low-dose-rate irradiation. However, when a 4-h repair period was allowed after irradiation, cells treated at all dose rates exhibited approximately the same amount of damage. The final level of unrejoined DSBs, as detected by PFGE, therefore does not correlate with cell survival at different dose rates. 16 refs., 2 figs

  15. Carabrol suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide synthase expression by inactivation of p38 and JNK via inhibition of I-κBα degradation in RAW 264.7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carabrol, isolated from Carpesium macrocephalum, showed anti-inflammatory potential in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In present study, carabrol demonstrated the inhibitory activity on pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and COX-2 were reduced by carabrol. Molecular analysis revealed that these suppressive effects were correlated with the inactivation of p38 and JNK via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Immunoblotting showed that carabrol suppressed LPS-induced degradation of I-κBα and decreased nuclear translocation of p65. Taken together, these results suggest that carabrol can be a modulator of pro-inflammatory signal transduction pathway in RAW 264.7 cells.

  16. Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, Sudeep C; Yates, Marylynn V; Deshusses, Marc A

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge digestion is a promising process to divert waste to beneficial use, but an important question is the required temperature and holding time to achieve a given degree of pathogen inactivation. In this study, the kinetics of inactivation of Ascaris suum and vaccine strain poliovirus type 1 (PVS-1), selected as indicators for helminth ova and enteric viruses respectively, were determined during anaerobic digestion at temperatures ranging from 51 to 56 °C. Inactivation of both indicator organisms was fast with greater than two log reductions achieved within 2 h for A. suum and three log reductions for PVS-1, suggesting that the current U.S. regulations are largely conservative. The first-order inactivation rate constants k followed Arrhenius relationship with activation energies of 105 and 39 KJ mol(-1) for A. suum and PVS-1, respectively indicating that A. suum was more sensitive to temperature. Although inactivation was fast, the presence of compounds in the sludge that are known to be protective of pathogen inactivation was observed, suggesting that composition-dependent time-temperature relationships are necessary. PMID:20692678

  17. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Ritter, David M; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na(+) channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  18. Rabies virus inactivation by binary ethylenimine: new method for inactivated vaccine production.

    OpenAIRE

    Larghi, O P; Nebel, A E

    1980-01-01

    The inactivation dynamics of rabies virus (PV strain) by binary ethylenimine, and the immunogenic properites and the stability of the vaccines prepared using this agent, were studied. Binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 0.01 M was prepared wtih 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide in alkaline solutions, either separately from or in suspensions of rabies virus propagated in BHK cells. The infectivity of virus suspensions containing more than 108 plaque-forming units per 0.1 ml was inacti...

  19. Dose-rate effects in mammalian cells in culture. III. Comparison of cell killing and cell proliferation during continuous irradiation for six different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of continuous irradiation over a wide range of dose rates were studied for six different mammalian cell lines in regard to cell survival and proliferation. Cell lines were chosen in which such characteristics as population doubling time, chromosome number, DNA content, acute dose-survival curve parameters, and division delay were as diverse as possible. There was no correlation between the minimum dose rate necessary to stop cell population growth and any of the above listed characteristics, with the exception of division delay following acute doses. In general, the longer the division delay (min/rad), the lower the dose rate required to stop cell population growth. The effects of cell-cycle redistribution during continuous irradiaton in regard to cell survival were dramatic. In some cases a reduction in dose rate resulted in an increase in cell killing for a given total dose. This occurred only when dose rates were sufficient to stop cell population growth and after exposure times sufficient to allow for the occurrence of cell-cycle redistribution

  20. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ({sup 137}Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  1. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation (137Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  2. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate by Assembling Nanosorbents on the Surfaces of Microbial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guobin, S.; Huaiying, Z.; Weiquan, C.; Jianmin, X.; Huizhou, L.

    2005-01-01

    To improve biodesulfurization rate is a key to industrialize biodesulfurization technology. The biodesulfurization rate is partially affected by transfer rate of substrates from organic phase to microbial cell. In this study, γ-Al2O3 nanosorbents, which had the ability to selectively adsorb dibenzothiophene (DBT) from organic phase, were assembled on the surfaces of Pseudomonas delafieldii R-8 cell, a desulfurization strain. γ-Al2O3 nanosorbents have the ability to adsorb DBT from oil phase, and the rate of adsorption was far higher than that of biodesulfurization. Thus, DBT can be quickly transferred to the biocatalyst surface where nanosorbents were located, which quickened DBT transfer from organic phase to biocatalyst surface and resulted in the increase of biodesulfurization rate. The desulfurization rate of the cells assembled with nanosorbents was approximately twofold higher than that of original cells. The cells assembled with nanosorbents were observed by a transmission electron microscope. PMID:16258046

  3. Effects of diltiazem and propafenone on the inactivation and recovery kinetics of fKvl.4 channel currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong ZHANG; Shi-min WANG; Hui CHEN; Xue-jun JIANG; Sheng-ping CHAO

    2011-01-01

    Alm: TO investigate the effects of diltiazem. an L-type calcium channel blocker, and propafenone, a sodium channel blocker,on the inactivation and recovery kinetics of fKvl.4.a potassium channel that generates the cardiac transient outward potassium current.Methods:The cRNA for fKv1.4△N.an N-rerminal deleted mutant of the flerret Kvl.4 potassium channel.was injected into Xenopusoocytes to express the fKv1.4△N channel in these cells. Currents were recorded using a two electrode voltage clamp technique. Results: Diltiazem(10 to 1000 μmol/L)inhibited the fKv1.4△N channel in a frequency-dependent,voltage-dependent,and concerttration-dependent manneh Suggesting an open channel block.The ICso was 241.04±23.06 μmol/L for the fKvl.4&N channel(at+50mY).and propafenone(10 to 500 μmol/L)showed a similar effect(IC50=103.68±10.13 μmol/L).After application of diltiazem and propafenone, fKv1.4AN inactivation was bi-exponential.with a faster drug-induced inactivation and a slower C-type inactivation.Diltiazem increased the C-type inactivation rate and slowed recovery in fKv1.4△N channels.Howeve, propafenone had no effect on either the slow inactivation time constant or the recovery.Conclusion:Diltiazem and propafenone accelerate the inactivation of the Kvl.4AN channeI by binding to the open state of the channel.Unlike propafenone, diltiazem slows the recovery of the Kv1.4AN channel.

  4. Effect of acriflavine on ultraviolet inactivation of Acholeplasma laidlawii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increased sensitivity to inactivation was observed when ultraviolet light-irradiated Acholeplasma laidlawii cells were plated on medium containing either acriflavine or chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol reduced liquid holding recovery (dark repair) to about 10 percent of that in untreated irradiated cells. In acriflavine treated cells no dark repair could be observed and there was a progressive degradation of cell DNA during holding. While the primary effect of acriflavine may be to inhibit excision repair, since ultraviolet-irradiated Mycoplasma gallisepticum (cells which lack an excision repair machanism) show a slight increase in inactivation when plated on medium containing acriflavine, the dye must also have some other effects on ultraviolet repair processes. Acriflavine treatment of A. laidlawii cells before ultraviolet irradiation has a protective effect, as seen by an increased cell survival. (Auth.)

  5. A synthetic lymph node containing inactivated Treponema pallidum cells elicits strong, antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Lola V; Drapp, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a synthetic lymph node (SLN) for delivery of Treponema pallidum (Tp) antigens. Immune responses of C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after SLN implantation. Group 1 mice received SLN with no antigen; Group 2, SLN with formalin-inactivated Tp (f-Tp); and Group 3, SLN with f-Tp plus a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. When tested by ELISA, sera from Group 2 and Group 3 mice showed stronger IgG antibody reactivity than sera from Group 1 mice to sonicates of f-Tp or untreated Tp, but not to sonicate of normal rabbit testicular extract at all times. The IgG1 level was higher than IgG2c level for Group 2 mice at all times and for Group 3 mice at 4 and 8 weeks. IgG1 and IgG2c levels were nearly equivalent for Group 3 mice at 12 weeks. Immunoblotting showed that IgG from Group 2 and Group 3 mice recognized several Tp proteins at all times. Supernatants of splenocytes from Group 2 and Group 3 mice contained significantly more IFNγ than those from Group 1 mice after stimulation with f-Tp at all times. A significant level of IL-4 was not detected in any supernatants. These data show that strong humoral and cellular immune responses to Tp can be elicited via a SLN. PMID:24106125

  6. Surface water disinfection by chlorination and advanced oxidation processes: Inactivation of an antibiotic resistant E. coli strain and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Andreza Costa; Lepretti, Marilena; Rizzo, Luigi; Caputo, Ivana; Vaiano, Vincenzo; Sacco, Olga; Lopes, Wilton Silva; Sannino, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The release of antibiotics into the environment can result in antibiotic resistance (AR) spread, which in turn can seriously affect human health. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in different aquatic environments used as drinking water source. Water disinfection may be a possible solution to minimize AR spread but conventional processes, such as chlorination, result in the formation of dangerous disinfection by-products. In this study advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV and N-TiO2/UV, have been compared with chlorination in the inactivation of an AR Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain in surface water. TiO2 P25 and nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2), prepared by sol-gel method at two different synthesis temperatures (0 and -20°C), were investigated in heterogeneous photocatalysis experiments. Under the investigated conditions, chlorination (1.0mgL(-1)) was the faster process (2.5min) to achieve total inactivation (6 Log). Among AOPs, H2O2/UV resulted in the best inactivation rate: total inactivation (6 Log) was achieved in 45min treatment. Total inactivation was not observed (4.5 Log), also after 120min treatment, only for N-doped TiO2 synthesized at 0°C. Moreover, H2O2/UV and chlorination processes were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity potential by means of 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium colorimetric test on a human-derived cell line and they similarly affected HepG2 cells viability. PMID:26945469

  7. A microwell array device capable of measuring single-cell oxygen consumption rates

    OpenAIRE

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Suchorolski, Martin T.; Strovas, Tim J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Due to interest in cell population heterogeneity, the development of new technology and methodologies for studying single cells has dramatically increased in recent years. The ideal single cell measurement system would be high throughput for statistical relevance, would measure the most important cellular parameters, and minimize disruption of normal cell function. We have developed a microwell array device capable of measuring single cell oxygen consumption rates (OCR). This OCR device is ab...

  8. Repair Capacity for DNA Defects and Inactivation of Microorganisms During Treatment with Radiation and Other Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA can be considered as the main target of agents inactivating microorganisms. Counteracting are enzymatic processes that repair the defects produced, thereby increasing the survival of microorganisms. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that only a limited number of defects can be repaired in a given time with a low error rate. If agents produce a higher number of defects, the fraction of not or incorrectly repaired defects increases exponentially. In the case of ionizing radiations, the deposited energy determines the number of DNA defects. Therefore, the effect has to be a linear/exponential function of the local energy density. Results from research in molecular biology, radiation chemistry, microdosimetry and computerized investigations of the biological evolution process are used in developing and justifying the described approach. DNA defects occur spontaneously with high frequency in living cells. They are repaired with the naturally occurring extremely low error rate. Therefore, it seems justified to use the number of spontaneously occurring DNS defects as an indicator for the capacity and effectiveness of the repair systems. For low LET radiations it is shown that a dose-rate of 102 to 103 Gy/h is necessary to ensure that the inactivation potential for microorganisms per unit of dose is completely used. At lower dose-rates the inactivation effect becomes a function of the dose-rate. Different low LET radiations may then show differing biological effectiveness. The synergistic effects of ionizing radiations and other agents can be anticipated if the other agent produces the same DNA defects as the radiation, or if it reduces the capacity and effectiveness of enzymatic mechanisms for the repair of the defects caused by radiation. (author)

  9. Viscoelastic cell mechanics and actin remodelling are dependent on the rate of applied pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Pravincumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Living cells are subjected to external and internal mechanical stresses. The effects of these stresses on the deformation and subsequent biological response of the cells remains unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that the rate at which pressure (or stress is applied influence the viscoelastic properties of the cell associated with differences in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Micropipette aspiration was used to determine the instantaneous and equilibrium moduli and the viscosity of isolated chondrocytes based on the standard linear solid (SLS model and a variation of this incorporating Boltzmann superposition. Cells were visualised for 180 seconds following aspiration to 7 cmH(2O at 0.35, 0.70 and 5.48 cmH(2O/sec. Cell recovery was then examined for a further 180 seconds once the pressure had been removed. Reducing the rate of application of pressure reduced the levels of cell deformation and recovery associated with a significant increase in modulus and viscosity. Using GFP transfection and confocal microscopy, we show that chondrocyte deformation involves distortion, disassembly and subsequent reassembly of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. At faster pressure rates, cell deformation produced an increase in cell volume associated with membrane bleb formation. GFP-actin transfection inhibited the pressure rate dependent variation in cell mechanics indicating that this behaviour is regulated by GFP-sensitive actin dynamics. CONCLUSION: We suggest that slower rates of aspiration pressure enable greater levels of cortical actin distortion. This is partially inhibited by GFP or faster aspiration rates leading to membrane bleb formation and an increase in cell volume. Thus the rate of application of pressure regulates the viscoelastic mechanical properties of living cells through pressure rate sensitive differences in actin dynamics. Therefore cells appear softer when aspirated at a faster rate in

  10. Role of NADH oxidase in the oxidative inactivation of Streptococcus salivarius fructosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbe, K; Takahashi-Abbe, S; Schoen, R A; Wittenberger, C L

    1986-01-01

    A cell-associated fructosyltransferase produced by Streptococcus salivarius was irreversibly inactivated in a time-dependent manner when resting or permeabilized cell suspensions were incubated with low concentrations (less than 1.0 microM) of copper. In addition to copper, the inactivation was dependent on oxygen and on a fermentable carbon source (endogenous intracellular polysaccharide or glucose). In starved, permeabilized cell suspensions, the fermentable carbon source could be replaced by NADH but not by NADPH or ATP. Of several other S. salivarius enzymes tested, only fructosyltransferase was inactivated under these conditions. The available evidence indicated that NADH oxidase is the enzyme responsible for fructosyltransferase inactivation. Results from oxygen radical scavenger studies implicated one or more species of oxygen radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the inactivation reaction. PMID:3759237

  11. HIV-1 Mutation and Recombination Rates Are Different in Macrophages and T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromer, Deborah; Schlub, Timothy E; Smyth, Redmond P; Grimm, Andrew J; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Davenport, Miles P; Mak, Johnson

    2016-01-01

    High rates of mutation and recombination help human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to evade the immune system and develop resistance to antiretroviral therapy. Macrophages and T-cells are the natural target cells of HIV-1 infection. A consensus has not been reached as to whether HIV replication results in differential recombination between primary T-cells and macrophages. Here, we used HIV with silent mutation markers along with next generation sequencing to compare the mutation and the recombination rates of HIV directly in T lymphocytes and macrophages. We observed a more than four-fold higher recombination rate of HIV in macrophages compared to T-cells (p retroviral therapeutics. PMID:27110814

  12. Inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives. II. Physical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives was evaluated by addition of marker viruses (VSV, Sindbis, Sendai, EMC) to anti-hemophilic factor (AHF) concentrates. The rate of virus inactivation at 60 degrees C was decreased by at least 100- to 700-fold by inclusion of 2.75 M glycine and 50 percent sucrose, or 3.0 M potassium citrate, additives which contribute to retention of protein biologic activity. Nonetheless, at least 10(4) infectious units of each virus was inactivated within 10 hours. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 70 or 80 degrees C caused a 90 percent or greater loss in AHF activity. An even greater decline in the rate of virus inactivation was observed on heating AHF in the lyophilized state, although no loss in AHF activity was observed after 72 hours of heating at 60 degrees C. Several of the proteins present in lyophilized AHF concentrates displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility as a result of exposure to 60 degrees C for 24 hours. Exposure of lyophilized AHF to irradiation from a cobalt 60 source resulted in an acceptable yield of AHF at 1.0, but not at 2.0, megarads. At 1 megarad, greater than or equal to 6.0 logs of VSV and 3.3 logs of Sindbis virus were inactivated

  13. In vivo measurement of DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe here a highly sensitive technique for measuring DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in vivo. Male SD rats were given 2H2O (heavy water). Colon epithelial cells were isolated, DNA was extracted, hydrolyzed to deoxyribonucleosides, and the deuterium enrichment of the deoxyribose moiety was determined by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometry. Turnover time of colon crypts and the time for migration of cells from basal to top fraction of the crypts were measured. These data were consistent with cell cycle analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labeling. By giving different concentrations of a promoter, dose-dependent increases in DNA synthesis rates were detected, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method. Administration of a carcinogen increased DNA synthesis rates cell proliferation in all fractions of the crypt. In conclusion, DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells can be measured directly in vivo using stable-isotope labeling. Potential applications in humans include use as a biomarker for cancer chemoprevention studies

  14. Circuits and methods for determination and control of signal transition rates in electrochemical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, David Kay

    2016-04-12

    A charge/discharge input is for respectively supplying charge to, or drawing charge from, an electrochemical cell. A transition modifying circuit is coupled between the charge/discharge input and a terminal of the electrochemical cell and includes at least one of an inductive constituent, a capacitive constituent and a resistive constituent selected to generate an adjusted transition rate on the terminal sufficient to reduce degradation of a charge capacity characteristic of the electrochemical cell. A method determines characteristics of the transition modifying circuit. A degradation characteristic of the electrochemical cell is analyzed relative to a transition rate of the charge/discharge input applied to the electrochemical cell. An adjusted transition rate is determined for a signal to be applied to the electrochemical cell that will reduce the degradation characteristic. At least one of an inductance, a capacitance, and a resistance is selected for the transition modifying circuit to achieve the adjusted transition rate.

