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Sample records for cell immune responses

  1. Cell-mediated immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A focused...... and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two...... triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). CONCLUSIONS...

  2. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

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    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  3. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

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    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  4. The Role of the Immune Response in Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triozzi, Pierre L., E-mail: triozzp@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Fernandez, Anthony P. [Departments of Dermatology and Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2013-02-28

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is implicated in its pathogenesis. Immune mechanisms are also implicated. Patients who are immunosuppressed have an increased risk. There is evidence that high intratumoral T-cell counts and immune transcripts are associated with favorable survival. Spontaneous regressions implicate immune effector mechanisms. Immunogenicity is also supported by observation of autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes. Case reports suggest that immune modulation, including reduction of immune suppression, can result in tumor regression. The relationships between MCPyV infection, the immune response, and clinical outcome, however, remain poorly understood. Circulating antibodies against MCPyV antigens are present in most individuals. MCPyV-reactive T cells have been detected in both MCC patients and control subjects. High intratumoral T-cell counts are also associated with favorable survival in MCPyV-negative MCC. That the immune system plays a central role in preventing and controlling MCC is supported by several observations. MCCs often develop, however, despite the presence of humoral and cellular immune responses. A better understanding on how MCPyV and MCC evade the immune response will be necessary to develop effective immunotherapies.

  5. Host Cell Autophagy in Immune Response to Zoonotic Infections

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    Panagiotis Skendros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  6. T cell immune responses in psoriasis.

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    Zohre Jadali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A central role for T cells and their cytokines in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed; however, there are controversies over the details of this issue. The goal of this study is to summarise currently available data on the importance of T cells in psoriasis pathogenesis. A systematic review of the English medical literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Iranian databases including Iranmedex, and SID for studies on associations between the involvement of T cell subsets and psoriasis. The results of the present study indicate that alterations in the number and function of different subsets of T-cells are associated with psoriasis. It appears that studies on T cell subsets contributed to understanding the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. In addition, it may have provided novel therapeutic opportunities in ameliorating immunopathologies.

  7. Mast cells and basophils in cutaneous immune responses.

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    Otsuka, A; Kabashima, K

    2015-02-01

    Mast cells and basophils share some functions in common and are generally associated with T helper 2 (Th2) immune responses, but taking basophils as surrogate cells for mast cell research or vice versa for several decades is problematic. Thus far, their in vitro functions have been well studied, but their in vivo functions remained poorly understood. New research tools for their functional analysis in vivo have revealed previously unrecognized roles for mast cells and basophils in several skin disorders. Newly developed mast cell-deficient mice provided evidence that mast cells initiate contact hypersensitivity via activating dendritic cells. In addition, studies using basophil-deficient mice have revealed that basophils were responsible for cutaneous Th2 skewing to haptens and peptide antigens but not to protein antigens. Moreover, human basophils infiltrate different skin lesions and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of skin diseases ranging from atopic dermatitis to autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances related to mast cells and basophils in human and murine cutaneous immune responses.

  8. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  9. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

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    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  10. Primary immune system responders to nucleus pulposus cells: evidence for immune response in disc herniation

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    K Murai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although intervertebral disc herniation and associated sciatica is a common disease, its molecular pathogenesis is not well understood. Immune responses are thought to be involved. This study provides direct evidence that even non-degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP cells elicit immune responses. An in vitro colony forming inhibition assay demonstrated the suppressive effects of autologous spleen cells on NP cells and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed the positive cytotoxic effects of natural killer (NK cells and macrophages on NP cells. Non-degenerated rat NP tissues transplanted into wild type rats and immune-deficient mice demonstrated a significantly higher NP cell survival rate in immune-deficient mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed the presence of macrophages and NK cells in the transplanted NP tissues. These results suggest that even non-degenerated autologous NP cells are recognized by macrophages and NK cells, which may have an immunological function in the early phase of disc herniation. These findings contribute to understanding resorption and the inflammatory reaction to disc herniation.

  11. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

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    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications.

  12. The Reticular Cell Network : A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During inf

  13. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

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    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  14. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

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    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  15. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

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    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  16. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

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    Ervin E Kara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H1/T(H2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  17. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

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    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  18. Effects of chrysotherapy on cell mediated immune response.

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    Lorber, A; Jackson, W H; Simon, T M

    1982-01-01

    Auranofin (AF) differs significantly from gold sodium thiomalate (GSTM) in formulation, i.e., aurous gold is stabilized by dual sulfur and phosphorus ligands, hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic characteristics, and lack of ionic charge. These attributes facilitate: oral absorption of AF, plasma membrane penetration, increase in intracellular lymphocyte gold concentration; and perhaps thereby influence lymphocyte function. AF treated subjects recorded prompt and sharp declines in mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (LMR) greater than 80%; suppressed response to skin testing with dinitrochlorobenezene (DNCB) in 11 of 14 subjects; and blebbing of lymphocyte membranes by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, lymphocytes from a matched group of GSTM treated subjects recorded later onset and less suppression of LMR; normal response to DNCB skin testing; and did not manifest membrane blebbing. Accordingly, the therapeutic action of AF on immune response was observed in the 16 subjects receiving 6 mg/d of an average of 45 weeks to effect primarily cell mediated rather than humoral immune response when compared with a matched group of GSTM treated patients.

  19. Cultured Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulate an Immune Response by Providing Immune Cells with Toll-Like Receptor 2 Ligand.

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    Weinstock, Ada; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Porat, Ziv; Selitrennik, Michael; Zipori, Dov

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) serve as supporting and regulatory cells, by providing tissues with multiple factors and are also known for their immunosuppressive capabilities. Our laboratory had previously shown that MSCs expressed toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and are activated by its ligand Pam3Cys. TLR2 is an important component of the innate immune system, as it recognizes bacterial lipopeptides, thus priming a pro-inflammatory immune response. This study showed that Pam3Cys attached extensively to cells of both wild-type and TLR2 deficient cultured MSCs, thus, independently of TLR2. The TLR2 independent binding occurred through the adsorption of the palmitoyl moieties of Pam3Cys. It was further showed that Pam3Cys was transferred from cultured MSCs to immune cells. Moreover, Pam3Cys provided to the immune cells induced a pro-inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Overall, it is demonstrated herein that a TLR2 ligand bound to MSCs also through a TLR2 independent mechanism. Furthermore, the ligand incorporated by MSCs is subsequently released to stimulate an immune response both in vitro and in vivo. It is thus suggested that during bacterial infection, stromal cells may retain a reservoir of the TLR2 ligands, in a long-term manner, and release them slowly to maintain an immune response.

  20. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the ...

  1. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J.O.; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recover...

  2. Cells involved in the immune response. XXIX Establishment of optimal conditions for the primary and secondary immune responses by rabbit lymphoid cells in vitro.

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    Richter, M; Behelak, Y

    1975-01-01

    Attempts were made to initiate the primary and secondary humoral immune responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in vitro as determined by the hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, with cell suspensions prepared from a variety of lymphoid organs of the rabbit- thymus, bone marrow, spleen, appendix, sacculus rotundus, Peyer's patches, popliteal lymph node and circulating leukocytes. A number of different media and gaseous phases were utilized in order to establish the optimal conditions for the immune response in vitro. The induction of a secondary PFC response was consistently obtained with 'memory' spleen cells obtained from rabbits 3-6 months following intravenous immunization with SRBC but not with cells of any of the other lymphoid organs, and this response probably represents the activity of memory cells which reside in the rabbit spleen. A primary response was observed only with 'normal' spleen cells, and the medium which faciliated the response was different from that which facilitated the induction of the secondary response in vitro. It was also observed, using a medium in which normal spleen cells were incapable of generating PFC', that mixed cultures of normal spleen and normal appendix or bone marrow cells could give a marked PFC reponse in vitro. Whether the PFC response to SRBCs obtained with the lymphoid cells of normal, unimmunized rabbits represent a true primary response, a secondary response, or a response of a different nature as a consequence of continuous subthreshold immunization of the rabbit with enteric microorganisms which cross-react with the antigen, remains to be determined. However, out initial successes with cultures consisting of cells of at least two distinct lymphoid organs in cases where the cells of any one of these organs could not respond, suggest that interaction of at least two functionally distinct cells is required and that the repsonse observed in vitro is probably a primary immune response.

  3. Neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells generated less autogenous immune response.

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    Huang, Ke; Liu, PengFei; Li, Xiang; Chen, ShuBin; Wang, LiHui; Qin, Li; Su, ZhengHui; Huang, WenHao; Liu, Juli; Jia, Bei; Liu, Jie; Cai, JingLei; Pei, DuanQing; Pan, GuangJin

    2014-02-01

    The breakthrough development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) raises the prospect of patient-specific treatment for many diseases through the replacement of affected cells. However, whether iPSC-derived functional cell lineages generate a deleterious immune response upon auto-transplantation remains unclear. In this study, we differentiated five human iPSC lines from skin fibroblasts and urine cells into neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and analyzed their immunogenicity. Through co-culture with autogenous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), we showed that both somatic cells and iPSC-derived NPCs do not stimulate significant autogenous PBMC proliferation. However, a significant immune reaction was detected when these cells were co-cultured with allogenous PBMCs. Furthermore, no significant expression of perforin or granzyme B was detected following stimulation of autogenous immune effector cells (CD3(+)CD8(-) T cells, CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells or CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells) by NPCs in both PBMC and T cell co-culture systems. These results suggest that human iPSC-derived NPCs may not initiate an immune response in autogenous transplants, and thus set a base for further preclinical evaluation of human iPSCs.

  4. Immune response

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    ... and tetanus antitoxin are examples of passive immunization. BLOOD COMPONENTS The immune system includes certain types of white ... lymphocytes develop, they normally learn to tell the difference between your own body tissues and substances that ...

  5. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

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    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  6. Wolbachia surface protein induces innate immune responses in mosquito cells

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    Pinto Sofia B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria are capable of inducing chronic upregulation of insect immune genes in some situations and this phenotype may influence the transmission of important insect-borne pathogens. However the molecules involved in these interactions have not been characterized. Results Here we show that recombinant Wolbachia Surface Protein (WSP stimulates increased transcription of immune genes in mosquito cells derived from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which is naturally uninfected with Wolbachia; at least two of the upregulated genes, TEP1 and APL1, are known to be important in Plasmodium killing in this species. When cells from Aedes albopictus, which is naturally Wolbachia-infected, were challenged with WSP lower levels of upregulation were observed than for the An. gambiae cells. Conclusions We have found that WSP is a strong immune elicitor in a naturally Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito species (Anopheles gambiae while a milder elicitor in a naturally-infected species (Aedes albopictus. Since the WSP of a mosquito non-native (nematode Wolbachia strain was used, these data suggest that there is a generalized tolerance to WSP in Ae. albopictus.

  7. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: identification of cell type-specific inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma, such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the inflammatory response to lung injury. In this study, we used chimeric mice generated by adoptive bone marrow transfer between TLR2 or TLR4 and wild-type mice. We found that, in the lung, both bone marrow-derived and nonmyeloid cells contribute to TLR-dependent inflammatory responses after injury in a cell type-specific manner. We also show a novel TLR2-dependent injury mechanism that is associated with enhanced airway epithelial cell apoptosis and increased pulmonary FasL and Fas expression in the lungs from injured mice. Thus, in addition to cardiopulmonary physiological dysfunction, cell type-specific TLR and their differential response to injury may provide novel specific targets for management of patients with pulmonary contusion.

  8. Vpu-Deficient HIV Strains Stimulate Innate Immune Signaling Responses in Target Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Fleming, Lamar; McNevin, John; Hladik, Florian; McElrath, M. Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Acute virus infection induces a cell-intrinsic innate immune response comprising our first line of immunity to limit virus replication and spread, but viruses have developed strategies to overcome these defenses. HIV-1 is a major public health problem; however, the virus-host interactions that regulate innate immune defenses against HIV-1 are not fully defined. We have recently identified the viral protein Vpu to be a key determinant responsible for HIV-1 targeting and degradation of interfer...

  9. Immune response in virus model structured by cell infection-age.

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    Browne, Cameron

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns modeling the coupled within-host population dynamics of virus and CTL (Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte) immune response. There is substantial evidence that the CTL immune response plays a crucial role in controlling HIV in infected patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that certain CTL variants can recognize HIV infected cells early in the infected cell lifecycle before viral production, while other CTLs only detect viral proteins (epitopes) presented on the surface of infected cells after viral production. The kinetics of epitope presentation and immune recognition can impact the efficacy of the immune response. We extend previous virus models to include cell infection-age structure in the infected cell compartment and immune response killing/activation rates of a PDE-ODE system. We characterize solutions to our system utilizing semigroup theory, determine equilibria and reproduction numbers, and prove stability and persistence results. Numerical simulations show that ' early immune recognition' precipitates both enhanced viral control and sustained oscillations via a Hopf bifurcation. In addition to inducing oscillatory dynamics, considering immune process rates to be functions of cell infection-age can also lead to coexistence of multiple distinct immune effector populations.

  10. Dendritic cell-derived IL-15 controls the induction of CD8 T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, René; Brandt, Katja; Bulanova, Elena; Mirghomizadeh, Farhad; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-12-01

    The development and the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells are dependent on IL-15. Here, we have studied the source and mechanism of how IL-15 modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated Th1 immune responses by employing two delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) models. IL-15-deficient (IL-15(-/-)) mice or mice treated with soluble IL-15Ralpha as an IL-15 antagonist showed significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent DTH responses, while activation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell functions remained unaffected. Injection of antigen-labeled dendritic cells (DC) from IL-15(+/+), IL-15(-/-) or IL-15Ralpha(-/-) mice revealed that DC-derived IL-15 is an absolute requirement for the initiation of DTH response. The re-establishment of the interaction of IL-15 with the IL-15Ralpha by incubating IL-15(-/-) DC with IL-15 completely restored the capacity to prime T cells for DTH induction in vivo. Moreover, IL-15 also enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC and triggered in vitro CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 release. Taken together, the data suggest that an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Ralpha signaling loop in DC is essential for inducing CD8(+)-dependent Th1 immune responses in mice. Therefore, targeted manipulation of this loop promises to be an effective, novel strategy for therapeutic modulation of clinically relevant DTH reactions.

  11. Cell-mediated immune responses in rainbow trout after DNA immunization against the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utke, Katrin; Kock, Holger; Schuetze, Heike

    2008-01-01

    To identify viral proteins that induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) against viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)-infected cells, rainbow trout were immunized with DNA vectors encoding the glycoprotein G or the nucleocapsid protein N of VHSV. The G protein was a more potent trigger...... injection site rather than to injection sites of heterologous vaccines, suggesting the antigen specificity of homing. By demonstrating CMC responses to distinct viral proteins and homing in rainbow trout, these results substantially contribute to the understanding of the teleost immune system....... of cytotoxic cells than the N protein. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from trout immunized against the G protein killed both VHSV-infected MHC class I matched (RTG-2) and VHSV-infected xenogeneic (EPC) target cells, suggesting the involvement of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells...

  12. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  13. T helper cell polarisation as a measure of the maturation of the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, S.B.; Stolte, H.H.; Chow, A.W.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T helper cell polarisation is important under chronic immune stimulatory conditions and drives the type of the evolving immune response. Mice treated with superantigens in vivo display strong effects on T-h subset differentiation. The aim of the study was to detect the intrinsic capacity

  14. Acellular pertussis booster in adolescents induces Th1 and memory CD8+ T cell immune response.

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    Nikolaus Rieber

    Full Text Available In a number of countries, whole cell pertussis vaccines (wcP were replaced by acellular vaccines (aP due to an improved reactogenicity profile. Pertussis immunization leads to specific antibody production with the help of CD4(+ T cells. In earlier studies in infants and young children, wcP vaccines selectively induced a Th1 dominated immune response, whereas aP vaccines led to a Th2 biased response. To obtain data on Th1 or Th2 dominance of the immune response in adolescents receiving an aP booster immunization after a wcP or aP primary immunization, we analyzed the concentration of Th1 (IL-2, TNF-α, INF-γ and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 cytokines in supernatants of lymphocyte cultures specifically stimulated with pertussis antigens. We also investigated the presence of cytotoxic T cell responses against the facultative intracellular bacterium Bordetella pertussis by quantifying pertussis-specific CD8(+ T cell activation following the aP booster immunization. Here we show that the adolescent aP booster vaccination predominantly leads to a Th1 immune response based on IFNgamma secretion upon stimulation with pertussis antigen, irrespective of a prior whole cell or acellular primary vaccination. The vaccination also induces an increase in peripheral CD8(+CD69(+ activated pertussis-specific memory T cells four weeks after vaccination. The Th1 bias of this immune response could play a role for the decreased local reactogenicity of this adolescent aP booster immunization when compared to the preceding childhood acellular pertussis booster. Pertussis-specific CD8(+ memory T cells may contribute to protection against clinical pertussis.

  15. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  16. B and T cell crosstalk in anti-bacterial immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Wit

    2012-01-01

    This thesis shows that phagocytosis of Salmonella by B cells may generate a survival niche and transport vehicle for Salmonella, but that simultaneously Salmonella-infected B cells induce an optimal anti-Salmonella response through activation of multiple arms of the adaptive immune response. The the

  17. Exercise boosts immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  18. Competition for IL-2 between regulatory and effector T cells to chisel immune responses

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    Thomas eHöfer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss how the competition for cytokines between different cells of the immune system can shape the system wide immune response. We focus on interleukin-2 (IL-2 secretion by activated effector T cells (Teff and on the competition for IL-2 consumption between Teff and regulatory T cells (Treg. We discuss the evidence for the mechanism in which the depletion of IL-2 by Treg cells would be sufficient to suppress an autoimmune response, yet not strong enough to prevent an immune response. We present quantitative estimations and summarize our modeling effort to show that the tug-of-war between Treg and Teff cells for IL-2 molecules can be won by Treg cells in the case of weak activation of Teff leading to the suppression of the immune response. Or, for strongly activated Teff cells, it can be won by Teff cells bringing about the activation of the whole adaptive immune system. Finally, we discuss some recent applications attempting to achieve clinical effects through the modulation of IL-2 consumption by Treg compartment.

  19. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s, and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs, which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well

  20. CD4+ T-cell priming as biomarker to study immune response to preventive vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCiabattini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available T-cell priming is a critical event in the initiation of the immune response to vaccination since it deeply influences both the magnitude and the quality of the immune response induced. CD4+ T-cell priming, required for the induction of high-affinity antibodies and immune memory, represents a key target for improving and modulating vaccine immunogenicity. A major challenge in the study of in vivo T-cell priming is due to the low frequency of antigen-specific T cells. This review discusses the current knowledge on antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell priming in the context of vaccination, as well as the most advanced tools for the characterization of the in vivo T-cell priming and the opportunities offered by the application of systems biology.

  1. IκB Kinase ε Is an NFATc1 Kinase that Inhibits T Cell Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT is crucial for immune responses. IKKε is an IκB kinase (IKK-related kinase, and the function of IKKε remains obscure in T cells, despite its abundant expression. We report that IKKε inhibits NFAT activation and T cell responses by promoting NFATc1 phosphorylation. During T cell activation, IKKε was transiently activated to phosphorylate NFATc1. Loss of IKKε elevated T cell antitumor and antiviral immunity and, therefore, reduced tumor development and persistent viral infection. IKKε was activated in CD8+ T cells of mice bearing melanoma or persistently infected with a model herpesvirus. These results collectively show that IKKε promotes NFATc1 phosphorylation and inhibits T cell responses, identifying IKKε as a crucial negative regulator of T cell activation and a potential target for immunotherapy.

  2. Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Summerfield

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are major players in both innate and adaptive immune responses against influenza virus. These immune responses, as well as the important interface between the innate and adaptive systems, are orchestrated by specialized subsets of DC, including conventional steady-state DC, migratory DC and plasmacytoid DC. The characteristics and efficacy of the responses are dependent on the relative activity of these DC subsets, rendering DC crucial for the development of both naïve and memory immune responses. However, due to their critical role, DC also contribute to the immunopathological processes observed during acute influenza, such as that caused by the pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Therein, the role of different DC subsets in the induction of interferon type I, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses is important for the outcome of interaction between the virus and host immune defences. The present review will present current knowledge on this area, relating to the importance of DC activity for the induction of efficacious humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. This will include the main viral elements associated with the triggering or inhibition of DC activation. Finally, the current knowledge on understanding how differences in various vaccines influence the manner of immune defence induction will be presented.

  3. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  4. Epithelial cells, the “switchboard” of respiratory immune defense responses: effects of air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Loretta; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Summary “Epimmunome”, a term introduced recently by Swamy and colleagues, describes all molecules and pathways used by epithelial cells (ECs) to instruct immune cells. Today, we know that ECs are among the first sites within the human body to be exposed to pathogens (such as influenza viruses) and that the release of chemokine and cytokines by ECs is influenced by inhaled agents. The role of the ECs as a switchboard to initiate and regulate immune responses is altered through air pollutant exposure, such as ozone, tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust emissions. The details of the interplay between ECs and immune cells are not yet fully understood and need to be investigated further. Co-culture models, cell specific genetically-modified mice and the analysis of human biopsies provide great tools to gain knowledge about potential mechanisms. Increasing our understanding about the role of ECs in respiratory immunity may yield novel therapeutic targets to modulate downstream diseases. PMID:22851042

  5. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  6. Single Cell Functional Proteomics for Monitoring Immune Response in Cancer Therapy: Technology, Methods and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eMa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, significant progresses have taken place in the field of cancer immunotherapeutics, which are being developed for most human cancers. New immunotherapeutics, such as Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4, have been approved for clinical treatment; cell-based immunotherapies such as adoptive cell transfer (ACT have either passed the final stage of human studies (i.e., sipuleucel-T for the treatment of selected neoplastic malignancies or reached the stage of phase II/III clinical trials. Immunotherapetics has become a sophisticated field. Multimodal therapeutic regimens comprising several functional modules (up to 5 in the case of ACT have been developed to provide focused therapeutic responses with improved efficacy and reduced side-effects. However, a major challenge remains: the lack of effective and clinically-applicable immune assessment methods. Due to the complexity of antitumor immune responses within patients, it is difficult to provide comprehensive assessment of therapeutic efficacy and mechanism. To address this challenge, new technologies have been developed to directly profile the cellular immune functions and the functional heterogeneity. With the goal to measure the functional proteomics of single immune cells, these technologies are informative, sensitive, high-throughput and highly-multiplex. They have been used to uncover new knowledge of cellular immune functions and have be utilized for rapid, informative, and longitudinal monitoring of immune response in clinical anti-cancer treatment. In addition, new computational tools are required to integrate high dimensional data sets generated from the comprehensive, single-cell level measurements of patient’s immune responses to guide accurate and definitive diagnostic decision. These single-cell immune function assessment tools will likely contribute to new understanding of therapy mechanism, pre-treatment stratification of patients and ongoing therapeutic monitoring and

  7. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  8. Longitudinal analysis of antibody response to immunization in paediatric survivors after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Hartford, Christine M.; Pei, Deqing; Posner, Meredith J.; Yang, Jie; Hayden, Randall T.; Srinivasan, Ashok; Triplett, Brandon M.; McCulllers, Jon A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Leung, Wing

    2011-01-01

    Summary The long-term antibody responses to re-immunization in recipients of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) have not been well studied. We prospectively and longitudinally evaluated the antibody responses to 8 vaccine antigens (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, and poliovirus) and assessed the factors associated with negative titres in 210 allo-HSCT recipients at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Antibody responses lasting for more than 5 years after immunization were observed in most patients for tetanus (95.7%), rubella (92.3%), poliovirus (97.9%), and, in diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) recipients, diphtheria (100%). However, responses to pertussis (25.0%), measles (66.7%), mumps (61.5%), hepatitis B (72.9%), and diphtheria in tetanus-diphtheria (Td) recipients (48.6%) were less favourable, with either only transient antibody responses or persistently negative titres. Factors associated with vaccine failure were older age at immunization; lower CD3, CD4 or CD19 counts; higher IgM concentrations; positive recipient cytomegalovirus serology; negative titres before immunization; acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease; and radiation during preconditioning. These response patterns and clinical factors can be used to formulate re-immunization and monitoring strategies. Patients at risk for vaccine failure should have long-term follow-up; those with loss of antibody response or no seroconversion should receive booster immunizations. PMID:22017512

  9. Immunization with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells induces Th1 immune response in Balb/C mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Estefania M.N.; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br; Resende, Maria Aparecida de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: maresend@mono.icb.ufmg.br; Reis, Bernardo S.; Goes, Alfredo M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia], e-mail: goes@mono.icb.ufmg.br, e-mail: brsgarbi@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent mycosis in Latin America. To date, there is no effective vaccine. In our laboratory yeast cells of P. brasiliensis were attenuated by gamma irradiation. We defined an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses the reproductive ability, while retaining the morphology, the synthesis and secretion of proteins and the oxidative metabolism. The immunization with these cells was able to confer protection in BALB/c mice. The aim of the present work was evaluate the immune response pathway activated in mice immunized with P. brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells. The protector effect was evaluated in BALB/c mice groups immunized once or twice, respectively. Each group was divided in three sub groups that were challenge 30, 45 or 60 days after the immunization. These groups were called G1A, G1B and G1C in the group immunized once and G2A, G2B and G2C in the group immunized twice. Recovery of CFUs and cytokines determination (IFN - {gamma}, IL - 10 and IL IV 4) were performed three months post challenge. Quantitative RT-PCR was the method of choice used to quantify the expression of cytokines. The sera were collected weekly to evaluate the IgG antibody titers and the IgG1 and IgG2a pattern in the course of infection. A significant reduction in CFUs recovery was verified 90 days post challenge in mice submitted to one immunization: 73.0%, 96.0% and 76.3% for sub-groups G1A, G1B and G1C, respectively. In the group submitted to two immunizations, a remarkable increase in the protection was obtained. No CFUs was recovered from sub-groups G2B and G2C and very few CFUs (reduction of 98.6%) were recovered from the lungs of sub group G2A. In mice submitted to one immunization, Th1 and Th2 cytokines were simultaneously produced. In the group submitted to two immunizations, levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were very low, while IFN-{gamma} production was maintained indicating that a Th1 pattern was

  10. Toll-like receptor 11-initiated innate immune response in male mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenghui; Yan, Keqin; Zhao, Shutao; Han, Daishu

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may infect the testis and impair testicular function. Mechanisms underlying testicular innate immune response to these two pathogens remain to be clarified. The present study examined the function of TLR11, which can be recognized by T. gondii-derived profilin and UPEC, in initiating innate immune response in male mouse germ cells. TLR11 is predominantly expressed in spermatids. Profilin and UPEC induced the expressions of different inflammatory cytokine profiles in the germ cells. In particular, profilin induced the expressions of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), interleukin 12 (IL12), and interferon gamma (IFNG) through nuclear factor KB (NFKB) activation. UPEC induced the expressions of MCP1, IL12, and IFNG, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA), IL6, and IFNB, through the activation of NFKB, IFN regulatory factor 3, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Evidence showed that profilin induced the innate response in male germ cells through TLR11 signaling, and UPEC triggered the response through TLR11 and other TLR-signaling pathways. We also provided evidence that local injection of profilin or UPEC induces the innate immune response in the germ cells. Data describe TLR11-mediated innate immune function of male germ cells in response to T. gondii profilin and UPEC stimulations. This system may play a role in testicular defense against T. gondii and UPEC infections in mice.

  11. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  12. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Terra

    Full Text Available Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1 in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2 STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3 STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency.

  13. Cell mediated immune responses in the placenta following challenge of vaccinated pregnant heifers with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Y P; Cantón, G; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Chianini, F; Morrell, E; Lischinsky, L; Ortega-Mora, L M; Innes, E A; Odeón, A; Campero, C M; Moore, D P

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and correlate the cell-mediated immune response and pathological changes at the maternal-fetal interface of Neospora-challenged pregnant cattle previously immunized with live and inactivated experimental vaccines. Pregnant heifers naïve to Neospora caninum were divided in 5 groups of 4 animals, each one immunized before mating: Group A heifers were intravenously (iv) immunized with 6.25 × 10(7) live tachyzoites of the NC-6 strain; group B heifers were immunized twice subcutaneously (sc) 3 weeks apart with native antigen extract of the NC-6 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group C heifers were sc immunized twice 3 weeks apart with three recombinant proteins (rNcSAG1, rNcHSP20, rNcGRA7) of the NC-1 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group D heifers were sc injected with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and group E heifers received sc ISCOM-matrix (ISCOMs without antigen). All groups were iv-challenged with 4.7 × 10(7) NC-1 tachyzoites at 70 days of gestation. Heifers were culled at day 104 of gestation and placentomes were examined to evaluate lesions and local cellular immune responses using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using bovine leucocyte specific antibodies. Cytokine expression and levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) were measured using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Minimal inflammation was observed in group A placentomes; while placentomes from group B, C, D and E had moderate to severe infiltration with CD3(+), CD4(+), γδ-T cells, CD8(+) cells and macrophages being more numerous in groups B and E placentomes, when compared with groups C and D (P<0.001). Cytokine levels were significantly increased in the caruncles of animals of groups B and C in comparison with the other animal groups (P < 0.001). The results from this study showed that the strongest cellular immune responses were observed in the

  14. Serotonergic chemosensory neurons modify the C. elegans immune response by regulating G-protein signaling in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Anderson

    Full Text Available The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food.

  15. Adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells: in vitro responses and in vivo immune responses after cell transplantation.

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    Oliver Treacy

    Full Text Available Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are non-hematopoietic cells with multi-lineage potential which makes them attractive targets for regenerative medicine applications. However, to date, therapeutic success of MSC-therapy is limited and the genetic modification of MSCs using viral vectors is one option to improve their therapeutic potential. Ex-vivo genetic modification of MSCs using recombinant adenovirus (Ad could be promising to reduce undesired immune responses as Ad will be removed before cell/tissue transplantation. In this regard, we investigated whether Ad-modification of MSCs alters their immunological properties in vitro and in vivo. We found that Ad-transduction of MSCs does not lead to up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Moreover, Ad-transduction caused no significant changes in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, chemokine and chemokine receptor and Toll-like receptor expression. In addition, Ad-modification of MSCs had no affect on their ability to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo injection of Ad-transduced MSCs did not change the frequency of various immune cell populations (antigen presenting cells, T helper and cytotoxic T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells neither in the blood nor in tissues. Our results indicate that Ad-modification has no major influence on the immunological properties of MSCs and therefore can be considered as a suitable gene vector for therapeutic applications of MSCs.