  15. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA ameliorates stress-induced depression-related behavior by promoting cell surface 5-HT1A receptor translocation, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Impairment of serotonergic neurotransmission is the major factor responsible for depression and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) participates in serotonergic transmission-mediated signaling networks relevant to mental illnesses. In the forced-swim test to assess depression-like behavior, the immobility time for mice with restraint stress was significantly longer than that for nonstressed control mice. Postsynaptic cell surface localization of 5-HT1A receptor, but not 5-HT2A receptor, in the hypothalamus for mice with restraint stress was significantly reduced as compared with that for control mice, which highly correlated to prolonged immobility time, i.e., depression-like behavior. The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) restored restraint stress-induced reduction of cell surface 5-HT1A receptor and improved depression-like behavior in mice with restraint stress. Moreover, DCP-LA stimulated serotonin release from hypothalamic slices and cancelled restraint stress-induced reduction of GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA could ameliorate depression-like behavior by promoting translocation of 5-HT1A receptor to the plasma membrane on postsynaptic cells, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β. PMID:24788685

  16. Rate of renal cell carcinoma subtypes in different races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sankin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We sought to identify racial differences among histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC between black and non-black patients in an equal-access health care system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We established a multi-institutional, prospective database of patients undergoing partial or radical nephrectomy between January 1, 2000 and Sept 31, 2009. For the purposes of this study, data captured included age at diagnosis, race, tumor size, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of capsular invasion, margin status, and tumor histology. RESULTS: 204 kidney tumors were identified (Table-1. Of these, 117 (57.4% were in black patients and 87 (42.6% were in non-black patients. Age at surgery ranged from 37 to 87 with a median of 62. Tumor size ranged from 1.0 to 22.0 cm with a median of 5.0 cm. Overall, tumors were composed of clear cell RCC in 97 cases (47.5%, papillary RCC in 65 cases (31.9%, chromophobe RCC in 13 cases (6.4%, collecting duct/medullary RCC in 2 cases (1.0%, RCC with multiple histological subtypes in 8 cases (3.9%, malignant tumors of other origin in 6 cases (2.9%, and benign histology in 13 cases (6.4%. Among black patients, papillary RCC was seen in 56 cases (47.9%, compared to 9 cases (10.3% among non-black patients (p < 0.001 (Table-2. Clear cell RCC was present in 38 (32.5% of black patients and in 59 (67.8% of non-blacks (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, papillary RCC had a much higher occurrence among black patients compared to non-black patients. This is the first study to document such a great racial disparity among RCC subtypes.

  17. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    Rakib, Md. Abdur; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Gon Sup; Han, Jae Hee; Kim, Jeong Ok; Ha, Yeong Lae

    2013-01-01

    The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly en...

  18. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF- κ B

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Abdur Rakib; Won Sup Lee; Gon Sup Kim; Jae Hee Han; Jeong Ok Kim; Yeong Lae Ha

    2013-01-01

    The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly en...

  19. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate by Assembling Nanosorbents on the Surfaces of Microbial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guobin, S.; Huaiying, Z.; Weiquan, C.; Jianmin, X.; Huizhou, L.

    2005-01-01

    To improve biodesulfurization rate is a key to industrialize biodesulfurization technology. The biodesulfurization rate is partially affected by transfer rate of substrates from organic phase to microbial cell. In this study, γ-Al2O3 nanosorbents, which had the ability to selectively adsorb dibenzothiophene (DBT) from organic phase, were assembled on the surfaces of Pseudomonas delafieldii R-8 cell, a desulfurization strain. γ-Al2O3 nanosorbents have the ability to adsorb DBT from oil phase, ...

  20. Dose-rate effects and chronological changes of chromosome aberration rates in spleen cells from mice that are chronically exposed to gamma-ray at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose-rate effects have not been examined in the low dose-rate regions of less than 60-600 mGy/h. Mice were chronically exposed to gamma-ray at 20 mGy/day (approximately 1 mGy/h) up to 700 days and at 1 mGy/day (approximately 0.05 mGy/h) for 500 days under SPF conditions. Chronological changes of chromosome aberration rates in spleen cells were observed along with accumulated doses at both low dose-rates. Unstable aberrations increased in a biphasic manner within 0-2 Gy and 4-14 Gy in 20 mGy/day irradiation. They slightly increased up to 0.5 Gy in 1 mGy/day irradiation. Chromosome aberration rates at 20 mGy/day and 1 mGy/day were compared at the same total doses of 0.5 Gy and 0.25 Gy. They were 2.0 vs. 0.53, and 1.0 vs. 0.47 respectively. Thus, dose-rate effects were observed in these low dose-rate regions. (author)

  1. Odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells and elicits PTEN elevation and inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) is expressed in a wide range of normal epithelial, and neoplastic tissues, and we have posited that ODAM serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and melanoma. Transfection of ODAM into breast cancer cells yields suppression of cellular growth, motility, and in vivo tumorigenicity. Herein we have extended these studies to the effects of ODAM on cultured melanoma cell lines. The A375 and C8161 melanoma cell lines were stably transfected with ODAM and assayed for properties associated with tumorigenicity including cell growth, motility, and extracellular matrix adhesion. In addition, ODAM–transfected cells were assayed for signal transduction via AKT which promotes cell proliferation and survival in many neoplasms. ODAM expression in A375 and C8161 cells strongly inhibited cell growth and motility in vitro, increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix, and yielded significant cytoskeletal/morphologic rearrangement. Furthermore, AKT activity was downregulated by ODAM expression while an increase was noted in expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) tumor suppressor gene, an antagonist of AKT activation. Increased PTEN in ODAM-expressing cells was associated with increases in PTEN mRNA levels and de novo protein synthesis. Silencing of PTEN expression yielded recovery of AKT activity in ODAM-expressing melanoma cells. Similar PTEN elevation and inhibition of AKT by ODAM was observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells while ODAM expression had no effect in PTEN-deficient BT-549 breast cancer cells. The apparent anti-neoplastic effects of ODAM in cultured melanoma and breast cancer cells are associated with increased PTEN expression, and suppression of AKT activity. This association should serve to clarify the clinical import of ODAM expression and any role it may serve as an indicator of tumor behavior

  2. In vitro studies of chlorin e6-assisted photodynamic inactivation of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C.; Mohrbacher, C.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bauer-Marschall, Ina; Krickhahn, C.; Stachon, A.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP), a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium located in gastric mucosa, plays an im- portant role in gastro carcinogenesis. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance, photodynamic inactivation of bacteria presents a new approach to treat bacterial infections, like HP. In vitro experiments were performed to determine the irradiation conditions for a complete inactivation of HP with the photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). The HP strain CCUG 38770 (Culture Collection, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) was routinely cultured under microaerophilic conditions, suspended in sodium chloride, incubated with Ce6 and irradiated briefly with red light of the appropriate wavelength of λ = 660 nm. Series of measurements of different Ce6-concentrations (0.1 μM - 100 μM) were carried out, whereby the incubation time was kept constant at 1 min. The absorbed energy dose has been selected in varying the irradiation time (1 s - 300 s) and the power density (4.5 mW/cm2 - 31 mW/cm2 ). Quantification of inactivation was performed by enumeration of the grown colonies. In addition, the accumulation of Ce6 in HP cells was studied more precisely by uorescence spectroscopy. With a Ce6 concentration of 100 μM and a power density of 9 mW cm2 , a 6-log10 reduction in the survival rate of HP was achieved within 30 seconds of irradiation. In conclusion the most relevant factor for the inactivation of HP is the exposure time of irradiation, followed by the concentration of Ce6 and the light intensity. Further studies with HP strains obtained from patient specimens are under current investigation.

  3. Flow rate calibration for absolute cell counting rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Clare; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    There is a need for absolute leukocyte enumeration in the clinical setting, and accurate, reliable (and affordable) technology to determine absolute leukocyte counts has been developed. Such technology includes single platform and dual platform approaches. Derivations of these counts commonly incorporate the addition of a known number of latex microsphere beads to a blood sample, although it has been suggested that the addition of beads to a sample may only be required to act as an internal quality control procedure for assessing the pipetting error. This unit provides the technical details for undertaking flow rate calibration that obviates the need to add reference beads to each sample. It is envisaged that this report will provide the basis for subsequent clinical evaluations of this novel approach. PMID:18770842

  4. Cell tropism predicts long-term nucleotide substitution rates of mammalian RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Hicks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high rates of RNA virus evolution are generally attributed to replication with error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, these long-term nucleotide substitution rates span three orders of magnitude and do not correlate well with mutation rates or selection pressures. This substitution rate variation may be explained by differences in virus ecology or intrinsic genomic properties. We generated nucleotide substitution rate estimates for mammalian RNA viruses and compiled comparable published rates, yielding a dataset of 118 substitution rates of structural genes from 51 different species, as well as 40 rates of non-structural genes from 28 species. Through ANCOVA analyses, we evaluated the relationships between these rates and four ecological factors: target cell, transmission route, host range, infection duration; and three genomic properties: genome length, genome sense, genome segmentation. Of these seven factors, we found target cells to be the only significant predictors of viral substitution rates, with tropisms for epithelial cells or neurons (P<0.0001 as the most significant predictors. Further, one-tailed t-tests showed that viruses primarily infecting epithelial cells evolve significantly faster than neurotropic viruses (P<0.0001 and P<0.001 for the structural genes and non-structural genes, respectively. These results provide strong evidence that the fastest evolving mammalian RNA viruses infect cells with the highest turnover rates: the highly proliferative epithelial cells. Estimated viral generation times suggest that epithelial-infecting viruses replicate more quickly than viruses with different cell tropisms. Our results indicate that cell tropism is a key factor in viral evolvability.

  5. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  6. A Cohesin-Based Partitioning Mechanism Revealed upon Transcriptional Inactivation of Centromere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Haase, Julian; Harrison, Benjamin; Snider, Chloe E.; Kaminsky, Lila; Hine, Rebecca M.; Haber, James E.; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional inactivation of the budding yeast centromere has been a widely used tool in studies of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. In haploid cells when an essential chromosome contains a single conditionally inactivated centromere (GAL-CEN), cell growth rate is slowed and segregation fidelity is reduced; but colony formation is nearly 100%. Pedigree analysis revealed that only 30% of the time both mother and daughter cell inherit the GAL-CEN chromosome. The reduced segregation capacity of the GAL-CEN chromosome is further compromised upon reduction of pericentric cohesin (mcm21∆), as reflected in a further diminishment of the Mif2 kinetochore protein at GAL-CEN. By redistributing cohesin from the nucleolus to the pericentromere (by deleting SIR2), there is increased presence of the kinetochore protein Mif2 at GAL-CEN and restoration of cell viability. These studies identify the ability of cohesin to promote chromosome segregation via kinetochore assembly, in a situation where the centromere has been severely compromised. PMID:27128635

  7. A Cohesin-Based Partitioning Mechanism Revealed upon Transcriptional Inactivation of Centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Haase, Julian; Harrison, Benjamin; Snider, Chloe E; Eldridge, Brittany; Kaminsky, Lila; Hine, Rebecca M; Haber, James E; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Transcriptional inactivation of the budding yeast centromere has been a widely used tool in studies of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. In haploid cells when an essential chromosome contains a single conditionally inactivated centromere (GAL-CEN), cell growth rate is slowed and segregation fidelity is reduced; but colony formation is nearly 100%. Pedigree analysis revealed that only 30% of the time both mother and daughter cell inherit the GAL-CEN chromosome. The reduced segregation capacity of the GAL-CEN chromosome is further compromised upon reduction of pericentric cohesin (mcm21∆), as reflected in a further diminishment of the Mif2 kinetochore protein at GAL-CEN. By redistributing cohesin from the nucleolus to the pericentromere (by deleting SIR2), there is increased presence of the kinetochore protein Mif2 at GAL-CEN and restoration of cell viability. These studies identify the ability of cohesin to promote chromosome segregation via kinetochore assembly, in a situation where the centromere has been severely compromised. PMID:27128635

  8. Dynamic changes in paternal X-chromosome activity during imprinted X-chromosome inactivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrat, Catherine; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Diabangouaya, Patricia; Vialon, Vivian; Le Baccon, Patricia; Chow, Jennifer; Heard, Edith

    2009-03-31

    In mammals, X-chromosome dosage compensation is achieved by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes in females. In mice, X inactivation is initially imprinted, with inactivation of the paternal X (Xp) chromosome occurring during preimplantation development. One theory is that the Xp is preinactivated in female embryos, because of its previous silence during meiosis in the male germ line. The extent to which the Xp is active after fertilization and the exact time of onset of X-linked gene silencing have been the subject of debate. We performed a systematic, single-cell transcriptional analysis to examine the activity of the Xp chromosome for a panel of X-linked genes throughout early preimplantation development in the mouse. Rather than being preinactivated, we found the Xp to be fully active at the time of zygotic gene activation, with silencing beginning from the 4-cell stage onward. X-inactivation patterns were, however, surprisingly diverse between genes. Some loci showed early onset (4-8-cell stage) of X inactivation, and some showed extremely late onset (postblastocyst stage), whereas others were never fully inactivated. Thus, we show that silencing of some X-chromosomal regions occurs outside of the usual time window and that escape from X inactivation can be highly lineage specific. These results reveal that imprinted X inactivation in mice is far less concerted than previously thought and highlight the epigenetic diversity underlying the dosage compensation process during early mammalian development. PMID:19273861

  9. X-Chromosome Inactivation Counting and Choice: Change or Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Monkhorst (Kim)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPlacental mammalian female cells have two X chromosomes. One of these chromosomes is randomly inactivated in each nucleus so that females are functionally mosaic for genes expressed from their X chromosomes. The evolutionary basis for this phenomenon is based on the fact that females wou

  10. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, K. T.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be inactivated by irradiation with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic.

  11. Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsen, K T [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Tsen, S-W D; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Kiang, Juliann G [Scientific Research Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of The Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2008-06-25

    We demonstrate for the first time that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be inactivated by irradiation with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic. (fast track communication)

  12. Preferential amplification of CD8 effector-T cells after transcutaneous application of an inactivated influenza vaccine: a randomized phase I trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Combadière, Behazine; Vogt, Annika; Mahé, Brice; Costagliola, Dominique; Hadam, Sabrina; Bonduelle, Olivia; Sterry, Wolfram; Staszewski, Shlomo; Schaefer, Hans; van der Werf, Sylvie; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current conventional vaccination approaches do not induce potent CD8 T-cell responses for fighting mostly variable viral diseases such as influenza, avian influenza viruses or HIV. Following our recent study on vaccine penetration by targeting of vaccine to human hair follicular ducts surrounded by Langerhans cells, we tested in the first randomized Phase-Ia trial based on hair follicle penetration (namely transcutaneous route) the induction of virus-specific CD8 T cell responses....

  13. Radiation inactivation of proteolytic enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey was devoted to generalization of protease inactivation mechanism for different conditions of irradiation and for different kinds of enzymes. The importance of radiation conformation changes and the possible use of radiolytic processes were considered especially. The serine-, SH-, acidic-and metal-contained enzymes were described

  14. Effect of Tc99m Labeling on The Survival Rate of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabari F

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Human dental pulp stem cells have substantial proliferative and differentiation potential. The isolated stem cells or progenitor cells of the pulp can differentiate into odontoblasts or /and osteoblast-like cells and aid in repair as well as reconstruction of tooth structure. Several ways have been introduced for isolation and tracing of these cells. The aim of this study was to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from deciduous dental pulps as well as labeling them with Technetium (Tc99m to investigate the effect of Tc labeling on the survival rate of stem cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, exfoliated deciduous teeth of 6-11 year old children without any history of systemic disease were collected. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic methods were used to expedite cell isolation and isolated cells (10000 from dental pulp were mixed with 25 millicurie of Tc for tracing purposes. Individual cell activity as well as culture medium activation was evaluated separately afterwards. Data was analyzed using ANOVA statistical test. Results: Isolated dental pulp cells formed single cell derived colonies which showed fibroblast-like growth with solo cloning morphology. Specific staining of the cells indicated them to be stem cells and confirmed their differentiation into bone and fat. Moreover, Technetium significantly decreased the activity of cells. The survival rates of the cells in the period of 1,3,6,24,48 hours were reported to be 95.5%, 85.5%, 77.4%, 68.4%, and 57.3% respectively. Conclusion: The dental pulp stem cells have a significant capacity to differentiate into bone and fat. Tracing the cells with Tc M99 will reduce their survival rate over time.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Inactivated Wood Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sernek, Milan

    2002-01-01

    A wood surface, which is exposed to a high temperature condition, can experience inactivation. Surface inactivation results in reduced ability of an adhesive to properly wet, flow, penetrate, and cure. Thus, an inactivated wood surface does not bond well with adhesives. The changes in surface chemistry, wettability, and adhesion of inactivated wood surfaces, including heartwood of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) and southern pine (Pinus taeda), were studied. Wood samples were dri...

  16. Comparative analysis of inactivated wood surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Šernek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    A wood surface, which is exposed to a high temperature condition, can experience inactivation. Surface inactivation results in reduced ability of an adhesive to properly wet, flow, penetrate, and cure. Thus, an inactivated wood surface does not bond well with adhesives. The changes in surface chemistry, wettability, and adhesion of inactivated wood surfaces, including heartwood of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) and southern pine (Pinus taeda), were studied. Wood samples were dried fr...

  17. An assay for the rate of removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide by cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells have a wide range of capacities to remove extracellular hydrogen peroxide. At higher concentrations of extracellular H2O2 (micromolar the rate of removal can be approximated by a rate equation that is first-order in the concentration of H2O2 and cell density. Here we present a method to determine the observed rate constant for the removal of extracellular H2O2 on a per cell basis. In the cells examined, when exposed to 20 μM H2O2, these rate constants (kcell range from 0.46×10−12 s−1 cell−1 L for Mia-PaCa-2 cells (human pancreatic carcinoma to 10.4×10−12 s−1 cell−1 L for U937 cells (human histiocytic lymphoma. For the relatively small red blood cell kcell=2.9×10−12 s−1 cell−1 L. These rate constants, kcell, can be used to compare the capacity of cells to remove higher levels of extracellular H2O2, as often presented in cell culture experiments. They also provide a means to estimate the rate of removal of extracellular H2O2, rate=−kcell [H2O2] (cells L−1, and the half-life of a bolus of H2O2. This information is essential to optimize experimental design and interpret data from experiments that expose cells to extracellular H2O2.

  18. Inactivation of citrus tristeza virus by gamma ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total exposure of gamma ray and the intensity of gamma ray per hour for the inactivation of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and also the effect on citrus tissues are described. The budwoods of Morita navel orange infected with a severe seedling-yellow strain of CTV were irradiated with gamma ray from a 60Co source for 20 -- 52 hours. The buds or small tissue pieces of the irradiated budwoods were subsequently grafted onto Mexcan lime. CTV was easily inactivated by the irradiation from 10 to 18 kR for from 20 to 52 hours. The higher the total exposure, the higher the rate of inactivation. The CTV in the budwoods was almost inactivated after the irradiation with 20 kR. When the total exposure to gamma ray on budwoods was the same, CTV was more efficiently inactivated by the irradiation for long period with low intensity of gamma ray per hour than that for short period with high intensity per hour. Gamma ray irradiation was effective to eliminate CTV from citrus tissues. (Mori, K.)

  19. Mucosal SIV vaccines comprising inactivated virus particles and bacterial adjuvants induce CD8+T-regulatory cells that suppress SIV positive CD4+cell activation and prevent SIV infection in the macaque model.

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Marie eAndrieu; song echen; Chunhui eLAI; weizhong eguo; Wei eLu

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against HIV infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated SIVmac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette & Guerin bacillus, lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastic route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies n...

  20. Mucosal SIV Vaccines Comprising Inactivated Virus Particles and Bacterial Adjuvants Induce CD8+ T-Regulatory Cells that Suppress SIV-Positive CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Prevent SIV Infection in the Macaque Model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Guo, Weizhong; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette and Guerin bacillus, Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastric route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, the...

  1. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  2. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  3. Influence of the total gas flow rate on high rate growth microcrystalline silicon films and solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Xiao-Yan; Hou Guo-Fu; Zhang Xiao-Dan; Wei Chang-Chun; Li Gui-Jun; Zhang De-Kun; Chen Xin-Liang; Sun Jian; Zhang Jian-Jun; Zhao Ying; Geng Xin-Hua

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that high-rate-deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells was performed by very-high-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.These solar cells,whose intrinsic μc-Si:H layers were prepared by using a different total gas flow rate (Ftotal),behave much differently in performance,although their intrinsic layers have similar crystalline volume fraction,opto-electronic properties and a deposition rate of~1.0 nm/s.The influence of Ftotal on the micro-structural properties was analyzed by Raman and Fourier transformed infrared measurements.The results showed that the vertical uniformity and the compact degree of μc-Si:H thin films were improved with increasing Ftotal.The variation of the microstructure was regarded as the main reason for the difference of the J-V parameters.Combined with optical emission spectroscopy,we found that the gas temperature plays an important role in determining the microstructure of thin films.With Ftotal of 300 sccm,a conversion efficiency of 8.11% has been obtained for the intrinsic layer deposited at 8.5 (A)/s (1 (A)=0.1 nm).

  4. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared.

  5. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues da Silva, A C; Caporale, G M; Gonçalves, C A; Targueta, M C; Comin, F; Zanetti, C R; Kotait, I

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA) higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared. PMID:10810324

  6. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  7. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  8. Activation and inactivation of the volume-sensitive taurine leak pathway in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and Ehrlich Lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Ian Henry

    2007-01-01

    Hypotonic exposure provokes the mobilization of arachidonic acid, production of ROS, and a transient increase in taurine release in Ehrlich Lettre cells. The taurine release is potentiated by H(2)O(2) and the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate and reduced by the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2......)) inhibitors bromoenol lactone (BEL) and manoalide, the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitor ETH-615139, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyl iodonium (DPI), and antioxidants. Thus, swelling-induced taurine efflux in Ehrlich Lettre cells involves Ca(2+)-independent (iPLA(2))/secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) plus 5-LO...... activity and modulation by ROS. Vanadate and H(2)O(2) stimulate arachidonic acid mobilization and vanadate potentiates ROS production in Ehrlich Lettre cells and NIH3T3 fibroblasts under hypotonic conditions. However, vanadate-induced potentiation of the volume-sensitive taurine efflux is, in both cell...

  9. Physiology of inactivation of microbial cells by near-ultraviolet light: mode of action and application for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mode of action of near-ultraviolet (NUV) light was studied in Escherichia coli. NUV light (maximum emission at 365 nm) caused the photodestruction of ribonucleoside diphosphate (RDP) reductase activity in vivo. Evidence was presented for a model suggesting that the loss of RDP-reductase resulted in a metabolic state analogous to that produced during starvation for thymine. Some important properties of cells irradiated by NUV light, cell death, loss of the ability to support the replication of DNA phages and a delay in the onset of cell division in sublethally irradiated cells, were accounted for in terms of photoinactivation of RDP-reductase. Conditions were described under which NUV light was an effective counterselective agent for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  10. Proteasome-independent pathway for activation of CD8+T cells by dendritic cells pulsed with inactivated foot-and-mouth disease virus%负载灭活口蹄疫病毒树突状细胞活化CD8+T细胞的非蛋白酶体依赖途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王若; 张丽; 张雷; 李娜; 张悦; 孟明; 王家鑫

    2011-01-01

    To study the activating pathways of CD8+ T cells by dendritic cells(DCs) pulsed with the inactivated foot-and-mouth disease virus(FMDV),monocyte-derived dendritic cells(MoDCs) treated with inhibitor were pulsed with the inactivated FMDV and co-cultured with CD8+T cells.FMDV-pulsed MoDCs co-cultured with CD8+ T cells served as control.The levels of IFN-γ in supernatant were determined at indicated time points with indirect ELISA.CD8+T cells co-cultured with MoDCs pulsed with the inactivated FMDV released great amount of IFN-γ at 9th hour post-co-cultured and declined gradually, reached the lowest level at 24 h.At 48th hour post-co-cultured,CD8+ T cells recovered their vigorous release of IFN-γwith inactivated FMDV-pulsed MoDCs' stimulation.While the release of IFN-γ from control CD8+ T cells was significantly lower at 9th hour(P<0.01) ,and the lowest level of IFN-γ was detected at 48th hour(P<0.01).Remarkably,the control CD8+ T cells released the highest level of IFN-γ at 24th hour post-co-cultured.These results indicated that MoDCs process inactivated FMDV antigens either in proteasome-independent pathway or in proteasome-dependent pathway and cross-present antigen to CD8+ T cells,leading to the release of IFN-γ.%为研究树突状细胞加工和呈递灭活口蹄疫病毒(FMDV)抗原并活化CD8+T细胞的途径,用灭活FMDV负载经抑制剂预处理的小鼠单核细胞源树突状细胞(MoDCs),与CD8+T细胞共培养,对照为负载FMDV的正常MoDCs与CD8+T细胞.收集上清液,检测γ干扰素(IFN-γ)的含量.结果显示,试验组CD8+T细胞在共培养的第9小时分泌大量IFN-γ,然后逐渐下降.至第24小时,CD8+T细胞分泌IFN-γ的量降至最低,随后逐渐升高,在第48小时,CD8+T细胞分泌IFN-γ的量升至最高.对照组CD8+T细胞在共培养的第9小时的IFN-γ分泌量显著低于试验组(P<0.01);随后逐渐升高,并在共培养的第24小时达到高峰,而后逐步下降,至第48小时,CD8+T

  11. Reciprocal inhibition and slow calcium decay in perigeniculate interneurons explain changes of spontaneous firing of thalamic cells caused by cortical inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Rogala, Jacek; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Łęski, Szymon; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wójcik, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The role of cortical feedback in the thalamocortical processing loop has been extensively investigated over the last decades. With an exception of several cases, these searches focused on the cortical feedback exerted onto thalamo-cortical relay (TC) cells of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In a previous, physiological study, we showed in the cat visual system that cessation of cortical input, despite decrease of spontaneous activity of TC cells, increased spontaneous firing of t...

  12. Combined Treatment of Hydroxytyrosol with Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule-2 Prevents TNF α -Induced Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction through NO Production with Subsequent NF κ B Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Houda Zrelli; Che Wei Wu; Nahla Zghonda; Hidehisa Shimizu; Hitoshi Miyazaki

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the atheroprotective properties of olive oil polyphenol, hydroxytyrosol (HT), in combination with carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) that acts as a carbon monoxide donor using vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Our results showed that CORM-2 could strengthen the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of HT against TNF α -induced cellular damage by enhancing cell survival and the suppression of caspase-3 activation. While HT alone attenuated NF κ Bp65 phos...

  13. Preferential amplification of CD8 effector-T cells after transcutaneous application of an inactivated influenza vaccine: a randomized phase I trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Behazine Combadière; Annika Vogt; Brice Mahé; Dominique Costagliola; Sabrina Hadam; Olivia Bonduelle; Wolfram Sterry; Shlomo Staszewski; Hans Schaefer; Sylvie van der Werf; Christine Katlama; Brigitte Autran; Ulrike Blume-Peytavi

    2010-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: Current conventional vaccination approaches do not induce potent CD8 T-cell responses for fighting mostly variable viral diseases such as influenza, avian influenza viruses or HIV. Following our recent study on vaccine penetration by targeting of vaccine to human hair follicular ducts surrounded by Langerhans cells, we tested in the first randomized Phase-Ia trial based on hair follicle penetration (namely transcutaneous route) the induction of virus-spec...