  16. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhaoChen; MeganS.Ford; KevinJ.Young; LiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4*CD8* double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  17. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhao Chen; Megan S. Ford; Kevin J. Young; Li Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  18. Medium from γ-irradiated Escherichia coli bacteria stimulates a unique immune response in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Bo G; Oldenvi, Sandra; Steiner, Håkan

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that γ-irradiated, non-dividing bacteria can elicit potent immune responses in mammals. Compared to traditional heat or chemical inactivation of microbes, γ-irradiation likely preserves metabolic activity and antigenic features to a larger extent. We have previously shown that antimicrobial peptides are induced in Drosophila by peptidoglycan fragments secreted into the medium of exponentially growing bacterial cultures. In this study, we γ-irradiated Escherichiacoli cells at a dose that halted cell division. The temporal synthesis and release of peptidoglycan fragments were followed as well as the potential of bacterial supernatants to induce immune responses in Drosophila S2 cells. We demonstrate that peptidoglycan synthesis continues for several days post irradiation and that monomeric peptidoglycan is shed into the medium. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed a strong immune response against the bacterial medium. The response to medium taken directly post irradiation shows a large overlap to that of peptidoglycan. Medium from prolonged bacterial incubation does, however, stimulate a selective set of immune genes. A shift towards a stress response was instead observed with a striking induction of several heat shock proteins. Our findings suggest that γ-irradiated bacteria release elicitors that stimulate a novel response in Drosophila.

  19. Effect of feeding whole compared with cell-free colostrum on calf immune status: Vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, S N; Wark, W A; Garst, S N; James, R E; McGilliard, M L; Petersson-Wolfe, C S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, I

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination contributes to improved herd health and production. Boosting immune development at a young age may have long-term effects by enhancing vaccine immune response and efficacy. In the bovine, colostrum is the sole source of maternal immunity, having a substantial effect on health status in the neonate. To date, colostral antibody concentration is used to evaluate colostrum quality. However, colostrum also contains proteins and cells, which may affect immune development and future responses to vaccines. To determine the effect of maternal colostral cells on immune development, 37 female Holstein and Jersey dairy calves were bottle-fed 4 quarts total of whole colostrum (WC) or cell-free colostrum (CFC) at birth. Calves were vaccinated with 2 series of multivalent vaccines. Series A consisted of vaccines given between 1 and 4mo of life. Series B consisted of vaccines given between 5 and 10mo of life. Calf peripheral blood samples were obtained before each vaccination series and monthly for 3mo after each vaccination series. Cellular blood parameters were determined by flow cytometry. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine cytokine gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before vaccination series B and once a month for 2mo after vaccination series B. Calves fed CFC had fewer numbers of B cells in mo 2 after vaccination series A when compared with WC-fed calves. Calves fed CFC had decreased gene expression levels of IL-2 in mo 1 and numbers of CD4(+)CD62L(+)CD45RO(-) and CD4(+)CD62L(+)CD45RO(+) T cells in mo 0 and 1 after vaccination series B as compared with WC-fed calves. Our findings indicate a greater response to vaccines up to 6 to 10mo post-WC feeding when compared with CFC. These data suggest that adoptive transfer of maternal colostral cells at birth has a long-term effect on development of the neonatal immune system.

  20. Detection of QTL for immune response to Sheep Red Blood Cells in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siwek-Gapinska, M.Z.; Cornelissen, S.J.B.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Parmentier, H.K.; Poel, van der J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in the regulation of the primary and the secondary immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in a resource population using microsatellite DNA markers. The F2 resource population originates from a cross of two divergentl

  1. CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSES IN THE SEA-STAR ASTERIAS RUBENS (ECHINODERM

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    Michel Leclerc

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune responses occur in sea star system. In Asterias rubens it is said that B sea star lymphocytes and T sea star lymphocytes exist in the axial organ which can be considered as an ancestral lymphoid organ. In the same manner the origin of lymphocytes can be found in Invertebrates such as Echinodermal.

  2. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise.

  3. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  4. HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris AJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alison J Harris, AA Roger Thompson, Moira KB Whyte, Sarah R Walmsley Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Leukocytes recruited to infected, damaged, or inflamed tissues during an immune response must adapt to oxygen levels much lower than those in the circulation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs are key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia and, as in other cell types, HIFs are critical for the upregulation of glycolysis, which enables innate immune cells to produce adenosine triphosphate anaerobically. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that hypoxia also regulates many other innate immunological functions, including cell migration, apoptosis, phagocytosis of pathogens, antigen presentation and production of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic and antimicrobial factors. Many of these functions are mediated by HIFs, which are not only stabilized posttranslationally by hypoxia, but also transcriptionally upregulated by inflammatory signals. Here, we review the role of HIFs in the responses of innate immune cells to hypoxia, both in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on myeloid cells, on which the majority of studies have so far been carried out. Keywords: hypoxia, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages

  5. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection induces an inflammatory response that is crucial in resolving acute infection but may also play a key role in the pathogenesis of C trachomatis associated infertility. The immune response is linked to cytokine secretion pattern which is influenced by the host genetic...... background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...... IL-10 genotypes. Enhanced IL-10 secretion and reduced antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative and IFN-gamma responses were found in subjects with IL-10 -1082 GG genotype when compared to those with -1082 AA genotype. CD14+ monocytes were main source of IL-10 indicating that these cells...

  6. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

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    Sunyoung Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers.

  7. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  8. A unique dermal dendritic cell subset that skews the immune response toward Th2.

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    Ryuichi Murakami

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC subsets in the skin and draining lymph nodes (LNs are likely to elicit distinct immune response types. In skin and skin-draining LNs, a dermal DC subset expressing macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin 2 (MGL2/CD301b was found distinct from migratory Langerhans cells (LCs or CD103(+ dermal DCs (dDCs. Lower expression levels of Th1-promoting and/or cross-presentation-related molecules were suggested by the transcriptome analysis and verified by the quantitative real-time PCR analysis in MGL2(+ dDCs than in CD103(+ dDCs. Transfer of MGL2(+ dDCs but not CD103(+ dDCs from FITC-sensitized mice induced a Th2-type immune response in vivo in a model of contact hypersensitivity. Targeting MGL2(+ dDCs with a rat monoclonal antibody against MGL2 efficiently induced a humoral immune response with Th2-type properties, as determined by the antibody subclass. We propose that the properties of MGL2(+ dDCs, are complementary to those of CD103(+ dDCs and skew the immune response toward a Th2-type response.

  9. Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes Stimulate Stronger CD8+ CTL Responses and Antitumor Immunity than Tumor Cell-Derived Exosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siguo Hao; Ou Bai; Jinying Yuan; Mabood Qureshi; Jim Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes (EXO) derived from dendritic cells (DC) and tumor cells have been used to stimulate antitumor immune responses in animal models and in clinical trials. However, there has been no side-by-side comparison of the stimulatory efficiency of the antitumor immune responses induced by these two commonly used EXO vaccines. In this study, we selected to study the phenotype characteristics of EXO derived from a transfected EG7 tumor cells expressing ovalbumin (OVA) and OVA-pulsed DC by flow cytometry. We compared the stimulatory effect in induction of OVA-specific immune responses between these two types of EXO. We found that OVA protein-pulsed DCovA-derived EXO (EXODC) can more efficiently stimulate naive OVA-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and differentiation into cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo, and induce more efficient antitumor immunity than EG7 tumor cell-derived EXO (EXOEG7). In addition, we elucidated the important role of the host DC in EXO vaccines that the stimulatory effect of EXO is delivered to T cell responses by the host DC. Therefore, DC-derived EXO may represent a more effective EXO-based vaccine in induction of antitumor immunity.

  10. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  11. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites.

  12. Letting Our Cells Do the Fighting: Flight-Induced Changes in the Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The organisms that make us ill, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, are like attacking armies. We now know a great deal more about this unseen world of microscopic invaders. Fortunately for us, the human immune system is ever vigilant against them. Microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi occupy almost every corner of the Earth, and even parts of the human body. Some organisms are beneficial to us, helping to produce milk, cheese or yogurt. Others are potentially harmful, yet we don#t always develop illnesses from them; they are kept in check by the sentinels of our immune system. Our immune system is routinely challenged by these organisms every day. When the immune response is diminished, our ability to fight off these "bugs" is lowered. And that's when we become ill. Space flight presents a challenge to the immune system. Scientists believe that the stressful conditions of space flight - launch into orbit, adapting to microgravity, heavy workloads, and isolation from family and friends, to name but a few - reduce the astronauts' immunity. This immune suppression makes them more susceptible to common illnesses from bacteria and to re-infections from latent viruses in the body. In addition, risk of spreading illness in the confined environment of the Space Shuttle is high. Understanding changes in immune function will help scientists develop ways to keep astronauts healthy in space. This knowledge can also benefit earthbound populations. This experiment will give scientists insight into the immune system by comparing how certain cells of astronauts' innate immune system - the first line of defense against invaders - function after flight compared to before flight.

  13. Broad early immune response of porcine epithelial jejunal IPI-2I cells to Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurens, François; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Melo, Sandrine; Grave, Aurore; Salmon, Henri; Guillén, Nancy

    2009-02-01

    Amoebiasis caused by Entamoebahistolytica triggers an acute inflammatory response at early stages of intestinal infection. The patho-physiological study of intestinal amoebiasis requires the development of powerful animal models. Swine provide robust model for human diseases and they could be used to study intestinal amoebiasis. Here, we introduce an in vitro model of swine intestinal epithelial cell (IPI-2I) co-cultured with E. histolytica. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) have crucial roles in sensing pathogens and initiating innate immune response, which qualitatively influence adaptive immune response against them. The contact between the two cells induces marked macroscopic lesions of IEC monolayer and striking alteration of the IPI-2I cell phenotype including blebbing, such as loss of attachment before to be phagocyte by the trophozoite. Increase in Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in the culture supernatant of IECs was observed when ameba is present and could reflect the cellular cytotoxicity exerted by the parasite. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we identified the up-regulation of cytokines/chemokines implicated in neutrophil chemoattraction and inflammation, such as CCL2, CCL20, CXCL2, CXCL3, GM-CSF, IL1 alpha, IL6 and IL8, in response to the parasite that can further regulate the immunoregulatory functions of the immune cells of the host. The study points a cardinal role of these pro-inflammatory compounds as central mediators in the interaction IECs/ameba and suggests mechanisms by which they coordinate intestinal immune response. This will focus future efforts on delineating the molecular and cellular mechanisms of other cell partners by the way of in vivo infection of swine.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

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    Alessandro Poggi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  15. Decidual Stromal Cell Response to Paracrine Signals from the Trophoblast: Amplification of Immune and Angiogenic Modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, AP; Hamilton, AE; Talbi, S;

    2007-01-01

    a functional genomics approach to investigate these paracrine interactions. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized with progesterone and were further treated with conditioned media (CM) from human trophoblasts (TCM) or, as a control, with conditioned media (CCM) from non-decidualized stromal cells...... with TCM, compared with CCM. Among the most up-regulated genes were the chemokines CXCL1 (GRO1) and IL8, CXCR4, and other genes involved in the immune response CCL8 (SCYA8), PTX3, IL6, and interferon-regulated and related genes), as well as TNFAIP6 and metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP10, MMP14). Among...... regulated groups. The data demonstrate a significant induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as angiogenic/static factors in decidualized endometrial stromal cells in response to trophoblast-secreted products. The data suggest that the trophoblast acts to alter the local immune...

  16. The Role of MicroRNAs in Regulatory T Cells and in the Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-02-01

    The discovery of microRNA (miRNA) is one of the major scientific breakthroughs in recent years and has revolutionized current cell biology and medical science. miRNAs are small (19~25nt) noncoding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by targeting the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for degradation of translation repression. Genetic ablation of the miRNA machinery, as well as loss or degradation of certain individual miRNAs, severely compromises immune development and response, and can lead to immune disorders. Several sophisticated regulatory mechanisms are used to maintain immune homeostasis. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent publications have provided compelling evidence that miRNAs are highly expressed in Treg cells, that the expression of Foxp3 is controlled by miRNAs and that a range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity. A large number of studies have reported links between alterations of miRNA homeostasis and pathological conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as psychiatric and neurological diseases. Although it is still unclear how miRNA controls Treg cell development and function, recent studies certainly indicate that this topic will be the subject of further research. The specific circulating miRNA species may also be useful for the diagnosis, classification, prognosis of diseases and prediction of the therapeutic response. An explosive literature has focussed on the role of miRNA. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the role of miRNAs in Treg cells and in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response. I also review the explosive current studies about clinical application of miRNA.

  17. Cloned, CD117 selected human amniotic fluid stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C Moorefield

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid stem (AFS cells are broadly multipotent, can be expanded extensively in culture, are not tumorigenic and can be readily cryopreserved for cell banking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC show immunomodulatory activity and secrete a wide spectrum of cytokines and chemokines that suppress inflammatory responses, block mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR and other immune reactions, and have proven therapeutic against conditions such as graft-versus-host disease. AFS cells resemble MSCs in many respects including surface marker expression and differentiation potential. We therefore hypothesized that AFS cells may exhibit similar immunomodulatory capabilities. We present data to demonstrate that direct contact with AFS cells inhibits lymphocyte activation. In addition, we show that cell-free supernatants derived from AFS cells primed with total blood monocytes or IL-1β, a cytokine released by monocytes and essential in mediation of the inflammatory response, also inhibited lymphocyte activation. Further investigation of AFS cell-free supernatants by protein array revealed secretion of multiple factors in common with MSCs that are known to be involved in immune regulation including growth related oncogene (GRO and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP family members as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6. AFS cells activated by PBMCs released several additional cytokines as compared to BM-MSCs, including macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α, MIP-1α and Activin. AFS cells also released higher levels of MCP-1 and lower levels of MCP-2 compared to BM-MSCs in response to IL-1β activation. This suggests that there may be some AFS-specific mechanisms of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Our results indicate that AFS cells are able to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro and that soluble factors are an essential component in the communication between lymphocytes and AFS cells. Their extensive self-renewal capacity, possibility for banking and

  18. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice.

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    Kazuyoshi Aso

    Full Text Available It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus cholera toxin (CT three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA and plasma IgG antibody (Ab responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer's patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice.

  19. Salmonella Typhimurium type III secretion effectors stimulate innate immune responses in cultured epithelial cells.

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    Vincent M Bruno

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of conserved bacterial products by innate immune receptors leads to inflammatory responses that control pathogen spread but that can also result in pathology. Intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to bacterial products and therefore must prevent signaling through innate immune receptors to avoid pathology. However, enteric pathogens are able to stimulate intestinal inflammation. We show here that the enteric pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium can stimulate innate immune responses in cultured epithelial cells by mechanisms that do not involve receptors of the innate immune system. Instead, S. Typhimurium stimulates these responses by delivering through its type III secretion system the bacterial effector proteins SopE, SopE2, and SopB, which in a redundant fashion stimulate Rho-family GTPases leading to the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and NF-kappaB signaling. These observations have implications for the understanding of the mechanisms by which Salmonella Typhimurium induces intestinal inflammation as well as other intestinal inflammatory pathologies.

  20. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

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    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  1. B cell-specific deficiencies in mTOR limit humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuling; Pruitt, Margaret; Tran, Dena; Du Bois, Wendy; Zhang, Ke; Patel, Rushi; Hoover, Shelley; Simpson, R Mark; Simmons, John; Gary, Joy; Snapper, Clifford M; Casellas, Rafael; Mock, Beverly A

    2013-08-15

    Generation of high-affinity Abs in response to Ags/infectious agents is essential for developing long-lasting immune responses. B cell maturation and Ab responses to Ag stimulation require Ig somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) for high-affinity responses. Upon immunization with either the model Ag 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten (NP) conjugated to chicken γ globulin lysine (NP-CGG) or heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular type 14 protein (Pn14), knock-in (KI) mice hypomorphic for mTOR function had a decreased ability to form germinal centers, develop high-affinity anti-NP-specific or anti-Pn14-specific Abs, and perform SHM/CSR. Hypomorphic mTOR mice also had a high mortality (40%) compared with wild-type (WT) (0%) littermates and had lower pneumococcal surface protein A-specific Ab titers when immunized and challenged with live S. pneumoniae infection. Mice with mTOR deleted in their B cell lineage (knockout [KO]) also produced fewer splenic germinal centers and decreased high-affinity Ab responses to NP-CGG than did their WT littermates. CSR rates were lower in mTOR KI and KO mice, and pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR in WT B cells resulted in decreased rates of ex vivo CSR. RNA and protein levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a protein essential for SHM and CSR, were lower in B cells from both KI and B cell-specific KO mice, concomitant with increases in phosphorylated AKT and FOXO1. Rescue experiments increasing AID expression in KI B cells restored CSR levels to those in WT B cells. Thus, mTOR plays an important immunoregulatory role in the germinal center, at least partially through AID signaling, in generating high-affinity Abs.

  2. The cell surface receptor Slamf6 modulates innate immune responses during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

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    van Driel, Boaz; Wang, Guoxing; Liao, Gongxian; Halibozek, Peter J; Keszei, Marton; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Bhan, Atul K; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-09-01

    The homophilic cell surface receptors CD150 (Slamf1) and CD352 (Slamf6) are known to modulate adaptive immune responses. Although the Th17 response was enhanced in Slamf6(-/-) C57BL/6 mice upon oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium, the pathologic consequences are indistinguishable from an infection of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Using a reporter-based binding assay, we show that Slamf6 can engage structures on the outer cell membrane of several Gram(-) bacteria. Therefore, we examined whether Slamf6, like Slamf1, is also involved in innate responses to bacteria and regulates peripheral inflammation by assessing the outcome of C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the pathology and immune responses in the lamina propria of C. rodentium-infected Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice were markedly reduced as compared with those of Rag(-/-) mice. Infiltration of inflammatory phagocytes into the lamina propria was consistently lower in Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice than in Rag(-/-) animals. Concomitant with the reduced systemic translocation of the bacteria was an enhanced production of IL-22, suggesting that Slamf6 suppresses a mucosal protective program. Furthermore, administering a mAb (330) that inhibits bacterial interactions with Slamf6 to Rag(-/-) mice ameliorated the infection compared with a control antibody. We conclude that Slamf6-mediated interactions of colonic innate immune cells with specific Gram(-) bacteria reduce mucosal protection and enhance inflammation, contributing to lethal colitis that is caused by C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice.

  3. Adjuvant-enhanced CD4 T Cell Responses are Critical to Durable Vaccine Immunity

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    Karen A.O. Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based vaccines offer a safer alternative to live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines but have limited immunogenicity. The identification of adjuvants that augment immunogenicity, specifically in a manner that is durable and antigen-specific, is therefore critical for advanced development. In this study, we use the filovirus virus-like particle (VLP as a model protein-based vaccine in order to evaluate the impact of four candidate vaccine adjuvants on enhancing long term protection from Ebola virus challenge. Adjuvants tested include poly-ICLC (Hiltonol, MPLA, CpG 2395, and alhydrogel. We compared and contrasted antibody responses, neutralizing antibody responses, effector T cell responses, and T follicular helper (Tfh cell frequencies with each adjuvant's impact on durable protection. We demonstrate that in this system, the most effective adjuvant elicits a Th1-skewed antibody response and strong CD4 T cell responses, including an increase in Tfh frequency. Using immune-deficient animals and adoptive transfer of serum and cells from vaccinated animals into naïve animals, we further demonstrate that serum and CD4 T cells play a critical role in conferring protection within effective vaccination regimens. These studies inform on the requirements of long term immune protection, which can potentially be used to guide screening of clinical-grade adjuvants for vaccine clinical development.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes protein fraction induces dendritic cells maturation and T helper 1 immune responses.

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    Azad Saei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fully mature dendritic cells (DCs play pivotal role in inducing immune responses and converting naïve T lymphocytes into functional Th1 cells. We aimed to evaluate Listeria Monocytogenes-derived protein fractions to induce DC maturation and stimulating T helper (Th1 immune responses.In the present study, we fractionated Listeria Monocytogenes-derived proteins by adding of ammonium sulfate in a stepwise manner. DCs were also generated from C57BL/6 mice bone marrow precursor cells. Then, the effects of protein fractions on bone marrow derived DC (BMDC maturation were evaluated. In addition, we assessed the capacity of activated DCs to induce cytokine production and proliferation of lymphocytes.Listeria-derived protein fractions induced fully mature DCs expressing high costimulatory molecules such as CD80, CD86 and CD40. DCs that were activated by selected F3 fraction had low capacity to uptake exogenous antigens while secreted high levels of Interleukine (IL-12. Moreover, lymphocytes cultured with activated BMDCs produced high amounts of IFN-γ and showed higher proliferation than control. Listeria derived protein fractions differently influenced DC maturation.In conclusion, Listeria protein activated-BMDCs can be used as a cell based vaccine to induce anti-tumor immune responses.

  5. Expression of Drosophila adenosine deaminase in immune cells during inflammatory response.

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    Novakova, Milena; Dolezal, Tomas

    2011-03-11

    Extra-cellular adenosine is an important regulator of inflammatory responses. It is generated from released ATP by a cascade of ectoenzymes and degraded by adenosine deaminase (ADA). There are two types of enzymes with ADA activity: ADA1 and ADGF/ADA2. ADA2 activity originates from macrophages and dendritic cells and is associated with inflammatory responses in humans and rats. Drosophila possesses a family of six ADGF proteins with ADGF-A being the main regulator of extra-cellular adenosine during larval stages. Herein we present the generation of a GFP reporter for ADGF-A expression by a precise replacement of the ADGF-A coding sequence with GFP using homologous recombination. We show that the reporter is specifically expressed in aggregating hemocytes (Drosophila immune cells) forming melanotic capsules; a characteristic of inflammatory response. Our vital reporter thus confirms ADA expression in sites of inflammation in vivo and demonstrates that the requirement for ADA activity during inflammatory response is evolutionary conserved from insects to vertebrates. Our results also suggest that ADA activity is achieved specifically within sites of inflammation by an uncharacterized post-transcriptional regulation based mechanism. Utilizing various mutants that induce melanotic capsule formation and also a real immune challenge provided by parasitic wasps, we show that the acute expression of the ADGF-A protein is not driven by one specific signaling cascade but is rather associated with the behavior of immune cells during the general inflammatory response. Connecting the exclusive expression of ADGF-A within sites of inflammation, as presented here, with the release of energy stores when the ADGF-A activity is absent, suggests that extra-cellular adenosine may function as a signal for energy allocation during immune response and that ADGF-A/ADA2 expression in such sites of inflammation may regulate this role.

  6. Quantum dots for tracking dendritic cells and priming an immune response in vitro and in vivo.

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    Debasish Sen

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in initiating adaptive immune response by presenting antigen to T cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we investigate the potential of quantum dots (QDs as fluorescent nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo imaging of DCs, and as a particle-based antigen-delivery system to enhance DC-mediated immune responses. We used confocal, two-photon, and electron microscopies to visualize QD uptake into DCs and compared CD69 expression, T cell proliferation, and IFN-gamma production by DO11.10 and OT-II T cells in vivo in response to free antigen or antigen-conjugated to QDs. CD11c(+ DCs avidly and preferentially endocytosed QDs, initially into small vesicles near the plasma membrane by an actin-dependent mechanism. Within 10 min DCs contained vesicles of varying size, motion, and brightness distributed throughout the cytoplasm. At later times, endocytosed QDs were compartmentalized inside lysosomes. LPS-induced maturation of DCs reduced the rate of endocytosis and the proportion of cells taking up QDs. Following subcutaneous injection of QDs in an adjuvant depot, DCs that had endocytosed QDs were visualized up to 400 microm deep within draining lymph nodes. When antigen-conjugated QDs were used, T cells formed stable clusters in contact with DCs. Antigen-conjugated QDs induced CD69 expression, T cell proliferation, and IFN-gamma production in vivo with greater efficiency than equivalent amounts of free antigen. These results establish QDs as a versatile platform for immunoimaging of dendritic cells and as an efficient nanoparticle-based antigen delivery system for priming an immune response.

  7. Immune cell-based screening assay for response to anticancer agents: applications in pharmacogenomics

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    Frick A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber Frick,1 Yuri Fedoriw,2 Kristy Richards,3,4 Blossom Damania,3,5 Bethany Parks,6 Oscar Suzuki,1 Cristina S Benton,1 Emmanuel Chan,1 Russell S Thomas,7 Tim Wiltshire1,3 1Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, 3Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, 4Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, 5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 6The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 7Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: Interpatient variability in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely due to complex genetic differences and is difficult to ascertain in humans. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at examining interstrain differences in viability on normal, noncancerous immune cells following chemotherapeutic cytotoxic insult. Drug effects were investigated by comparing selective chemotherapeutic agents, such as BEZ-235 and selumetinib, against conventional cytotoxic agents targeting multiple pathways, including doxorubicin and idarubicin. Methods: Splenocytes were isolated from 36 isogenic strains of mice using standard procedures. Of note, the splenocytes were not stimulated to avoid attributing responses to pathways involved with cellular stimulation rather than toxicity. Cells were incubated with compounds on a nine-point logarithmic dosing scale ranging from 15 nM to 100 µM (37°C, 5% CO2. At 4 hours posttreatment, cells were labeled with antibodies and physiological indicator dyes and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. Cellular phenotypes (eg, viability were collected and analyzed using flow cytometry. Dose-response curves with response normalized to the zero dose as a function of log concentration

  8. Cell death and the immune responses of the sipunculan worm Themiste petricola

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    GA Blanco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We have recently studied the role of cell death in the immune system of the sipunculan worm Themiste petricola. Typical biochemical and morphological changes of apoptosis were induced in celomocytes of these marine worms after in vitro exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide. Apoptosis was time and dose dependent, and required several hours to become apparent. Surprisingly, in unexposed samples a subtype of granulocyte was observed to undergo homotypic aggregation, extensive cytoskeletal changes, and degranulation followed by cell death. This spontaneous response ending in cell death occurred in a divalent cation-dependent manner, served to entrap foreign particles, and was blocked by EDTA-containing saline solutions. Even though the mode of granulocyte cell death shares some features with apoptosis, it appears to be a different form of programmed cell death since it occurs within minutes and does not produce single cell-derived apoptotic bodies but transforms itself into one or several syncytial masses with haemostatic and immune purposes. Since numerous granulocyte types and multicellular masses involved in cellular immunity have been described in sipunculan worms, the review also discusses the potential influence of activation of granulocytes by sea water in expanding the variety of morphological types and multicellular structures identified through morphological studies among sipunculan species.

  9. Innate immune response to influenza A virus in differentiated human alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieru; Nikrad, Mrinalini P; Phang, Tzulip; Gao, Bifeng; Alford, Taylor; Ito, Yoko; Edeen, Karen; Travanty, Emily A; Kosmider, Beata; Hartshorn, Kevan; Mason, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Alveolar Type II (ATII) cells are important targets for seasonal and pandemic influenza. To investigate the influenza-induced innate immune response in those cells, we measured the global gene expression profile of highly differentiated ATII cells infected with the influenza A virus at a multiplicity of infection of 0.5 at 4 hours and 24 hours after inoculation. Infection with influenza stimulated a significant increase in the mRNA concentrations of many host defense-related genes, including pattern/pathogen recognition receptors, IFN, and IFN-induced genes, chemokines, and suppressors of cytokine signaling. We verified these changes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. At the protein level, we detected a robust virus-induced secretion of the three glutamic acid-leucine-arginine (ELR)-negative chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, according to ELISA. The ultraviolet inactivation of virus abolished the chemokine and cytokine response. Viral infection did not appear to alter the differentiation of ATII cells, as measured by cellular mRNA and concentrations of surfactant proteins. However, viral infection significantly reduced the secretion of surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D. In addition, influenza A virus triggered a time-dependent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in ATII cells. The inhibition of this pathway significantly decreased the release of infectious virus and the chemokine response, but did not alter virus-induced cell death. This study provides insights into influenza-induced innate immunity in differentiated human ATII cells, and demonstrates that the alveolar epithelium is a critical part of the initial innate immune response to influenza.

  10. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    OpenAIRE

    Simón-Vázquez R; Lozano-Fernández T; Dávila-Grana A; González-Fernández A

    2016-01-01

    Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO) and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI), University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps) can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune respon...

  11. Nonimmune Cells Contribute to Crosstalk between Immune Cells and Inflammatory Mediators in the Innate Response to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Maria Pilar Aoki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas myocarditis, which is caused by infection with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, remains the major infectious heart disease worldwide. Innate recognition through toll-like receptors (TLRs on immune cells has not only been revealed to be critical for defense against T. cruzi but has also been involved in triggering the pathology. Subsequent studies revealed that this parasite activates nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain- (NOD-like receptors and several particular transcription factors in TLR-independent manner. In addition to professional immune cells, T. cruzi infects and resides in different parenchyma cells. The innate receptors in nonimmune target tissues could also have an impact on host response. Thus, the outcome of the myocarditis or the inflamed liver relies on an intricate network of inflammatory mediators and signals given by immune and nonimmune cells. In this paper, we discuss the evidence of innate immunity to the parasite developed by the host, with emphasis on the crosstalk between immune and nonimmune cell responses.

  12. Adaptive peripheral immune response increases proliferation of neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susanne A; Steiner, Barbara; Wengner, Antje; Lipp, Martin; Kammertoens, Thomas; Kempermann, Gerd

    2009-09-01

    To understand the link between peripheral immune activation and neuronal precursor biology, we investigated the effect of T-cell activation on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in female C57Bl/6 mice. A peripheral adaptive immune response triggered by adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (2 microg/microl methylated BSA) or staphylococcus enterotoxin B (EC(50) of 0.25 microg/ml per 20 g body weight) was associated with a transient increase in hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis as assessed by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Both treatments were paralleled by an increase in corticosterone levels in the hippocampus 1- to 2-fold over the physiological amount measured by quantitative radioimmunoassay. In contrast, intraperitoneal administration of the innate immune response activator lipopolysaccaride (EC(50) of 0.5 microg/ml per 20 g body weight) led to a chronic 5-fold increase of hippocampal glucocorticoid levels and a decrease of adult neurogenesis. In vitro exposure of murine neuronal progenitor cells to corticosterone triggered either cell death at high (1.5 nM) or proliferation at low (0.25 nM) concentrations. This effect could be blocked using a viral vector system expressing a transdomain of the glucocorticoid receptor. We suggest an evolutionary relevant communication route for the brain to respond to environmental stressors like inflammation mediated by glucocorticoid levels in the hippocampus.

  13. Immunization with vaccinia virus induces polyfunctional and phenotypically distinctive CD8+ T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precopio, Melissa L.; Betts, Michael R.; Parrino, Janie; Price, David A.; Gostick, Emma; Ambrozak, David R.; Asher, Tedi E.; Douek, Daniel C.; Harari, Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Bailer, Robert; Graham, Barney S.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus immunization provides lifelong protection against smallpox, but the mechanisms of this exquisite protection are unknown. We used polychromatic flow cytometry to characterize the functional and phenotypic profile of CD8+ T cells induced by vaccinia virus immunization in a comparative vaccine trial of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) versus Dryvax immunization in which protection was assessed against subsequent Dryvax challenge. Vaccinia virus–specific CD8+ T cells induced by both MVA and Dryvax were highly polyfunctional; they degranulated and produced interferon γ, interleukin 2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and tumor necrosis factor α after antigenic stimulation. Responding CD8+ T cells exhibited an unusual phenotype (CD45RO−CD27intermediate). The unique phenotype and high degree of polyfunctionality induced by vaccinia virus also extended to inserted HIV gene products of recombinant NYVAC. This quality of the CD8+ T cell response may be at least partially responsible for the profound efficacy of these vaccines in protection against smallpox and serves as a benchmark against which other vaccines can be evaluated. PMID:17535971

  14. The Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Alpha Herpes Virus Infections

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    Philipp Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, two independent groups identified plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC as major type I interferon- (IFN- producing cells in the blood. Since then, evidence is accumulating that PDC are a multifunctional cell population effectively coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper focuses on the role of different immune cells and their interactions in the surveillance of alpha herpes virus infections, summarizes current knowledge on PDC surface receptors and their role in direct cell-cell contacts, and develops a risk factor model for the clinical implications of herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus reactivation. Data from studies involving knockout mice and cell-depletion experiments as well as human studies converge into a “spider web”, in which the direct and indirect crosstalk between many cell populations tightly controls acute, latent, and recurrent alpha herpes virus infections. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses more extensively than previously thought.

  15. Changes in cell-mediated immune response after lung resection surgery for MDR-TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Hong, Sunghee; Eum, Seok-Yong; Lee, In Hee; Shin, Donk Ok; Cho, Jang Eun; Cho, Sungae; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2011-07-01

    The immune responses of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients undergoing lung resection surgery were investigated in order to understand the mechanism of strong immune suppression in MDR-TB. We examined changes in cell-mediated immune response (CMI) of a total of sixteen MDR-TB patients, three of them extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients, after the removal of the heavily diseased lung section. The IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins (Mtb-CFP), one of the most important CMI to defend TB, showed a statistically significant elevation in 2-4 months after operation when compared to the preoperative CMI in patients who were converted into AFB negative and cured in two years' follow-up, suggesting that the recovery of CMI may be one of the key factors in the successful treatment of MDR-TB. Interestingly, IL-10 response to Mtb-CFP was also elevated in 2-4 months after surgery in cured patients although both proliferative response and PBMC composition were not significantly changed. Infection with first- or second-line drugs resistant Mtb reduces the efficiency of chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB to about 50%. Thus, this study suggests that chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB may be more effective when combined with accompanying therapy that increases CMI, includes lung resection surgery.

  16. Vaccinia virus infection attenuates innate immune responses and antigen presentation by epidermal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liang; Dai, Peihong; Ding, Wanhong; Granstein, Richard D; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-10-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are antigen-presenting cells in the skin that play sentinel roles in host immune defense by secreting proinflammatory molecules and activating T cells. Here we studied the interaction of vaccinia virus with XS52 cells, a murine epidermis-derived dendritic cell line that serves as a surrogate model for LCs. We found that vaccinia virus productively infects XS52 cells, yet this infection displays an atypical response to anti-poxvirus agents. Whereas adenosine N1-oxide blocked virus production and viral protein synthesis during a synchronous infection, cytosine arabinoside had no effect at concentrations sufficient to prevent virus replication in BSC40 monkey kidney cells. Vaccinia virus infection of XS52 cells not only failed to elicit the production of various cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40, alpha interferon (IFN-alpha), and IFN-gamma, it actively inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6 by XS52 cells in response to exogenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or poly(I:C). Infection with a vaccinia virus mutant lacking the E3L gene resulted in TNF-alpha secretion in the absence of applied stimuli. Infection of XS52 cells or BSC40 cells with the DeltaE3L virus, but not wild-type vaccinia virus, triggered proteolytic decay of IkappaBalpha. These results suggest a novel role for the E3L protein as an antagonist of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. DeltaE3L-infected XS52 cells secreted higher levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in response to LPS and poly(I:C) than did cells infected with the wild-type virus. XS52 cells were productively infected by a vaccinia virus mutant lacking the K1L gene. DeltaK1L-infected cells secreted higher levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in response to LPS than wild-type virus-infected cells. Vaccinia virus infection of primary LCs harvested from mouse epidermis was nonpermissive, although a viral reporter protein was

  17. Response to Hepatocarcinoma Hca-F of Mice Immunized with Heat Shock Protein 70 from Elemene Combo Tumor Cell Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianying Guo; Guangxia Shi; Zhihong Gao; Jie Shen; Rong Xing; Zhenchao Qian

    2006-01-01

    To analyze immune response to murine hepatocarcinoma Hca-F of mice immunized with heat shock protein 70(HSP70) derived from elemene combo tumor cell vaccine (EC-TCV) of Hca-F, HSP70 was isolated from EC-TCV by ADP affinity chromatography. Mice were immunized with HSP70 intraperitoneally three times and spleen cells were sampled. For cells, their proliferation and cytotoxicity against Hca-F were measured with MTT assay and their phenotypes were analyzed with flow cytometry. Spleen cells of immunized mice with HSP70 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity against Hca-F and proliferation than that of normal control mice, but less potent than that of mice immunized with EC-TCV. Among three groups, the percent of γδ T lymphocytes in the mice immunized with HSP70 (35.5%) was the highest compared with 6.25% in normal mice, and 28.4% in the mice immunized with EC-TCV. Immunization of HSP70 derived from EC-TCV could elicit potent immune response to Hca-F. HSP70 is one of elements inducing anti-tumor immune responses against Hca-F. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):291-295.

  18. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón-Vázquez R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune response mediated by the exposure of human lymphoid cells to metal oxide Nps (moNps was characterized using four different moNps (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO to study the three most relevant mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamilies and the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of the activated B-cell inhibitor, IκBα, as well as the expression of several genes by immune cells incubated with these Nps. The moNps activated different signaling pathways and altered the gene expression in human lymphocyte cells. The ZnO Nps were the most active and the release of Zn2+ ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. CeO2 Nps induced the smallest changes in gene expression and in the IκBα protein. The effects of the particles were strongly dependent on the type and concentration of the Nps and on the cell activation status prior to Np exposure. Keywords: Jurkat, MAPK, NFκB, qPCR, inflammation, metabolism

  19. Mouse Model of Devil Facial Tumour Disease establishes that an effective immune response can be generated against the cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry L Pinfold

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest carnivorous marsupial in Australia, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is facing extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is a clonal cell line transmitted from host to host with 100% mortality and no known immunity. While it was first considered that low genetic diversity of the population of devils enabled the allograft transmission of DFTD recent evidence reveals that genetically diverse animals succumb to the disease. The lack of an immune response against the DFTD tumor cells may be due to a lack of immunogenicity of the tumor cells. This could facilitate transmission between devils. To test immunogenicity, mice were injected with viable DFTD cells and anti-DFTD immune responses analyzed. A range of antibody isotypes against DFTD cells was detected, indicating that as DFTD cells can induce an immune response they are immunogenic. This was supported by cytokine production, when splenocytes from mice injected with DFTD cells were cultured in vitro with DFTD cells and the supernatant analyzed. There was a significant production of IFN-γ and TNF-α following the first injection with DFTD cells and a significant production of IL-6 and IL-10 following the second injection. Splenocytes from naïve or immunized mice killed DFTD cells in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Thus they are also targets for immunological destruction. We conclude that as an immune response can be generated against DFTD cells they would be suitable targets for a vaccine.

  20. Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria beneficially regulate immune response triggered by poly(I:C in porcine intestinal epithelial cells

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    Hosoya Shoichi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study analyzed the functional expression of TLR3 in various gastrointestinal tissues from adult swine and shows that TLR3 is expressed preferentially in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC, CD172a+CD11R1high and CD4+ cells from ileal Peyer's patches. We characterized the inflammatory immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in a clonal porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells and in PIE-immune cell co-cultures, and demonstrated that these systems are valuable tools to study in vitro the immune response triggered by TLR3 on IEC and the interaction between IEC and immune cells. In addition, we selected an immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria strain, Lactobacillus casei MEP221106, able to beneficially regulate the anti-viral immune response triggered by poly(I:C stimulation in PIE cells. Moreover, we deepened our understanding of the possible mechanisms of immunobiotic action by demonstrating that L. casei MEP221106 modulates the interaction between IEC and immune cells during the generation of a TLR3-mediated immune response.

  1. Transcriptomic profiling of microglia reveals signatures of cell activation and immune response, during experimental cerebral malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuccini, Barbara; Lin, Jingwen; Talavera-López, Carlos; Khan, Shahid M.; Sodenkamp, Jan; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Langhorne, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a pathology involving inflammation in the brain. There are many immune cell types activated during this process, but there is little information on the response of microglia, in this severe complication. We examined microglia by genome wide transcriptomic analysis in a model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), in which C57BL/6 mice are infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Thousands of transcripts were differentially expressed in microglia at two different time points during infection. Proliferation of microglia was a dominant feature before the onset of ECM, and supporting this, we observed an increase in numbers of these cells in the brain. When cerebral malaria symptoms were manifest, genes involved in immune responses and chemokine production were upregulated, which were possibly driven by Type I Interferon. Consistent with this hypothesis, in vitro culture of a microglial cell line with Interferon-β, but not infected red blood cells, resulted in production of several of the chemokines shown to be upregulated in the gene expression analysis. It appears that these responses are associated with ECM, as microglia from mice infected with a mutant P. berghei parasite (ΔDPAP3), which does not cause ECM, did not show the same level of activation or proliferation. PMID:27991544

  2. Orchestrating an immune response against cancer with engineered immune cells expressing αβTCRs, CARs, and innate immune receptors: an immunological and regulatory challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Moniek A; Kierkels, Guido J J; Straetemans, Trudy; Britten, Cedrik M; Kuball, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Over half a century ago, the first allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) initiated cellular immunotherapy. For several decades, little progress was made, and toxicity of allo-SCT remained a major challenge. However, recent breakthroughs have opened new avenues to further develop this modality and to provide less toxic and equally efficient interventions for patients suffering from hematological or solid malignancies. Current novel cellular immune interventions include ex vivo expansion and adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating immune cells or administration of drugs which antagonize tolerizing mechanisms. Alternatively, transfer of immune cells engineered to express defined T cell receptors (TCRs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown its potential. A valuable addition to 'engineered' adaptive immunity has emerged recently through the improved understanding of how innate immune cells can attack cancer cells without substantial side effects. This has enabled the development of transplantation platforms with limited side effects allowing early immune interventions as well as the design of engineered immune cells expressing innate immune receptors. Here, we focus on innate immune interventions and their orchestration with TCR- and CAR-engineered immune cells. In addition, we discuss how the exploitation of the full potential of cellular immune interventions is influenced by regulatory frameworks. Finally, we highlight and discuss substantial differences in the current landscape of clinical trials in Europe as compared to the USA. The aim is to stimulate international efforts to support regulatory authorities and funding agencies, especially in Europe, to create an environment that will endorse the development of engineered immune cells for the benefit of patients.

  3. Vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with hepatitis C pseudo particles induces specific immune responses in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kilian Weigand; Franziska Voigt; Jens Encke; Birgit Hoyler; Wolfgang Stremmel; Christoph Eisenbach

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To explore dendritic cells (DCs) multiple functions in immune modulation.METHODS:We used bone-marrow derived dendritic cells from BALB/c mice pulsed with pseudo particles from the hepatitis C virus to vaccinate naive BALB/c mice.Hepatitis C virus (HCV) pseudo particles consist of the genotype 1b derived envelope proteins E1 and E2,covering a non-HCV core structure.Thus,not a single epitope,but the whole "viral surface" induces immunogenicity.For vaccination,mature and activated DC were injected subcutaneously twice.RESULTS:Humoral and cellular immune responses measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot test showed antibody production as well as T-cells directed against HCV.Furthermore,T-cell responses confirmed two highly immunogenic regions in E1 and E2 outside the hypervariable region 1.CONCLUSION:Our results indicate dendritic cells as a promising vaccination model for HCV infection that should be evaluated further.

  4. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses to a pertussis containing vaccine in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygen, Kris; Caboré, Raïssa Nadège; Maertens, Kirsten; Van Damme, Pierre; Leuridan, Elke

    2015-08-07

    Vaccination of pregnant women is recommended for some infectious diseases in order to protect both women and offspring through high titres of maternal IgG antibodies. Less is known on the triggering of cellular immune responses by vaccines administered during pregnancy. In an ongoing study on maternal pertussis vaccination (2012-2014) 18 pregnant women were vaccinated with a tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) containing vaccine (Boostrix®) during the third pregnancy trimester. Sixteen age-matched nonpregnant women received the same vaccine in the same time period. A blood sample was taken at the moment of, but before vaccination and one month and one year after vaccination. Anti-Pertussis Toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (Prn), tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin (DT) antibodies were measured by ELISA. Cellular immune responses were analyzed using a diluted whole blood assay, measuring proliferation, and cytokine release in response to vaccine antigens PT, FHA, TT, and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as polyclonal stimulus. Antibody levels to all five vaccine components increased significantly and to the same extent after vaccination in pregnant and nonpregnant women. One year after vaccination, antibody titres had decreased particularly to PT, but they were still significantly higher to all antigens than before vaccination. In contrast, proliferative and IFN-γ responses were increased to TT, PT, and FHA in nonpregnant women one month after vaccination, whereas in pregnant women only TT specific T cell responses were increased and to a lesser extent than in the control group. One year after vaccination, cellular responses equaled the baseline levels detected prior to vaccination in both groups. In conclusion, a Tdap vaccination can increase vaccine specific IgG antibodies to the same extent in pregnant and in nonpregnant women, whereas the stimulation of vaccine specific Th1 type cellular immune responses with this acellular vaccine

  5. Immune history profoundly affects broadly protective B cell responses to influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sarah F.; Huang, Yunping; Kaur, Kaval; Popova, Lyubov I.; Ho, Irvin Y.; Pauli, Noel T.; Dunand, Carole J. Henry; Taylor, William M; Lim, Samuel; Huang, Min; Qu, Xinyan; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Salgado-Ferrer, Marlene; Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Generating a broadly protective influenza vaccine is critical to global health. Understanding how immune memory influences influenza immunity is central to this goal. We undertook an in-depth study of the B cell response to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine over consecutive years. Analysis of monoclonal Abs generated from vaccine-induced plasmablasts demonstrated that individuals with low preexisting serological titers to the vaccinating strain generated a broadly reactive, HA stalk-biased, response. Higher preexisting serum antibody levels correlated with a strain-specific HA head-dominated response. We demonstrate that this HA head immunodominance encompasses poor accessibility of the HA stalk epitopes. Further, we show polyreactivity of HA stalk-reactive antibodies that could cause counterselection of these cells. Thus, preexisting memory against HA head epitopes predominate, inhibiting a broadly protective response against the HA stalk upon revaccination with similar strains. Consideration of influenza exposure history is critical for new vaccine strategies designed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. PMID:26631631

  6. Armc5 deletion causes developmental defects and compromises T-cell immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Lao, Linjiang; Mao, Jianning; Jin, Wei; Luo, Hongyu; Charpentier, Tania; Qi, Shijie; Peng, Junzheng; Hu, Bing; Marcinkiewicz, Mieczyslaw Martin; Lamarre, Alain; Wu, Jiangping

    2017-01-01

    Armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) is a cytosolic protein with no enzymatic activities. Little is known about its function and mechanisms of action, except that gene mutations are associated with risks of primary macronodular adrenal gland hyperplasia. Here we map Armc5 expression by in situ hybridization, and generate Armc5 knockout mice, which are small in body size. Armc5 knockout mice have compromised T-cell proliferation and differentiation into Th1 and Th17 cells, increased T-cell apoptosis, reduced severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis, and defective immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. These mice also develop adrenal gland hyperplasia in old age. Yeast 2-hybrid assays identify 16 ARMC5-binding partners. Together these data indicate that ARMC5 is crucial in fetal development, T-cell function and adrenal gland growth homeostasis, and that the functions of ARMC5 probably depend on interaction with multiple signalling pathways. PMID:28169274

  7. CD8α− Dendritic Cells Induce Antigen-Specific T Follicular Helper Cells Generating Efficient Humoral Immune Responses

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    Changsik Shin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on T follicular helper (Tfh cells have significantly advanced our understanding of T cell-dependent B cell responses. However, little is known about the early stage of Tfh cell commitment by dendritic cells (DCs, particularly by the conventional CD8α+ and CD8α− DC subsets. We show that CD8α− DCs localized at the interfollicular zone play a pivotal role in the induction of antigen-specific Tfh cells by upregulating the expression of Icosl and Ox40l through the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Tfh cells induced by CD8α− DCs function as true B cell helpers, resulting in significantly increased humoral immune responses against various human pathogenic antigens, including Yersinia pestis LcrV, HIV Gag, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Our findings uncover a mechanistic role of CD8α− DCs in the initiation of Tfh cell differentiation and thereby provide a rationale for investigating CD8α− DCs in enhancing antigen-specific humoral immune responses for improving vaccines and therapeutics.

  8. Isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, regulate mucosal immune response by suppressing dendritic cell function.

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    John Wei

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, has been shown to have a strong adjuvant effect towards inhaled antigens contributing to airway inflammation. Isoflavones are anti-inflammatory molecules present in abundant quantities in soybeans. We investigated the effect of isoflavones on human dendritic cell (DC activation via LPS stimulation and subsequent DC-mediated effector cell function both in vitro and in a mouse model of upper airway inflammation. Human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDC were matured with LPS (or TNF-α +/- isoflavones (genistein or daidzein. The surface expression levels of DC activation markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Mature DCs +/- isoflavones were washed and cultured with freshly-isolated allogenic naïve CD4⁺ T cells for 5 days or with autologous natural killer (NK cells for 2 hours. The percentages of proliferating IFN-γ⁺ CD4⁺ T cells and cytokine levels in culture supernatants were assessed. NK cell degranulation and DC cytotoxicity were measured by flow cytometry. Isoflavones significantly suppressed the activation-induced expression of DC maturation markers (CD83, CD80, CD86 and MHC class I but not MHC class II molecules in vitro. Isoflavone treatment inhibited the ability of LPS-DCs to induce IFN-γ in CD4⁺ T cells. NK cell degranulation and the percentage of dead DCs were significantly increased in isoflavone-treated DC-NK co-culture experiments. Dietary isoflavones suppressed the mucosal immune response to intra-nasal sensitization of mice to ovalbumin. Similar results were obtained when isoflavones were co-administered during sensitization. These results demonstrate that soybean isoflavones suppress immune sensitization by suppressing DC-maturation and its subsequent DC-mediated effector cell functions.

  9. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component.

  10. Melatonin improves humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of male golden hamster following stress induced by dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwas, Dipanshu Kumar; Mukherjee, Arun; Haldar, Chandana

    2013-06-15

    Melatonin is known as an antistress and immunostimulator compound while glucocorticoids have immunosuppressive function. The mechanism of action of both the hormones on immune cells is still a question. We found that melatonin improved the effect of dexamethasone (synthetic glucocorticoid) induced immunosuppression of splenocytes and bone marrow GM-CFU along with increased production of serum IL-2, IgG and the receptor expression for melatonin and glucocorticoid in spleen that might be responsible for the proliferation of immune cells. Thus, seasonal variation in peripheral melatonin might be responsible for the improvement of immune status under different stress conditions experienced by the rodents for better survival.

  11. Activation of invariant NKT cells enhances the innate immune response and improves the disease course in influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ling-Pei; Denney, Laura; Luhn, Kerstin; Teoh, Denise; Clelland, Colin; McMichael, Andrew J

    2008-07-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells have an indubitable role in antiviral immunity, although the mechanisms by which these cells exert their functions are not fully elucidated. With the emerging importance of high-pathogenicity influenza A virus infections in humans, we questioned whether iNKT cells contribute to immune defence against influenza A virus and whether activation of these cells influences outcome. We show that activation of iNKT cells with alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GC) during influenza virus infection transiently enhanced early innate immune response without affecting T cell immunity, and reduced early viral titres in lungs of C57BL/6 mice. This is accompanied by a better disease course with improved weight loss profile. Temporal changes in iNKT cells in the liver, blood and lungs suggest activation and migration of iNKT cells from the liver to the lungs in mice that were administered alpha-GC. Improvement in viral titres appears dependent on activation of iNKT cells via the intraperitoneal route since intranasal administration of alpha-GC did not have the same effect. We conclude that activation of iNKT cells enhances early innate immune response in the lungs and contribute to antiviral immunity and improved disease course in influenza A virus infection.

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

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    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  13. Distribution of immune response cells in the pelvic urethra and the prepuce of rams

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    Jorge Acosta-Dibarrat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogens of the reproductive system in the male can penetrate and establish by ascending route, from to the prepuce to the urethra, accessory glands, epididymis and testicles. The aim of this paper is determine the distribution and number of cells involved in the immune response in prepuce and pelvic urethra of rams, without apparent clinical alterations in testicle, epididymis and prepuce. The distribution of some of the cells involved in the immune response at the level of the prepuce and the pelvic urethra was quantified in four one-year-old rams seronegative for B. ovis and A. seminis and without apparent lesions in the testicles, the epididymis, and the prepuce. At the moment of slaughter, samples were taken from the preputial fornix and the pelvic urethra and placed in 10% formalin and under freezing conditions. CD4, CD8, WC1, CD45RO, CD14 and CD1b cells were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, and immunoglobulin-containing cells (ICC of the IgA, IgG and IgM classes were demonstrated by immunofluorescence. The labeled cells present in the mucosa of both organs were counted with an image analyzer. The total number of cells was compared between both tissues and differentially between the epithelium and the connective tissue of the mucosa. Significant differences were found in the total number of CD4, CD45RO, and WC1 lymphocytes, in CD14 macrophages, and CD1b dendritic cells, with mean values being greater in the fornix than in the urethra (p<0.05 in all cases. Only dendritic cells were found in the prepuce. No differences were found in the number of CD8 lymphocytes between both organs. The ratio between each cell type in the connective and the intraepithelial tissues and between organs was 10/1 for CD4 in the fornix (p<0.05, against 7/1 in the urethra (p<0.05, while CD8 had a 1/1 distribution in both mucosae. The WC1 ratio was 5/1 in both mucosae (p<0.05. CD45RO labeling was 19/1 in the prepuce (p<0.05 and 1/1 in the urethra. Ig

  14. Immunization with Escherichia coli outer membrane vesicles protects bacteria-induced lethality via Th1 and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oh Youn; Hong, Bok Sil; Park, Kyong-Su; Yoon, Yae Jin; Choi, Seng Jin; Lee, Won Hee; Roh, Tae-Young; Lötvall, Jan; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2013-04-15

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), secreted from Gram-negative bacteria, are spherical nanometer-sized proteolipids enriched with outer membrane proteins. OMVs, also known as extracellular vesicles, have gained interests for use as nonliving complex vaccines and have been examined for immune-stimulating effects. However, the detailed mechanism on how OMVs elicit the vaccination effect has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the immunological mechanism governing the protective immune response of OMV vaccines. Immunization with Escherichia coli-derived OMVs prevented bacteria-induced lethality and OMV-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome. As verified by adoptive transfer and gene-knockout studies, the protective effect of OMV immunization was found to be primarily by the stimulation of T cell immunity rather than B cell immunity, especially by the OMV-Ag-specific production of IFN-γ and IL-17 from T cells. By testing the bacteria-killing ability of macrophages, we also demonstrated that IFN-γ and IL-17 production is the main factor promoting bacterial clearances. Our findings reveal that E. coli-derived OMV immunization effectively protects bacteria-induced lethality and OMV-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome primarily via Th1 and Th17 cell responses. This study therefore provides a new perspective on the immunological detail regarding OMV vaccination.

  15. A cell-based systems biology assessment of human blood to monitor immune responses after influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Kristen L; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M; Floyd, Kyle A; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses.

  16. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Erle, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin.

  17. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khosravi

    Full Text Available Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car and its isomer thymol (Thy are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses

  18. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

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    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  19. Research on Preparation of Human Immune Cell in vitro with Response to Shrimp Allergen

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    W.B. Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp is one of the most important food allergens. Tropomyosin is its major allergen. Wherein Pen a 1, contains five antibody binding regions, has been identified as the only major shrimp allergen. However, the study on IgE with response to shrimp allergen is still a serious lack, compared with the allergenic proteins. Particularly in the aspects of the preparation of IgE in vitro, it is restricted and can only obtain the complete IgE molecules by polyclonal or monoclonal technology. As for the preparation of small molecule IgE to the shrimp allergen has not yet been reported. This study attempts to carry out research on obtaining of cell materials that are used to clone. It sets up a convenient and efficient immune system in vitro which combines dendritic cell differentiation, allergens immune, mixed lymphocyte culture and so on. Finally the system successfully activates the proliferation of specific B cells and the secretion of a large number of specific IgE antibodies to shrimp allergen.

  20. Cellular Immune Response to an Engineered Cell-Based Tumor Vaccine at the Vaccination Site

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou,Qiang; Johnson, Bryon D.; Rimas J Orentas

    2007-01-01

    The engineered expression of the immune co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD137L on the surface of a neuroblastoma cell line converts this tumor into a cell-based cancer vaccine. The mechanism by which this vaccine activates the immune system was investigated by capturing and analyzing immune cells responding to the vaccine cell line embedded in a collagen matrix and injected subcutaneously. The vaccine induced a significant increase in the number of activated CD62L− CCR7− CD49b+ CD8 effector...

  1. Effect of malaria components on blood mononuclear cells involved in immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuchard Punsawad

    2013-01-01

    During malaria infection, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide production have been associated with pathogenesis and disease severity. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have proposed that both Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols are able to modulate blood mononuclear cells, contributing to stimulation of signal transduction and downstream regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and subsequently leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide. The present review summarizes the published in vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the mechanism of intracellular signal transduction and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in blood mononuclear cells after being inducted by Plasmodium falciparum malaria components. Particular attention is paid to hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols which reflect the important mechanism of signaling pathways involved in immune response.

  2. Effect of malaria components on blood mononuclear cells involved in immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsawad, Chuchard

    2013-09-01

    During malaria infection, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide production have been associated with pathogenesis and disease severity. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have proposed that both Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols are able to modulate blood mononuclear cells, contributing to stimulation of signal transduction and downstream regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and subsequently leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide. The present review summarizes the published in vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the mechanism of intracellular signal transduction and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in blood mononuclear cells after being inducted by Plasmodium falciparum malaria components. Particular attention is paid to hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols which reflect the important mechanism of signaling pathways involved in immune response.

  3. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  4. Blocking junctional adhesion molecule C enhances dendritic cell migration and boosts the immune responses against Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballet, Romain; Emre, Yalin; Jemelin, Stéphane; Charmoy, Mélanie; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Imhof, Beat A

    2014-12-01

    The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs) from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1) response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2) response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response.

  5. Blocking junctional adhesion molecule C enhances dendritic cell migration and boosts the immune responses against Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ballet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1 response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2 response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response.

  6. Melatonin treatment prevents modulation of cell-mediated immune response induced by propoxur in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suke, Sanvidhan G; Pathak, Rahul; Ahmed, Rafat S; Tripathi, A K; Banerjee, B D

    2008-08-01

    The effect of melatonin, a major secretory product of the pineal gland, in attenuation of propoxur (2-isopropoxy phenyl N-methyl carbamate)-induced modulation of cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was studied in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were exposed to propoxur (a widely used pesticide) orally (10 mg/kg) and/or melatonin (10 mg/kg) orally for 4 weeks. CMI was measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), leucocyte and macrophage migration inhibition (LMI and MMI) responses and estimation of cytokines TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels. Rats exposed to propoxur for 4 weeks showed significant decrease in DTH, LMI and MMI responses. Propoxur also suppressed TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma production significantly. Administration of melatonin alone caused a significant increase in DTH response. Although there were no changes in the LMI and MMI response, the cytokine levels were significantly increased, as compared to control. Co-administration of melatonin along with propoxur significantly nullified the effect of the pesticide on the CMI response, except DTH and reversed levels of cytokines to near control/normal values. Thus, melatonin treatment considerably attenuated immunomodulation caused by sub-chronic treatment of propoxur in experimental animals.

  7. TISSUE FACTOR EXPRESSION BY MYELOID CELLS CONTRIBUTES TO PROTECTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST Mycobacterium tuberculosis INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Tripathi, Deepak; Tucker, Torry; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana; Welch, Elwyn; Raghunath, Anjana; Jeffers, Ann; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Schechter, Melissa E; Andrade, Bruno B; Mackman, Nizel; Idell, Steven; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an essential role in hemostasis by activating coagulation. TF is also expressed by monocytes/macrophages as part of the innate immune response to infections. In the current study, we determined the role of TF expressed by myeloid cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection by using mice lacking the TF gene in myeloid cells (TFΔ) and human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs). We found that during M. tb infection, a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells was associated with reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression, enhanced IL-10 production and reduced apoptosis in infected macrophages, which augmented M. tb growth. Our results demonstrate that a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells promotes M2 like phenotype in M .tb infected macrophages. A deficiency in TF expression by myeloid cells was also associated with reduced fibrin deposition and increased matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mediated inflammation in M. tb infected lungs. Our studies demonstrate that TF expressed by myeloid cells has newly recognized abilities to polarize macrophages and to regulate M. tb growth. PMID:26471500

  8. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Meertens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ZIKA virus (ZIKV is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Immune Response in Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Su

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a spatial–temporal mathematical model (PDE to capture fundamental aspects of the immune response to antigen. We have considered terms that broadly describe intercellular communication, cell movement, and effector function (activation or inhibition. The PDE model is robust to variation in antigen load and it can account for (1 antigen recognition, (2 an innate immune response, (3 an adaptive immune response, (4 the elimination of antigen and subsequent resolution of the immune response or (5 equilibrium of the immune response to the presence of persistent antigen (chronic infection and the formation of a granuloma.