  14. Interleukin-32α inactivates JAK2/STAT3 signaling and reverses interleukin-6-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and metastasis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingfeng; Wang, Silu; Su, Jiadong; Chu, Guanyu; You, Heyi; Chen, Zongjing; Sun, Hongwei; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 is a newly discovered cytokine that has multifaceted roles in inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and autoimmune diseases and participates in cell apoptosis, cancer cell growth inhibition, accentuation of inflammation, and angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the potential effects of IL-32α on epithelial-mesenchymal transition, metastasis, and invasion, and the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer cells. The human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and SW1990 were used. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers, including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, and Zeb1, as well as extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP2, MMP7, and MMP9, were detected by immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The activation of JAK2/STAT3 signaling proteins was detected by Western blotting. Wound healing assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting were performed to assess cell migration and invasion. The effects of IL-32α on the IL-6-induced activation of JAK2/STAT3 were also evaluated. In vitro, we found that IL-32α inhibits the expressions of the related markers N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, and Zeb1, as well as JAK2/STAT3 proteins, in a dose-dependent manner in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression was increased significantly after IL-32α treatment. IL-32α downregulated the expression of MMPs, including MMP2, MMP7, and MMP9, and decreased wound healing in pancreatic cancer cells. These consistent changes were also found in IL-6-induced pancreatic cancer cells following IL-32α treatment. This study showed that reversion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, inhibition of invasiveness and metastasis, and activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway could be achieved through the application of exogenous IL-32α. PMID:27471397

  15. Inverse dose rate effect in tumour cells measured by the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of the dose rate of low LET radiation from high (Gy/min) to low (Gy/h) usually leads to a reduced effect as measured by the survival methods. If the dose rate is reduced, cells are able to repair sublethal damage even during irradiation. During the last few years a comet assay has been widely used to measure DNA damage induction and repair in single cells. In our study we used the alkaline version of the comet assay for comparison of high (0.833 Gy/min) and low dose rate (0.0707 Gy/min) effects on DNA damage and repair in R1 rat rhabdomyosarcoma and Me45 human malignant melanoma cells. Cells gathered from exponential culture by trypsynization were suspended in a growth medium and irradiated at room temperature, with 5 Gy of photons X generated by linear accelerator at both dose rates. Comets were analysed automatically using self-made software for measurement of percentage DNA in the tail, and tail moment and inertia. Our results show that tail inertia is the best parameter expressing DNA damage and repair. Although the level of DNA damage induced by low dose rate was comparable with that induced by a high dose rate, the damage induced by the low dose rate are repair more slowly than after high dose rate irradiation. This inverse dose rate effect suggest that nature of damage can differ in both groups. (author)

  16. Inactivation of the WNT5A Alternative Promoter B Is Associated with DNA Methylation and Histone Modification in Osteosarcoma Cell Lines U2OS and SaOS-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himani Vaidya

    Full Text Available WNT5A is a secreted ligand involved in Wnt pathway signaling and has a role in cell movement and differentiation. Altered WNT5A expression is associated with various cancers, although in most studies the focus has been on only one of the known WNT5A isoforms. In this study, we analyzed expression from two of the major WNT5A promoters, termed promoter A and promoter B, in normal human osteoblasts, SaOS-2 and U2OS osteosarcoma cell lines, and osteosarcoma tumor tissue. We found that both promoters A and B are active in normal osteoblasts with nearly 11-fold more promoter B than A transcripts. Promoter B but not promoter A transcripts are decreased or nearly undetectable in the SaOS-2 and U2OS cell lines and osteosarcoma tumor tissues. Transient transfection of promoter A and promoter B reporter constructs confirmed that SaOS-2 cells have the necessary factors to transcribe both promoters. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that three CpG enriched regions upstream of the promoter B exon 1βare highly methylated in both SaOS-2 and U2OS cells. The CpG island sub-region R6 located in promoter B exon 1β was approximately 51% methylated in SaOS-2 and 25% methylated in U2OS. Region 3 was approximately 28% methylated in normal osteoblasts, whereas the others were unmethylated. Promoter B was re-activated by treatment of SaOS-2 cells with 1 μM 5-azacytidine, which was associated with only a small insignificant change in methylation of sub-region R6. ChIP analysis of U2OS and SaOS-2 cells indicated that the promoter B region is less enriched in the active histone mark H3K4me3, in comparison to promoter A and that there is increased enrichment of the repressive mark H3K27me3 in association with the promoter B genomic region in the cell line SaOS-2. These findings show that epigenetic inactivation of the WNT5A promoter B involves both DNA methylation and histone modifications and suggest that differential expression of the WNT5A alternative promoters A

  17. Inactivation of the WNT5A Alternative Promoter B Is Associated with DNA Methylation and Histone Modification in Osteosarcoma Cell Lines U2OS and SaOS-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Himani; Rumph, Candie; Katula, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    WNT5A is a secreted ligand involved in Wnt pathway signaling and has a role in cell movement and differentiation. Altered WNT5A expression is associated with various cancers, although in most studies the focus has been on only one of the known WNT5A isoforms. In this study, we analyzed expression from two of the major WNT5A promoters, termed promoter A and promoter B, in normal human osteoblasts, SaOS-2 and U2OS osteosarcoma cell lines, and osteosarcoma tumor tissue. We found that both promoters A and B are active in normal osteoblasts with nearly 11-fold more promoter B than A transcripts. Promoter B but not promoter A transcripts are decreased or nearly undetectable in the SaOS-2 and U2OS cell lines and osteosarcoma tumor tissues. Transient transfection of promoter A and promoter B reporter constructs confirmed that SaOS-2 cells have the necessary factors to transcribe both promoters. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that three CpG enriched regions upstream of the promoter B exon 1βare highly methylated in both SaOS-2 and U2OS cells. The CpG island sub-region R6 located in promoter B exon 1β was approximately 51% methylated in SaOS-2 and 25% methylated in U2OS. Region 3 was approximately 28% methylated in normal osteoblasts, whereas the others were unmethylated. Promoter B was re-activated by treatment of SaOS-2 cells with 1 μM 5-azacytidine, which was associated with only a small insignificant change in methylation of sub-region R6. ChIP analysis of U2OS and SaOS-2 cells indicated that the promoter B region is less enriched in the active histone mark H3K4me3, in comparison to promoter A and that there is increased enrichment of the repressive mark H3K27me3 in association with the promoter B genomic region in the cell line SaOS-2. These findings show that epigenetic inactivation of the WNT5A promoter B involves both DNA methylation and histone modifications and suggest that differential expression of the WNT5A alternative promoters A and B is a

  18. Exposure of DNA and Bacillus subtilis spores to simulated martian environments: use of quantitative PCR (qPCR) to measure inactivation rates of DNA to function as a template molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Schuerger, Andrew C; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2010-05-01

    Several NASA and ESA missions are planned for the next decade to investigate the possibility of present or past life on Mars. Evidence of extraterrestrial life will likely rely on the detection of biomolecules, which highlights the importance of preventing forward contamination not only with viable microorganisms but also with biomolecules that could compromise the validity of life-detection experiments. The designation of DNA as a high-priority biosignature makes it necessary to evaluate its persistence in extraterrestrial environments and the effects of those conditions on its biological activity. We exposed DNA deposited on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons to a simulated martian environment for periods ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour and measured its ability to function as a template for replication in a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. We found that inactivation of naked DNA or DNA extracted from exposed spores of Bacillus subtilis followed a multiphasic UV-dose response and that a fraction of DNA molecules retained functionality after 60 minutes of exposure to simulated full-spectrum solar radiation in martian atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that forward-contaminant DNA could persist for considerable periods of time at the martian surface. PMID:20528195

  19. Using micro-patterned sensors and cell self-assembly for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for self-assembling arrays of live single cells on a glass chip using a photopatternable polymer to form micro-traps. We have studied the single-cell self-assembly method and optimized the process to obtain a 52% yield of single-trapped cells. We also report a method to measure the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using micro-patterned sensors. These molecular oxygen sensors were fabricated around each micro-trap allowing optical interrogation of oxygen concentration in the immediate environment of the trapped cell. Micromachined micro-wells were then used to seal the trap, sensor and cell in order to determine the oxygen consumption rate of single cells. These techniques reported here add to the collection of tools for performing 'singe-cell' biology. An oxygen consumption rate of 1.05 ± 0.28 fmol min−1 was found for a data set consisting of 25 single A549 cells.

  20. Inactivation of Bacillus Subtilis by Atomic Oxygen Radical Anion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Longchun; WANG Lian; YU Zhou; LV Xuanzhong; LI Quanxin

    2007-01-01

    UAtomic oxygen radical anion (O- ) is one of the most active oxygen species, and has extremely high oxidation ability toward small-molecules of hydrocarbons. However, to our knowledge, little is known about the effects of O- on cells of micro-organisms. This work showed that O- could quickly react with the Bacillus subtilis cells and seriously damage the cell walls a s well as their other contents, leading to a fast and irreversible inactivation. SEM micrographs revealed that the cell structures were dramatically destroyed by their exposure to O-. The inactivation efficiencies of B. subtilis depend on the O-- intensity, the initial population of cells and the treatment temperature, but not on the pH in the range of our investigation. For a cell concentration of 106 cfu/ml, the number of survived cells dropped from 106 cfu/ml to 103 cfu/ml after about five-minute irradiation by an O- flux in an intensity of 233 nA/cm2 under a dry argon environment (30 ℃, 1 atm, exposed size: 1.8 cm2). The inactivation mechanism of micro-organisms induced by O- is also discussed.

  1. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye sentisised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Winter-Jensen, Bjørn; Jacobsen, Torben

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide / tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide / tri-iodide...... layer on top of the FTO glass to lower the tri-iodide reduction rate....

  2. Kinetic modeling of Sendai virus fusion with PC-12 cells. Effect of pH and temperature on fusion and viral inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Maria da Conceição Pedroso de; Ramalho-Santos, João; Martins, Maria de Fátima; Carvalho, Arsélio Pato de; Bairos, Vasco; Nir, Shlomo

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the fusion activity of Sendai virus, a lipid-enveloped paramyxovirus, towards a line of adherent cells designated PC-12. Fusion was monitored by the dequenching of octadecylrhodamine, a fluorescent non-exchangeable probe. The results were analysed with a mass action kinetic model which could explain and predict the kinetics of virus2013cell fusion. When the temperature was lowered from 37°C to 25°C, a sharp inhibition of the fusion process was observed, probably reflecting a c...

  3. Calcium currents in the A7r5 smooth muscle-derived cell line. Increase in current and selective removal of voltage-dependent inactivation by intracellular trypsin

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effects of trypsin on L-type calcium current in the A7r5 smooth muscle cell line. Intracellular dialysis with trypsin increased the whole-cell current up to fivefold. The effect was concentration dependent, and was prevented by soybean trypsin inhibitor. Ensemble analysis indicated an increase in the number of functional channels, and possibly a smaller increase in the open probability, with no change in the single channel current. The shape of the current-voltage curve was una...

  4. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    VanCauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  5. HIV-1 Mutation and Recombination Rates Are Different in Macrophages and T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Cromer; Schlub, Timothy E.; Smyth, Redmond P.; Grimm, Andrew J.; Abha Chopra; Simon Mallal; Davenport, Miles P.; Johnson Mak

    2016-01-01

    High rates of mutation and recombination help human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to evade the immune system and develop resistance to antiretroviral therapy. Macrophages and T-cells are the natural target cells of HIV-1 infection. A consensus has not been reached as to whether HIV replication results in differential recombination between primary T-cells and macrophages. Here, we used HIV with silent mutation markers along with next generation sequencing to compare the mutation and the recombi...

  6. [Effect of Segestria florentina spider venom on the mechanism of inactivation of sodium channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, P B; Kalikulov, D; Nasledov, G A; Tashmukhamedov, B A

    1985-01-01

    It was shown that Segestria florentina spider venom mainly reduces the rate and amount of sodium inactivation. This effect is likely to be responsible for the prolongation of the action potential. PMID:2413900

  7. Clonality - X Chromosome Inactivation Assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Molecular Profiling Initiative, NCI This method was successful in our lab using prostate tissue and for our specific objectives. Investigators must be aware that they will need to tailor the following protocol for their own research objectives and tissue under study. Investigators can utilize X chromosome inactivation (methylation) to determine the clonality status of a tumor or premalignant lesion in females. The technique is based on a methylation-sensitive restriction enzym...

  8. Naringin inhibits the invasion and migration of human glioblastoma cell via downregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and inactivation of p38 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroui, Sonia; Najlaoui, Feten; Chtourou, Yassine; Meunier, Annie-Claire; Laajimi, Amel; Kenani, Abderraouf; Fetoui, Hamadi

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors. They are associated with a poor prognosis despite the availability of multiple therapeutic options. Naringin, a common dietary flavonoid abundantly present in fruits and vegetables, is believed to possess strong anti-proliferative and anti-cancer properties. However, there are no reports describing its effects on the invasion and migration of glioblastoma cell lines. Our results showed that the treatment of U251 glioma cell lines with different concentrations of naringin inhibited the invasion and migration of these cells. In addition, we revealed a decrease in the levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2) and (MMP-9) expression as well as proteinase activity in U251 glioma cells. In contrast, the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1) and (TIMP-2) was increased. Furthermore, naringin treatment decreased significantly the phosphorylated level of p38. Combined treatment with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) resulted in the synergistic reduction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions correlated with an increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions and the anti-invasive properties. However, p38 chemical activator (anisomycin) could block these effects produced by naringin, suggesting a direct downregulation of the p38 signaling pathway. These data suggest that naringin may have therapeutic potential for controlling invasiveness of malignant gliomas by inhibiting of p38 signal transduction pathways. PMID:26474590

  9. Cell segmentation for division rate estimation in computerized video time-lapse microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weijun; Wang, Xiaoxu; Metaxas, Dimitris; Mathew, Robin; White, Eileen

    2007-02-01

    The automated estimation of cell division rate plays an important role in the evaluation of a gene function in high throughput biomedical research. Using Computerized Video Time-Lapse (CVTL) microcopy , it is possible to follow a large number of cells in their physiological conditions for several generations. However analysis of this large volume data is complicated due to cell to cell contacts in a high density population. We approach this problem by segmenting out cells or cell clusters through a learning method. The feature of a pixel is represented by the intensity and gradient information in a small surrounding sub-window. Curve evolution techniques are used to accurately find the cell or cell cluster boundary. With the assumption that the average cell size is the same in each frame, we can use the cell area to estimate the cell division rate. Our segmentation results are compared to manually-defined ground truth. Both recall and precision measures for segmentation accuracy are above 95%.

  10. Mechanism of chromophore assisted laser inactivation employing fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mark A; Rajfur, Zenon; Chen, Zaozao; Humphrey, David; Yang, Bing; Sligar, Stephen G; Jacobson, Ken

    2009-03-01

    Chromophore assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a technique that uses irradiation of chromophores proximate to a target protein to inactivate function. Previously, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) mediated CALI has been used to inactivate EGFP-fusion proteins in a spatio-temporally defined manner within cells, but the mechanism of inactivation is unknown. To help elucidate the mechanism of protein inactivation mediated by fluorescent protein CALI ([FP]-CALI), the activities of purified glutathione-S-transferase-FP (GST-EXFP) fusions were measured after laser irradiation in vitro. Singlet oxygen and free radical quenchers as well as the removal of oxygen inhibited CALI, indicating the involvement of a reactive oxygen species (ROS). At higher concentrations of protein, turbidity after CALI increased significantly indicating cross-linking of proximate fusion proteins suggesting that damage of residues on the surface of the protein, distant from the active site, results in inactivation. Control experiments removed sample heating as a possible cause of these effects. Different FP mutants fused to GST vary in their CALI efficiency in the order enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) > enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) > enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), while a GST construct that binds fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (FlAsH) results in significantly higher CALI efficiency than any of the fluorescent proteins (XFPs) tested. It is likely that the hierarchy of XFP effectiveness reflects the balance between ROS that are trapped within the XFP structure and cause fluorophore and chromophore bleaching and those that escape to effect CALI of proximate proteins. PMID:19199572

  11. ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells following continuous low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the change of ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells following a continuous low dose-rate irradiation. Methods: Cells were persistently exposed to low dose-rate (8.28 cGy/h) irradiation. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot were used to detect the expression of ATM phosphorylated proteins. Colony forming assay was used to observe the effect of a low dose-rate irradiation on HepG2 cell survival. Results: After 30 min of low dose-rate irradiation, the phosphorylation of ATM occurred. After 6 h persistent irradiation, the expression of ATM phosphorylated protein reached the peak value, then gradually decreased. After ATM phosphorylation was inhibited with Wortmannin, the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells was lower than that of the irradiation alone group at each time point (P<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous low dose-rate irradiation attenuated ATM phosphorylation, suggesting that continuous low dose-rate irradiation has a potential effect for increasing the radiosensitivity of HepG2 cells. (authors)

  12. Hyperactivated Wnt Signaling Induces Synthetic Lethal Interaction with Rb Inactivation by Elevating TORC1 Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tianyi; Liao, Yang; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Robin; Searle, Jennifer S.; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Du, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a ...

  13. Inactivation of bacteriophage lambda by near-ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophage lambdasub(vir) was inactivated when it was irradiated with near-UV light in the presence of chlorpromazine. DNA strand breakage in the treated phage was indicated by alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. The number of the breaks was increased with increasing fluence. Although the inactivation rate was enhanced with a decreasing salt concentration in the reaction mixture and under a nitrogen atmosphere, the number of the strand breaks was not altered in either case. Therefore, the DNA strand breakage is not a sole lethal damage in the treated phage. The addition of NaN3 repressed the inactivation and the reaction in a D2O medium enhanced the inactivation even if the reaction mixture was irradiated under anaerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, the inactivation occurs presumably via a radical mechanism. (author)

  14. Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Cholesterol Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channel Currents and Augments Voltage-Dependent Inactivation in A7r5 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ochi, Rikuo; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Gupte, Sachin A.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol distributes at a high density in the membrane lipid raft and modulates ion channel currents. Poly(ethylene glycol) cholesteryl ether (PEG-cholesterol) is a nonionic amphipathic lipid consisting of lipophilic cholesterol and covalently bound hydrophilic PEG. PEG-cholesterol is used to formulate lipoplexes to transfect cultured cells, and liposomes for encapsulated drug delivery. PEG-cholesterol is dissolved in the external leaflet of the lipid bilayer, and expands it to flatten the...