  10. Study on Blood Cell Immune Response in Water Buffaloes Infected Acutely with F. hepatica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Long; MAO Xin-zhi; WANG Bing-yun; Award Daugschies; J. Gonzalez-Gallego

    2002-01-01

    Action mechanism of blood cell immune response in water buffaloes against acute infection with F. Hepatica was studied. The results showed that after water buffaloes were infected, the total levels of WBC surpassed control group during whole infection period; Eosinophiles (%) of DC were higher than control group at the 2nd week until 19th week, and then dropped and was close to control group; Neutrophiles(%)was low or significantly lower than control group within the 5 - 16th weeks; The total levels of lymphocytes (%) was lower than control group during the whole infection period; T-lymphocytes (%) dropped significantly, but B-lymphocytes(%) had opposite changes from the first week of infection, and they were close to the control group after 11 weeks; RBC-CR1 and RBC-IC rosette rates dropped and rose during 2 - 16 and 2- 18 weeks, respectively, and then approached the same between both groups. It was suggested that the violent changes of specific and nonspecific immune responses in water buffaloes with acute F. hepatica infection are related with the mechanism against infection with F. hepatica together.

  11. In vitro antitumor immune response induced by fusion of dendritic cells and colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; Ying-Jiang Ye; Shan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The prevention of recurrence of colon cancer (CC)after operation is very important for improvement of the prognosis of CC patients, especially those with micrometastasis. The generation of fused cells between dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells maybe an effective approach for tumor antigen presentation in immunotherapy. In this study,we fused human colon caner SW480 cells and human peripheral blood - derived DCs to induce an antitumor activity against human CC.METHODS: CC SW480 cells and human peripheral blood derived DCs were fused with 500 mL/L polyethylene glycol (PEG).RESULTS: The specific T cell responses activated by fusion cells (FCs), were observed. About 100 mL/L to 160 mL/L of the PEG-treated non-adherent cells with fluorescences were considered to be dendritomas that highly expressed the key molecules for antigen presentation in our five cases. In vitro studies showed that fusions effectively activated CD8+ T lymphocytes to secrete interferon-γ. The early apoptotic ratio of the colon cancer SW480 cells was higher than that of controls, which was affected by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) stimulated by dendritomas.CONCLUSION: The data indicate that fusion of tumor cells with DCs is an attractive strategy to induce tumor rejection.

  12. Stimulatory effect of Eucalyptus essential oil on innate cell-mediated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasi Guido

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides few data concerning the antiseptic properties against a range of microbial agents and the anti-inflammatory potential both in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the influence of Eucalyptus oil (EO extract on the monocytic/macrophagic system, one of the primary cellular effectors of the immune response against pathogen attacks. The activities of this natural extract have mainly been recognized through clinical experience, but there have been relatively little scientific studies on its biological actions. Here we investigated whether EO extract is able to affect the phagocytic ability of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs in vitro and of rat peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes in vivo in absence or in presence of immuno-suppression induced by the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Methods Morphological activation of human MDMs was analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Phagocytic activity was tested: i in vitro in EO treated and untreated MDMs, by confocal microscopy after fluorescent beads administration; ii in vivo in monocytes/granulocytes from peripheral blood of immuno-competent or 5-FU immuno-suppressed rats, after EO oral administration, by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labelled E. coli. Cytokine release by MDMs was determined using the BD Cytometric Bead Array human Th1/Th2 cytokine kit. Results EO is able to induce activation of MDMs, dramatically stimulating their phagocytic response. EO-stimulated internalization is coupled to low release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and requires integrity of the microtubule network, suggesting that EO may act by means of complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Implementation of innate cell-mediated immune response was also observed in vivo after EO administration, mainly involving the peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes. The 5-FU/EO combined treatment inhibited the 5-FU induced myelotoxicity and raised the phagocytic activity of the

  13. Original encounter with antigen determines antigen-presenting cell imprinting of the quality of the immune response in mice.

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    Valérie Abadie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining a certain multi-functionality of cellular immunity for the control of infectious diseases is a burning question in immunology and in vaccine design. Early events, including antigen shuttling to secondary lymphoid organs and recruitment of innate immune cells for adaptive immune response, determine host responsiveness to antigens. However, the sequence of these events and their impact on the quality of the immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we chose to study Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA which is now replacing live Smallpox vaccines and is proposed as an attenuated vector for vaccination strategies against infectious diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed in vivo mechanisms triggered following intradermal (i.d. and intramuscular (i.m. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA administration. We demonstrated significant differences in the antigen shuttling to lymphoid organs by macrophages (MPhis, myeloid dendritic cells (DCs, and neutrophils (PMNs. MVA i.d. administration resulted in better antigen distribution and more sustained antigen-presenting cells (APCs recruitment into draining lymph nodes than with i.m. administration. These APCs, which comprise both DCs and MPhis, were differentially involved in T cell priming and shaped remarkably the quality of cytokine-producing virus-specific T cells according to the entry route of MVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study improves our understanding of the mechanisms of antigen delivery and their consequences on the quality of immune responses and provides new insights for vaccine development.

  14. YB-1 immunization combined with regulatory T-cell depletion induces specific T-cell responses that protect against neuroblastoma in the early stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zheng; Ping Liu; Xiaofeng Yang

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and the most common cancer in infancy.Currently,no effective clinical treatments are available for advanced neuroblastoma.In a previous study,we screened Y Box protein 1 (YB-1) as a potential neuroblastoma-associated antigen from sera of AGN2a-immunized mice by serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries technique.The aim of this study is to explore if YB-1 immunization in the context of Treg depletion could induce protective immune response against the neuroblastoma in mice.YB-1 was expressed and purified by pET-15b prokaryotic expression system.It was demonstrated that anti-YB-1 CD8+ T-cell responses could be induced by AGN2a immunization,and the strongest CD8+ T-cell responses against AGN2a were induced by YB-1-immunized mice in the context of Treg depletion compared with YB-1 only immunization group and control group.Importantly,the survival rate of mice treated with YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion was 80% when challenged by 1 × 104 AGN2a cells,significantly higher than that of mice immunized with YB-1 alone (P< 0.01).Furthermore,T-cell adoptive therapy showed that the neuroblastoma growth was inhibited when T cells or splenic cells from YB-1-immunized mice with Treg depletion were transferred to AGN2a bearing mice.Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were involved in the anti-neuroblastoma responses induced by YB-1immunization combined with Treg depletion.These results indicated that YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion could induce specific T-cell responses against neuroblastoma and could be a potential strategy for the prevention and treatment of neuroblastoma in the early stage.

  15. The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD200R identifies cells involved in type 2 immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Lars H; Martel, Britta C; Larsen, Lau F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathology of allergic diseases involves type 2 immune cells, such as Th2, ILC2, and basophils exerting their effect by production of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. However, surface receptors that are specifically expressed on type 2 immune cells are less well documented. The aim...... and ILC2 cells and basophils. In peanut-allergic subjects the peanut-specific Th2 (CD154(+) CRTh2(+) ) cells expressed more CD200R than the non-allergen specific Th2 (CD154(-) CRTh2(+) ) cells. Moreover, co-staining of CD161 and CD200R identified peanut-specific highly differentiated IL-4(+) IL-5(+) Th2...

  16. Impairment of the humoral and CD4(+) T cell responses in HTLV-1-infected individuals immunized with tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Anselmo; Santos, Silvane; Carvalho, Lucas P; Grassi, Maria Fernanda R; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2016-08-01

    T cells from HTLV-1-infected individuals have a decreased ability to proliferate after stimulation with recall antigens. This abnormality may be due to the production of regulatory cytokine or a dysfunctional antigen presentation. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antibody production and cytokine expression by lymphocytes before and after immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT) and to evaluate the immune response of monocytes after stimulation with TT and frequency of dendritic cells (DC) subsets. HTLV-1 carriers (HC) and uninfected controls (UC) with negative serology for TT were immunized with TT, and the antibody titers were determined by ELISA as well as the cell activation markers expression by monocytes. The frequencies of DC subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Following immunization, the IgG anti-TT titers and the frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 in response to TT were lower in the HC than in the UC. Additionally, monocytes from HC did not exhibit increased HLA-DR expression after stimulation with TT, and presented low numbers of DC subsets, therefore, it's necessary to perform functional studies with antigen-presenting cells. Collectively, our finding suggests that HC present an impairment of the humoral and CD4(+) T cell immune responses after vaccination.

  17. Immune response to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  18. Correspondence of Neutralizing Humoral Immunity and CD4 T Cell Responses in Long Recovered Sudan Virus Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Sobarzo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Robust humoral and cellular immunity are critical for survival in humans during an ebolavirus infection. However, the interplay between these two arms of immunity is poorly understood. To address this, we examined residual immune responses in survivors of the Sudan virus (SUDV outbreak in Gulu, Uganda (2000–2001. Cytokine and chemokine expression levels in SUDV stimulated whole blood cultures were assessed by multiplex ELISA and flow cytometry. Antibody and corresponding neutralization titers were also determined. Flow cytometry and multiplex ELISA results demonstrated significantly higher levels of cytokine and chemokine responses in survivors with serological neutralizing activity. This correspondence was not detected in survivors with serum reactivity to SUDV but without neutralization activity. This previously undefined relationship between memory CD4 T cell responses and serological neutralizing capacity in SUDV survivors is key for understanding long lasting immunity in survivors of filovirus infections.

  19. The effects and mechanisms of insulin on systemic inflammatory response and immune cells in severe trauma, burn injury, and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hu-Ping; Chai, Jia-Ke

    2009-10-01

    Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, inflammatory disorders and immune dysfunction cause high morbidity and mortality in patients with severe trauma, burn injuries, or sepsis. Many studies have shown that intensive insulin therapy can combat insulin resistance, decrease blood glucose levels, and induce anabolic processes, thus, decreasing morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in recent years, it has been proven that insulin can attenuate systemic inflammatory responses and modulate the proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and immune functions of certain immune cells, especially monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, and T cells associated with severe trauma, burn injury, or sepsis. This effect of insulin may expand our understanding of intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. This review attempts to summarize studies on the modulatory effects and mechanisms of insulin therapy on systemic inflammation and immune cells in severe trauma, burn injury and sepsis, and further propose some questions for future studies.

  20. Functional analysis of membrane-bound complement regulatory protein on T-cell immune response in ginbuna crucian carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Indriyani; Abdelkhalek, Nevien K; Motobe, Shiori; Nakamura, Ryota; Tsujikura, Masakazu; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2016-02-01

    Complements have long been considered to be a pivotal component in innate immunity. Recent researches, however, highlight novel roles of complements in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Membrane-bound complement regulatory protein CD46, a costimulatory protein for T cells, is a key molecule for T-cell immunomodulation. Teleost CD46-like molecule, termed Tecrem, has been newly identified in common carp and shown to function as a complement regulator. However, it remains unclear whether Tecrem is involved in T-cell immune response. We investigated Tecrem function related to T-cell responses in ginbuna crucian carp. Ginbuna Tecrem (gTecrem) proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation using anti-common carp Tecrem monoclonal antibody (mAb) and were ubiquitously expressed on blood cells including CD8α(+) and CD4(+) lymphocytes. gTecrem expression on leucocyte surface was enhanced after stimulation with the T-cell mitogen, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Coculture with the anti-Tecrem mAb significantly inhibited the proliferative activity of PHA-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that cross-linking of Tecrems on T-cells interferes with a signal transduction pathway for T-cell activation. These findings indicate that Tecrem may act as a T-cell moderator and imply that the complement system in teleost, as well as mammals, plays an important role for linking adaptive and innate immunity.

  1. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  2. Human rhinovirus induced cytokine/chemokine responses in human airway epithelial and immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Infections with human rhinovirus (HRV are commonly associated with acute upper and lower respiratory tract disease and asthma exacerbations. The role that HRVs play in these diseases suggests it is important to understand host-specific or virus-specific factors that contribute to pathogenesis. Since species A HRVs are often associated with more serious HRV disease than species B HRVs, differences in immune responses they induce should inform disease pathogenesis. To identify species differences in induced responses, we evaluated 3 species A viruses, HRV 25, 31 and 36 and 3 species B viruses, HRV 4, 35 and 48 by exposing human PBMCs to HRV infected Calu-3 cells. To evaluate the potential effect of memory induced by previous HRV infection on study responses, we tested cord blood mononuclear cells that should be HRV naïve. There were HRV-associated increases (significant increase compared to mock-infected cells for one or more HRVs for IP-10 and IL-15 that was unaffected by addition of PBMCs, for MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IFN-α, and HGF only with addition of PBMCs, and for ENA-78 only without addition of PBMCs. All three species B HRVs induced higher levels, compared to A HRVs, of MIP-1α and MIP-1β with PBMCs and ENA-78 without PBMCs. In contrast, addition of CBMCs had less effect and did not induce MIP-1α, MIP-1β, or IFN-α nor block ENA-78 production. Addition of CBMCs did, however, increase IP-10 levels for HRV 35 and HRV 36 infection. The presence of an effect with PBMCs and no effect with CBMCs for some responses suggest differences between the two types of cells possibly because of the presence of HRV memory responses in PBMCs and not CBMCs or limited response capacity for the immature CBMCs relative to PBMCs. Thus, our results indicate that different HRV strains can induce different patterns of cytokines and chemokines; some of these differences may be due to differences in memory responses induced by past HRV infections, and other differences

  3. Differential requirements of MyD88 and TRIF pathways in TLR4-mediated immune responses in murine B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    LPS stimulates the TLR4/Myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) complex and promotes a variety of immune responses in B cells. TLR4 has two main signaling pathways, MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathways, but relatively few studies have examined these pathways in B cells. In this study, we investigated MyD88- or TRIF-dependent LPS responses in B cells by utilizing their knockout mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, MyD88(-/-) B cells were markedly impaired in up-regulation of CD86 and proliferation induced by lipid A moiety of LPS. TRIF(-/-) B cells were also impaired in these responses compared with WT B cells, but showed better responses than MyD88(-/-) B cells. Regarding class switch recombination (CSR) elicited by lipid A plus IL-4, MyD88(-/-) B cells showed similar patterns of CSR to WT B cells. However, TRIF(-/-) B cells showed the impaired in the CSR. Compared with WT and MyD88(-/-) B cells, TRIF(-/-) B cells exhibited reduced cell division, fewer IgG1(+) cells per division, and decreased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aicda) mRNA expression in response to lipid A plus IL-4. Finally, IgG1 production to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS immunization was impaired in TRIF(-/-) mice, while MyD88(-/-) mice exhibited increased IgG1 production. Thus, MyD88 and TRIF pathways differently regulate TLR4-induced immune responses in B cells.

  4. Recombinant yellow fever viruses elicit CD8+ T cell responses and protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Tayar Nogueira

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a major public health problem affecting nearly 10 million in Latin America. Despite several experimental vaccines have shown to be immunogenic and protective in mouse models, there is not a current vaccine being licensed for humans or in clinical trial against T. cruzi infection. Towards this goal, we used the backbone of Yellow Fever (YF 17D virus, one of the most effective and well-established human vaccines, to express an immunogenic fragment derived from T. cruzi Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (ASP-2. The cDNA sequence of an ASP-2 fragment was inserted between E and NS1 genes of YF 17D virus through the construction of a recombinant heterologous cassette. The replication ability and genetic stability of recombinant YF virus (YF17D/ENS1/Tc was confirmed for at least six passages in Vero cells. Immunogenicity studies showed that YF17D/ENS1/Tc virus elicited neutralizing antibodies and gamma interferon (IFN-γ producing-cells against the YF virus. Also, it was able to prime a CD8(+ T cell directed against the transgenic T. cruzi epitope (TEWETGQI which expanded significantly as measured by T cell-specific production of IFN-γ before and after T. cruzi challenge. However, most important for the purposes of vaccine development was the fact that a more efficient protective response could be seen in mice challenged after vaccination with the YF viral formulation consisting of YF17D/ENS1/Tc and a YF17D recombinant virus expressing the TEWETGQI epitope at the NS2B-3 junction. The superior protective immunity observed might be due to an earlier priming of epitope-specific IFN-γ-producing T CD8(+ cells induced by vaccination with this viral formulation. Our results suggest that the use of viral formulations consisting of a mixture of recombinant YF 17D viruses may be a promising strategy to elicit protective immune responses against pathogens, in general.

  5. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses.

  6. LONG-LIVED BONE MARROW PLASMA CELLS DURING IMMUNE RESPONSE TO ALPHA (1→3 DEXTRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chernyshova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production kinetics and some functional properties of long-lived marrow plasma cells were studied in mice immunized with T-independent type 2 antigens. Alpha (1→3 dextran was used as an antigen for immunization. The mice were immunized by dextran, and the numbers of IgM antibody producing cells were determined by ELISPOT method. The cell phenotype was determined by cytofluorimetric technique. In the area of normal bone marrow lymphocytes ~4% of T and ~85% of B cells were detected. About 35% of the cells expressed a plasmocyte marker (CD138; 3% were CD138+IgM+, and about 6% of the lymphocytes were double-positive for CD138+IgA+. Among spleen lymphocytes, 50% of T and 47% of B cells were detected. About 1.5% lymphocytes were CD138+, and 0.5% were positive for CD138 and IgM. Time kinetics of antibody-producing cells in bone marrow and spleen was different. In spleen populations, the peak amounts of antibody-secreting cells have been shown on the day 4; the process abated by the day 28. Vice versa, the numbers of the antibody-producing cells in bone marrow started to increase on the day 4. The process reached its maximum on day 14, and after 28th day became stationary. The in vitro experiments have shown that supplementation of bone marrow cells from immune mice with dextran did not influence their functional activity. It was previously shown for cells responding to T-dependent antigens only. A specific marker for the long-lived plasma cells is still unknown. However, these cells possess a common CD138 marker specific for all plasma cells. A method for isolation of bone marrow CD138+ cells was developed. The CD138+ cells were of 87-97% purity, being enriched in long-lived bone marrow cells, and produced monospecific antibodies. 

  7. Whole blood assay to access T cell-immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in healthy Brazilian individuals

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    Paulo RZ Antas

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of interferon gamma (IFNgamma guarantees effective T cell-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In the present study, we simply compare the in vitro immune responses to Mycobacterium antigens in terms of IFNg production in a total of 10 healthy Brazilian volunteers. Whole blood and mononuclear cells were cultivated in parallel with PPD, Ag85B, and M. bovis hsp65, and five-days supernatants were harvested for cytokine detection by ELISA. The inter-assay result was that the overall profile of agreement in response to antigens was highly correlated (r² = 0.9266; p = 0.0102. Potential analysis is in current progress to dictate the usefulness of this method to access the immune responses also in tuberculosis patients and its contacts.

  8. Tranilast inhibits the function of cancer-associated fibroblasts responsible for the induction of immune suppressor cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshio, Y; Hanaoka, J; Kontani, K; Teramoto, K

    2014-12-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component in the tumour microenvironment (TME), playing critical roles in generation of pro-tumourigenic TME; however, their contribution to suppression of antitumour immune responses has not been fully understood. To elucidate the interaction between CAFs and immune suppressor cells, we examined whether inhibition of CAFs function would impair the induction of immune suppressor cell types in vitro. In this study, we applied an anti-allergic and antifibrotic agent tranilast, which is used clinically, and evaluated a potential of tranilast to serve as a CAFs inhibitor. CAFs that had been isolated from E.G7 or LLC1 tumour-bearing mice were cultured in the presence of tranilast, and thereafter, CAFs functions on the secretion of some soluble factors as well as the induction of immune suppressor cells were evaluated. As a result, tranilast inhibited the proliferation of CAFs and reduced the levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2 and transforming growth factor-β1 from CAFs in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, tranilast exerted no inhibitory effects on immune cells at doses under 100 μm. The induction of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells from their progenitor cells was suppressed in the medium that CAFs had been cultured in the presence of tranilast; however, these findings were not observed when those progenitor cells were cultured in the medium containing tranilast alone. These data demonstrate that tranilast inhibits CAFs function, which is responsible for the induction of immune suppressor cells, and possesses a potential to serve as a specific CAFs inhibitor.

  9. Depletion of CD25+CD4+T cells (Tregs) enhances the HBV-specific CD8+ T cell response primed by DNA immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshihiro Furuichi; Hirotake Tokuyama; Satoshi Ueha; Makoto Kurachi; Fuminori Moriyasu; Kazuhiro Kakimi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by a weak CD8+ T cell response to HBV. Immunotherapeutic strategies that overcome tolerance and boost these suboptimal responses may facilitate viral clearance in chronically infected individuals. Therefore, we examined whether CD25+CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells might be involved in a inhibition of CD8+T cell priming or in the modulation of the magnitude of the'peak' antiviral CD8+ T cell response primed by DNA immunization. METHODS: B10.D2 mice were immunized once with plasmid pCMV-S. Mice received 500 μg of anti-CD25 mAb injected intraperitoneally 3 d before DNA immunization to deplete CD25+ cells. Induction of HBV-specific CD8+ T ceils in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured by S28-39 peptide loaded DimerX staining and their function was analyzed by intracellular IFN-γ staining.RESULTS: DNA immunization induced HBV-specific CD8+ T cells. At the peak T cell response (d 10), 7.1±2.0% of CD8+ T cells were HBV-specific after DNA immunization, whereas 12.7±3.2% of CD8+ T cells were HBV-specific in Treg-depleted mice, suggesting that DNA immunization induced more antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD25+ Treg cells (n = 6, P<0.05). Similarly, fewer HBVspecific memory T cells were detected in the presence of these cells (1.3±0.4%) in comparison to Treg-depleted mice (2.6±0.9%) on d 30 after DNA immunization (n = 6, P<0.01). Both IFN-γ production and the avidity of the HBV-specific CD8+ T cell response to antigen were higher in HBV-specific CD8+ T cells induced in the absence of Treg cells.CONCLUSION: CD25+ Treg cells suppress priming and/or expansion of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells during DNA immunization and the peak CD8+ T cell response is enhanced by depleting this cell population. Furthermore, Treg cells appear to be involved in the contraction phase of the CD8+ T ceil response and may affect the quality of memory T cell pools. The elimination of Treg

  10. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future.

  11. Dendritic cell editing by activated natural killer cells results in a more protective cancer-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Morandi

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, several studies have extensively reported that activated natural killer (NK cells can kill autologous immature dendritic cells (DCs in vitro, whereas they spare fully activated DCs. This led to the proposal that activated NK cells might select a more immunogenic subset of DCs during a protective immune response. However, there is no demonstration that autologous DC killing by NK cells is an event occurring in vivo and, consequently, the functional relevance of this killing remains elusive. Here we report that a significant decrease of CD11c(+ DCs was observed in draining lymph nodes of mice inoculated with MHC-devoid cells as NK cell targets able to induce NK cell activation. This in vivo DC editing by NK cells was perforin-dependent and it was functionally relevant, since residual lymph node DCs displayed an improved capability to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, in a model of anti-cancer vaccination, the administration of MHC-devoid cells together with tumor cells increased the number of tumor-specific CTLs and resulted in a significant increase in survival of mice upon challenge with a lethal dose of tumor cells. Depletion of NK cells or the use of perforin knockout mice strongly decreased the tumor-specific CTL expansion and its protective role against tumor cell challenge. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that NK cell-mediated DC killing takes place in vivo and is able to promote expansion of cancer-specific CTLs. Our results also indicate that cancer vaccines could be improved by strategies aimed at activating NK cells.

  12. Differential and site specific impact of B cells in the protective immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the mouse.

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    Egídio Torrado

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune responses are known to be critical for control of mycobacterial infections whereas the role of B cells and humoral immunity is unclear. B cells can modulate immune responses by secretion of immunoglobulin, production of cytokines and antigen-presentation. To define the impact of B cells in the absence of secreted immunoglobulin, we analyzed the progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection in mice that have B cells but which lack secretory immunoglobulin (AID(-/-µS(-/-mice. AID(-/-µS(-/- mice accumulated a population of activated B cells in the lungs when infected and were more susceptible to aerosol Mtb when compared to wild type (C57BL/6 mice or indeed mice that totally lack B cells. The enhanced susceptibility of AID(-/-µS(-/- mice was not associated with defective T cell activation or expression of a type 1 immune response. While delivery of normal serum to AID(-/-µS(-/- mice did not reverse susceptibility, susceptibility in the spleen was dependent upon the presence of B cells and susceptibility in the lungs of AID(-/-µS(-/-mice was associated with elevated expression of the cytokines IL-6, GM-CSF, IL-10 and molecules made by alternatively activated macrophages. Blocking of IL-10 signaling resulted in reversal of susceptibility in the spleens and lungs of AID(-/-µS(-/- mice. These data support the hypothesis that B cells can modulate immunity to Mtb in an organ specific manner via the modulation of cytokine production and macrophage activation.

  13. Cell-mediated immune responses differentiate infections with Brucella suis from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O : 9 in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Jungersen, Gregers

    2007-01-01

    serological Brucellosis reactions. While 36 of the 39 FPSR pigs were also FPSR in a second test, none of the pigs were test positive in whole blood IFN-gamma assay or Brucellergene OCB skin test. In conclusion, use of IFN-gamma assay and skin test as measurements of cell-mediated immune responses to non...

  14. Novel antigens for detection of cell mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2011-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of the intestine of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Early stage MAP infection can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the whole blood interferon-γ (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assa...

  15. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, T. S.; Norup, L. R.; Pedersen, A.R.;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use flow cytometry to assess chicken T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study two inbred genetic chicken lines (L130 and L133) were subjected to two times vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND) and a subsequent challenge by ND virus (NDV) infection...

  16. Innate immune response of human alveolar type II cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaohui; Travanty, Emily A; Oko, Lauren; Edeen, Karen; Berglund, Andrew; Wang, Jieru; Ito, Yoko; Holmes, Kathryn V; Mason, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus (CoV) produces a devastating primary viral pneumonia with diffuse alveolar damage and a marked increase in circulating cytokines. One of the major cell types to be infected is the alveolar type II cell. However, the innate immune response of primary human alveolar epithelial cells infected with SARS-CoV has not been defined. Our objectives included developing a culture system permissive for SARS-CoV infection in primary human type II cells and defining their innate immune response. Culturing primary human alveolar type II cells at an air-liquid interface (A/L) improved their differentiation and greatly increased their susceptibility to infection, allowing us to define their primary interferon and chemokine responses. Viral antigens were detected in the cytoplasm of infected type II cells, electron micrographs demonstrated secretory vesicles filled with virions, virus RNA concentrations increased with time, and infectious virions were released by exocytosis from the apical surface of polarized type II cells. A marked increase was evident in the mRNA concentrations of interferon-β and interferon-λ (IL-29) and in a large number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. A surprising finding involved the variability of expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2, the SARS-CoV receptor, in type II cells from different donors. In conclusion, the cultivation of alveolar type II cells at an air-liquid interface provides primary cultures in which to study the pulmonary innate immune responses to infection with SARS-CoV, and to explore possible therapeutic approaches to modulating these innate immune responses.

  17. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Hara, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kita, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  18. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yin Drake

    Full Text Available Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  19. Probiotics-pathogen interactions elicit differential regulation of cutaneous immune responses in epidermal cells of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2014-01-01

    Little is known on the cutaneous immune responses during probiotics-pathogen interactions in fish. Thus, this study employed Atlantic cod primary epidermal (EP) cell cultures as a model to understand this interaction. The probiotics-pathogen interactions in the EP cell cultures were elucidated using Vibrio anguillarum 2133 (VA) as the pathogen and two host-derived bacteria (GP21 and GP12) as the probiotics. There was a regional size difference on the EP cells; i.e., EP cells from the dorsal region were significantly larger than the EP cells at the ventral side. VA significantly decreased viability of EP cells. In the presence of probiotics, this inhibition was mitigated. The probiotics reduced VA-induced cellular apoptosis and the probiotics-pathogen interactions influenced cellular myeloperoxidase activity during the latter stage of co-incubation. The probiotics-pathogen interactions triggered differential regulation of immune-related genes and the effects of the interaction were dependent on the region where the cells were isolated and the length of the co-incubation period. In most cases, the presence of probiotics alone showed no significant change on the mRNA level of immune genes in the EP cells but triggered immunostimulatory activity when incubated with VA. This study showed that the virulence of VA in EP cells could be modulated by host-derived probiotics and the immunomodulatory characteristics of the two candidate probionts advanced their immune-related probiotic potential.

  20. Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum induces immune responses to cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1 and maturation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobergslien, Anne; Vasovic, Vlada; Mathiesen, Geir; Fredriksen, Lasse; Westby, Phuong; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Peng, Qian; Sioud, Mouldy

    2015-01-01

    Given their safe use in humans and inherent adjuvanticity, Lactic Acid Bacteria may offer several advantages over other mucosal delivery strategies for cancer vaccines. The objective of this study is to evaluate the immune responses in mice after oral immunization with Lactobacillus (L) plantarum WCFS1 expressing a cell-wall anchored tumor antigen NY-ESO-1. And to investigate the immunostimulatory potency of this new candidate vaccine on human dendritic cells (DCs). L. plantarum displaying NY-ESO-1 induced NY-ESO-1 specific antibodies and T-cell responses in mice. By contrast, L. plantarum displaying conserved proteins such as heat shock protein-27 and galectin-1, did not induce immunity, suggesting that immune tolerance to self-proteins cannot be broken by oral administration of L. plantarum. With respect to immunomodulation, immature DCs incubated with wild type or L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 upregulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secreted a large amount of interleukin (IL)-12, TNF-α, but not IL-4. Moreover, they upregulated the expression of immunosuppressive factors such as IL-10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Although L. plantarum-matured DCs expressed inhibitory molecules, they stimulated allogeneic T cells in-vitro. Collectively, the data indicate that L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 can evoke antigen-specific immunity upon oral administration and induce DC maturation, raising the potential of its use in cancer immunotherapies.