  15. The Ethanol Extract of Fructus trichosanthis Promotes Fetal Hemoglobin Production via p38 MAPK Activation and ERK Inactivation in K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological stimulation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF expression may be a promising approach for the treatment of beta-thalassemia. In this study, the effects of Fructus trichosanthis (FT were investigated in human erythroleukemic K562 cells for their gamma-globin mRNA and HbF-induction activities. The role of signaling pathways, including extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, was also investigated. It was found that the ethanol extract of FT significantly increased gamma-globin mRNA and HbF levels, determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, in dose- and time-dependent manner. Total Hb (THb levels were also elevated in the concentrations without cytotoxicity (<80 μg mL−1. Pre-treatment with p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked the stimulatory effects of FT extract in total and HbF induction. In contrast, no change in HbF was observed when treated with ERK inhibitor PD98059. Furthermore, FT ethanol extract activated p38 MAPK and inhibited ERK signaling pathways in K562 cells, as revealed in western blotting analysis. In addition, SB203580 significantly abolished p38 MAPK activation when the cells were treated with FT. In summary, the ethanol extract of FT was found to be a potent inducer of HbF synthesis in K562 cells. The present data delineated the role of ERK and p38 MAPK signaling as molecular targets for pharmacologic stimulation of HbF production upon FT treatment.

  16. Turnover of ammonium-inducible glutamate dehydrogenase during induction and its rapid inactivation after removal of inducer from Chlorella sorokiniana cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bascomb, N F; Yeung, A T; Turner, K J; Schmidt, R R

    1981-01-01

    When ammonia was removed from Chlorella sorokiniana cells, which contain an ammonium-inducible nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH), the activity of this enzyme decayed with a half-life of approximately 8 min. By use of rocket immunoelectrophoresis, indirect immunoprecipitation, and indirect immunoadsorption (coupled with pulse-chase experiments with 35S-labeled sulfate), the rapid initial loss in activity was shown to be due to enzyme inacti...

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia coli planktonic cells by multi-walled carbon nanotubes in suspensions: Effect of surface functionalization coupled with medium nutrition level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mu-Fan; Wu, Wei-Ling; Du, Yuchin; Chin, Ching-Ju M; Lin, Chu-Ching

    2016-11-15

    While earlier studies have identified the antibacterial activity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and proposed that cell membrane damage by direct contact with CNTs is likely the main toxicity mechanism, the relative importance of chemical versus physical properties of CNTs in controlling their bacterial cytotoxicity is understudied. Given that CNT is commonly modified via acid treatment to enhance its dispersivity and surface chemistry, in this study commercially available multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with high purity were processed carefully by acid reflux, resulting in differences in surface charge of MWCNTs without altering their physical properties. The surface condition of MWCNTs was also modified by adsorption of organic matter to compare bacterial toxicity of functionalized and non-functionalized MWCNTs in suspensions. Results show that although overall electrostatic repulsion and steric obstruction resulted from surface modifications led to elevated dispersivity of MWCNTs and mitigated toxicity on planktonic Escherichia coli cultures, no correlation between the dispersivity and bacterial toxicity of MWCNTs was observed, suggesting that dispersity alone may not be a proper index to estimate the CNT antibacterial effect on planktonic cells in the aqueous phase. In addition, viability recovery of MWCNT-treated cells was observed to be nutrition level-dependent, implying that availability of proper nutrients may be another important factor to be considered when assessing the ecotoxicity of CNTs in the aquatic system. PMID:27450343

  18. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  19. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  20. Inactivation of the Autolysis-Related Genes lrgB and yycI in Staphylococcus aureus Increases Cell Lysis-Dependent eDNA Release and Enhances Biofilm Development In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Ossaille Beltrame

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus ica-independent biofilms are multifactorial in nature, and various bacterial proteins have been associated with biofilm development, including fibronectin-binding proteins A and B, protein A, surface protein SasG, proteases, and some autolysins. The role of extracellular DNA (eDNA has also been demonstrated in some S. aureus biofilms. Here, we constructed a Tn551 library, and the screening identified two genes that affected biofilm formation, lrgB and yycI. The repressive effect of both genes on the development of biofilm was also confirmed in knockout strains constructed by allelic recombination. In contrast, the superexpression of either lrgB or yycI by a cadmium-inducible promoter led to a decrease in biofilm accumulation. Indeed, a significant increase in the cell-lysis dependent eDNA release was detected when lrgB or yycI were inactivated, explaining the enhanced biofilm formed by these mutants. In fact, lrgB and yycI genes belong to distinct operons that repress bacterial autolysis through very different mechanisms. LrgB is associated with the synthesis of phage holin/anti-holin analogues, while YycI participates in the activation/repression of the two-component system YycGF (WalKR. Our in vivo data suggest that autolysins activation lead to increased bacterial virulence in the foreign body animal model since a higher number of attached cells was recovered from the implanted catheters inoculated with lrgB or yycI knockout mutants.

  1. Inactivation of Influenza A virus, Adenovirus, and Cytomegalovirus with PAXgene tissue fixative and formalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kap, Marcel; Arron, Georgina I; Loibner, M; Hausleitner, Anja; Siaulyte, Gintare; Zatloukal, Kurt; Murk, Jean-Luc; Riegman, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Formalin fixation is known to inactivate most viruses in a vaccine production context, but nothing is published about virus activity in tissues treated with alternative, non-crosslinking fixatives. We used a model assay based on cell culture to test formalin and PAXgene Tissue fixative for their virus-inactivating abilities. MDCK, A549, and MRC-5 cells were infected with Influenza A virus, Adenovirus, and Cytomegalovirus, respectively. When 75% of the cells showed a cytopathic effect (CPE), the cells were harvested and incubated for 15 min, or 1, 3, 6, or 24 hours, with PBS (positive control), 4% formalin, or PAXgene Tissue Fix. The cells were disrupted and the released virus was used to infect fresh MDCK, A549, and MRC-5 cells cultured on cover slips in 24-well plates. The viral cultures were monitored for CPE and by immunocytochemistry (ICC) to record viral replication and infectivity. Inactivation of Adenovirus by formalin occurred after 3 h, while Influenza A virus as well as Cytomegalovirus were inactivated by formalin after 15 min. All three virus strains were inactivated by PAXgene Tissue fixative after 15 min. We conclude that PAXgene Tissue fixative is at least as effective as formalin in inactivating infectivity of Influenza A virus, Adenovirus, and Cytomegalovirus. PMID:24845590

  2. Inactivation of α1-proteinase inhibitor by Candida albicans aspartic proteases favors the epithelial and endothelial cell colonization in the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogol, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Dominika; Klaga, Kinga; Bochenska, Oliwia; Wolak, Natalia; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, a causative agent of opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, uses ten secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs) to deregulate the homeostasis of the host organism on many levels. One of these deregulation mechanisms involves a SAP-dependent disturbance of the control over proteolytic enzymes of the host by a system of dedicated proteinase inhibitors, with one important example being the neutrophil elastase and alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). In this study, we found that soluble SAPs 1-4 and the cell membrane-anchored SAP9 efficiently cleaved A1PI, with the major cleavage points located at the C-terminal part of A1PI in a close vicinity to the reactive-site loop that plays a critical role in the inhibition mechanism. Elastase is released by neutrophils to the environment during fungal infection through two major processes, a degranulation or formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). Both, free and NET-embedded elastase forms, were found to be controlled by A1PI. A local acidosis, resulting from the neutrophil activity at the infection sites, favors A1PI degradation by SAPs. The deregulation of NET-connected elastase affected a NET-dependent damage of epithelial and endothelial cells, resulting in the increased susceptibility of these host cells to candidal colonization. Moreover, the SAP-catalyzed cleavage of A1PI was found to decrease its binding affinity to a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8. The findings presented here suggest a novel strategy used by C. albicans for the colonization of host tissues and overcoming the host defense. PMID:26641639

  3. Fluorescence microscopic morphology and inhibition rate studies on apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells induced by 153Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells treated with irradiation by 153Sm-EDTMP was studied. The morphological changes in osteosarcoma cells were observed by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that osteosarcoma cells exposed with 153Sm-EDTMP displayed significant nuclear fragmentation and marked pyknosis. With the prolongation of observing period, the membrane bound apoptotic bodies formation was observed. It should be noted, that with the lengthening of irradiation time by 153Sm-EDTMP, the inhibition rate of proliferation of osteosarcoma cells increased progressively

  4. Effect of erythrocyte aggregation and flow rate on cell-free layer formation in arterioles

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Peng Kai; Namgung, Bumseok; Johnson, Paul C.; Kim, Sangho

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a cell-free layer is an important dynamic feature of microcirculatory blood flow, which can be influenced by rheological parameters, such as red blood cell aggregation and flow rate. In this study, we investigate the effect of these two rheological parameters on cell-free layer characteristics in the arterioles (20–60 μm inner diameter). For the first time, we provide here the detailed temporal information of the arteriolar cell-free layer in various rheological conditions to bet...

  5. A comparative study of biological effects on tumor cells between low-dose-rate β-irradiation and high- dose-rate γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To elucidate the radiobiological mechanism underlying cancer treatment with low-dose-rate β-irradiation of 32P, by comparing the cell-killing pattern with high-dose-rate γ-irradiation of 60Co. Methods: HeLa cells were exposed to low-dose-rate β-irradiation of 32P or high-dose-rate γ-irradiation of 60Co. Comparisons were made between these two types of radiations, focusing on the cell-killing patterns evaluated by radiation-induced reproductive cell death( senescence) and necrotic cell death through X-gal senescence staining and tRypan blue exclusion method respectively. Results: The results showed that there were different cell-killing patterns in HeLa cells between 32P radiation at dose-rate of 0.375 cGy/min and that of 60Co at dose-rate of 206 cGy/min at 72 h post irradiation. In exposure to 32P, more HeLa cells were lost due to reproductive cell death than to 60Co. X-gal staining showed that senescent cell ratio in HeLa cells after exposure of 32P was higher than after that of 60Co which caused more necrotic cell death. Conclusions: More reproductive and less necrotic cell death contribute to total cell loss in HeLa cells by radiation of 32P than by 60Co. Understanding the underlying mechanism of radiobiology in different radiations is helpful in radiotherapy of malignant tumor by choosing a more reasonable and effective procedure of treatment. (author)

  6. Inactivation of dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea in synthetic ballast water by reactive species generated from dielectric barrier discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Qiong; Jiang Wenju; Yang Zhishan [Institute of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhang Yi; Lim Tuti Mariana, E-mail: TMLim@ntu.edu.s [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technology University, Innovation Center, Block 2, Unit 237, 18 Nanyang Drive, 637723 Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-05-07

    The inactivation of dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea in synthetic ballast water by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system was investigated. The OH{sup .} radical, ozone and hydrogen peroxide generated from the DBD system were measured. Before and after the treatment, the viability of dinoflagellate S. trochoidea was evaluated by analyzing chlorophyll a, protein and saccharide content and morphology of the cells, as well as the pH of the cell culture media. The results show OH{sup .} radical was the major reactive species when humid air was used. The inactivation of S. trochoidea was found to be dependent on the applied voltage and the gas flow rate, and was completed within 4 min at a gas flow rate of 7 L min{sup -1} and an applied voltage of 20 kV. The change of chlorophyll a, protein and saccharide concentrations of S. trochoidea and the morphology of the cells indicates that the reactive species generated from the DBD system can break up the cells via oxidation.

  7. Inactivation of genes coding for mitochondrial Nd7 and Nd9 complex I subunits in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Impact of complex I loss on respiration and energetic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Plancke, Charlotte; Lapaille, Marie; Bailleul, Benjamin; Pirotte, Dorothée; Radoux, Michèle; Leprince, Pierre; Coosemans, Nadine; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    In Chlamydomonas, unlike in flowering plants, genes coding for Nd7 (NAD7/49 kDa) and Nd9 (NAD9/30 kDa) core subunits of mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex I are nucleus-encoded. Both genes possess all the features that facilitate their expression and proper import of the polypeptides in mitochondria. By inactivating their expression by RNA interference or insertional mutagenesis, we show that both subunits are required for complex I assembly and activity. Inactivation of complex I impairs the cell growth rate, reduces the respiratory rate, leads to lower intracellular ROS production and lower expression of ROS scavenging enzymes, and is associated to a diminished capacity to concentrate CO2 without compromising photosynthetic capacity. PMID:24316185

  8. LEF1 and B9L shield β-catenin from inactivation by Axin, desensitizing colorectal cancer cells to tankyrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Roche, Marc; Ibrahim, Ashraf E K; Mieszczanek, Juliusz; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-03-01

    Hyperactive β-catenin drives colorectal cancer, yet inhibiting its activity remains a formidable challenge. Interest is mounting in tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi), which destabilize β-catenin through stabilizing Axin. Here, we confirm that TNKSi inhibit Wnt-induced transcription, similarly to carnosate, which reduces the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by blocking its binding to BCL9, and attenuates intestinal tumors in Apc(Min) mice. By contrast, β-catenin's activity is unresponsive to TNKSi in colorectal cancer cells and in cells after prolonged Wnt stimulation. This TNKSi insensitivity is conferred by β-catenin's association with LEF1 and BCL9-2/B9L, which accumulate during Wnt stimulation, thereby providing a feed-forward loop that converts transient into chronic β-catenin signaling. This limits the therapeutic value of TNKSi in colorectal carcinomas, most of which express high LEF1 levels. Our study provides proof-of-concept that the successful inhibition of oncogenic β-catenin in colorectal cancer requires the targeting of its interaction with LEF1 and/or BCL9/B9L, as exemplified by carnosate. PMID:24419084

  9. Mixed effects modeling of proliferation rates in cell-based models: consequence for pharmacogenomics and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Im

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The International HapMap project has made publicly available extensive genotypic data on a number of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Building on this resource, many research groups have generated a large amount of phenotypic data on these cell lines to facilitate genetic studies of disease risk or drug response. However, one problem that may reduce the usefulness of these resources is the biological noise inherent to cellular phenotypes. We developed a novel method, termed Mixed Effects Model Averaging (MEM, which pools data from multiple sources and generates an intrinsic cellular growth rate phenotype. This intrinsic growth rate was estimated for each of over 500 HapMap cell lines. We then examined the association of this intrinsic growth rate with gene expression levels and found that almost 30% (2,967 out of 10,748 of the genes tested were significant with FDR less than 10%. We probed further to demonstrate evidence of a genetic effect on intrinsic growth rate by determining a significant enrichment in growth-associated genes among genes targeted by top growth-associated SNPs (as eQTLs. The estimated intrinsic growth rate as well as the strength of the association with genetic variants and gene expression traits are made publicly available through a cell-based pharmacogenomics database, PACdb. This resource should enable researchers to explore the mediating effects of proliferation rate on other phenotypes.

  10. Nasopharyngeal carriage rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateete David P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a determinant for invasive pneumococcal disease, which often complicates homozygous sickle cell disease. Here, we determined the nasopharyngeal carriage rate of S. pneumoniae in Ugandan children with homozygous sickle cell disease, who attended the outpatient Sickle Cell Clinic at Mulago National Referral hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Results S. pneumoniae occurred in 27 of the 81 children with homozygous sickle cell disease (giving a carriage rate of 33%, 27/81. Twenty three children were previously hospitalized of whom S. pneumoniae occurred in only two (9%, 2/23, while among the 58 who were not previously hospitalized it occurred in 25 (43%, 25/58, χ2 = 8.8, p = 0.003, meaning there is an association between high carriage rate and no hospitalization. Two children previously immunized with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine did not carry the organism. Prior antimicrobial usage was reported in 53 children (65%, 53/81. There was high resistance of pneumococci to penicillin (100%, 27/27 and trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole (97%, 26/27, but low resistance to other antimicrobials. Of the 70 children without sickle cell disease, S. pneumoniae occurred in 38 (54%, 38/70 of whom 43 were males and 27 females (53% males, 23/43, and 56% females, 15/27. Conclusion Nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci in Ugandan children with homozygous sickle cell disease is high. While nasopharyngeal carriage of S. pneumoniae is a determinant for invasive pneumococcal disease, pneumococcal bacteremia is reportedly low in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease. Studies on the contribution of high carriage rates to invasive pneumococcal disease in these children will be helpful. This is the first report on pneumococcal carriage rate in Ugandan children with sickle cell disease.

  11. Levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids correlate with growth rate in plant cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meï, Coline; Michaud, Morgane; Cussac, Mathilde; Albrieux, Catherine; Gros, Valérie; Maréchal, Eric; Block, Maryse A.; Jouhet, Juliette; Rébeillé, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    In higher plants, fatty acids (FAs) with 18 carbons (18C) represent about 70% of total FAs, the most abundant species being 18:2 and 18:3. These two polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) represent about 55% of total FAs in Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures, whereas 18:1 represents about 10%. The level of PUFAs may vary, depending on ill-defined factors. Here, we compared various sets of plant cell cultures and noticed a correlation between the growth rate of a cell population and the level of unsaturation of 18C FAs. These observations suggest that the final level of PUFAs might depend in part on the rate of cell division, and that FAD2 and FAD3 desaturases, which are respectively responsible for the formation of 18:2 and 18:3 on phospholipids, have limiting activities in fast-growing cultures. In plant cell culture, phosphate (Pi) deprivation is known to impair cell division and to trigger lipid remodeling. We observed that Pi starvation had no effect on the expression of FAD genes, and that the level of PUFAs in this situation was also correlated with the growth rate. Thus, the level of PUFAs appears as a hallmark in determining cell maturity and aging. PMID:26469123

  12. Lack of X inactivation associated with maternal X isodisomy: Evidence for a counting mechanism prior to X inactivation during human embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migeon, B.R.; Torchia, B.S.; Fu, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported functional disomy for X-linked genes in females with tiny ring X chromosomes and a phenotype significantly more abnormal than Turner syndrome. In such cases the disomy results from failure of these X chromosomes to inactivate because they lack DNA sequences essential for cis X inactivation. Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for functional X disomy that is associated with maternal isodisomy. In this case, the severe mental retardation and multiple congenital abnormalities in a female with a mosaic 45,X/46,X,del(X) (q21.3-qter)/46X,r(X) karyotype are associated with overexpression of the genes within Xpter to Xq21.31 in many of her cells. Her normal X, ring X, and deleted linear X chromosomes originate from the same maternal X chromosome, and all are transcriptionally active. None expresses X inactive specific transcript (XIST), although the locus and region of the putative X inactivation center (XIC) are present on both normal and linear deleted X chromosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a functional maternal X isodisomy, and the largest X chromosome to escape inactivation. In addition, these results (1) show that cis inactivation does not invariably occur in human females with two X chromosomes, even when the XIC region is present on both of them; (2) provide evidence for a critical time prior to the visible onset of X inactivation in the embryo when decisions about X inactivation are made; and (3) support the hypothesis that the X chromosome counting mechanism involves chromosomal imprinting, occurs prior to the onset of random inactivation, and is required for subsequent inactivation of the chromosome. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories. PMID:27023645

  14. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest—a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  15. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of certain bacterial cultures suspended in sewage sludge and exposed to gamma-radiation was studied. The inactivation patterns of most of the organisms were significantly different when irradiation was performed using sewage samples collected in the summer and monsoon seasons. The summer sample collected from the anaerobic digester afforded significant protection to both Gram negative and Gram positive organisms. This was evident by the increase in dose required to bring about a 6 log cycle reduction in viable count of the bacterial cultures, when suspended in sewage samples instead of phosphate buffer. The observations made using monsoon digester samples were quite different. This sewage sludge greatly enhanced inactivation by gamma-radiation in most cases. The effects of certain chemicals on the inactivation patterns of two organisms - Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri - were examined. Arsenate, mercury and lead salts sensitised S. typhi, while barium acetate and sodium sulphide protected this culture against gamma-radiation. In the case of Sh. flexneri, barium acetate and iodacetamide proved to be radioprotectors. The effects of some chemicals on the inactivation pattern of Sh. flexneri cells irradiated in sludge are also discussed. (author)

  16. A convective transport theory for high rate discharge in lithium ion cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solution phase transport theory considering solvent effects is developed for lithium ion cells. The solvent convection velocity is derived from a volume conservation argument, leading to a diffusive correction, a transference number gradient correction and a pore-wall flux correction to the material balance equation. The diffusive correction exactly cancels the solvent-related (1−dlnc0/dlnc) factor in the original diffusion term. The transference number gradient and pore-wall flux corrections lead to a larger effective value of the lithium ion transference number. Comparative discharge simulations are carried out for a graphite–LiMn2O4 cell with 1 M or 2 M LiPF6 solution. The convective transport theory demonstrates little cell voltage difference at low rates (1 C and 3 C) compared with the original approach that neglects convection. Nevertheless, at a 6 C rate, a maximum of 51.32 mV excess cell voltage is predicted by the convective theory for the 1 M cell. For the 2 M cell the convective theory predicts a slightly slower voltage drop at the beginning of discharge, but a faster drop at the end of the 6 C discharge. At all rates the convective theory also gives a lower salt concentration profile within the negative electrode, but higher within the positive electrode. This implies that the concentration gradient is diminished by convection. Detailed analysis shows that the transference number gradient correction is always positive during discharge and is highly rate sensitive; the pore-wall flux correction is not only rate sensitive but also proportional to the salt concentration and is thus more prominent in the 2 M cell.

  17. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  18. Enhanced transcription rates in membrane-free protocells formed by coacervation of cell lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Ekaterina; Spruijt, Evan; Hansen, Maike M K; Dubuc, Emilien; Groen, Joost; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; Piruska, Aigars; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2013-07-16

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions in complex mixtures of proteins and other molecules produce crowded compartments supporting in vitro transcription and translation. We developed a method based on picoliter water-in-oil droplets to induce coacervation in Escherichia coli cell lysate and follow gene expression under crowded and noncrowded conditions. Coacervation creates an artificial cell-like environment in which the rate of mRNA production is increased significantly. Fits to the measured transcription rates show a two orders of magnitude larger binding constant between DNA and T7 RNA polymerase, and five to six times larger rate constant for transcription in crowded environments, strikingly similar to in vivo rates. The effect of crowding on interactions and kinetics of the fundamental machinery of gene expression has a direct impact on our understanding of biochemical networks in vivo. Moreover, our results show the intrinsic potential of cellular components to facilitate macromolecular organization into membrane-free compartments by phase separation. PMID:23818642

  19. MK615 attenuates Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release via MAPK inactivation in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yoko; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Ito, Takashi; Tokuda, Masayuki; Matsuyama, Takashi; Noma, Satoshi; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Torii, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Ikuro; Kawahara, Ko-Ichi

    2009-11-01

    The Japanese apricot, known as Ume in Japanese, has been a traditional Japanese medicine for centuries, and is a familiar and commonly consumed food. The health benefits of Ume are now being widely recognized and have been strengthened by recent studies showing that MK615, an extract of compounds from Ume, has strong anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the potential role of MK615 in the periodontal field remains unknown. Here, we found that MK615 significantly reduced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major etiological agent in localized chronic periodontitis, in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. MK615 markedly inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK, which is associated with pro-inflammatory mediator release pathways. Moreover, MK615 completely blocked LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation. The present results suggest that MK615 has potential as a therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis. PMID:19706286

  20. Sputtered Gum metal thin films showing bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, S; Alhussein, A; Lamri, S; François, M; Sanchette, F; Pulgarin, C; Kiwi, J; Rtimi, S

    2016-10-01

    Super-elastic Titanium based thin films Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-(O) (TNTZ-O) and Ti-24Nb-(N) (TN-N) (at.%) were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) in different reactive atmospheres. The effects of oxygen doping (TNTZ-O) and/or nitrogen doping (TN-N) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the as-deposited coatings were investigated. Nano-indentation measurements show that, in both cases, 1sccm of reactive gas in the mixture is necessary to reach acceptable values of hardness and Young's modulus. Mechanical properties are considered in relation to the films compactness, the compressive stress and the changes in the grain size. Data on Bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility are reported in this study. The biocompatibility tests showed that O-containing samples led to higher cells proliferation. Bacterial inactivation was concomitant with the observed pH and surface potential changes under light and in the dark. The increased cell fluidity leading to bacterial lysis was followed during the bacterial inactivation time. The increasing cell wall fluidity was attributed to the damage of the bacterial outer cell which losing its capacity to regulate the ions exchange in and out of the bacteria. PMID:27434155

  1. High-rate lithium/manganese dioxide batteries; the double cell concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, J. [LITRONIK Batterietechnologie GmbH und Co., Pirna (Germany); Wolf, R. [LITRONIK Batterietechnologie GmbH und Co., Pirna (Germany); Fehrmann, G. [LITRONIK Batterietechnologie GmbH und Co., Pirna (Germany); Staub, R. [LITRONIK Batterietechnologie GmbH und Co., Pirna (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    An implantable defibrillator battery has to provide pulse-power capabilities as well as high energy density. Low self-discharge rates are mandatory and an ability to check the state of charge is required. To accomplish these requirements, a lithium/manganese dioxide battery with a modified active cathode mass has been developed. Usage of a double cell design increases significantly the battery performance within an implantable defibrillator. The design features of a high-rate, pulse-power, manganese dioxide double cell are described. (orig.)

  2. Differential Effect of Culture Temperature and Specific Growth Rate on CHO Cell Behavior in Chemostat Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara, Mauricio; Becerra, Silvana; Berrios, Julio; Osses, Nelson; Reyes, Juan; Rodríguez-Moyá, María; Gonzalez, Ramon; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Mild hypothermia condition in mammalian cell culture technology has been one of the main focuses of research for the development of breeding strategies to maximize productivity of these production systems. Despite the large number of studies that show positive effects of mild hypothermia on specific productivity of r-proteins, no experimental approach has addressed the indirect effect of lower temperatures on specific cell growth rate, nor how this condition possibly affects less specific pro...

  3. Cell Spreading and Lamellipodial Extension Rate Is Regulated by Membrane Tension

    OpenAIRE

    Raucher, Drazen; Sheetz, Michael P

    2000-01-01

    Cell spreading and motility require the extension of the plasma membrane in association with the assembly of actin. In vitro, extension must overcome resistance from tension within the plasma membrane. We report here that the addition of either amphiphilic compounds or fluorescent lipids that expanded the plasma membrane increased the rate of cell spreading and lamellipodial extension, stimulated new lamellipodial extensions, and caused a decrease in the apparent membrane tension. Further, in...

  4. Enhanced transcription rates in membrane-free protocells formed by coacervation of cell lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolova, Ekaterina; Spruijt, Evan; Hansen, Maike M. K.; Dubuc, Emilien; Groen, Joost; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; Piruska, Aigars; Heus, Hans A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid–liquid phase transitions in complex mixtures of proteins and other molecules produce crowded compartments supporting in vitro transcription and translation. We developed a method based on picoliter water-in-oil droplets to induce coacervation in Escherichia coli cell lysate and follow gene expression under crowded and noncrowded conditions. Coacervation creates an artificial cell-like environment in which the rate of mRNA production is increased significantly. Fits to the measured tran...

  5. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  6. The tarantula toxin jingzhaotoxin-XI (κ-theraphotoxin-Cj1a) regulates the activation and inactivation of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Wang, Meichi; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2014-12-15

    Specific peptide toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels by regulating the activation or inactivation of targeted channels. However, few toxins possessing dual effects have been identified. In the present study, we showed that jingzhaotoxin-XI/κ-theraphotoxin-Cj1a (JZTX-XI), a 34-residue peptide from the venom of the Chinese spider Chilobrachys jingzhao, inhibits the sodium conductance (IC50 = 124 ± 26 nM) and slows the fast inactivation (EC50 = 1.18 ± 0.2 μM) of Nav1.5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. JZTX-XI significantly shifted the activation to more depolarized voltages and decreased the deactivation of Nav1.5 currents upon extreme depolarization, but only slightly affected voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition, JZTX-XI caused an approximately five-fold decrease in the rate of recovery from inactivation and an approximately 1.9-fold reduction in the closed-state inactivation rate. Our data suggest that JZTX-XI integrates the functions of site 3 toxins (α-scorpion toxins) with site 4 toxins (β-scorpion and spider toxins) by targeting multiple sites on Nav1.5. The unique properties displayed by JZTX-XI in its inhibitory activity on Nav1.5 suggest that its mechanism of action is distinct from those of site 3 and site 4 toxins, making JZTX-XI a useful probe for investigating the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and toxin-channel interactions. PMID:25240294

  7. Investigation of Battery/Ultracapacitor Energy Storage Rating for a Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Schaltz, Erik; Khaligh, A.; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2008-01-01

    Combining high energy density batteries and high power density ultracapacitors in Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles (FCHEV) results in a high efficient, high performance, low size, and light system. Often the batteries are rated with respect to their energy requirement in order to reduce their volume and mass. This does not prevent deep discharges of the batteries, which is critical to their lifetime. In this paper, the ratings of the batteries and ultracapacitors in a FCHEV are investigated...

  8. DNA replication initiation, doubling of rate of phospholipid synthesis, and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseleau-Petit, D; Képès, F; Peutat, L; D'Ari, R; Képès, A

    1987-01-01

    In synchronized culture of Escherichia coli, the specific arrest of phospholipid synthesis (brought about by glycerol starvation in an appropriate mutant) did not affect the rate of ongoing DNA synthesis but prevented the initiation of new rounds. The initiation block did not depend on cell age at the time of glycerol removal, which could be before, during, or after the doubling in the rate of phospholipid synthesis (DROPS) and as little as 10 min before the expected initiation. We conclude t...

  9. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D.; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  10. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRössert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission.In this modelling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e. uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode.A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fibre synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR. Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for.The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fibre synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates.These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit.