  1. The Impact of Ly49-NK Cell-Dependent Recognition of MCMV Infection on Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Pyzik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental data indicate that a subset of innate lymphocytes, natural killer (NK cells, plays a crucial role in the response against herpesviruses, especially cytomegaloviruses (CMV. Indeed, in mice, NK cells, due to the expression of germline encoded Ly49 receptors, possess multiple mechanisms to recognize CMV infection. Classically, this results in NK cell activation and the destruction of the infected cells. More recently, however, this unique host-pathogen interaction has permitted the discovery of novel aspects of NK cell biology, implicating them in the regulation of adaptive immune responses as well as in the development of immunological memory. Here, we will concisely review the newly acquired evidence pertaining to NK cell Ly49-dependent recognition of MCMV-infected cell and the ensuing NK cell regulatory responses.

  2. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme in myelomonocytic cells enhances the immune response [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth E. Bernstein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and thereby plays an important role in blood pressure control. However, ACE is relatively non-specific in its substrate specificity and cleaves many other peptides. Recent analysis of mice overexpressing ACE in monocytes, macrophages, and other myelomonocytic cells shows that these animals have a marked increase in resistance to experimental melanoma and to infection by Listeria monocytogenes or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Several other measures of immune responsiveness, including antibody production, are enhanced in these animals. These studies complement a variety of studies indicating an important role of ACE in the immune response.

  3. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Alyssa Lundgren; Teoh, Jeffrey; Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The MHC class I D(k) molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds D(k), are required to control viral spread. The extent of D(k)-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust D(k)-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen.

  4. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses.

  5. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M.; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses. PMID:26630176

  6. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 Attenuates Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunosuppression and Regulates Th17/Treg Cell Immune Responses in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junhua; Nie, Shaoping; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Junyi; Xiong, Tao; Gong, Deming; Xie, Mingyong

    2016-02-17

    The balance of T helper cells 17 (Th17)/regulatory T cells (Treg) plays a key role in maintaining a normal immune response. It is well-known that cyclophosphamide (CTX) applied at high dose often damages the immune system by inhibiting immune cell proliferation. In this study, the immunomodulating effects of Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 in CTX-induced immunosuppression mice were investigated. Results showed that the levels of cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-21 were significantly increased after 10 days of treatment with a high dose of NCU116 (46.92 ± 4.28 and 119.92 ± 10.89, respectively) compared with the model group (36.20 ± 2.63, 61.00 ± 6.92, respectively), and the levels of cytokines IL-23 and TGF-β3 of the three NCU116 treatment groups were significantly higher than that of the model group (90.48 ± 6.33 and 140.45 ± 14.30, respectively) (p < 0.05) and close to 62 and 69% of the normal group's level (140.98 ± 14.74 and 266.95 ± 23.11, respectively) at 10 days. The bacterium was also found to increase the expression levels of Th17 immune response and Treg immune response specific transcription factors RORγt and Foxp3. In addition, the bacterium significantly increased the number of CD4(+)T cells and dendrtic cells (DCs) and up-regulated mRNA expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These findings demonstrated that NCU116 has the potential ability to enhance intestinal mucosa immunity and regulate the Th17/Treg balance, which may be attributed to the TLR pathway in DCs.

  7. On the trail of innate immune responses: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balzarolo, M.

    2013-01-01

    Our study sheds new light on pDCs development and function, and might provide new clues for optimizing infection and cancer therapy by harnessing pDC cytotoxicity through TRAIL. Furthermore, this study provides interesting clues to understand the innate immune responses towards bacterial nucleic aci

  8. Genetic ablation or pharmacological blockade of dipeptidyl peptidase IV does not impact T cell-dependent immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryor Kellyann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current literature suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV; CD26 plays an essential role in T-dependent immune responses, a role that could have important clinical consequences. To rigorously define the role of DPP-IV in the immune system, we evaluated genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme on T-dependent immune responses in vivo. Results The DPP-IV null animals mounted robust primary and secondary antibody responses to the T dependent antigens, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl-ovalbumin (NP-Ova and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl-chicken gamma globulin (NP-CGG, which were comparable to wild type mice. Serum levels of antigen specific IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 were similar between the two groups of animals. DPP-IV null animals mounted an efficient germinal center reaction by day 10 after antigen stimulation that was comparable to wild type mice. Moreover, the antibodies produced by DPP-IV null animals after repeated antigenic challenge were affinity matured. Similar observations were made using wild type animals treated with a highly selective DPP-IV inhibitor during the entire course of the experiments. T cell recall responses to ovalbumin and MOG peptide, evaluated by measuring proliferation and IL-2 release from cells isolated from draining lymph nodes, were equivalent in DPP-IV null and wild type animals. Furthermore, mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor had intact T-cell recall responses to MOG peptide. In addition, female DPP-IV null and wild type mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor exhibited normal and robust in vivo cytotoxic T cell responses after challenge with cells expressing the male H-Y minor histocompatibility antigen. Conclusion These data indicate Selective inhibition of DPP-IV does not impair T dependent immune responses to antigenic challenge.

  9. Chitosan Interferon-γ Nanogene Therapy for Lung Disease: Modulation of T-Cell and Dendritic Cell Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiaoyuan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of chitosan nanoparticles as carriers for expression plasmids represents a major improvement in gene expression technology. We demonstrated previously that treatment with chitosan interferon-γ (IFN-γ plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA nanoparticles (chitosan interferon-γ nanogene [CIN] led to in situ production of IFN-γ and a reduction in inflammation and airway reactivity in mice, but the mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory effects of CIN remains unclear. In this report, the effect of CIN treatment on the immune responses of CD8+ T cells and dendritic cells was examined in a BALB/c mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced allergic asthma. OT1 mice (OVA-T cell receptor [TCR] transgenic were also used to test the effects of CIN on OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. CIN treatment caused a reduction in IFN-γ production in a subpopulation of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells cultured in vitro in the presence of OVA. CIN also reduced apoptosis of the CD8+ T cells. Examination of dendritic cells from lung and lymph nodes indicated that CIN treatment decreased their antigen-presenting activity, as evident from the reduction in CD80 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, CIN treatment significantly decreased the number of CD11c+b+ dendritic cells in lymph nodes, suggesting that endogenous IFN-γ expression may immunomodulate dendritic cell migration and activation. CIN therapy results in a reduction in proinflammatory CD8+ T cells and decreases the number and antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells.

  10. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells: architects of CD4 immune responses in mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M-Y; Kim, K-S; McConnell, F; Lane, P

    2009-07-01

    In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the multiple functions of the mouse lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells in: (i) the development of organized lymphoid tissue, (ii) the generation and maintenance of CD4-dependent immunity in adult lymphoid tissues; and (iii) the regulation of central tolerance in thymus. By contrast with mouse LTi cells, which have been well described, the human equivalent is only just beginning to be characterized. Human LTi-like cells expressing interleukin (IL)-22 have been identified recently and found to differentiate into natural killer (NK) cells. The relationship of LTi cells to NK cells is discussed in the light of several studies reporting a close relationship in the mouse between LTi cells and transcription factor retinoid-related orphan receptor gammat-dependent IL-22 producing NK cells in the gut. We also outline our data suggesting that these cells are present in adult human lymphoid tissues.

  11. Effects of dietary salt levels on monocytic cells and immune responses in healthy human subjects: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Buqing; Titze, Jens; Rykova, Marina; Feuerecker, Matthias; Vassilieva, Galina; Nichiporuk, Igor; Schelling, Gustav; Morukov, Boris; Choukèr, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicated that excess salt consumption can impose risks on human health and a reduction in daily salt intake from the current average of approximately 12 g/d to 5-6 g/d was suggested by public health authorities. The studies on mice have revealed that sodium chloride plays a role in the modulation of the immune system and a high-salt diet can promote tissue inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, translational evidence of dietary salt on human immunity is scarce. We used an experimental approach of fixing salt intake of healthy human subjects at 12, 9, and 6 g/d for months and examined the relationship between salt-intake levels and changes in the immune system. Blood samples were taken from the end point of each salt intake period. Immune phenotype changes were monitored through peripheral leukocyte phenotype analysis. We assessed immune function changes through the characterization of cytokine profiles in response to mitogen stimulation. The results showed that subjects on the high-salt diet of 12 g/d displayed a significantly higher number of immune cell monocytes compared with the same subjects on a lower-salt diet, and correlation test revealed a strong positive association between salt-intake levels and monocyte numbers. The decrease in salt intake was accompanied by reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-23, along with enhanced producing ability of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These results suggest that in healthy humans high-salt diet has a potential to bring about excessive immune response, which can be damaging to immune homeostasis, and a reduction in habitual dietary salt intake may induce potentially beneficial immune alterations.

  12. Abacavir Induced T Cell Reactivity from Drug Naïve Individuals Shares Features of Allo-Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Adam; Natascha Wuillemin; Stephan Watkins; Heidi Jamin; Eriksson, Klara K.; Peter Villiger; Stefano Fontana; Pichler, Werner J.; Daniel Yerly

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was inde...

  13. Seasonal changes in cell mediated immune responses to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with haemoglobin AA and haemoglobin AS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative of ......AS children during the malaria season. No distinct seasonal change in the response to PPD was found in relation to the haemoglobin phenotype. The study points to the role of the sickle cell trait in modulating the cellular immune responses to falciparum malaria.......In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative...

  14. Levamisole enhances immune response by affecting the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-Y; Lin, Y-L; Chiang, B-L

    2008-01-01

    Levamisole is a synthetic phenylimidazolthiazole that was first introduced in 1966 as an anti-helmintic agent. Current studies have been focused upon its effect on immune response and on cancer treatment. We examined the molecular mechanisms of levamisole in the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) and human T cells. Treatment of DC with levamisole increased the presentation of CD80, CD86, CD83 and human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR) molecules on the cell membrane, as well as the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and IL-10. Levamisole-treated human DC also enhanced T cell activation towards type 1 T helper immune response by inducing interferon-γ secretion. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 inhibited levamisole-induced production of IL-12 p40 and IL-10, suggesting a vital role for TLR-2 in signalling DC upon incubation with levamisole. The inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 or c-Jun N-terminal kinases pathways also prevented the effects of levamisole on DC in producing IL-12 p40 or IL-10. Taken together, levamisole could enhance immune response towards T helper 1 development through the activation of dendritic cells or T cell aspects. PMID:18005262

  15. Analysing immune cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  16. Th17 and regulatory T cells contribute to the in situ immune response in skin lesions of Jorge Lobo's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanashiro-Galo, Luciane; Pagliari, Carla; Barboza, Tania Cristina; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Xavier, Marilia Brasil; de Oliveira, Clivia Maria Moraes; Unger, Deborah Aben Athar; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas

    2016-01-01

    Jorge Lobo's disease (JLD) is a chronic granulomatous mycosis described in various Latin American countries. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the possible role of Th17 and Foxp3+ Treg cells in the pathogenesis of Jorge Lobo's disease. Human skin biopsies were submitted to an immunohistochemistry protocol to detect Foxp3, interleukin (IL)-1beta, CD25, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-23. The epidermis presented acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, and frequent presence of fungi. The dermis presented inflammatory infiltrate comprising macrophages, lymphocytes, epithelioid and multinucleated cells, and an intense number of fungi. Foxp3+ Treg cells and IL-17+ cells were visualized in lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrate. IL-1, IL-2R (CD25), IL-6, and IL-23 were visualized in the dermis, intermingled with fungal cells, permeating or participating of the granuloma. Following IL-17, the most prominent cytokine was IL-6. IL-23 and cells expressing CD25 were present in fewer number. The comparative analysis between IL-17 and Foxp3 demonstrated a statistically significant increased number of IL-17+ cells. Th17 cells play a role in the immune response of JLD. IL-1beta and IL-6 added to the previously described increased number of TGF-beta would stimulate such pattern of response. Th17 cells could be present as an effort to modulate the local immune response; however, high levels of a Th17 profile could overcome the role of Treg cells. The unbalance between Treg/Th17 cells seems to corroborate with the less effective immune response against the fungus.

  17. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  18. Studies of cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Albert; Van Assen, Sander; De Haan, Aalzen; Huckriede, Anke; Benne, Cornelis A.; Westra, Johanna; Palache, Abraham; Wilschut, Jan; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Both antibody and cell-mediated responses are involved in the defense against influenza. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a decreased antibody response to subunit influenza vaccine has been demonstrated, but cell-mediated responses have not yet been assessed. This stud

  19. Modification to the capsid of the adenovirus vector that enhances dendritic cell infection and transgene-specific cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worgall, Stefan; Busch, Annette; Rivara, Michael; Bonnyay, David; Leopold, Philip L; Merritt, Robert; Hackett, Neil R; Rovelink, Peter W; Bruder, Joseph T; Wickham, Thomas J; Kovesdi, Imi; Crystal, Ronald G

    2004-03-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to transfer and express antigens and function as strong adjuvants and thus are useful platforms for the development of genetic vaccines. Based on the hypothesis that Ad vectors with enhanced infectibility of dendritic cells (DC) may be able to evoke enhanced immune responses against antigens encoded by the vector in vivo, the present study analyzes the vaccine potential of an Ad vector expressing beta-galactosidase as a model antigen and genetically modified with RGD on the fiber knob [AdZ.F(RGD)] to more selectively infect DC and consequently enhance immunity against the beta-galactosidase antigen. Infection of murine DC in vitro with AdZ.F(RGD) showed an eightfold-increased transgene expression following infection compared to AdZ (also expressing beta-galactosidase, but with a wild-type capsid). Binding, cellular uptake, and trafficking in DC were also increased with AdZ.F(RGD) compared to AdZ. To determine whether AdZ.F(RGD) could evoke enhanced immune responses to beta-galactosidase in vivo, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with AdZ.F(RGD) or AdZ subcutaneously via the footpad. Humoral responses with both vectors were comparable, with similar anti-beta-galactosidase antibody levels following vector administration. However, cellular responses to beta-galactosidase were significantly enhanced, with the frequency of CD4(+) as well as the CD8(+) beta-galactosidase-specific gamma interferon response in cells isolated from the draining lymph nodes increased following immunization with AdZ.F(RGD) compared to Ad.Z (P AdZ.F(RGD) vector was sufficient to evoke enhanced inhibition of the growth of preexisting tumors expressing beta-galactosidase: BALB/c mice implanted with the CT26 syngeneic beta-galactosidase-expressing colon carcinoma cell line and subsequently immunized with AdZ.F(RGD) showed decreased tumor growth and improved survival compared to mice immunized with AdZ. These data demonstrate that addition of an RGD motif

  20. CD45/CD8 myeloid histioid antigen and plasma cell antibody immune response in a case of malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response in metastatic melanoma is not well established and therefore is of particular interest to test for recruitment of immune cells to the tumor. A 46-year-old Caucasian female was evaluated for an asymptomatic right forearm mass. The lesion had been present for at least 4 years and had become painful 4 months ago. Biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin (H and E staining, as well as immunohistochemical analysis were performed on the primary tumor and on sentinel lymph nodes. The H and E staining was consistent with metastatic melanoma. Positive staining was noted on the tumor cells with S-100, Mart-1/Melan A/CD63, PNL2, HMB45, and tyrosinase. Peritumoral and intratumoral inflammatory cells stained positive for CD8, CD45, PCNA, myeloid histoid antigen, antihuman plasma cell antibody, and focal BRCA1. The staining patterns of CD8/CD45, myeloid histoid antigen and plasma cell antibody on inflammatory cells around the melanoma cells suggest an unusual type of immune response.

  1. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders.

  2. Role of pathogen-derived cell wall carbohydrates and prostaglandin E2 in immune response and suppression of fish immunity by the oomycete Saprolegnia parasitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Rodrigo; Wang, Tiehui; Duncan, Gary J; Skaar, Ida; Mélida, Hugo; Bulone, Vincent; van West, Pieter; Secombes, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Saprolegnia parasitica is a freshwater oomycete that is capable of infecting several species of fin fish. Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by this microbe, has a substantial impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. No sustainable treatment against saprolegniosis is available, and little is known regarding the host response. In this study, we examined the immune response of Atlantic salmon to S. parasitica infection and to its cell wall carbohydrates. Saprolegnia triggers a strong inflammatory response in its host (i.e., induction of interleukin-1β1 [IL-1β1], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha), while severely suppressing the expression of genes associated with adaptive immunity in fish, through downregulation of T-helper cell cytokines, antigen presentation machinery, and immunoglobulins. Oomycete cell wall carbohydrates were recognized by fish leukocytes, triggering upregulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, similar to what is observed during infection. Our data suggest that S. parasitica is capable of producing prostaglandin [corrected] E2 (PGE2) in vitro, a metabolite not previously shown to be produced by oomycetes, and two proteins with homology to vertebrate enzymes known to play a role in prostaglandin biosynthesis have been identified in the oomycete genome. Exogenous PGE2 was shown to increase the inflammatory response in fish leukocytes incubated with cell wall carbohydrates while suppressing genes involved in cellular immunity (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and the IFN-γ-inducible protein [γ-IP]). Inhibition of S. parasitica zoospore germination and mycelial growth by two cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin and indomethacin) also suggests that prostaglandins may be involved in oomycete development.

  3. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  4. CRACC-targeting Fc-fusion protein induces activation of NK cells and DCs and improves T cell immune responses to antigenic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Rastall, David P W; Chen, Weimin; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Kaminski, Norbert E; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-06-08

    The CD2-like receptor activating cytotoxic cell (CRACC) receptor is a member of the SLAM family of receptors that are found on several types of immune cells. We previously demonstrated that increasing the abundance of the adaptor protein EAT-2 during vaccination enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccine antigens. Engagement of the CRACC receptor in the presence of the EAT-2 adaptor generally results in immune cell activation, while activating CRACC signaling in cells that lack EAT-2 adaptor inhibits their effector and regulatory functions. As EAT-2 is the only SAP adaptor that interacts with the CRACC receptor, we hypothesized that technologies that specifically modulate CRACC signaling during vaccination may also improve antigen specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a CRACC-targeting Fc fusion protein and included it in vaccination attempts. Indeed, mice co-vaccinated with the CRACC-Fc fusion protein and an adenovirus vaccine expressing the HIV-Gag protein had improved Gag-specific T cell responses, as compared to control mice. These responses are characterized by increased numbers of Gag-specific tetramer+ CD8+ T cells and increases in production of IFNγ, TNFα, and IL2, by Gag-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results revealed that use of the CRACC-Fc fusion protein enhances vaccine-elicited innate immune responses, as characterized by increased dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and IFNγ production from NK cells. This study highlights the importance of CRACC signaling during the induction of an immune response generally, and during vaccinations specifically, and also lends insight into the mechanisms underlying our prior results noting EAT-2-dependent improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  5. The effect of Beauveria bassiana infection on cell mediated and humoral immune response in house fly, Musca domestica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sapna; Kumar, Peeyush; Malik, Anushree

    2015-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi that manifest infections by overcoming insect's immune response could be a successful control agent for the house fly, Musca domestica L. which is a major domestic, medical, and veterinary pest. In this study, the immune response of house fly to Beauveria bassiana infection was investigated to reveal fundamental aspects of house fly hemocyte biology, such as hemocyte numbers and size, which is poorly understood. The total hemocyte counts (THCs) in B. bassiana-infected house fly showed an initial increase (from 6 to 9 h), followed by subsequent decrease (9 to 12 h) with increase in time of infection. The THCs was slightly greater in infected flies than the non-infected ones. Insight into relative hemocyte counts depicted a significant increase in prohemocyte (PR) and decrease in granulocyte (GR) in infected house flies compared to non-infected ones. The relative cell area of hemocyte cells showed a noticeable increase in PR and intermediate cells (ICs), while a considerable reduction was observed for plasmatocyte (PL) and GR. The considerable variation in relative cell number and cell area in the B. bassiana-infected house flies indicated stress development during infection. The present study highlights changes occurring during B. bassiana invasion to house fly leading to establishment of infection along with facilitation in understanding of basic hemocyte biology. The results of the study is expected to help in better understanding of house fly immune response during fungal infection, so as to assist production of more efficient mycoinsecticides for house fly control using B. bassiana.

  6. Oral vaccination with lipid-formulated BCG induces a long-lived, multifunctional CD4(+ T cell memory immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay R Ancelet

    Full Text Available Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4(+ T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4(+ T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4(+ T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4(+ T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4(+ T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4(+ T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines.

  7. Expression map of the human exome in CD34+ cells and blood cells: increased alternative splicing in cell motility and immune response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Tondeur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic cells are endowed with very specific biological functions, including cell motility and immune response. These specific functions are dramatically altered during hematopoietic cell differentiation, whereby undifferentiated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC residing in bone marrow differentiate into platelets, red blood cells and immune cells that exit into the blood stream and eventually move into lymphoid organs or inflamed tissues. The contribution of alternative splicing (AS to these functions has long been minimized due to incomplete knowledge on AS events in hematopoietic cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Human Exon ST 1.0 microarrays, the entire exome expression profile of immature CD34+ HSPC and mature whole blood cells was mapped, compared to a collection of solid tissues and made freely available as an online exome expression atlas (Amazonia Exon! : http://amazonia.transcriptome.eu/exon.php. At a whole transcript level, HSPC strongly expressed EREG and the pluripotency marker DPPA4. Using a differential splicing index scheme (dsi, a list of 849 transcripts differentially expressed between hematopoietic cells and solid tissues was computed, that included NEDD9 and CD74. Some of these genes also underwent alternative splicing events during hematopoietic differentiation, such as INPP4B, PTPLA or COMMD6, with varied contribution of CD3+ T cells, CD19+ B cells, CD14+ or CD15+ myelomonocytic populations. Strikingly, these genes were significantly enriched for genes involved in cell motility, cell adhesion, response to wounding and immune processes. CONCLUSION: The relevance and the precision provided by this exon expression map highlights the contribution of alternative splicing to key feature of blood cells differentiation and function.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Dampening Arthritis Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, R. A.; Djouad, F.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are able to immunomodulate cells from both the innate and the adaptive immune systems promoting an anti-inflammatory environment. During the last decade, MSCs have been intensively studied in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal model of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Based on these studies, MSCs are currently widely used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) characterized by complex deregulation of the immune systems. However, the therapeutic properties of MSCs in arthritis are still controverted. These controversies might be due to the diversity of MSC sources and isolation protocols used, the time, the route and dose of MSC administration, the variety of the mechanisms involved in the MSCs suppressive effects, and the complexity of arthritis pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of the interactions between MSCs and the different immune cells associated with arthritis pathogenesis and the possible means described in the literature that could enhance MSCs therapeutic potential counteracting arthritis development and progression. PMID:27847522

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Dampening Arthritis Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Contreras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells that are able to immunomodulate cells from both the innate and the adaptive immune systems promoting an anti-inflammatory environment. During the last decade, MSCs have been intensively studied in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal model of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Based on these studies, MSCs are currently widely used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA characterized by complex deregulation of the immune systems. However, the therapeutic properties of MSCs in arthritis are still controverted. These controversies might be due to the diversity of MSC sources and isolation protocols used, the time, the route and dose of MSC administration, the variety of the mechanisms involved in the MSCs suppressive effects, and the complexity of arthritis pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of the interactions between MSCs and the different immune cells associated with arthritis pathogenesis and the possible means described in the literature that could enhance MSCs therapeutic potential counteracting arthritis development and progression.

  10. Development of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-supplemented adjuvant and its effects on cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in male rats immunized against sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOGUCHI, Junko; WATANABE, Shinya; NGUYEN, Thanh Q. Dang; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro; KANEKO, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from non-pathogenic Escherichia coli was found to enhance the adjuvant effects of a veterinary vaccine adjuvant (ISA 71VG®). Sperm immunization using 71VG as an adjuvant in the immature period induced infertility in 25% of male rats, whereas this increased to 62.5% after immunization with 71VG + LPS or Freund′s complete adjuvant (FCA). Mean testicular weight of non-sterile males in the 71VG + LPS group was significantly lower than that in the 71VG or FCA group. Histological examination of testicular tissue from sterile males demonstrated severe impairment of spermatogenesis due to experimental autoimmune orchitis, a cell-mediated autoimmune condition. The serum anti-sperm titer was elevated in the three sperm-immunized groups relative to male rats treated with adjuvant alone, but the titer was higher in the 71VG + LPS and FCA groups than in the 71VG group. We consider that this LPS-supplemented adjuvant stimulates both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to an extent comparable to FCA. PMID:27890874

  11. A Generalized Kinetic Model of the T-Cell Independent Primary Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Immune response Immunology 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere elde If neceery amd idenlify by block number) A generalized kinetic model has been developed...scientific discovery. Unfortunately, Jenner’s discovery had little impact on preventing any other disease or on our detailed understanding of the...if the rate of replication of the antigen is varied it is possible for the antigen concentration not to come down for longer than the _ life

  12. Immune responses to bioengineered organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando, Jordi; Charron, Dominique; Baptista, Pedro M.; Uygun, Basak E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Organ donation in the United States registered 9079 deceased organ donors in 2015. This high percentage of donations allowed organ transplantation in 29 851 recipients. Despite increasing numbers of transplants performed in comparison with previous years, the numbers of patients that are in need for a transplant increase every year at a higher rate. This reveals that the discrepancy between the demand and availability of organs remains fundamental problem in organ transplantation. Recent findings Development of bioengineered organs represents a promising approach to increase the pool of organs for transplantation. The technology involves obtaining complex three-dimensional scaffolds that support cellular activity and functional remodeling though tissue recellularization protocols using progenitor cells. This innovative approach integrates cross-thematic approaches from specific areas of transplant immunology, tissue engineering and stem cell biology, to potentially manufacture an unlimited source of donor organs for transplantation. Summary Although bioengineered organs are thought to escape immune recognition, the potential immune reactivity toward each of its components has not been studied in detail. Here, we summarize the host immune response toward different progenitor cells and discuss the potential implications of using nonself biological scaffolds to develop bioengineered organs. PMID:27926545

  13. Visualization of immediate immune responses to pioneer metastatic cells in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Mark B; Bins, Adriaan; Nip, Alyssa; Roberts, Edward W; Looney, Mark R; Gerard, Audrey; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-03-24

    Lung metastasis is the lethal determinant in many cancers and a number of lines of evidence point to monocytes and macrophages having key roles in its development. Yet little is known about the immediate fate of incoming tumour cells as they colonize this tissue, and even less known about how they make first contact with the immune system. Primary tumours liberate circulating tumour cells (CTCs) into the blood and we have developed a stable intravital two-photon lung imaging model in mice for direct observation of the arrival of CTCs and subsequent host interaction. Here we show dynamic generation of tumour microparticles in shear flow in the capillaries within minutes of CTC entry. Rather than dispersing under flow, many of these microparticles remain attached to the lung vasculature or independently migrate along the inner walls of vessels. Using fluorescent lineage reporters and flow cytometry, we observed 'waves' of distinct myeloid cell subsets that load differentially and sequentially with this CTC-derived material. Many of these tumour-ingesting myeloid cells collectively accumulated in the lung interstitium along with the successful metastatic cells and, as previously understood, promote the development of successful metastases from surviving tumour cells. Although the numbers of these cells rise globally in the lung with metastatic exposure and ingesting myeloid cells undergo phenotypic changes associated with microparticle ingestion, a consistently sparse population of resident conventional dendritic cells, among the last cells to interact with CTCs, confer anti-metastatic protection. This work reveals that CTC fragmentation generates immune-interacting intermediates, and defines a competitive relationship between phagocyte populations for tumour loading during metastatic cell seeding.

  14. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L;

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC ...

  15. Exosomes in the Immune Response and Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修方明; 曹雪涛

    2004-01-01

    Exosomes, secreted by many live cells, are small non-cell vesicles with nanoparticle-grade size. In addition to the original function of discarding the uselessful membrane molecules, exosomes are involved in a range of immunoregulatory functions. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes and tumor-derived exosomes are the best characterized vesicles with potent antitumor effect by efficienfly inducing immune response. Down-regtdation of immune response or induction of immune tolerance is another interesting function of exosomes, Further functional studies of the exosomes will shed light on the application of exosomes。

  16. Immune Responses to RHAMM in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Chemotherapy and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Casalegno-Garduño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic blasts overexpress immunogenic antigens, so-called leukemia-associated antigens like the receptor for hyaluronan acid-mediated motility (RHAMM. Persistent RHAMM expression and decreasing CD8+ T-cell responses to RHAMM in the framework of allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chemotherapy alone might indicate the immune escape of leukemia cells. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of RHAMM in 48 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Furthermore, we correlated transcripts with the clinical course of the disease before and after treatment. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed from RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. T cell responses against RHAMM were assessed by tetramer staining (flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assays. Results were correlated with the clinical outcome of patients. The results of the present study showed that almost 60% of the patients were RHAMM positive; specific T-cells recognizing RHAMM could be detected, but they were nonfunctional in terms of interferon gamma or granzyme B release as demonstrated by ELISPOT assays. Immunotherapies like peptide vaccination or adoptive transfer of RHAMM-specific T cells might improve the immune response and the outcome of AML/MDS patients.

  17. Prenatal cadmium exposure produces persistent changes to thymus and spleen cell phenotypic repertoire as well as the acquired immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Hanson, Miranda L.; Schafer, Rosana [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental contaminant. Adult exposure to Cd alters the immune system, however, there are limited studies on the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at 20 weeks of age. Prenatal Cd exposure caused an increase in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup +}CD25{sup −} (DN1) thymocytes in both sexes and a decrease in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup −}CD25{sup +} (DN3) thymocytes in females. Females had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells, CD8{sup +} T cells, and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of NK cells and granulocytes (Gr-1{sup +}). Males had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of CD8{sup +} T cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. The percentage of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells were reduced in both sexes. The percent of splenic nTreg cells was decreased in all Cd-exposed offspring. Cd-exposed offspring were immunized with a streptococcal vaccine and the antibody response was determined. PC-specific serum antibody titers were decreased in Cd exposed female offspring but increased in the males. PspA-specific serum IgG titers were increased in both females and males compared to control animals. Females had a decrease in PspA-specific serum IgM antibody titers. Females and males had a decrease in the number of splenic anti-PspA antibody-secreting cells when standardized to the number of B cells. These findings demonstrate that very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term sex-specific alterations on the immune system of the offspring. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal exposure to cadmium alters the immune system of 20 week old offspring. ► The percentage of DN1 and DN3 thymocytes was changed

  18. Binase induces apoptosis of transformed myeloid cells and does not induce T-cell immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskaya, Olga N; Zelenikhin, Pavel V; Petrushanko, Irina Yu; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Makarov, Alexander A

    2007-10-01

    Microbial RNases along with such animal RNases as onconase and BS-RNase are a promising basis for developing new antitumor drugs. We have shown that the Bacillus intermedius RNase (binase) induces selective apoptosis of transformed myeloid cells. It attacks artificially expressing activated c-Kit myeloid progenitor FDC cells and chronic myelogenous leukemia cells K562. Binase did not induce apoptosis in leukocytes of healthy donors and in normal myeloid progenitor cells. The inability of binase to initiate expression of activation markers CD69 and IFN-gamma in CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes testifies that enzyme is devoid of superantigenic properties. Altogether, these results demonstrate that binase possesses therapeutic opportunities for treatment of genotyped human neoplasms expressing activated kit.

  19. Navigating the immune system: Improving CD8+ T cell responses for vaccine design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Most vaccines rely on the protective effect of the humoral response. In case of intracellular- or rapidly mutating pathogens, humoral responses are less protective and the cellular response, mainly CD8+ T cells, can convey protection. However, vaccine efficacy is hampered by insufficient knowledge o

  20. IL-25 promotes Th2 immunity responses in airway inflammation of asthmatic mice via activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongjia, Li; Caiqing, Zhang; Degan, Lu; Fen, Liu; Chao, Wang; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Allergic asthma occurs as a consequence of inappropriate immunologic inflammation to allergens and characterized by Th2 adaptive immune response. Recent studies indicated that interleukin (IL)-25, a member of the IL-17 cytokine family, had been implicated in inducing Th2 cell-dependent inflammation in airway epithelium and IL-25-deficient mice exhibit impaired Th2 immunity responses; however, how these cytokines influence innate immune responses remains poorly understood. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge to induce the murine asthmatic model and confirmed by histological analysis of lung tissues and serum levels of total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-E. The expression of IL-25 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and the dendritic cells (DCs) activation was detected by levels of CD80 and CD86 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by flow cytometry. The mice sensitized and challenged with OVA showed high expression of IL-25 in both mRNA and protein levels in lungs. We detected the expression of CD80 and CD86 in BALF was also increased. A tight correlation between IL-25 mRNA and other Th2 cells producing cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BALF was identified. Furthermore, when the asthmatic mice were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, the inflammatory cells infiltration and the inflammatory cytokines secretion were significantly decreased. In this study, we show that IL-25 promoted the accumulation of co-stimulatory molecules of CD80 and CD86 on DCs and then induced the differentiation of prime naive CD4(+) T cells to become proinflammatory Th2 cells and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in OVA-induced airway inflammation. The ability of IL-25 to promote the activation and differentiation of DCs population was identified as a link between the IL-17 cytokine family and the innate immune response and suggested a previously unrecognized innate immune pathway that promotes Th2

  1. Modification to the Capsid of the Adenovirus Vector That Enhances Dendritic Cell Infection and Transgene-Specific Cellular Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Worgall, Stefan; Busch, Annette; Rivara, Michael; Bonnyay, David; Leopold, Philip L.; Merritt, Robert; Hackett, Neil R.; Rovelink, Peter W.; Joseph T Bruder; Wickham, Thomas J.; Kovesdi, Imi; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2004-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to transfer and express antigens and function as strong adjuvants and thus are useful platforms for the development of genetic vaccines. Based on the hypothesis that Ad vectors with enhanced infectibility of dendritic cells (DC) may be able to evoke enhanced immune responses against antigens encoded by the vector in vivo, the present study analyzes the vaccine potential of an Ad vector expressing β-galactosidase as a model antigen and genetica...

  2. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10+ cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vacci...

  3. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  4. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~10(4) CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7- and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines.

  5. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A.; Magder, Laurence S.; Darton, Thomas C.; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S.; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~104 CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7− and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines. PMID:28303138

  6. Identification and visualization of CD8+ T cell mediated IFN-γ signaling in target cells during an antiviral immune response in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Puntel

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells infiltrate the brain during an anti-viral immune response. Within the brain CD8(+ T cells recognize cells expressing target antigens, become activated, and secrete IFNγ. However, there are no methods to recognize individual cells that respond to IFNγ. Using a model that studies the effects of the systemic anti-adenoviral immune response upon brain cells infected with an adenoviral vector in mice, we describe a method that identifies individual cells that respond to IFNγ. To identify individual mouse brain cells that respond to IFNγ we constructed a series of adenoviral vectors that contain a transcriptional response element that is selectively activated by IFNγ signaling, the gamma-activated site (GAS promoter element; the GAS element drives expression of a transgene, Cre recombinase (Ad-GAS-Cre. Upon binding of IFNγ to its receptor, the intracellular signaling cascade activates the GAS promoter, which drives expression of the transgene Cre recombinase. We demonstrate that upon activation of a systemic immune response against adenovirus, CD8(+ T cells infiltrate the brain, interact with target cells, and cause an increase in the number of cells expressing Cre recombinase. This method can be used to identify, study, and eventually determine the long term fate of infected brain cells that are specifically targeted by IFNγ. The significance of this method is that it will allow to characterize the networks in the brain that respond to the specific secretion of IFNγ by anti-viral CD8(+ T cells that infiltrate the brain. This will allow novel insights into the cellular and molecular responses underlying brain immune responses.

  7. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna ( Sturnus tristis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Mansur A.; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S.; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna ( Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly ( P blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  8. Fibrocyte-like cells recruited to the spleen support innate and adaptive immune responses to acute injury or infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisseleva, Tatiana; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Reichart, Donna; McGillvray, Shauna M; Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Glass, Christopher K; Nizet, Victor; Brenner, David A

    2011-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived fibrocytes are a population of CD45(+) and collagen Type I-expressing cells that migrate to the spleen and to target injured organs, such as skin, lungs, kidneys, and liver. While CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocytes contribute to collagen deposition at the site of injury, the role of CD45(+)Col(+) cells in spleen has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatotoxic injury (CCl(4)), TGF-β1, lipopolysaccharide, or infection with Listeria monocytogenes induce rapid recruitment of CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocyte-like cells to the spleen. These cells have a gene expression pattern that includes antimicrobial factors (myleoperoxidase, cathelicidin, and defensins) and MHC II at higher levels than found on quiescent or activated macrophages. The immune functions of these splenic CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocyte-like cells include entrapment of bacteria into extracellular DNA-based structures containing cathelicidin and presentation of antigens to naïve CD8(+) T cells to induce their proliferation. Stimulation of these splenic fibrocyte-like cells with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor or macrophage-colony stimulating factor induces downregulation of collagen expression and terminal differentiation into the dendritic cells or macrophage. Thus, splenic CD45(+)Col(+) cells are a population of rapidly mobilized BM-derived fibrocyte-like cells that respond to inflammation or infection to participate in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  9. Hymenolepis nana: adoptive transfer of protective immunity and delayed type hypersensitivity response with mesenteric lymph node cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Okamoto, K

    1991-01-01

    A marked degree of footpad swelling was observed in BALB/c mice infected with Hymenolepis nana eggs, when soluble egg antigen was injected into their footpads 4 to 21 days after the egg infection, indicating delayed type hypersensitivity responses in infected mice. Adoptive transfer with mesenteric lymph node cells from donor mice (BALB/c strain; +/+) infected with eggs 4 days before cell collection could confer this hypersensitivity to recipient nude mice (BALB/c strain; nu/nu). These mesenteric lymph node cells were then divided into two fractions, blast-enriched and blast-depleted cells, by density gradient centrifugation with Percoll. The recipients intravenously injected with the blast-depleted cell fraction showed a marked increase in footpad thickness, whereas the intravenous transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction resulted in an insignificant increase in footpad thickness. The transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction, but not of the blast-depleted cell fraction, conferred a strong adoptive immunity on syngeneic recipient nude mice, when the immunity transferred was assessed by examining cysticercoids developed in the intestinal villi on Day 4 of challenge infection. The lack of delayed type hypersensitivity response in mice that received the blast-enriched cell population was not due to a lack of the capacity of the cells to induce the response, because the cells were capable of inducing a significant increase in thickness of footpads of normal mice when these cells were locally injected into the footpad together with soluble egg antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Immunization with Neospora caninum profilin induces limited protection and a regulatory T-cell response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Florencia Celeste; Quintana, María Eugenia; Langellotti, Cecilia; Wilda, Maximiliano; Martinez, Andrea; Fonzo, Adriana; Moore, Dadín Prando; Cardoso, Nancy; Capozzo, Alejandra Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Profilins are actin-binding proteins that regulate the polymerization of actin filaments. In apicomplexan parasites, they are essential for invasion. Profilins also trigger the immune response of the host by activating TLRs on dendritic cells (DCs), inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study we characterized for the first time the immune response and protection elicited by a vaccine based on Neospora caninum profilin in mice. Groups of eight BALB/c mice received either two doses of a recombinant N. caninum profilin expressed in Escherichia coli. (rNcPRO) or PBS, both formulated with an aqueous soy-based adjuvant enriched in TLR-agonists. Specific anti-profilin antibodies were detected in rNcPRO-vaccinated animals, mainly IgM and IgG3, which were consumed after infection. Splenocytes from rNcPRO-immunized animals proliferated after an in vitro stimulation with rNcPRO before and after challenge. An impairment of the cellular response was observed in NcPRO vaccinated and infected mice following an in vitro stimulation with native antigens of N. caninum, related to an increase in the percentage of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+. Two out of five rNcPRO-vaccinated challenged mice were protected; they were negative for parasite DNA in the brain and showed no histopathological lesions, which were found in all PBS-vaccinated animals. As a whole, our results provide evidence of a regulatory response elicited by immunization with rNcPRO, and suggest a role of profilin in the modulation and/or evasion of immune responses against N. caninum.

  11. Anthrax lethal toxin-mediated killing of human and murine dendritic cells impairs the adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkrim Alileche

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogens have acquired strategies to combat the immune response. Bacillus anthracis interferes with host defenses by releasing anthrax lethal toxin (LT, which inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, rendering dendritic cells (DCs and T lymphocytes nonresponsive to immune stimulation. However, these cell types are considered resistant to killing by LT. Here we show that LT kills primary human DCs in vitro, and murine DCs in vitro and in vivo. Kinetics of LT-mediated killing of murine DCs, as well as cell death pathways induced, were dependent upon genetic background: LT triggered rapid necrosis in BALB/c-derived DCs, and slow apoptosis in C57BL/6-derived DCs. This is consistent with rapid and slow killing of LT-injected BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively. We present evidence that anthrax LT impairs adaptive immunity by specifically targeting DCs. This may represent an immune-evasion strategy of the bacterium, and contribute to anthrax disease progression. We also established that genetic background determines whether apoptosis or necrosis is induced by LT. Finally, killing of C57BL/6-derived DCs by LT mirrors that of human DCs, suggesting that C57BL/6 DCs represent a better model system for human anthrax than the prototypical BALB/c macrophages.

  12. Induction of ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cell immunity during murine malaria infection is a critical part of the protective immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Kaiissar; Li, Changchun; Inafuku, Masashi; Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Abo, Toru; Sato, Yoshiya; Watanabe, Hisami

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been hypothesized that autoimmune-like phenomena may play a critical role in the protective immune responses to both human and animal malaria, there are still no evidence-based data to support this view. In this study we demonstrate that the majority of anti-single stranded (ss) DNA autoantibody secreting B cells were confined to B220(+)CD21(+)CD23(-) cells and that these cells expanded significantly in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17X non-lethal (PyNL). To determine the role of ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cell responses in murine malaria, we conjugated generation 6 (poly) amidoamine dendrimer nanoparticles with ssDNA to deplete ssDNA-binding autoreactive B cells in vivo. Our data revealed that 55.5% of mice died after DNA-coated nanoparticle-mediated in vivo depletion of ssDNA-specific autoreactive B cells and subsequent challenge using PyNL. Adoptive transfer of B cells with ssDNA specificity to mice, followed by PyNL infection, caused a later appearance and inhibition of parasitemia. The possible mechanism by which the ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cells is involved in the protection against murine malaria has also been demonstrated.

  13. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  14. Mathematical model of the primary CD8 T cell immune response: stability analysis of a nonlinear age-structured system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Emmanuelle; Marvel, Jacqueline; Arpin, Christophe; Gandrillon, Olivier; Crauste, Fabien

    2012-08-01

    The primary CD8 T cell immune response, due to a first encounter with a pathogen, happens in two phases: an expansion phase, with a fast increase of T cell count, followed by a contraction phase. This contraction phase is followed by the generation of memory cells. These latter are specific of the antigen and will allow a faster and stronger response when encountering the antigen for the second time. We propose a nonlinear mathematical model describing the T CD8 immune response to a primary infection, based on three nonlinear ordinary differential equations and one nonlinear age-structured partial differential equation, describing the evolution of CD8 T cell count and pathogen amount. We discuss in particular the roles and relevance of feedback controls that regulate the response. First we reduce our system to a system with a nonlinear differential equation with a distributed delay. We study the existence of two steady states, and we analyze the asymptotic stability of these steady states. Second we study the system with a discrete delay, and analyze global asymptotic stability of steady states. Finally, we show some simulations that we can obtain from the model and confront them to experimental data.

  15. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Act as the Most Competent Cell Type in Linking Antiviral Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhang; Fu-Sheng Wang

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate in vivo control of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) recruitment and activation is a fundamental requirement for defense against viral infection. During this process, a pivotal event that influences the outcome of viral infection is the production of high levels of type I interferon by pDCs. In particular, recent research findings showed that pDCs not only shape the nature of innate resistance, but are also responsible for the successful transition from innate to adaptive immunity for viral resistance. In addition, pDCs can differentiate into antigen presenting cells that may regulate tolerance to a given pathogen. Importantly, in a series of recent clinical studies,pDCs appeared to be defective in number and function in conditions of chronic viral diseases such as infected with HIV-1, HBV or HCV. pDC-associated clinical antiviral therapy is also emerging. This review describes research findings exanining the functional and antiviral properties of in vivo pDC plasticity.

  16. In vitro evaluation of live attenuated vaccines against Salmonella enteritidis: cell-mediated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Torriani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Salmonella enteritidis (SE live attenuated vaccines is one of the major tool to reduce this infection in commercial poultry. In this work, techniques, evaluating the presence and the expression of some cytokines, were studied to improve the knowledge of the cellular-mediated immune response following SE vaccination. This study demonstrated that SE vaccination enhances the production of INF-γ, IL-8, iNOs, while downregulates IL-1β. Between these immunologic parameters, the evaluation of INF-γ seems to be the most significant and easy test to plan and optimize SE vaccination programs.

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of tritiated thymidine incorporation and ELISPOT assays in identifying antigen specific T cell immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLeod Beth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardization of cell-based immunologic monitoring is becoming increasingly important as methods for measuring cellular immunity become more complex. We assessed the ability of two commonly used cell-based assays, tritiated thymidine incorporation (proliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, to predict T cell responses to HER-2/neu, tetanus toxoid (tt, and cytomegalovirus (CMV antigens. These antigens were determined to be low (HER-2/neu, moderate (tt, and robustly (CMV immunogenic proteins. Samples from 27 Stage II, III, and IV HER-2/neu positive breast cancer patients, vaccinated against the HER-2/neu protein and tt, were analyzed by tritiated thymidine incorporation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT for T cell response. Results Linear regression analysis indicates that both stimulation index (SI (p = 0.011 and IFN-gamma secreting precursor frequency (p Conclusion These data underscore the importance of taking into consideration the performance characteristics of assays used to measure T cell immunity. This consideration is particularly necessary when determining which method to utilize for assessing responses to immunotherapeutic manipulations in cancer patients.

  18. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

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    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  19. Effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract on weight, hematology and cell-mediated immune response of newborn goat kids

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    Borhan Shokrollahi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effects of different levels of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract on growth rate, hematology and cell-mediated immune response in Markhoz newborn goat kids. Twenty four goat kids (aged 7±3 days were randomly allotted to four groups with six replicates. The groups included: control, T1, T2 and T3 groups which received supplemented-milk with 0, 100, 200 and 400mg aqueous rosemary extract per kg of live body weight per day for 42 days. Body weights of kids were measured weekly until the end of the experiment. On day 42, 10 ml blood samples were collected from each kid through the jugular vein. Cell-mediated immune response was assessed through the double skin thickness after intradermal injection of phyto-hematoglutinin (PHA at day 21 and 42. No significant differences were seen in initial body weight, average daily gain (ADG and total gain. However, significant differences in globulin (P<0.05, and white blood cells (WBC (P<0.001 were observed. There were no significant differences in haemoglobin (Hb, packed cell volume (PCV, red blood cells (RBC, lymphocytes and neutrophils between the treatments. Skin thickness in response to intra dermal injection of PHA significantly increased in the treated groups as compared to the control group at day 42 (P<0.01 with the T3 group showing the highest response to PHA injection. In conclusion, the results indicated that aqueous rosemary extract supplemented-milk had a positive effect on immunity and skin thickness of newborn goat kids.

  20. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are sensitive to low dose cyclophosphamide: implications for the immune response.

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    Daniel Heylmann

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg play a pivotal role in the immune system since they inhibit the T cell response. It is well known that cyclophosphamide applied at low dose is able to stimulate the immune response while high dose cyclophosphamide exerts inhibitory activity. Data obtained in mice indicate that cyclophosphamide provokes a reduction in the number of Treg and impairs their suppressive activity, resulting in immune stimulation. Here, we addressed the question of the sensitivity of human Treg to cyclophosphamide, comparing Treg with cytotoxic T cells (CTL and T helper cells (Th. We show that Treg are more sensitive than CTL and Th to mafosfamide, which is an active derivative of cyclophosphamide, which does not need metabolic activation. The high sensitivity of Treg was due to the induction of apoptosis. Treg compared to CTL and Th were not more sensitive to the alkylating drugs temozolomide and nimustine and also not to mitomycin C, indicating a specific Treg response to mafosfamide. The high sensitivity of Treg to mafosfamide resulted not only in enhanced cell death, but also in impaired Treg function as demonstrated by a decline in the suppressor activity of Treg in a co-culture model with Th and Helios positive Treg. Treatment of Treg with mafosfamide gave rise to a high level of DNA crosslinks, which were not repaired to the same extent as observed in Th and CTL. Also, Treg showed a low level of γH2AX foci up to 6 h and a high level 24 h after treatment, indicating alterations in the DNA damage response. Overall, this is the first demonstration that human Treg are, in comparison with Th and CTL, hypersensitive to cyclophosphamide, which is presumably due to a DNA repair defect.

  1. An African horse sickness virus serotype 4 recombinant canarypox virus vaccine elicits specific cell-mediated immune responses in horses.

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    El Garch, H; Crafford, J E; Amouyal, P; Durand, P Y; Edlund Toulemonde, C; Lemaitre, L; Cozette, V; Guthrie, A; Minke, J M

    2012-09-15

    A recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing synthetic genes encoding outer capsid proteins, VP2 and VP5, of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) serotype 4 (ALVAC(®)-AHSV4) has been demonstrated to fully protect horses against homologous challenge with virulent field virus. Guthrie et al. (2009) detected weak and variable titres of neutralizing antibody (ranging from horses received two vaccinations twenty-eight days apart and three horses remained unvaccinated. The detection of VP2/VP5 specific IFN-γ responses was assessed by enzyme linked immune spot (ELISpot) assay and clearly demonstrated that all ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinated horses developed significant IFN-γ production compared to unvaccinated horses. More detailed immune responses obtained by flow cytometry demonstrated that ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinations induced immune cells, mainly CD8(+) T cells, able to recognize multiple T-epitopes through all VP2 and only the N-terminus sequence of VP5. Neither VP2 nor VP5 specific IFN-γ responses were detected in unvaccinated horses. Overall, our data demonstrated that an experimental recombinant canarypox based vaccine induced significant CMI specific for both VP2 and VP5 proteins of AHSV4.

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Innate Antiviral Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Influence of Immunobiotic Lactobacilli

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    Albarracin, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Iida, Hikaru; Sato, Nana; Nochi, Tomonori; Aso, Hisashi; Salva, Susana; Alvarez, Susana; Kitazawa, Haruki; Villena, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 and Lactobacillus plantarum CRL1506 are immunobiotic strains able to increase protection against viral intestinal infections as demonstrated in animal models and humans. To gain insight into the host–immunobiotic interaction, the transcriptomic response of porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells to the challenge with viral molecular associated pattern poly(I:C) and the changes in the transcriptomic profile induced by the immunobiotics strains CRL1505 and CRL1506 were investigated in this work. By using microarray technology and reverse transcription PCR, we obtained a global overview of the immune genes involved in the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells. Stimulation of PIE cells with poly(I:C) significantly increased the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β, several interferon-stimulated genes, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and genes involved in prostaglandin biosynthesis. It was also determined that lactobacilli differently modulated immune gene expression in poly(I:C)-challenged PIE cells. Most notable changes were found in antiviral factors (IFN-α, IFN-β, NPLR3, OAS1, OASL, MX2, and RNASEL) and cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, IL-6, CCL4, CCL5, and CXCL10) that were significantly increased in lactobacilli-treated PIE cells. Immunobiotics reduced the expression of IL-15 and RAE1 genes that mediate poly(I:C) inflammatory damage. In addition, lactobacilli treatments increased the expression PLA2G4A, PTGES, and PTGS2 that are involved in prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 and L. plantarum CRL1506 showed quantitative and qualitative differences in their capacities to modulate the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells, which would explain the higher capacity of the CRL1505 strain when compared to CRL1506 to protect against viral infection and inflammatory damage in vivo. These results provided valuable information for the deeper understanding of the host–immunobiotic interaction and their

  3. HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROHORMONES AND IMMUNE RESPONSES

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    J. Luis eQuintanar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, Corticotropin-releasing hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  4. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells.

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    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis.

  5. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

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    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  6. SIGIRR inhibits toll-like receptor 4, 5, 9-mediated immune responses in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Wu, Xueling; Zhao, Yunfeng; Deng, Zhaoxia; Qian, Guisheng

    2011-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) may contribute to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through toll-like receptors (TLRs)-mediated molecular mechanisms. TLRs exist on the surface of HAEC where binding to their cognate ligands initiates airway inflammation. Single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related protein (SIGIRR) is a member of the toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) family that can negatively modulate the immune response. We carried out studies to characterize SIGIRR modulation of TLR-mediated immune response in HAEC and to define its mechanisms of action. Following treatment with various concentrations of LPS, flagellin and CpG DNA, the levels of cognate TLRs 4, 5, and 9 were measured in the supernatants of HAEC over-expressing the SIGIRR molecule. Moreover, the interaction of the TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) with SIGIRR in response to LPS-, flagellin- and CpG DNA-stimulation was examined by co-immunoprecipitation. The findings from this study revealed that overexpression of SIGIRR in HAEC stimulated by LPS, flagellin or CpG DNA resulted in attenuated production of the inflammatory mediators IL-6 and TNF-α. This attenuation was not the result of decreased expression of TLR4, 5 or 9, but rather a sequestration of MyD88 to the TLRs. In conclusion, SIGIRR can inhibit TLR4, 5, and 9-mediated immune responses in HAEC and may be a valuable therapeutic target for the prevention of ALI/ARDS.

  7. Innate Immune Responses in Viral Hepatitis: the role of Kupffer cells and liver-derived monocytes in shaping intrahepatic immunity in mice using the LCMV infection model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Movita (Dowty)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This study was performed to elucidate the immunological role of the liver in viral hepatitis. The immune functions of the liver are shaped by the intrahepatic cells present during steady state condition, as well as the recruited immune cells during liver inflammation.

  8. Identification of genetic loci in Lactobacillus plantarum that modulate the immune response of dendritic cells using comparative genome hybridization.

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    Marjolein Meijerink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial mucosal immunomodulatory effects. Beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotics have been established in the treatment and prevention of various intestinal disorders, including allergic diseases and diarrhea. However, the precise molecular mechanisms and the strain-dependent factors involved are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we aimed to identify gene loci in the model probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 that modulate the immune response of host dendritic cells. The amounts of IL-10 and IL-12 secreted by dendritic cells (DCs after stimulation with 42 individual L. plantarum strains were measured and correlated with the strain-specific genomic composition using comparative genome hybridisation and the Random Forest algorithm. This in silico "gene-trait matching" approach led to the identification of eight candidate genes in the L. plantarum genome that might modulate the DC cytokine response to L. plantarum. Six of these genes were involved in bacteriocin production or secretion, one encoded a bile salt hydrolase and one encoded a transcription regulator of which the exact function is unknown. Subsequently, gene deletions mutants were constructed in L. plantarum WCFS1 and compared to the wild-type strain in DC stimulation assays. All three bacteriocin mutants as well as the transcription regulator (lp_2991 had the predicted effect on cytokine production confirming their immunomodulatory effect on the DC response to L. plantarum. Transcriptome analysis and qPCR data showed that transcript level of gtcA3, which is predicted to be involved in glycosylation of cell wall teichoic acids, was substantially increased in the lp_2991 deletion mutant (44 and 29 fold respectively. CONCLUSION: Comparative genome hybridization led to the identification of gene loci in L

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a role for effective innate immune responses during Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in mice.

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    Timothy R Crother

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs are known for their robust antiviral response and their pro-tolerance effects towards allergic diseases and tissue engraftments. However, little is known about the role pDCs may play during a bacterial infection, including pulmonary Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP. In this study, we investigated the role of pDCs during pulmonary CP infection. Our results revealed that depletion of pDCs during acute CP infection in mice results in delayed and reduced lung inflammation, with an early delay in cellular recruitment and significant reduction in early cytokine production in the lungs. This was followed by impaired and delayed bacterial clearance from the lungs which then resulted in a severe and prolonged chronic inflammation and iBALT like structures containing large numbers of B and T cells in these animals. We also observed that increasing the pDC numbers in the lung by FLT3L treatment experimentally results in greater lung inflammation during acute CP infection. In contrast to these results, restimulation of T-cells in the draining lymph nodes of pDC-depleted mice induced greater amounts of proinflammatory cytokines than we observed in control mice. These results suggest that pDCs in the lung may provide critical proinflammatory innate immune responses in response to CP infection, but are suppressive towards adaptive immune responses in the lymph node. Thus pDCs in the lung and the draining lymph node appear to have different roles and phenotypes during acute CP infection and may play a role in host immune responses.

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a role for effective innate immune responses during Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crother, Timothy R; Ma, Jun; Jupelli, Madhulika; Chiba, Norika; Chen, Shuang; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Shimada, Kenichi; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are known for their robust antiviral response and their pro-tolerance effects towards allergic diseases and tissue engraftments. However, little is known about the role pDCs may play during a bacterial infection, including pulmonary Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP). In this study, we investigated the role of pDCs during pulmonary CP infection. Our results revealed that depletion of pDCs during acute CP infection in mice results in delayed and reduced lung inflammation, with an early delay in cellular recruitment and significant reduction in early cytokine production in the lungs. This was followed by impaired and delayed bacterial clearance from the lungs which then resulted in a severe and prolonged chronic inflammation and iBALT like structures containing large numbers of B and T cells in these animals. We also observed that increasing the pDC numbers in the lung by FLT3L treatment experimentally results in greater lung inflammation during acute CP infection. In contrast to these results, restimulation of T-cells in the draining lymph nodes of pDC-depleted mice induced greater amounts of proinflammatory cytokines than we observed in control mice. These results suggest that pDCs in the lung may provide critical proinflammatory innate immune responses in response to CP infection, but are suppressive towards adaptive immune responses in the lymph node. Thus pDCs in the lung and the draining lymph node appear to have different roles and phenotypes during acute CP infection and may play a role in host immune responses.

  11. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens.

  12. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Kimberly A; Jiang, Xiaowen; Stephensen, Charles B

    2013-04-30

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10(+) cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vaccination. Blood was drawn before, 3, 7, 14, and 28days after vaccination and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured for 7days with TT, negative control (diluent), and a positive control (Staphylococcus enterotoxin B [SEB]). Activation markers (CD25 and CD69) were measured after 44h (n=8), cytokines in supernatant after 3 and 7days, and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) of proliferated cells (identified by dye dilution) after 7days (n=6). Vaccination increased TT-specific expression of CD25 and CD69 on CD3(+)CD4(+) lymphocytes, and TT-specific proliferation at 7, 14 and 28days post vaccination. Vaccination induced TT-specific Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2) Th2 (IL-13, IL-5, and IL-4), Th17 (IL-17A) and IL-10(+) cells as measured by ICS. TT-specific Th1 cells were the most abundant (12-15% of all TT-specific CD4(+) T-cells) while IL10(+) (1.8%) Th17 (1.1%) and Th2 cells (0.2-0.6%) were less abundant. TT-specific cytokine concentrations in PBMC supernatants followed the same pattern where a TT-specific IL-9 response was also seen. In conclusion, TT booster vaccination induced a broad T-helper cell response. This method of evaluating cytokine phenotypes may be useful in examining the impact of nutrition and environmental conditions on the plasticity of T-helper cell memory responses.

  13. Vitamin A supplementation in early life enhances the intestinal immune response of rats with gestational vitamin A deficiency by increasing the number of immune cells.

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    Xia Liu

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is a critical micronutrient for regulating immunity in many organisms. Our previous study demonstrated that gestational or early-life vitamin A deficiency decreases the number of immune cells in offspring. The present study aims to test whether vitamin A supplementation can restore lymphocyte pools in vitamin A-deficient rats and thereby improve the function of their intestinal mucosa; furthermore, the study aimed to identify the best time frame for vitamin A supplementation. Vitamin A-deficient pregnant rats or their offspring were administered a low-dose of vitamin A daily for 7 days starting on gestational day 14 or postnatal day 1, day 14 or day 28. Serum retinol concentrations increased significantly in all four groups that received vitamin A supplementation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The intestinal levels of secretory immunoglobulin A and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor increased significantly with lipopolysaccharide challenge in the rats that received vitamin A supplementation starting on postnatal day 1. The rats in this group had higher numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, CD11C+ dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches and CD4+CD25+ T cells in the spleen compared with the vitamin A-deficient rats; flow cytometric analysis also demonstrated that vitamin A supplementation decreased the number of B cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation during late gestation increased the numbers of CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and decreased the numbers of B lymphocytes in the mesenteric lymph nodes. However, no significant differences in lymphocyte levels were found between the rats in the other two vitamin A supplement groups and the vitamin A-deficient group. In conclusion, the best recovery of a subset of lymphocytes in the offspring of gestational vitamin A-deficient rats and the greatest improvement in the intestinal mucosal immune

  14. Depletion of alloreactive T-cells in vitro using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib preserves the immune response against pathogens.