  11. A cell based analysis on p53 response to low dose rate γ-ray irradiation in murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A derivative of murine immortal NIH/PG13Luc cells stably transfected with p53-dependent luciferase reporter plasmid was used to detect transcriptional activity of p53 in response to radiation. Microarray analysis revealed up-regulation of six p53-mediated genes (CDKN1A/p21, MDM2, SIP27, CCNG1/cyclin G1, EI24/PIG8 and Dinb/POLK) by exposure of cells to low dose rates (LDR) 60Co γ-ray for 72 h. Using real-time PCR, a significant elevation in expression of CCNG1/cyclinG1, MDM2 and CDKN1A/p21 was observed at dose rates of over 50 mGy/h. Dose rate dependency of these three p53-mediated genes was also observed. Expression of CCNG1/cyclinG1 at high dose rates (HDR) γ-rays was higher than that for LDR. However, expression of MDM2 for LDR γ-rays was higher than that for HDR. Cells irradiated at LDRs (1 mGy/h and 10 mGy/h) of γ-rays showed G1 phase arrest. Furthermore, G2 growth arrest was observed in cells irradiated at 50 mGy/h and 100 mGy/h, being correlated with p53-mediated CCNG1/cyclinG1 up-regulation. These results implicate that cellular response to radiation differs between the two LDRs of γ-rays used: (i) dose rates of 1-10mGy/h and (ii) dose rates over 50 mGy/h. (author)

  12. Radiation-induced inactivation of single isolated genes mediated by secondary radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two eukaryotic model systems have been established which use inactivation of specific genes to assess the biological importance of DNA damage produced by irradiation of DNA in vitro. Using transcription by endogenous RNA polymerases on isolated r-chromatin from Tetrahymena (system 1) it is found that secondary radicals from t-butanol may inactivate the gene when irradiated under 100% N2O in aqueous solution. Transfer and expression of a cloned gene (gpt) in CHO cells (system 2) is being used to investigate the types of lesions that are important for gene activation in mammalian cells. The results show a correlation between biological inactivation and double strand break induction in DNA. Preliminary data suggest that secondary radicals from isopropanol may cause gene inactivation. (author)

  13. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  14. Ganglioside GM1 influences the proliferation rate of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Kug Choo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gangliosides play important roles in the control of severalbiological processes, including proliferation and transmembranesignaling. In this study, we demonstrate the effect ofganglioside GM1 on the proliferation of mouse inducedpluripotent stem cells (miPSCs. The proliferation rate ofmiPSCs was lower than in mouse embryonic stem cells(mESCs. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis showedthat the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase in miPSCs waslower than that in mESCs. GM1 was expressed in mESCs, butnot miPSCs. To confirm the role of GM1 in miPSC proliferation,miPSCs were treated with GM1. GM1-treated miPSCsexhibited increased cell proliferation and a larger number ofcells in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, phosphorylation ofmitogen-activated protein kinases was increased in GM1-treated miPSCs.

  15. Influence of the rated power in the performance of different proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cells are clean generators that provide both electrical and thermal energy with a high global efficiency level. The characteristics of these devices depend on numerous parameters such as: temperature, fuel and oxidizer pressures, fuel and oxidizer flows, etc. Therefore, their influence should be evaluated to appropriately characterize behaviour of the fuel cell, in order to enable its integration in the electric system. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental analysis of the performance of two commercial Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells of 40 and 1200 W, and introduces the application of the principle of geometrical similarity. Using the principle of geometrical similarity it is possible to extrapolate the results obtained from the evaluation of one fuel cell to other fuel cells with different ratings. An illustrating example is included.

  16. pH-dependent inactivation of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C and porfiromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D; Beall, H; Kasai, M; Arai, H; Gibson, N W; Ross, D

    1993-12-01

    Mitomycin C and porfiromycin were found to inactivate rat hepatic DT-diaphorase. Inactivation was pH dependent; little inactivation was detected at pH 5.8, but inactivation increased as the pH was raised to 7.8. Inactivation was concentration and time dependent and displayed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Inactivation was NADH dependent, indicating that reductive metabolism was necessary for inhibition. [3H]Mitomycin C was covalently bound to DT-diaphorase during inhibition, and the stoichiometry for inactivation of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C was approximately 0.8 nmol of mitomycin C bound/nmol of enzyme. A higher molecular mass product (60 kDa) was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis of DT-diaphorase preincubated with NADH and mitomycin C at pH 7.8, suggesting that mitomycin C is capable of cross-linking DT-diaphorase. The kinetics of inhibition, requirement for NADH for inhibition, covalent binding of [3H] mitomycin C to DT-diaphorase, and approximate 1:1 stoichiometry suggest that this inactivation process may be mechanism based. Inhibition of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C and porfiromycin is not limited to a cell-free system and could also be observed in HT-29 cells in culture at pH 7.2. Bioactivation of mitomycin C or porfiromycin by DT-diaphorase is favored at lower pH, whereas at higher pH values enzyme alkylation and inactivation of DT-diaphorase occur. These data suggest that the success of attempts to exploit the elevated DT-diaphorase content of certain human tumors for improved chemotherapeutic response using mitomycin C or porfiromycin will depend on intracellular pH. PMID:8264549

  17. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  18. Identification of biomolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters in living cells by inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirmohammadi Adel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of in-vivo biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters from experimental data obtained by Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP is becoming more important. Methods and results The Osborne-Moré extended version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was coupled with the experimental data obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP protocol, and the numerical solution of a set of two partial differential equations governing macromolecule mass transport and reaction in living cells, to inversely estimate optimized values of the molecular diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor. The results indicate that the FRAP protocol provides enough information to estimate one parameter uniquely using a nonlinear optimization technique. Coupling FRAP experimental data with the inverse modeling strategy, one can also uniquely estimate the individual values of the binding rate coefficients if the molecular diffusion coefficient is known. One can also simultaneously estimate the dissociation rate parameter and molecular diffusion coefficient given the pseudo-association rate parameter is known. However, the protocol provides insufficient information for unique simultaneous estimation of three parameters (diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters owing to the high intercorrelation between the molecular diffusion coefficient and pseudo-association rate parameter. Attempts to estimate macromolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters simultaneously from FRAP data result in misleading conclusions regarding concentrations of free macromolecule and bound complex inside the cell, average binding time per vacant site, average time for diffusion of macromolecules from one site to the next, and slow or rapid mobility of biomolecules in cells. Conclusion To obtain unique values for molecular diffusion coefficient and

  19. Photodynamic inactivation of contaminated blood with Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Thaila Q.; Inada, Natalia M.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Blanco, Kate C.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of bacteria in the bloodstream can trigger a serious systemic inflammation and lead to sepsis that cause septic shock and death. Studies have shown an increase in the incidence of sepsis over the years and it is mainly due to the increased resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics, since these drugs are still sold and used improperly. The bacterial contamination of blood is also a risk to blood transfusions. Thus, bacteria inactivation in blood is being studied in order to increase the security of the blood supply. The purpose of this study was to decontaminate the blood using the photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Human blood samples in the presence of Photogem® were illuminated at an intensity of 30 mW/cm2, and light doses of 10 and 15 J/cm2. Blood counts were carried out for the quantitative evaluation and blood smears were prepared for qualitative and morphological evaluation by microscopy. The results showed normal viability values for the blood cells analyzed. The light doses showed minimal morphological changes in the membrane of red blood cells, but the irradiation in the presence of the photosensitizer caused hemolysis in red blood cells at the higher concentrations of the photosensitizer. Experiments with Staphylococcus aureus, one of the responsible of sepsis, showed 7 logs10 of photodynamic inactivation with 50 μg/mL and 15 J/cm2 and 1 log10 of this microorganism in a co-culture with blood.

  20. 应用硫酸鱼精蛋白处理蔗糖密度梯度超速离心高度纯化流行性乙型脑炎灭活疫苗(非洲绿猴肾细胞)%Purification of Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine from Vero Cell by Protamine Sulfate and Sucrose Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国松; 韦娟; 姜建; 丁志芬

    2011-01-01

    Objective To prepare a purified inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine (JEV) by ultracentrifugation. Methods Japanese encephalitis supernatant was collected from bioreactor. After concentrated by ultra-filtration and inactivated by formaldehyde, the inactivated virus suspension was treated with protamine sulfate and purified by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The sucrose was removed by ultra-filtration. Results The residual of vero cells deaxyribonucleic acid(DNA) was reduced to 10pg/dose and total protein content was reduced to lμg/dose, the host cell protein was decreased to 15ng/dose, and satisfied recovery was obtained. Conclusion A purified inactivated JEV was prepared by optimizing condition of protamine sulfate treatment and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation purification.%目的 通过离心试验,制备出一种高纯度的流行性乙型脑炎(乙脑)灭活纯化疫苗(非洲绿猴肾细胞)[Purified Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine (Vero Cell),JEV].方法 生物反应器培养的Vero细胞乙脑病毒液,超滤浓缩、甲醛灭活后,应用硫酸鱼精蛋白处理,再经过高速离心,蔗糖密度梯度超速离心纯化,超滤除糖,配制成JEV(Vero细胞).结果 经检测,疫苗中Vero细胞脱氧核糖核酸残留量≤10pg(皮克,Picogram)/剂,蛋白含量≤1μg(微克)/剂,宿主蛋白残留量≤30ng(纳克,Nanogram)/ml,并获得较高的抗原回收率.结论 经过优化硫酸鱼精蛋白处理和蔗糖密度梯度超速离心纯化,制得了高纯度的JEV(Vero细胞).

  1. Strong Constraint on Human Genes Escaping X-Inactivation Is Modulated by their Expression Level and Breadth in Both Sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavney, Andrea; Arbiza, Leonardo; Clark, Andrew G; Keinan, Alon

    2016-02-01

    In eutherian mammals, X-linked gene expression is normalized between XX females and XY males through the process of X chromosome inactivation (XCI). XCI results in silencing of transcription from one ChrX homolog per female cell. However, approximately 25% of human ChrX genes escape XCI to some extent and exhibit biallelic expression in females. The evolutionary basis of this phenomenon is not entirely clear, but high sequence conservation of XCI escapers suggests that purifying selection may directly or indirectly drive XCI escape at these loci. One hypothesis is that this signal results from contributions to developmental and physiological sex differences, but presently there is limited evidence supporting this model in humans. Another potential driver of this signal is selection for high and/or broad gene expression in both sexes, which are strong predictors of reduced nucleotide substitution rates in mammalian genes. Here, we compared purifying selection and gene expression patterns of human XCI escapers with those of X-inactivated genes in both sexes. When we accounted for the functional status of each ChrX gene's Y-linked homolog (or "gametolog"), we observed that XCI escapers exhibit greater degrees of purifying selection in the human lineage than X-inactivated genes, as well as higher and broader gene expression than X-inactivated genes across tissues in both sexes. These results highlight a significant role for gene expression in both sexes in driving purifying selection on XCI escapers, and emphasize these genes' potential importance in human disease. PMID:26494842

  2. INAKT--an interactive non-linear regression program for enzyme inactivation and affinity labelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, A; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1984-01-01

    An interactive program for analysing enzyme activity-time data using non-linear regression analysis is described. Protection studies can also be dealt with. The program computes inactivation rates, dissociation constants and promotion or inhibition parameters with their standard errors. It can also be used to distinguish different inactivation models. The program is written in SIMULA and is menu-oriented for refining or correcting data at the different levels of computing. PMID:6546558

  3. Viral inactivation in hemotherapy: systematic review on inactivators with action on nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marial Sobral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the photoinactivators used in hemotherapy, with action on viral genomes. The SciELO, Science Direct, PubMed and Lilacs databases were searched for articles. The inclusion criterion was that these should be articles on inactivators with action on genetic material that had been published between 2000 and 2010. The key words used in identifying such articles were "hemovigilance", "viral inactivation", "photodynamics", "chemoprevention" and "transfusion safety". Twenty-four articles on viral photoinactivation were found with the main photoinactivators covered being: methylene blue, amotosalen HCl, S-303 frangible anchor linker effector (FRALE, riboflavin and inactin. The results showed that methylene blue has currently been studied least, because it diminishes coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Riboflavin has been studied most because it is a photoinactivator of endogenous origin and has few collateral effects. Amotosalen HCl is effective for platelets and is also used on plasma, but may cause changes both to plasma and to platelets, although these are not significant for hemostasis. S-303 FRALE may lead to neoantigens in erythrocytes and is less indicated for red-cell treatment; in such cases, PEN 110 is recommended. Thus, none of the methods for pathogen reduction is effective for all classes of agents and for all blood components, but despite the high cost, these photoinactivators may diminish the risk of blood-transmitted diseases.

  4. Hyperactivated Wnt signaling induces synthetic lethal interaction with Rb inactivation by elevating TORC1 activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Liao, Yang; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Robin; Searle, Jennifer S; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Du, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a weak allele of axin, which deregulates Wg signaling and increases cell proliferation without obvious effects on cell fate specification, significantly alters metabolic gene expression, causes hypersensitivity to metabolic stress induced by fasting, and induces synergistic apoptosis with mutation of fly Rb ortholog, rbf. Furthermore, hyperactivation of Wg signaling by other components of the Wg pathway also induces synergistic apoptosis with rbf. We show that hyperactivated Wg signaling significantly increases TORC1 activity and induces excessive energy stress with rbf mutation. Inhibition of TORC1 activity significantly suppressed synergistic cell death induced by hyperactivated Wg signaling and rbf inactivation, which is correlated with decreased energy stress and decreased induction of apoptotic regulator expression. Finally the synthetic lethality between Rb and deregulated Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian cells and that inactivation of Rb and APC induces synergistic cell death through a similar mechanism. These results suggest that elevated TORC1 activity and metabolic stress underpin the evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between hyperactivated Wnt signaling and inactivated Rb tumor suppressor. PMID:24809668

  5. Free-radical inactivation of muscle aldolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit muscle aldolase has been shown to be deactivated by addition of irradiated crystals of various sugars and amino acids. Inactivation observed immediately upon dissolution is ascribed to reaction with free radicals, whereas post-dissolution inactivation is ascribed to acid-catalyzed reaction with nonradical radiolysis products. (U.S.)

  6. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  7. Multi-Cell Random Beamforming: Achievable Rate and Degrees of Freedom Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hieu Duy; Hui, Hon Tat

    2012-01-01

    Random beamforming (RBF) is a practically favorable transmission scheme for multiuser multi-antenna downlink systems since it requires only partial channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter. Under the conventional single-cell setup, RBF is known to achieve the optimal sum-capacity scaling law as the number of users goes to infinity, thanks to the multiuser diversity effect that eliminates the inter-user interference. In this paper, we extend the study on RBF to a more practical multi-cell downlink system subject to the additional inter-cell interference (ICI). First, we consider the case of finite user's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We derive a closed-form expression of the achievable sum rate with the multi-cell RBF, based upon which we show the asymptotic sum-rate scaling law as the number of users goes to infinity. Next, we consider the high-SNR regime and for a tractable analysis assume that the number of users in each cell scales in a certain order with the per-cell SNR. Under this setup, we cha...

  8. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  9. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  10. Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsuyo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Feline calicivirus was inactivated electrochemically by a factor of >5 log. • The electrochemical treatment was performed at 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 15 min. • Electrochemical treatment caused oxidation of viral proteins. • Oxidation of viral proteins can lead to loss of viral structural integrity. - Abstract: Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

  11. Effect of cell size and shear stress on bacterium growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlallah, Hadi; Jarrahi, Mojtaba; Herbert, Éric; Peerhossaini, Hassan; PEF Team

    2015-11-01

    Effect of shear stress on the growth rate of Synechocystis and Chlamydomonas cells is studied. An experimental setup was prepared to monitor the growth rate of the microorganisms versus the shear rate inside a clean room, under atmospheric pressure and 20 °C temperature. Digital magnetic agitators are placed inside a closed chamber provided with airflow, under a continuous uniform light intensity over 4 weeks. In order to study the effect of shear stress on the growth rate, different frequencies of agitation are tested, 2 vessels filled with 150 ml of each specie were placed on different agitating system at the desired frequency. The growth rate is monitored daily by measuring the optical density and then correlate it to the cellular concentration. The PH was adjusted to 7 in order to maintain the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, to measure the shear stress distribution, the flow velocity field was measured using PIV. Zones of high and low shear stress were identified. Results show that the growth rate is independent of the shear stress magnitude, mostly for Synechocystis, and with lower independency for Chlamydomonas depending on the cell size for each species.

  12. Investigation of Low-Pressure Ultraviolet Radiation on Inactivation of Rhabitidae Nematode from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Dehghani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rhabditidae is a family of free-living nematodes. Free living nematodes due to their active movement and resistance to chlorination, do not remove in conventional water treatment processes thus can be entered to distribution systems and cause adverse health effects. Ultraviolet radiation (UV can be used as a method of inactivating for these organisms. This cross sectional study was done to investigate the efficiency of ultraviolet lamp in the inactivation of free living nematode in water.Methods: The effects of radation time, turbidity, pH and temperature were invistigated in this study. Ultraviolet lamp used in this study was a 11 W lamp and intensity of this lamp was 24 µw / cm2.Results: Radiation time required to achieve 100% efficiency for larvae nematode and adults was 9 and 10 minutes respectively. There was a significant correlation between the increase in radiation time, temperature rise and turbidity reduction with inactivation efficiency of lamp (P<0.001. Increase of turbidity up 25 NTU decreased inactivation efficiency of larvae and adult nematodes from 100% to 66% and 100% to 64% respectively. Change in pH range from 6 to 9 did not affect the efficiency of inactivation. With increasing temperature inactivation rate increased. Also the effect of the lamp on inactivation of larvae nematod was mor than adults.Conclusions: It seems that with requiring the favorable conditions low-pressure ultraviolet radiation systems can be used for disinfection of water containing Rhabitidae nematode.