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    Blanco, Belén; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Santamaría, Carlos; Inogés, Susana; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2011-10-01

    Current graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) inhibition approaches lead to abrogation of pathogen-specific T-cell responses. We propose an approach to inhibit GVHD without hampering immunity against pathogens: in vitro depletion of alloreactive T cells with the preoteasome inhibitor bortezomib. We show that PBMCs stimulated with allogeneic cells and treated with bortezomib greatly reduce their ability to produce IFN-γ when re-stimulated with the same allogeneic cells, but mainly preserve their ability to respond to citomegalovirus stimulation. Unlike in vivo administration of immunosuppressive drugs or other strategies of allodepletion, in vitro allodepletion with bortezomib maintains pathogen-specific T cells, representing a promising alternative for GVHD prophylaxis.

  15. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michelle; Koup, Richard A.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs) in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m), VP35 (EBOV/VP35m) or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as compared to wt

  16. Interferon-γ Added During Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Stimulates Potent Th1 Immune Responses

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    Pestano Linda A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are increasingly prepared in vitro for use in immunotherapy trials. Mature DC express high levels of surface molecules needed for T cell activation and are superior at antigen-presentation than immature DC. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is one of several products known to induce DC maturation, and interferon (IFN-γ has been shown to enhance the activity of DC stimulated with certain maturation factors. In this study, we investigated the use of IFN-γ in combination with the powerful maturation agent, BCG. The treatment of immature DC with IFN-γ plus BCG led to the upregulation of CD54, CD80, and CD86 in comparison with BCG treatment alone. In MLR or recall immune responses, the addition of IFN-γ at the time of BCG-treatment did not increase the number of antigen-specific T cells but enhanced the development of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. In primary immune responses, on the other hand, BCG and IFN-γ co-treated DC stimulated higher proportions of specific T cells as well as IFN-γ secretion by these T cells. Thus the use of IFN-γ during BCG-induced DC maturation differentially affects the nature of recall versus naïve antigen-specific T-cell responses. IFN-γ co-treatment with BCG was found to induce IL-12 and, in some instances, inhibit IL-10 secretion by DC. These findings greatly enhance the potential of BCG-matured dendritic cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Effects of ascorbic acid on cell mediated, humoral immune response and pathophysiology of

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    Suchint Simaraks

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to conduct an experiment related to the effects of chronic heat stress on total white blood cell changes, pathophysiology of leukocyte and effects of ascorbic acid on lymphocytes, lympholytic cells and humoral immunity of New-castle disease of broilers under chronic heat stress. Randomized complete block was the design. One hundred-forty-four chickens were maintained at 33+1 oC environmental temperature and on four levels of added ascorbic acid i.e. 0 (control group, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg in dietsfor 21 days. On days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period, total white blood cells count, lympholytic cell and HI titer for Newcastle disease were determined. On day 21, histopathology of lung, liver, kidney, heart and bursa of fabricius of randomly selected broilers (n=36; 3 birds per experimental unit were studied. Total white blood cells (TWBC of the birds were significantly increased on day 3 (P<0.05 and were higheston days 7 and 14 then significantly decreased on days 21 (P<0.05. Monocytes were significantly increased on day 3 (P<0.05. Lymphocytes were significantly increased on day 7, and were highest on day 14 (P<0.05. On day 21, the value of lymphocyte was significantly lower than on days 7 and 14 (P<0.05, respectively. Lympholytic cells were significantly increased on day 3 and 7 (P<0.05, respectively, but on day 21, lympholyticcells were significantly decreased to lower value than on day 7 (P<0.05. Heterophils were significantly increased on day 3 and 7 and then decreased on day 14 (P<0.05. Tissue injury and hemorrhage in broilers under chronic heat stress caused leukocytosis, heterophilia, lympholysis and monocytosis. The size of lobules within the bursa of fabricius in broilers receiving ascorbic acid at 800 mg/kg in the diet were larger than inbirds that received added ascorbic acid at 400, 200 and 0 mg/kg in their diets, respectively. Lymphocytes and lympholytic cells were not significantly different

  18. Arabidopsis EDS1 connects pathogen effector recognition to cell compartment-specific immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Katharina; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Tasset, Céline; Pouzet, Cécile; Deslandes, Laurent; Parker, Jane E

    2011-12-01

    Pathogen effectors are intercepted by plant intracellular nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors. However, processes linking receptor activation to downstream defenses remain obscure. Nucleo-cytoplasmic basal resistance regulator EDS1 (ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1) is indispensible for immunity mediated by TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor)-NB-LRR receptors. We show that Arabidopsis EDS1 molecularly connects TIR-NB-LRR disease resistance protein RPS4 recognition of bacterial effector AvrRps4 to defense pathways. RPS4-EDS1 and AvrRps4-EDS1 complexes are detected inside nuclei of living tobacco cells after transient coexpression and in Arabidopsis soluble leaf extracts after resistance activation. Forced AvrRps4 localization to the host cytoplasm or nucleus reveals cell compartment-specific RPS4-EDS1 defense branches. Although nuclear processes restrict bacterial growth, programmed cell death and transcriptional resistance reinforcement require nucleo-cytoplasmic coordination. Thus, EDS1 behaves as an effector target and activated TIR-NB-LRR signal transducer for defenses across cell compartments.

  19. Modulation of dendritic cell function and immune response by cysteine protease inhibitor from murine nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Liu, Guiyun; Li, Zhaotao; Chen, Yue; Liu, Yunfeng; Liu, Boyu; Su, Zhong

    2013-04-01

    Modulation and suppression of the immune response of the host by nematode parasites have been reported extensively and the cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI or cystatin) is identified as one of the major immunomodulators. In the present study, we cloned and produced recombinant CPI protein from the murine nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus (rHp-CPI) and investigated its immunomodulatory effects on dendritic cell (DC) function and immune responses in mice. Bone-marrow-derived CD11c(+) DC (BMDC) that were exposed to rHp-CPI during the differentiation stage showed reduced MHC-II molecule expression compared with BMDC that were generated in normal culture conditions. The BMDC generated in the presence of rHp-CPI also exhibited reduced expression of CD40, CD86 and MHC-II molecules and reduced interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α cytokine production when stimulated with Toll-like receptor ligand CpG. Activation of BMDC generated in normal conditions induced by lipopolysaccharide and CpG was also suppressed by rHp-CPI, as shown by reduced co-stimulatory molecule expression and cytokine production. Furthermore, BMDC treated with rHp-CPI before ovalbumin (OVA) antigen pulsing induced a weaker proliferation response and less interferon-γ production of OVA-specific CD4(+) T cells compared with BMDC without rHp-CPI pre-treatment. Adoptive transfer of rHp-CPI-treated and OVA-loaded BMDC to mice induced significantly lower levels of antigen-specific antibody response than the BMDC loaded with antigen alone. These results demonstrated that the CPI from nematode parasites is able to modulate differentiation and activation stages of BMDC. It also interferes with antigen and MHC-II molecule processing and Toll-like receptor signalling pathway, resulting in functionally deficient DC that induce a suboptimum immune response.

  20. iNKT Cells Are Responsible for the Apoptotic Reduction of Basophils That Mediate Th2 Immune Responses Elicited by Papain in Mice Following γPGA Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sung Won; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Bacillus subtilis-derived poly-gamma glutamic acid (γPGA) treatment suppresses the development of allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Although basophils, an innate immune cell, are known to play critical roles in allergic immune responses and repeated long-term administration of γPGA results in decreased splenic basophils in an AD murine model, the underlying mechanisms by which γPGA regulates basophil frequency remain unclear. To investigate how γPGA modulates basophils, we employed basophil-mediated Th2 induction in vivo model elicited by the allergen papain protease. Repeated injection of γPGA reduced the abundance of basophils and their production of IL4 in mice, consistent with our previous study using NC/Nga AD model mice. The depletion of basophils by a single injection of γPGA was dependent on the TLR4/DC/IL12 axis. CD1d-dependent Vα14 TCR invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are known to regulate a variety of immune responses, such as allergy. Because iNKT cell activation is highly sensitive to IL12 produced by DCs, we evaluated whether the effect of γPGA on basophils is mediated by iNKT cell activation. We found that in vivo γPGA treatment did not induce the reduction of basophils in iNKT cell-deficient CD1d KO mice, suggesting the critical role of iNKT cells in γPGA-mediated basophil depletion at the early time points. Furthermore, increased apoptotic basophil reduction triggered by iNKT cells upon γPGA stimulation was mainly attributed to Th1 cytokines such as IFNγ and TNFα, consequently resulting in inhibition of papain-induced Th2 differentiation via diminishing basophil-derived IL4. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that γPGA-induced iNKT cell polarization toward the Th1 phenotype induces apoptotic basophil depletion, leading to the suppression of Th2 immune responses. Thus, elucidation of the crosstalk between innate immune cells will contribute to the design and

  1. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  2. Forced expression of stabilized c-Fos in dendritic cells reduces cytokine production and immune responses in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Sakaguchi, Ryota; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Kimura, Akihiro; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda-ku 102-0075 (Japan); Shiraishi, Hiroshi [Division of Medical Biochemistry, Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Saga Medical School, Saga (Japan); Shimoda, Kouji [Department of Laboratory Animal Center, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko, E-mail: yoshimura@a6.keio.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda-ku 102-0075 (Japan)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos produced less inflammatory cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos activated T cells less efficiently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transgenic mice expressing stabilized c-Fos were resistant to EAE model. -- Abstract: Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses innate immunity by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytic cells. We have shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is responsible for cAMP-mediated suppression of inflammatory cytokine production, and that c-Fos protein is stabilized by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation. We found that S308 is one of the major phosphorylation sites, and that the S308D mutation prolongs c-Fos halflife. To investigate the role of stabilized c-Fos protein in dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, we generated CD11c-promoter-deriven c-FosS308D transgenic mice. As expected, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from these Tg mice produced smaller amounts of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-12, and IL-23, but higher levels of IL-10, in response to LPS, than those from wild-type (Wt) mice. When T cells were co-cultured with BMDCs from Tg mice, production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines was reduced, although T cell proliferation was not affected. Tg mice demonstrated more resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) than did Wt mice. These data suggest that c-Fos in DCs plays a suppressive role in certain innate and adaptive immune responses.

  3. Murine dendritic cells generated under serum-free conditions have a mature phenotype and efficiently induce primary immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warncke, Max; Dodero, Anna; Dierbach, Heide; Follo, Marie; Veelken, Hendrik

    2006-03-20

    Vaccination with in vitro-generated dendritic cells (DC) that present tumor-associated antigens is a promising approach for immunotherapy of malignant tumors. For optimization of DC-based vaccination protocols, preclinical tumor models that mimic the clinical situation closely are highly desirable. Strong non-specific T cell activation was observed in experimental immunization of mice with syngeneic DC generated in standard FCS-supplemented culture medium. To avoid deviation of the immune response to FCS-derived antigens, a serum-free culture protocol for in vitro generation of murine DC from bone marrow progenitor cells was developed. In comparison to DC differentiated with FCS supplementation, DC generated under serum-free conditions (sfDC) have a more homogeneous phenotype with higher expression of IL-12 and the differentiation and activation markers CD11c, CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, DEC-205, and MHC class II. Demonstration of strong uptake of protein and carbohydrate antigens and analysis of the in vivo migration behaviour of sfDC also indicated excellent APC function. Vaccination of mice with peptide-pulsed sfDC efficiently induced an antigen-specific T cell response as assessed by MHC tetramer staining, IFN-gamma ELISPOT and in vivo cytotoxicity assay. sfDC may therefore represent a valuable tool to improve active tumor immunotherapy in animal models.

  4. Abacavir induced T cell reactivity from drug naïve individuals shares features of allo-immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jacqueline; Wuillemin, Natascha; Watkins, Stephan; Jamin, Heidi; Eriksson, Klara K; Villiger, Peter; Fontana, Stefano; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was independent of co-stimulatory signals, as neither DC maturation nor release of inflammatory cytokines were observed upon abacavir exposure. Abacavir induced T cells arose in the absence of professional APC and stemmed from naïve and memory compartments. These features are reminiscent of allo-reactivity. Screening for allo-reactivity revealed that about 5% of generated T cell clones (n = 136) from three donors were allo-reactive exclusively to the related HLA-B*58∶01. The addition of peptides which can bind to the HLA-B*57∶01-abacavir complex and to HLA-B*58∶01 during the induction phase increased the proportion of HLA-B*58∶01 allo-reactive T cell clones from 5% to 42%. In conclusion, abacavir can alter the HLA-B*57∶01-peptide complex in a way that mimics an allo-allele ('altered self-allele') and create the potential for robust T cell responses.

  5. Induction of novel CD8+ T-cell responses during chronic untreated HIV-1 infection by immunization with subdominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloverpris, Henrik; Karlsson, Ingrid; Bonde, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    . RESULTS:: Previously undetected T-cell responses specific for one or more epitopes were induced in all 12 individuals. Half of the participants had sustained CD4 T-cell responses 32 weeks after immunization. No severe adverse effects were observed. No overall or sustained change in viral load or CD4 T...... with seven CD8 T-cell epitopes and three CD4 T-cell epitopes. Epitope-specific responses were evaluated by intracellular cytokine staining for interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-2 and/or pentamer labeling 3 weeks prior to, 10 weeks after and 32 weeks after the first immunization......-cell counts was observed. CONCLUSION:: These data show that it is possible to generate new T-cell responses in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected individuals despite high viral loads, and thereby redirect immunity to target new multiple and rationally selected subdominant CTL epitopes. Further optimization could...

  6. Antigen-Specific lgA B Memory Cell Responses to Shigella Antigens Elicited in Volunteers Immunized with Live Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a Oral Vaccine Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    cell responses to Shigella antigens elicited in volunteers immunized with live attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a oral vaccine candidates J.K. Simona,b... Shigella ;. B cell memory; Immunoglobulin lgA; Mucosal immunity Abstract We studied the induction of antigen-specific lgA memory B cells (BM) in...volunteers who received live attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a vaccines. Subjects ingested a single oral dose of 107 , 108 or 109 CFU of S. flexneri 2a with

  7. Leptin induces the phagocytosis and protective immune response in Leishmania donovani infected THP-1 cell line and human PBMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an infectious disease responsible for several deaths in malnourished children due to impaired cell-mediated immunity, which is accompanied by low circulating leptin levels. The cytokine function of leptin is implicated for several immune regulation activities such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, innate and adaptive immunity. Its deficiency associated with polarization of Th2 response, which coincides with VL pathogenesis. To determine the cytokine role of leptin in case of experimental VL, we tested the leptin associated Th1/Th2 type cytokine profile at mRNA level from Leishmania donovani infected human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also tested the effect of leptin on macrophages activation (viz. studying the phosphorylation of signaling moieties), phagocytic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during infection. We observed that leptin induced Th1 specific response by upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in THP-1 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-2 in PBMCs. We also observed the downregulation of Th2 type cytokine i.e. IL-10 in THP-1 and unaltered expression of cytokines i.e. TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-4 in PBMCs. In addition, leptin stimulates the macrophages by inducing phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt which are usually dephosphorylated in L. donovani infection. In concordance, leptin also induces the macrophage phagocytic activity by enhancing the intracellular ROS generation which helps in phagolysosome formation and oxidative killing of the parasite. In compilation, leptin is able to maintain the defensive environment against L. donovani infection through the classical macrophage activity.

  8. Fucoidan can function as an adjuvant in vivo to enhance dendritic cell maturation and function and promote antigen-specific T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, including promoting antigen uptake and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of fucoidan in vivo, especially its adjuvant effect on in vivo anti-tumor immune responses, was not fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the function of spleen dendritic cells (DCs and its adjuvant effect in vivo. Systemic administration of fucoidan induced up-regulation of CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen cDCs. Fucoidan also promoted the generation of IFN-γ-producing Th1 and Tc1 cells in an IL-12-dependent manner. When used as an adjuvant in vivo with ovalbumin (OVA antigen, fucoidan promoted OVA-specific antibody production and primed IFN-γ production in OVA-specific T cells. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced OVA-induced up-regulation of MHC class I and II on spleen cDCs and strongly prompted the proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, OVA immunization with fucoidan as adjuvant protected mice from the challenge with B16-OVA tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that fucoidan can function as an adjuvant to induce Th1 immune response and CTL activation, which may be useful in tumor vaccine development.

  9. Isolation, modulatory functions on murine B cell development and antigen-specific immune responses of BP11, a novel peptide from the chicken bursa of Fabricius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Bin; Cao, Rui-Bing; Li, Xin-Feng; Ma, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2012-05-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF) is the central humoral immune organ unique to birds which plays important roles in B lymphocyte differentiation. Here, a new bursal peptide (BP11) with the amino acid sequence DVAGKLPDNRT was identified and characterized from BF. It was proved that BP11 promoted CFU pre-B formation, and regulated B cell differentiation, including increase the percentage of immature and mature B cells in BM cells co-cultured with IL-7. BP11 also exerted immunomodulatory function on antigen-specific immune responses in BALB/c mice immunized with inactivated influence virus (AIV, H9N2 subtype) vaccine, including enhancing AIV-specific antibody and cytokine production. Furthermore, it was noteworthy that BP11 stimulated antibody productions and potentiates the Th1 and Th2-type immune responses in dose-dependent manner in chicken. These results suggested that BP11 might be highly relevant for the development of avian immune system.

  10. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection of cattle can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test. Available IFN-γ tests are using purified protein derivatives of MAP (PPDj) which are crude products...... on the same 30 heifers from a known MAP infected herd. Determination of cut-off for each antigen was based on samples from a non-infected herd, including 60 heifers. Based on PPDj stimulations, more than 50% of the heifers tested MAP positive at the first two samplings, whereas only 20% tested positive...

  11. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; E; Norton; Kirsten; A; Ward-Hartstonge; Edward; S; Taylor; Roslyn; A; Kemp

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, par-ticularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship betweencancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  12. IgE/FcεRI-Mediated Antigen Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Enhances Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Platzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies discovered an inverse association between immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergies and cancer, implying tumor-protective properties of IgE. However, the underlying immunologic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is of key importance for anti-tumor immunity because it induces the generation of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs with specificity for tumor antigens. We demonstrate that DCs use IgE and FcεRI, the high-affinity IgE receptor, for cross-presentation and priming of CTLs in response to free soluble antigen at low doses. Importantly, IgE/FcεRI-mediated cross-presentation is a distinct receptor-mediated pathway because it does not require MyD88 signals or IL-12 induction in DCs. Using passive immunization with tumor antigen-specific IgE and DC-based vaccination experiments, we demonstrate that IgE-mediated cross-presentation significantly improves anti-tumor immunity and induces memory responses in vivo. Our findings suggest a cellular mechanism for the tumor-protective features of IgE and expand the known physiological functions of this immunoglobulin.

  13. Interferon γ Stimulates Cellular Maturation of Dendritic Cell Line DC2.4 Leading to Induction of Efficient Cytotoxic T Cell Responses and Antitumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianpei He; Chaoke Tang; Shulin Xu; Terence Moyana; Jim Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for the initiation of antigen (Ag)-specific immune responses. In most studies, mature DCs are generated from bone marrow cells or peripheral monocytes; in either case, the harvested cells are then cultured in medium containing recombinant GM-CSF, IL-4 and TNF-α for 7-10 days and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, this approach is time-consuming and expensive. There is another less cost approach of using immobilized DC cell lines, which can easily grow in the medium. A disadvantage with the immobilized DC cell lines, however, is that they are immature DCs and lack expression of MHC class Ⅱ and costimulatory CD40 and CD80 molecules. This, therefore, limits their capacity for inducing efficient antitumor immunity. In the current study, we investigated the possible efficacy of various stimuli (IL-1β,IFN-γ, TNF-α, CpG and LPS) in converting the immature dendritic cell line DC2.4 to mature DCs. Our findings were quite interesting since we demonstrated for the first time that IFN-γ was able to stimulate the maturation of DC2.4 cells. The IFN-γ-activated ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed DC2.4 cells have capacity to upregulate MHC class Ⅱ,CD40, CD80 and CCR7, and to more efficiently stimulate in vitro and in vivo OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses and antitumor immunity. Therefore, IFN-γ-activated immortal DC2.4 cells may prove to be useful in the study of DC biology and antitumor immunity.

  14. The immune receptor Trem1 cooperates with diminished DNA damage response to induce preleukemic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W; Amarachintha, S; Wilson, A; Pang, Q

    2017-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with extremely high risk of leukemic transformation. Here we investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and leukemogenesis using the Fanca knockout mouse model. We found that chronic exposure of the Fanca(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells to DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C in vivo leads to diminished DDR, and the emergence/expansion of pre-leukemia stem cells (pre-LSCs). Surprisingly, although genetic correction of Fanca deficiency in the pre-LSCs restores DDR and reduces genomic instability, but fails to prevent pre-LSC expansion or delay leukemia development in irradiated recipients. Furthermore, we identified transcription program underlying dysregulated DDR and cell migration, myeloid proliferation, and immune response in the Fanca(-/-) pre-LSCs. Forced expression of the downregulated DNA repair genes, Rad51c or Trp53i13, in the Fanca(-/-) pre-LSCs partially rescues DDR but has no effect on leukemia, whereas shRNA knockdown of the upregulated immune receptor genes Trem1 or Pilrb improves leukemia-related survival, but not DDR or genomic instability. Furthermore, Trem1 cooperates with diminished DDR in vivo to promote Fanca(-/-) pre-LSC expansion and leukemia development. Our study implicates diminishing DDR as a root cause of FA leukemogenesis, which subsequently collaborates with other signaling pathways for leukemogenic transformation.

  15. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing.

  16. Depletion of regulatory T lymphocytes reverses the imbalance between pro- and anti-tumor immunities via enhancing antigen-specific T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulatory T cells (Tregs can actively suppress the immune responses. However, literature about detailed changes of host effective and suppressive immunities before and after depletion of Tregs in ovarian carcinomas, is rare. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ovarian cancer patients and the ascitogenic animal model were employed. Immunologic profiles with flow cytometric analyses, immunohistochemistric staining, RT-PCR, ELISA, and ELISPOT assays were performed. In vivo depletion of Treg cells with the mAb PC61was also performed in the animal model. RESULTS: The cytokines, including IL-4 (p=0.017 and TNF-α (p=0.046, significantly decreased while others such as TGF-β (p=0.013, IL-6 (p=0.016, and IL-10 (p=0.018 were elevated in ascites of ovarian cancer patients, when the disease progressed to advanced stages. The ratio of CD8(+ T cell/Treg cell in ascites was also lower in advanced diseases than in early diseases (advanced 7.37 ± 0.64 vs. early 14.25 ± 3.11, p=0.037. The kinetic low-dose CD25 Ab depletion group had significantly lower intra-peritoneal tumor weight (0.20 ± 0.03 g than the sequential high-dose (0.69 ± 0.06 g and sequential low-dose (0.67 ± 0.07 g CD25 Ab deletion groups (p=0.001 after 49 days of tumor challenge in the animal. The kinetic low-dose CD25 Ab depletion group generated the highest number of IFN-γ-secreting, mesothelin-specific T lymphocytes compared to the other groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The imbalance between effective and suppressive immunities becomes more severe as a tumor progresses. The depletion of Treg cells can correct the imbalance of immunologic profiles and generate potent anti-tumor effects. Targeting Treg cells can be a new strategy for the immunotherapy of ovarian carcinoma.

  17. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  18. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals.

  19. Characterization of effector and memory T cell subsets in the immune response to bovine tuberculosis in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara F Maggioli

    Full Text Available Cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm responses with humans; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly characterized in cattle. Vaccine-elicited cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. However, whether this assay measures cattle Tcm responses or not is uncertain. The objective of the present study was to characterize the relative contribution of Tcm (CCR7+, CD62Lhi, CD45RO+, T effector memory (Tem, defined as: CCR7-, CD62Llow/int, CD45RO+, and T effector cells (CCR7-, CD62L-/low, CD45RO-, in the immune response to Mycobacterium bovis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from infected cattle were stimulated with a cocktail of M. bovis purified protein derivative, rTb10.4 and rAg85A for 13 days with periodic addition of fresh media and rIL-2. On day 13, cultured PBMC were re-stimulated with medium alone, rESAT-6:CFP10 or PPDb with fresh autologous adherent cells for antigen presentation. Cultured cells (13 days or fresh PBMCs (ex vivo response from the same calves were analyzed for IFN-γ production, proliferation, and CD4, CD45RO, CD62L, CD44, and CCR7 expression via flow cytometry after overnight stimulation. In response to mycobacterial antigens, ~75% of CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells in long-term cultures expressed a Tcm phenotype while less than 10% of the ex vivo response consisted of Tcm cells. Upon re-exposure to antigen, long-term cultured cells were highly proliferative, a distinctive characteristic of Tcm, and the predominant phenotype within the long-term cultures switched from Tcm to Tem. These findings suggest that proliferative responses of Tcm cells to some extent occurs simultaneously with reversion to effector phenotypes (mostly Tem. The present study characterizes Tcm cells of cattle and their participation in the response to M. bovis infection.

  20. Carbon anhydrase IX specific immune responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma potentially cured by interleukin-2 based immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Johannes W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The majority of clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) show high and homogeneous expression levels of the tumor associated antigen (TAA) carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and treatment with interleukin-2 (IL-2) based immunotherapy can lead to cure in patients with metastatic renal cell...... of disease (NED) following treatment with IL-2 based immunotherapy, and thus potentially cured. Immune reactivity in these patients was compared with samples from patients with dramatic tumor response obtained immediately at the cessation of therapy, samples from patients that experienced progressive disease...... interest in future cancer vaccines, but more studies are needed to elucidate the immunological mechanisms of action in potentially cured patients treated with an immunotherapeutic agent....

  1. Oct2 and Obf1 as facilitators of B:T cell collaboration during a humoral immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn M Corcoran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Oct2 protein, encoded by the Pou2f2 gene, was originally predicted to act as a DNA binding transcriptional activator of immunoglobulin (Ig in B lineage cells. This prediction flowed from the earlier observation that an 8 bp sequence, the octamer motif, was a highly conserved component of most Ig gene promoters and enhancers, and evidence from over-expression and reporter assays confirmed Oct2-mediated, octamer-dependent gene expression. Complexity was added to the story when Oct1, an independently encoded protein, ubiquitously expressed from the Pou2f 1 gene, was characterised and found to bind to the octamer motif with almost identical specificity, and later, when the co-activator Obf1 (OCA-B, Bob.1, encoded by the Pou2af1 gene, was cloned. Obf1 joins Oct2 (and Oct1 on the DNA of a subset of octamer motifs to enhance their transactivation strength. While these proteins variously carried the mantle of determinants of Ig gene expression in B cells for many years, such a role has not been borne out for them by characterisation of mice lacking functional copies of the genes, either as single or as compound mutants. Instead, we and others have shown that Oct2 and Obf1 are required for B cells to mature fully in vivo, for B cells to respond to the T cell cytokines IL5 and IL4, and for B cells to produce IL6 normally during a T cell dependent immune response. We show here that Oct2 affects Syk gene expression, thus influencing B cell receptor signalling, and that Oct2 loss blocks Slamf1 expression in vivo as a result of incomplete B cell maturation. Upon IL4 signalling, Stat6 up-regulates Obf1, indirectly via Xbp1, to enable plasma cell differentiation. Thus, Oct2 and Obf1 enable B cells to respond normally to antigen receptor signals, to express surface receptors that mediate physical interaction with T cells, or to produce and respond to cytokines that are critical drivers of B cell and T cell differentiation during a humoral immune response.

  2. Probiotics and lung immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for microbe-based therapeutic approaches to asthma and respiratory infection. However, to date, clinical trials of probiotics in the treatment of respiratory disease have met with limited success. It is becoming clear that to identify the true therapeutic potential of microbes we must move away from a purely empirical approach to clinical trials and adopt knowledge-based selection of candidate probiotics strains, dose, and means of administration. Animal models have played a key role in the identification of mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory capacity of specific bacteria. Microbe-induced changes in dendritic cell phenotype and function appear key to orchestrating the multiple pathways, involving inter alia, T cells, natural killer cells, and alveolar macrophages, associated with the protective effect of probiotics. Moving forward, the development of knowledge-based strategies for microbe-based therapeutics in respiratory disease will be aided by greater understanding of how specific bacterial structural motifs activate unique combinations of pattern recognition receptors on dendritic cells and thus direct desired immune responses.

  3. Interferon and IL-27 antagonize the function of group 2 innate lymphoid cells and type 2 innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Kazuyo; Kabata, Hiroki; Tanabe, Masanobu; Koga, Satoshi; Takeno, Natsuki; Mochizuki, Miho; Fukunaga, Koichi; Asano, Koichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Koyasu, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 cells) are type 2 cytokine-producing cells of the innate immune system with important roles in helminth infection and allergic inflammation. Here we found that tissue-resident ILC2 cells proliferated in situ without migrating during inflammatory responses. Both type I and type II interferons and interleukin 27 (IL-27) suppressed ILC2 function in a manner dependent on the transcription factor STAT1. ILC2-mediated lung inflammation was enhanced in the absence of the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) receptor on ILC2 cells in vivo. IFN-γ effectively suppressed the function of tissue-resident ILC2 cells but not that of inflammatory ILC2 cells, and IL-27 suppressed tissue-resident ILC2 cells but not tissue-resident TH2 cells during lung inflammation induced by Alternaria alternata. Our results demonstrate that suppression mediated by interferon and IL-27 is a negative feedback mechanism for ILC2 function in vivo.