  13. BHK cell lines with increased rates of gene amplification are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four cell lines (MP1, -4, -5, -7), isolated from baby hamster kidney cells after simultaneous selection with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate and methotrexate, have previously been shown to amplify their DNA at an increased rate. We now show that all four lines are hypersensitive to killing by UV light and mitomycin C. At high doses of UV light or mitomycin C, the MP lines survived less than 10% or less than 5% as well as parental cells, respectively. After UV irradiation, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was greater in MP than in parental cells, and recovery was slower or absent. A 2- to 3.5-fold increase in the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange was also seen in the four cell lines. In MP5, unscheduled DNA replication after treatment with UV light was only approximately 70% as great as in parental cells and the other MP lines. In MP4 and MP7 cells S phase was elongated. Although their individual properties confirm that the four cell lines are independent, their common properties suggest a relationship between tolerance of DNA damage and gene amplification

  14. Escherichia coli inactivation by pressurized CO2 treatment methods at room temperature: Critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongji; Huang, Doudou; Zhou, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to increase the inactivation efficiency of CO2 against Escherichia coli under mild conditions to facilitate the application of pressurized CO2 technology in water disinfection. Based on an aerating-cycling apparatus, three different treatment methods (continuous aeration, continuous reflux, and simultaneous aeration and reflux) were compared for the same temperature, pressure (0.3-0.7MPa), initial concentration, and exposure time (25min). The simultaneous aeration and reflux treatment (combined method) was shown to be the best method under optimum conditions, which were determined to be 0.7MPa, room temperature, and an exposure time of 10min. This treatment achieved 5.1-log reduction after 25min of treatment at the pressure of 0.3MPa and 5.73-log reduction after 10min at 0.7MPa. Log reductions of 4.4 and 5.0 occurred at the end of continuous aeration and continuous reflux treatments at 0.7MPa, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images suggested that cells were ruptured after the simultaneous aeration and reflux treatment and the continuous reflux treatment. The increase of the solubilization rate of CO2 due to intense hydraulic conditions led to a rapid inactivation effect. It was found that the reduction of intracellular pH caused by CO2 led to a more lethal bactericidal effect. PMID:27155435

  15. Optimization of the medium perfusion rate in a packed-bed bioreactor charged with CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwly, F; von Stockar, U; Kadouri, A

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, the optimal medium perfusion rate to be used for the continuous culture of a recombinant CHO cell line in a packed-bed bioreactor made of Fibra-Cel((R)) disk carriers was determined. A first-generation process had originally been designed with a high perfusion rate, in order to rapidly produce material for pre-clinical and early clinical trials. It was originally operated with a perfusion of 2.6 vvd during production phase in order to supply the high cell density (2.5x10(7) cell ml(-1) of packed-bed) with sufficient fresh medium. In order to improve the economics of this process, a reduction of the medium perfusion rate by -25% and -50% was investigated at small-scale. The best option was then implemented at pilot scale in order to further produce material for clinical trials with an improved second-generation process. With a -25% reduction of the perfusion rate, the volumetric productivity was maintained compared to the first-generation process, but a -30% loss of productivity was obtained when the medium perfusion rate was further reduced to -50% of its original level. The protein quality under reduced perfusion rate conditions was analyzed for purity, N-glycan sialylation level, abundance of dimers or aggregates, and showed that the quality of the final drug substance was comparable to that obtained in reference conditions. Finally, a reduction of -25% medium perfusion was implemented at pilot scale in the second-generation process, which enabled to maintain the same productivity and the same quality of the molecule, while reducing costs of media, material and manpower of the production process. For industrial applications, it is recommended to test whether and how far the perfusion rate can be decreased during the production phase - provided that the product is not sensitive to residence time - with the benefits of reduced cost of goods and to simplify manufacturing operations. PMID:19003257

  16. Rate equation model of phototransduction into the membranous disks of mouse rod cells

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Rei; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to investigate the rod phototransduction process in the mouse. In particular, we explored the biochemical reactions of several chemical components that contribute to the signaling process into/around the membranous disks in the outer segments of the rod cells. We constructed a rate equation model incorporating the molecular crowding effects of rhodopsin according to experimental results, which may hinder the diffusion of molecules on the disk mem- brane. The present model could effectively reproduce and explain the mechanisms of the following phenomena observed in experiments. First, the activations and relaxation of the wild-type mouse rod cell progressed more slowly than those of mutant cells containing half the amount of rhodopsin on the disk membrane. Second, the strong photoactivated state of the cell was sustained for a longer period when the light stimuli were strong. Finally, the lifetime of photoactivation exhibited a logarithmic increase with increasing light streng...

  17. Importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation in the evaluation of biological experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclei of cells within the bodies of astronauts traveling on extended missions outside the geomagnetosphere will experience single traversals of particles with high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) (e.g., one iron ion per one hundred years, on average) superimposed on a background of tracks with low LET (approximately one proton every two to three days, and one helium ion per month). In addition, some cell populations within the body will be proliferating, thus possibly providing increasing numbers of cells with 'initiated' targets for subsequent radiation hits. These temporal characteristics are not generally reproduced in laboratory experimental protocols. Implications of the differences in the temporal patterns of radiation delivery between conventionally designed radiation biology experiments and the pattern to be experienced in space are examined and the importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation are pointed out in the context of radiation risk assessment on long mission in space.

  18. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here. PMID:27046340

  19. Photothermal inactivation of bacteria on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Greggy M.; Ibañez de Santi Ferrara, Felipe; Zhao, Fusheng; Rodrigues, Debora F.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Hospital-acquired bacterial infections are frequently associated with the pathogenic biofilms on surfaces of devices and instruments used in medical procedures. The utilization of thermal plasmonic agents is an innovative approach for sterilizing hospital equipment and for in vivo therapeutic treatment of bacterial infection. A photothermal inactivation technique via array of nanoporous gold disks (NPGDs) has been developed by irradiating near infrared (NIR) light onto deposited bacterial cells (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Exiguobacterium AT1B) on the surface of metal nanostructure. The physical and photothermal properties of the NPGD substrate were investigated using topographical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermographic infrared imaging. Bacterial viability studies on NPGD substrates irradiated with and without NIR light were evaluated using a fluorescence-based two-component stain assay. The results show that the heat generated from the NPGD substrate promotes high cell death counts (~100%) at short exposure durations (<25 s) even for thermally-resistant bacterial strains. The photothermal effects on NPGD substrate can lead to point-of-care applications.

  20. Effects of Proton Radiation Dose, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ware, J.H.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X. S.; Rusek, A.; Kennedy, A R

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05–0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals...

  1. Investigation of Battery/Ultracapacitor Energy Storage Rating for a Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaltz, Erik; Khaligh, A.; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2008-01-01

    Combining high energy density batteries and high power density ultracapacitors in Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles (FCHEV) results in a high efficient, high performance, low size, and light system. Often the batteries are rated with respect to their energy requirement in order to reduce their...... volume and mass. This does not prevent deep discharges of the batteries, which is critical to their lifetime. In this paper, the ratings of the batteries and ultracapacitors in a FCHEV are investigated. Comparison of system volume, mass, efficiency, and battery lifetime due to the rating of the energy...... storage devices are presented. It is concluded, that by sufficient rating of the battery or ultracapacitors, an appropriate balance between system volume, mass, efficiency, and battery lifetime is achievable....

  2. The Effect of Prolonged Culture of Chromosomally Abnormal Human Embryos on The Rate of Diploid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Bazrgar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A decrease in aneuploidy rate following a prolonged co-culture of human blastocysts has been reported. As co-culture is not routinely used in assisted reproductive technology, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of the prolonged single culture on the rate of diploid cells in human embryos with aneuploidies. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to reanalyze surplus blastocysts undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD on day 3 postfertilization. They were randomly studied on days 6 or 7 following fertilization. Results: Of the 30 analyzed blastocysts, mosaicism was observed in 26(86.6%, while 2(6.7% were diploid, and 2(6.7% were triploid. Of those with mosaicism, 23(88.5% were determined to be diploid-aneuploid and 3(11.5% were aneuploid mosaic. The total frequency of embryos with more than 50% diploid cells was 33.3% that was lower on day 7 in comparison with the related value on day 6 (P<0.05; however, there were no differences when the embryos were classified according to maternal age, blastocyst developmental stage, total cell number on day 3, and embryo quality. Conclusion: Although mosaicism is frequently observed in blastocysts, the prolonged single culture of blastocysts does not seem to increase the rate of normal cells.

  3. Microdosimetric approach to the anlysis of cell responses at low dose and low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to the problem of radiation response is proposed and described by which effects produced at low doses and dose rates can be understood as the consequences of radiation absorption events in the nucleus of a single relevant cell and in its DNA. Radiation quality appears as the consequence of two related probabilities, that of energy deposition in the cell nucleus and that of energy deposition in DNA. The starting point is a ''gross sensitive volume'', GSV, identified with an average mammalian cell nucleus and composed of smaller sensitive volumes, identified with some critical parts of the DNA genome. The GSV leads to the definitions of an ''elemental dose'', the ''integral probability of responses of the GSV population'', and the smaller volumes lead to a ''relative local efficiency''. This approach is applied to various biological endpoints illustrating its merits. The level of dose below which the fraction of hit cells depends linearly on absorbed dose and is independent of dose rate, is delineated. Finally, guide lines for designing low dose and low dose rate experiments are proposed. (author)

  4. Treatment of human muscle cells with popular dietary supplements increase mitochondrial function and metabolic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Roger A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a common pathology with increasing incidence, and is associated with increased mortality and healthcare costs. Several treatment options for obesity are currently available ranging from behavioral modifications to pharmaceutical agents. Many popular dietary supplements claim to enhance weight loss by acting as metabolic stimulators, however direct tests of their effect on metabolism have not been performed. Purpose This work identified the effects popular dietary supplements on metabolic rate and mitochondrial biosynthesis in human skeletal muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with popular dietary supplements at varied doses for 24 hours. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α, an important stimulator of mitochondrial biosynthesis, was quantified using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial content was measured using flow cytometry confirmed with confocal microscopy. Glycolytic metabolism was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification rate (ECAR and oxidative metabolism was quantified by measuring oxygen consumption rate (OCR. Total relative metabolism was quantified using WST-1 end point assay. Results Treatment of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells with dietary supplements OxyElite Pro (OEP or Cellucore HD (CHD induced PGC-1α leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content. Glycolytic and oxidative capacities were also significantly increased following treatment with OEP or CHD. Conclusion This is the first work to identify metabolic adaptations in muscle cells following treatment with popular dietary supplements including enhanced mitochondrial biosynthesis, and glycolytic, oxidative and total metabolism.

  5. Detailed analysis of X chromosome inactivation in a 49,XXXXX pentasomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Lucia M; Cardoso, Leila CA; Moura, Vera LS; Moreira, Miguel AM; Menezes, Albert N; Llerena, Juan C; Seuánez, Héctor N

    2009-01-01

    Background Pentasomy X (49,XXXXX) has been associated with a severe clinical condition, presumably resulting from failure or disruption of X chromosome inactivation. Here we report that some human X chromosomes from a patient with 49,XXXXX pentasomy were functionally active following isolation in inter-specific (human-rodent) cell hybrids. A comparison with cytogenetic and molecular findings provided evidence that more than one active X chromosome was likely to be present in the cells of this patient, accounting for her abnormal phenotype. Results 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-pulsed cultures showed different patterns among late replicating X chromosomes suggesting that their replication was asynchronic and likely to result in irregular inactivation. Genotyping of the proband and her mother identified four maternal and one paternal X chromosomes in the proband. It also identified the paternal X chromosome haplotype (P), indicating that origin of this X pentasomy resulted from two maternal, meiotic non-disjunctions. Analysis of the HUMANDREC region of the androgen receptor (AR) gene in the patient's mother showed a skewed inactivation pattern, while a similar analysis in the proband showed an active paternal X chromosome and preferentially inactivated X chromosomes carrying the 173 AR allele. Analyses of 33 cell hybrid cell lines selected in medium containing hypoxanthine, aminopterin and thymidine (HAT) allowed for the identification of three maternal X haplotypes (M1, M2 and MR) and showed that X chromosomes with the M1, M2 and P haplotypes were functionally active. In 27 cell hybrids in which more than one X haplotype were detected, analysis of X inactivation patterns provided evidence of preferential inactivation. Conclusion Our findings indicated that 12% of X chromosomes with the M1 haplotype, 43.5% of X chromosomes with the M2 haplotype, and 100% of the paternal X chromosome (with the P haplotype) were likely to be functionally active in the proband's cells, a

  6. Neutron and gamma dose rates determined in a cell phantom at the Finnish BNCT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry studies have played an essential role in the Finnish BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) project. Various phantom studies have been carried out in the FiR I epithermal neutron beam to characterise the gamma and the neutron dose distributions involved in the patient treatment circumstances and to evaluate the beam model used for dose planning. During the summer 1999 cell-line phantom irradiations were done. Dose calculations and measurements were required to determine the dose delivered to the cells at the different locations in the phantom. A cylindrical water-filled polyethylene phantom was used in contact with the 14 cm diameter circular beam aperture. The phantom was modelled by deterministic DORT code. Activation detectors (MT-AI wires), twin (Mg and TE) ionisations chambers (IC) and TL detectors were used to establish the measured dose and 55Mn(n,γ) reaction rates compared to the calculated values. The measured (IC) and calculated gamma and neutron dose rates at three depths in the phantom will be presented. The measured gamma dose rates were about 10 % lower, and the neutron dose rates about 35% lower than the calculations. The difference between the measured 55Mn reaction rates and the calculations was insignificant (= 1%). During the measurements the reactor was operated at the nominal power of 250 kW. The measured (IC) gamma dose rates were in fair agreement with the calculated values but the neutron dose rates displayed considerable discrepancy. However, the activation results, having the best accuracy, were very consistent with the calculated 55Mn reaction rates and therefore the dose determination could be based on the simulated results (author)

  7. Relationship of HepG2 cell sensitivity to continuous low dose-rate irradiation with ATM phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quelin Mei; Jianyong Yang; Duanming Du; Zaizhong Cheng; Pengcheng liu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells and its effect on HepG2 cell survival under a continuous low dose-rate irradiation.Methods: HepG2 cells were exposed to equivalent doses of irradiation delivered at either a continuous low dose-rate (7.76 cGy/h) or a high dose-rate (4500 cGy/h).The ATM phosphorylated proteins and surviving fraction of HepG2 cell after low dose-rate irradiation were compared with that after equivalent doses of high dose-rate irradiation.Results: The phosphorylation of ATM protein was maximal at 0.5 Gy irradiation delivered at either a high dose-rate or a continuous low dose-rate.As the radiation dose increased, the phosphorylation of ATM protein decreased under continuous low dose-rate irradiation.However, the phosphorylation of ATM protein was remained stable under high dose-rate irradiation.When the phosphorylation of ATM protein under continuous low dose-rate irradiation was equal to that under high dose-rate irradiation, there was no significant difference in the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells between two ir-radiation methods (P>0.05).When the phosphorylation of ATM protein significantly decreased after continuous low dose-rate irradiation compared with that after high dose-rate irradiation, increased amounts of cell killing was found in low dose-rate irradiation (P<0.01).Conclusion: Continuous low dose-rate irradiation increases HepG2