  4. Evaluation of specific humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated with cell culture adapted classical swine fever vaccine

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    Mrinal K. Nath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine an efficient vaccination schedule on the basis of the humoral immune response of cell culture adapted live classical swine fever virus (CSFV vaccinated pigs and maternally derived antibody (MDA in piglets of vaccinated sows. Materials and Methods: A cell culture adapted live CSFV vaccine was subjected to different vaccination schedule in the present study. Serum samples were collected before vaccination (day 0 and 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 180, 194, 208, 270, 284 and 298 days after vaccination and were analyzed by liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MDA titre was detected in the serum of piglets at 21 and 42 days of age after farrowing of the vaccinated sows. Results: On 28 days after vaccination, serum samples of 83.33% vaccinated pigs showed the desirable level of antibody titer (log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution, whereas 100% animals showed log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution after 42 days of vaccination. Animals received a booster dose at 28 and 180 days post vaccination showed stable high-level antibody titre till the end of the study period. Further, piglets born from pigs vaccinated 1 month after conception showed the desirable level of MDA up to 42 days of age. Conclusion: CSF causes major losses in pig industry. Lapinised vaccines against CSFV are used routinely in endemic countries. In the present study, a cell culture adapted live attenuated vaccine has been evaluated. Based on the level of humoral immune response of vaccinated pigs and MDA titer in piglets born from immunized sows, it may be concluded that the more effective vaccination schedule for prevention of CSF is primary vaccination at 2 months of age followed by booster vaccination at 28 and 180 days post primary vaccination and at 1 month of gestation.

  5. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...... activation. The exact interconnections between the signaling pathways initiated by the surface receptors described in this article remain to be completely worked out; thus, this remains a topic for future investigation....

  6. Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immune Responses after Immunization of Calves with a Recombinant Multiantigenic Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Subunit Vaccine at Different Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Aagaard, Claus; Stockmarr, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Neonates and juvenile ruminants are very susceptible to paratuberculosis infection. This is likely due to a high degree of exposure from their dams and an immature immune system. To test the influence of age on vaccine-induced responses, a cocktail of recombinant Mycobacterium avium subsp...... and 12 relative to the first vaccination. Vaccine-induced immune responses, the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) cytokine secretion and antibody responses, were followed for 20 weeks. In general, the specific responses were significantly elevated in all three vaccination groups after the first booster...... vaccination with no or only a minor effect from the second booster. However, significant differences were observed in the immunogenicity levels of the different proteins, and it appears that the older age group produced a more consistent IFN-γ response. In contrast, the humoral immune response is seemingly...

  7. Differential regional immune response in Chagas disease.

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    Juliana de Meis

    Full Text Available Following infection, lymphocytes expand exponentially and differentiate into effector cells to control infection and coordinate the multiple effector arms of the immune response. Soon after this expansion, the majority of antigen-specific lymphocytes die, thus keeping homeostasis, and a small pool of memory cells develops, providing long-term immunity to subsequent reinfection. The extent of infection and rate of pathogen clearance are thought to determine both the magnitude of cell expansion and the homeostatic contraction to a stable number of memory cells. This straight correlation between the kinetics of T cell response and the dynamics of lymphoid tissue cell numbers is a constant feature in acute infections yielded by pathogens that are cleared during the course of response. However, the regional dynamics of the immune response mounted against pathogens that are able to establish a persistent infection remain poorly understood. Herein we discuss the differential lymphocyte dynamics in distinct central and peripheral lymphoid organs following acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While the thymus and mesenteric lymph nodes undergo a severe atrophy with massive lymphocyte depletion, the spleen and subcutaneous lymph nodes expand due to T and B cell activation/proliferation. These events are regulated by cytokines, as well as parasite-derived moieties. In this regard, identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying regional lymphocyte dynamics secondary to T. cruzi infection may hopefully contribute to the design of novel immune intervention strategies to control pathology in this infection.

  8. A nonequilibrium phase transition in immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Qi An-Shen

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of immune response correlated to signal transduction in immune thymic cells (T cells) is studied.In particular, the problem of the phosphorylation of the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) is explored. A nonlinear model is established on the basis of experimental observations. The behaviours of the model can be well analysed using the concepts of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In addition, the Riemann-Hugoniot cusp catastrophe is demonstrated by the model. Due to the application of the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions,the biological phenomena can be clarified more precisely. The results can also be used to further explain the signal transduction and signal discrimination of an important type of immune T cell.

  9. Radiation triggering immune response and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Nezih; Cetin, Zafer; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Cort, Aysegul; Saygili, Eyup Ilker

    2015-11-28

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a well-established but still under optimization branch of Cancer Therapy (CT). RT uses electromagnetic waves or charged particles in order to kill malignant cells, by accumulating the energy onto these cells. The issue at stake for RT, as well as for any other Cancer Therapy technique, is always to kill only cancer cells, without affecting the surrounding healthy ones. This perspective of CT is usually described under the terms "specificity" and "selectivity". Specificity and selectivity are the ideal goal, but the ideal is never entirely achieved. Thus, in addition to killing healthy cells, changes and effects are observed in the immune system after irradiation. In this review, we mainly focus on the effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system and its components like bone marrow. Additionally, we are interested in the effects and benefits of low-dose ionizing radiation on the hematopoiesis and immune response. Low dose radiation has been shown to induce biological responses like inflammatory responses, innate immune system activation and DNA repair (adaptive response). This review reveals the fact that there are many unanswered questions regarding the role of radiation as either an immune-activating (low dose) or immunosuppressive (high dose) agent.

  10. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

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    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  11. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  12. Helicobacter pylori cholesteryl α-glucosides contribute to its pathogenicity and immune response by natural killer T cells.

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    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Approximately 10-15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer, while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT, which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18(-/- or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Cholesteryl α-Glucosides Contribute to Its Pathogenicity and Immune Response by Natural Killer T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Vela, Jose Luis; Matsumura, Fumiko; Hoshino, Hitomi; Tyznik, Aaron; Lee, Heeseob; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Liddington, Robert; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Bao, Xingfeng; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Jin, Rongsheng; Zong, Yinong; Seeberger, Peter H.; Nakayama, Jun; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Fukuda, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10–15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer), while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18−/−) or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis. PMID:24312443

  14. Slamf receptors : Modulators of Phagocyte Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, Boaz Job

    2015-01-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule family (Slamf) receptors can operate in three distinct modes. Slamf receptors can dictate the extent of immune responses, thereby maneuvering immunity to the optimal zone between immunopathology or autoimmunity and weak, ineffective immune responses. A second

  15. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongliangZhang; ChenDong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):20-27.

  16. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongliang Zhang; Chen Dong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  17. Immune Response After Measles Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj A.K

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles immunization of 192 under 5 years of age children was undertaken and the overall seroconversion was 76.0%. Seroconversion rate in the age group of 9-12 months was 70.9% and it was 100% after one year. Immune response in malnourished children was more as compared to normal children. There were negligible side reactions after measles vaccination, and this vaccine passed normal potency tests under field conditions.

  18. Deubiquitinase function of arterivirus papain-like protease 2 suppresses the innate immune response in infected host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kasteren, Puck B; Bailey-Elkin, Ben A; James, Terrence W; Ninaber, Dennis K; Beugeling, Corrine; Khajehpour, Mazdak; Snijder, Eric J; Mark, Brian L; Kikkert, Marjolein

    2013-02-26

    Protein ubiquitination regulates important innate immune responses. The discovery of viruses encoding deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) suggests they remove ubiquitin to evade ubiquitin-dependent antiviral responses; however, this has never been conclusively demonstrated in virus-infected cells. Arteriviruses are economically important positive-stranded RNA viruses that encode an ovarian tumor (OTU) domain DUB known as papain-like protease 2 (PLP2). This enzyme is essential for arterivirus replication by cleaving a site within the viral replicase polyproteins and also removes ubiquitin from cellular proteins. To dissect this dual specificity, which relies on a single catalytic site, we determined the crystal structure of equine arteritis virus PLP2 in complex with ubiquitin (1.45 Å). PLP2 binds ubiquitin using a zinc finger that is uniquely integrated into an exceptionally compact OTU-domain fold that represents a new subclass of zinc-dependent OTU DUBs. Notably, the ubiquitin-binding surface is distant from the catalytic site, which allowed us to mutate this surface to significantly reduce DUB activity without affecting polyprotein cleavage. Viruses harboring such mutations exhibited WT replication kinetics, confirming that PLP2-mediated polyprotein cleavage was intact, but the loss of DUB activity strikingly enhanced innate immune signaling. Compared with WT virus infection, IFN-β mRNA levels in equine cells infected with PLP2 mutants were increased by nearly an order of magnitude. Our findings not only establish PLP2 DUB activity as a critical factor in arteriviral innate immune evasion, but the selective inactivation of DUB activity also opens unique possibilities for developing improved live attenuated vaccines against arteriviruses and other viruses encoding similar dual-specificity proteases.

  19. Immune Responses of Dendritic Cells Loaded with Antigens from Apoptotic Cholangiocarcinoma Cells Caused by γ-Irradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUGang; HANBenli; PEIXuetao

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the induction cytotoxic T cells(CTLs) with antitumor activity and therapeutic efficacy after dendritic cells(DCs) acquired antigen from apoptotic cholangiocarcinoma cells caused by γ-irradiation. Methods:DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that maintain the antigen capturing and processing capacity charateristic of immature cells have been established in vitro, using granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Then, in cholangiocarcinoma cells apoptosis was induced by γ-irradiation. The experimental groups were as follows:(1)coculture of DCs and apoptotic cancer cells and T cells;(2)coculture of DCs and necrotic cancer cells and T cells;(3)coculture of DCs, cultured cancer cell and T cells. They are cocultured for 7 days.DCs and T cells were riched, isolated and their antitumor response was tested. Results:The cells had typical dendritic morphology, expressed high levels of CDla and B7, acquired antigen from apoptotic cells caused by γ-irradiation and induced an increased T cell stimulatory capacity in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR). Conclusion:DCs obtained from PBMCs using GM-CSF and IL-4 can efficiently present antigen derived from apoptotic cells caused by γ-irradiation and efficiently induce T cells.This strategy, therefore, may present an effective approach to transduce DCs with antigen.

  20. Differential cell-mediated immune response to S. mutans in children with low and high dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, H; Sharma, A; Banerjee, U; Sidhu, S S; Sundaram, K R

    1993-08-01

    Role of cell-mediated immune response (CMI) in dental caries was studied in 171 subjects, comprising of 86 children with low caries (LC), 31 with high caries (HC), and 54 age matched controls. [3H]thymidine mediated lymphoblast transformation test (LTT) using mutans streptococci antigen as stimulant was used to study the stimulation index (SI) of in vitro cultured lymphocytes from these children. The analysis revealed low stimulation index in high caries children whereas low caries children exhibited high stimulation index normally ranging between 2 to 6. The findings indicated that low caries children had strong CMI response as compared to high caries children. Although, the findings are based on limited number of samples, it certainly lays emphasis on protective or regulatory role of CMI in different phases of dental caries.

  1. Differential Impact of LPG-and PG-Deficient Leishmania major Mutants on the Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells.

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    Michelle A Favila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania major infection induces robust interleukin-12 (IL12 production in human dendritic cells (hDC, ultimately resulting in Th1-mediated immunity and clinical resolution. The surface of Leishmania parasites is covered in a dense glycocalyx consisting of primarily lipophosphoglycan (LPG and other phosphoglycan-containing molecules (PGs, making these glycoconjugates the likely pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS responsible for IL12 induction.Here we explored the role of parasite glycoconjugates on the hDC IL12 response by generating L. major Friedlin V1 mutants defective in LPG alone, (FV1 lpg1-, or generally deficient for all PGs, (FV1 lpg2-. Infection with metacyclic, infective stage, L. major or purified LPG induced high levels of IL12B subunit gene transcripts in hDCs, which was abrogated with FV1 lpg1- infections. In contrast, hDC infections with FV1 lpg2- displayed increased IL12B expression, suggesting other PG-related/LPG2 dependent molecules may act to dampen the immune response. Global transcriptional profiling comparing WT, FV1 lpg1-, FV1 lpg2- infections revealed that FV1 lpg1- mutants entered hDCs in a silent fashion as indicated by repression of gene expression. Transcription factor binding site analysis suggests that LPG recognition by hDCs induces IL-12 in a signaling cascade resulting in Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB and Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF mediated transcription.These data suggest that L. major LPG is a major PAMP recognized by hDC to induce IL12-mediated protective immunity and that there is a complex interplay between PG-baring Leishmania surface glycoconjugates that result in modulation of host cellular IL12.

  2. Immune Response to Ebola Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Alonso Remedios

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus belongs to the family Filoviridae and causes a highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Affected patients show an impaired immune response as a result of the evasion mechanisms employed by the virus. Cathepsin is an enzyme present in the granules of phagocytes which cleaves viral surface glycoproteins, allowing virus entry into the host cell. In addition, this virus is resistant to the antiviral effects of type I interferon, promotes the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and induces apoptosis of monocytes and lymphocytes. It also induces an incomplete activation of dendritic cells, thus avoiding the presentation of viral antigens. Although specific antibodies are produced after the first week, their neutralizing capacity is doubtful. The virus evades the immune response and replicates uncontrollably in the host. This paper aims to summarize the main characteristics of the immune response to Ebola virus infection.

  3. Pasteurella multocida and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2012-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida was first discovered by Perroncito in 1878 and named after Louis Pasteur who first isolated and described this Gram-negative bacterium as the cause of fowl disease in 1880. Subsequently, P. multocida was also found to cause atrophic rhinitis in pigs, haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle and respiratory diseases in many other animals. Among other factors such as lipopolysaccharide, outer membrane proteins and its capsule, the protein toxin (PMT) of P. multocida is an important virulence factor that determines the immunological response of the host's immune system. However, the exact molecular mechanisms taking place in cells of the innate and adaptive immune system are largely unknown for any of these virulence factors. Due to the obvious function of PMT on cells of the porcine skeletal system where it causes bone destruction, PMT was regarded as an osteolytic protein toxin. However, it remained unclear what the actual benefit for the bacteria would be. Recently, more attention was drawn to the osteoimmunological effects of PMT and the interplay between bone and immune cells. This review summarises the knowledge of effects of P. multocida virulence factors on the host's immune system.

  4. Intranasal administration of HIV-DNA vaccine formulated with a polymer, carboxymethylcellulose, augments mucosal antibody production and cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, K; Sasaki, S; Fukushima, J; Kaneko, T; Xin, K Q; Kudoh, I; Okuda, K

    1998-08-01

    We previously reported that intramuscular (i.m.) immunization of DNA vaccine encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)IIIB env and rev genes alone or in combination with appropriate adjuvant induces substantial and enhanced immune response against HIV-1. In the present study, we examined whether a polymer, low-viscosity carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt (CMCS-L), has an adjuvant effect on immune response induced by DNA vaccination. BALB/c mice were immunized with HIV-DNA vaccine formulated with CMCS-L via the intranasal (i.n.) and i.m. routes. The combination with the polymer elicited higher levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA antibodies than DNA vaccine alone. For cell-mediated immunity, HIV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity were measured by the footpad-swelling test and the 51Cr-release assay, respectively. Both were enhanced by the combination with CMCS-L via i.n. and i.m. inoculation. Cytokine analysis in culture media of bulk splenocytes harvested from immunized animals showed higher levels of IL-4 production in i.n. -immunized mice compared with i.m.-immunized mice. Nevertheless, the increased IFN-gamma production resulting from the combination with CMCS-L was observed only in i.n.-immunized mice. These data indicate that i.n. immunization of HIV-DNA vaccine formulated with CMCS-L enhances HIV-specific mucosal antibody (Ab) and systemic Ab and cell-mediated immune response.

  5. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abschuetz, Oliver [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Osen, Wolfram [Division of Translational Immunology, German Cancer Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Frank, Kathrin [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kato, Masashi [Unit of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Schadendorf, Dirk [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45122 (Germany); Umansky, Viktor, E-mail: v.umansky@dkfz.de [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2012-04-26

    Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA) tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  6. Cross-reactive memory CD8(+) T cells alter the immune response to heterologous secondary dengue virus infections in mice in a sequence-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Mathew, Anuja; Bashyam, Hema S; Rothman, Alan L

    2008-02-15

    Dengue virus is the causative agent of dengue fever and the more-severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Human studies suggest that the increased risk of DHF during secondary infection is due to immunopathology partially mediated by cross-reactive memory T cells from the primary infection. To model T cell responses to sequential infections, we immunized mice with different sequences of dengue virus serotypes and measured the frequency of peptide-specific T cells after infection. The acute response after heterologous secondary infections was enhanced compared with the acute or memory response after primary infection. Also, the hierarchy of epitope-specific responses was influenced by the specific sequence of infection. Adoptive-transfer experiments showed that memory T cells responded preferentially to the secondary infection. These findings demonstrate that cross-reactive T cells from a primary infection alter the immune response during a heterologous secondary infection.

  7. Waddlia chondrophila infects and multiplies in ovine trophoblast cells stimulating an inflammatory immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Wheelhouse

    Full Text Available Waddlia chondrophila (W. chondrophila is an emerging abortifacient organism which has been identified in the placentae of humans and cattle. The organism is a member of the order Chlamydiales, and shares many similarities at the genome level and in growth studies with other well-characterised zoonotic chlamydial abortifacients, such as Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus. This study investigates the growth of the organism and its effects upon pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in a ruminant placental cell line which we have previously utilised in a model of C. abortus pathogenicity.Using qPCR, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy, we characterised the infection and growth of W. chondrophila within the ovine trophoblast AH-1 cell line. Inclusions were visible from 6 h post-infection (p.i. and exponential growth of the organism could be observed over a 60 h time-course, with significant levels of host cell lysis being observed only after 36 h p.i. Expression of CXCL8, TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-1β were determined 24 h p.i. A statistically significant response in the expression of CXCL8, TNF-α and IL-1β could be observed following active infection with W. chondrophila. However a significant increase in IL-1β expression was also observed following the exposure of cells to UV-killed organisms, indicating the stimulation of multiple innate recognition pathways.W. chondrophila infects and grows in the ruminant trophoblast AH-1 cell line exhibiting a complete chlamydial replicative cycle. Infection of the trophoblasts resulted in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner similar to that observed with C. abortus in previous studies, suggesting similarities in the pathogenesis of infection between the two organisms.

  8. [Experimental study on the immune response of fusion tumor vaccine of HepG2 and dendritic cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Y B; Cui, B Y; He, J; Huang, X P; Liang, W; Li, L Q; Luo, X L

    2017-02-21

    Objective: To estimate the immune response of HepG2/dendritic cell (DC) fusion cells vaccines against HepG2 cells in vitro. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from healthy donors by Ficoll-Hypaque density-gradient centrifugation.Then DC were obtain from PBMCs by culturing in medium containing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) for 5 days.DC and HepG2 fusion cells were induced by polythyleneglycol (PEG). The fusion cells were examined under fluorescence microscope by labeling DCs and HepG2 with green and red fluorescein, respectively, and then the fusion rates were analyzed by flow cytometry.The capacity of fusion cells to secrete interleukin (IL)-12 and stimulate the proliferation of T lymphocyte was assessed by ELISA and Flow cytometry, respectively.ELISPOT was used to assess the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) produced by cytotoxicity T lymphocyte (CTL), and the specific killing ability of fusion cells induce-CTL targeting HepG2 was estimated. Results: The fusion rate of HepG2/DC was 54.5%, and the fusion cells expressed a higher levels of DC mature marker CD80 and costimulatory molecules CD83, CD86 and MHC-Ⅰ, MHC-Ⅱ molecules HLA-ABC and HLA-DR than those in immature DCs (Pfusion cells could efficiently stimulate T lymphocytes to generate specific CTL targeting HepG2 cells.It might be a promising strategy of immunotherapy for HCC.

  9. The early antitumor immune response is necessary for tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Parmiani, Giorgio; Maccalli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Early events responsible of tumor growth in patients with a normal immune system are poorly understood. Here, we discuss, in the context of human melanoma, the Prehn hypothesis according to which a weak antitumor immune response may be required for tumor growth before weakly or non-immunogenic tumor cell subpopulations are selected by the immune system.

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells modulate immune responses independently of NADPH oxidase in the ovarian tumor microenvironment in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi E Godoy

    Full Text Available The phagocyte NADPH oxidase generates superoxide anion and downstream reactive oxidant intermediates in response to infectious threat, and is a critical mediator of antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory responses. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that are recruited by cancer cells, accumulate locally and systemically in advanced cancer, and can abrogate anti-tumor immunity. Prior studies have implicated the phagocyte NADPH oxidase as being an important component promoting MDSC accumulation and immunosuppression in cancer. We therefore used engineered NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47 (phox-/- mice to delineate the role of this enzyme complex in MDSC accumulation and function in a syngeneic mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer. We found that the presence of NADPH oxidase did not affect tumor progression. The accumulation of MDSCs locally and systemically was similar in tumor-bearing wild-type (WT and p47 (phox-/- mice. Although MDSCs from tumor-bearing WT mice had functional NADPH oxidase, the suppressive effect of MDSCs on ex vivo stimulated T cell proliferation was NADPH oxidase-independent. In contrast to other tumor-bearing mouse models, our results show that MDSC accumulation and immunosuppression in syngeneic epithelial ovarian cancer is NADPH oxidase-independent. We speculate that factors inherent to the tumor, tumor microenvironment, or both determine the specific requirement for NADPH oxidase in MDSC accumulation and function.

  11. Defined breast milk EV subsets boost the immune response and skew the T-cell balance towards a regulatory phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld, Marijke; Van Herwijnen, Martijn; Brouwers, Jos; Garssen, Johan; Redegeld, Frank; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Wauben, Marca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the past years it has become clear that cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EV) are present in human breast milk and that these EV can play a role in the instruction of the immune system. Since breast milk impacts the development of the neonatal immune system by conveying environme

  12. Vaccines against Human Carcinomas: Strategies to Improve Antitumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations in preclinical and clinical studies support a role for the immune system in controlling tumor growth and progression. Various components of the innate and adaptive immune response are able to mediate tumor cell destruction; however, certain immune cell populations can also induce a protumor environment that favors tumor growth and the development of metastasis. Moreover, tumor cells themselves are equipped with various mechanisms that allow them to evade surveillance by the immune system. The goal of cancer vaccines is to induce a tumor-specific immune response that ultimately will reduce tumor burden by tipping the balance from a protumor to an antitumor immune environment. This review discusses common mechanisms that govern immune cell activation and tumor immune escape, and some of the current strategies employed in the field of cancer vaccines aimed at enhancing activation of tumor-specific T-cells with concurrent reduction of immunosuppression.

  13. CHARACTERISATION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE IN PIGS IN A CLINICAL CHALLENGE EXPERIMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST MYCOPLASMA HYOSYNOVIAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Josephine Skovgaard; Riber, Ulla; Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll;

    -antigen and recombinant IL-18, significantly higher level of IFN-γ was produced in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group one day before challenge with Mhs. In contrast, significantly higher level of IFN-γ was measured in the placebo group compared to the vaccine group at day 6 after challenge. The latter could...... (Germany) September 10-13, 2009), testing a new vaccine (formalin inactivated Mhs and EMULSIGEN-BCL® (MVP Laboratories)), cell-mediated immune response was measured in the vaccine group (n=13) and not in the placebo group (n=13). In an IFN-γ assay, where whole-blood was co-cultured with Mhs...... to be CD4 and especially CD4CD8 double positive T-cells simultaneously expressing CD25. Interestingly, the proportion of CD4CD8 double positive T-cells within the total population of CD4 positive cells increased in the vaccine group after challenge, indicating that generation of specific T-cell memory had...

  14. Trappin-2/elafin modulate innate immune responses of human endometrial epithelial cells to PolyI:C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G Drannik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upon viral recognition, innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses are initiated by genital epithelial cells (ECs to eradicate or contain viral infection. Such responses, however, are often accompanied by inflammation that contributes to acquisition and progression of sexually transmitted infections (STIs. Hence, interventions/factors enhancing antiviral protection while reducing inflammation may prove beneficial in controlling the spread of STIs. Serine antiprotease trappin-2 (Tr and its cleaved form, elafin (E, are alarm antimicrobials secreted by multiple cells, including genital epithelia. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated whether and how each Tr and E (Tr/E contribute to antiviral defenses against a synthetic mimic of viral dsRNA, polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C and vesicular stomatitis virus. We show that delivery of a replication-deficient adenovector expressing Tr gene (Ad/Tr to human endometrial epithelial cells, HEC-1A, resulted in secretion of functional Tr, whereas both Tr/E were detected in response to polyI:C. Moreover, Tr/E were found to significantly reduce viral replication by either acting directly on virus or through enhancing polyI:C-driven antiviral protection. The latter was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory factors IL-8, IL-6, TNFα, lowered expression of RIG-I, MDA5 and attenuated NF-κB activation. Interestingly, enhanced polyI:C-driven antiviral protection of HEC-Ad/Tr cells was partially mediated through IRF3 activation, but not associated with higher induction of IFNβ, suggesting multiple antiviral mechanisms of Tr/E and the involvement of alternative factors or pathways. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first evidence of both Tr/E altering viral binding/entry, innate recognition and mounting of antiviral and inflammatory responses in genital ECs that could have significant implications for homeostasis of the female genital tract.

  15. Investigation on the effect of peptides mixture from tumor cells inducing anti-tumor specific immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯作化; 黄波; 张桂梅; 李东; 王洪涛

    2002-01-01

    The peptides mixture was prepared from tumor cells by freezing-thawing cells, precipitation by heating, followed by acidification of the solution. The activation and proliferation of mouse splenocytes by HSP70-peptide complex, formed by the binding of HSP70 and peptides in vitro, were observed, so was the specific cytotoxicity of the proliferative lymphocytes to tumor cells. The phenotypes of the proliferative lymphocytes were analyzed by a flow cytometer. BALB/c mice inoculated with H22 hepatocarcinoma cells in peritoneal cavity or hind thigh were immunized by injection with HSP70-peptides complex to observe the inhibitory effect of the immunization on tumor and lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. On the other hand, blood samples were collected from the immunized mice to check the functions of liver and kidney. The results showed that the peptides mixture from tumor cells contained tumor-specific antigen peptides which could be presented by HSP70 to activate lymphocytes in vitro, the proliferative lymphocytes were T cells which were specifically cytotoxic to tumor cells, the in vivo growth of both ascitic and solid carcinoma could be suppressed by immunization with HSP70-peptides and the lifetime of tumor-bearing mice was prolonged, the in vivo immunization with HSP70-H22-peptides had no impact on the function of mouse liver and kidney, suggesting that there was no occurrence of autoimmunity in vivo after immunization.

  16. Commensal bacteria modulate innate immune responses of vaginal epithelial cell multilayer cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, William A; McGowin, Chris L; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D; Popov, Vsevolod L; Pyles, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome plays a critical but poorly defined role in reproductive health. Vaginal microbiome alterations are associated with increased susceptibility to sexually-transmitted infections (STI) possibly due to related changes in innate defense responses from epithelial cells. Study of the impact of commensal bacteria on the vaginal mucosal surface has been hindered by current vaginal epithelial cell (VEC) culture systems that lack an appropriate interface between the apical surface of stratified squamous epithelium and the air-filled vaginal lumen. Therefore we developed a reproducible multilayer VEC culture system with an apical (luminal) air-interface that supported colonization with selected commensal bacteria. Multilayer VEC developed tight-junctions and other hallmarks of the vaginal mucosa including predictable proinflammatory cytokine secretion following TLR stimulation. Colonization of multilayers by common vaginal commensals including Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. rhamnosus led to intimate associations with the VEC exclusively on the apical surface. Vaginal commensals did not trigger cytokine secretion but Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal, was inflammatory. Lactobacilli reduced cytokine secretion in an isolate-specific fashion following TLR stimulation. This tempering of inflammation offers a potential explanation for increased susceptibility to STI in the absence of common commensals and has implications for testing of potential STI preventatives.

  17. Enhancing Immune Responses for Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-An Xue; Hans J Stauss

    2007-01-01

    Although the immune system possesses the means to respond to cancer, it often fails to control the spread of malignancy. Nonetheless, equipping endogenous immunity to release a strong antitumor response has significant advantages over conventional therapies. This review explores some of the options available to accomplish this,focusing first on vaccinations with tumor antigens to stimulate the immune system and empower stronger antitumor responses. We then compare and contrast the so-far limited clinical success of vaccination with the well-documented curative potential of adoptive therapy using T lymphocytes transfer. Finally, we highlight novel approaches using T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer strategy to exploit allogeneic T cell repertoires in conjunction with receptors selected in vitro for defined MHC/peptide combinations, as a basis for antigen-specific gene therapy of cancers.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis and its association with HLA-DR antigens. I. Cell mediated immune response against connective tissue antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, C M; Pesoa, S A; Onetti, C M; Riera, C M

    1987-04-01

    HLA-DR antigens and cellular sensitivity to native bovine type I and type II collagen and proteoglycans were examined in patients with classic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and normal individuals. Fifty eight percent of patients with RA (n = 88) and 28% of normals (n = 52) were DR4+ (pc less than 0.01). DR4 phenotype was significantly increased in patients with severe disease stages (III-IV), as defined by the ARA criteria, in contrast to those showing mild disease stages (I-II) (p less than 0.05). Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 55 patients and 30 controls were evaluated for the in vitro production of leukocyte inhibitory factor in response to native type I and type II collagen and proteoglycans. By using this assay, cells from the arthritic group exhibited a statistically significant response when stimulated with native type I collagen and proteoglycans. The cellular immune response was not associated with any particular HLA-DR antigens, or to the disease stage or severity.

  19. Immune response signatures of benzo{alpha}pyrene exposure in normal human mammary epithelial cells in the absence or presence of chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kaarthik; Keshava, Channa; Richardson, Diana L; Weston, Ainsley; Nath, Joginder

    2009-01-01

    Carcinogenic polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons can alter immune responses. Changes in immune response gene expression profiles in multiple human mammary cell strains exposed to benzo(alpha)pyrene (BP) (4 microM) in vitro, in the presence or absence of chlorophyllin (5 microM), were observed using Affymetrix gene arrays. Expressions of five immune response genes were altered ~3.0-fold by BP exposure and 24 genes by BP in the presence chlorophyllin. In silico pathway analysis revealed altered immune response genes form interactive gene networks with many cellular processes, suggesting their role in a complex multigenic response to toxins. Additionally, it was suggestive of the possible immunomodulatory potential of chlorophyllin apart from various other well-documented mechanisms of action. Gene expression matrices revealed consistent alteration patterns involving IL1B, SECTM1 and CXCL14 on exposure to BP, and IL1RN, CD86, IF144 and GIP2 in the presence of chlorophyllin and BP, suggesting some of these genes might constitute putative immune response biomarkers of PAH exposure. This study has therefore identified a battery of potential immune response biomarkers of PAH exposure, amidst several genes, for future validation studies.

  20. Complement Deposition on Nanoparticles Can Modulate Immune Responses by Macrophage, B and T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, K.M.; Tsolaki, A.G.; Paudyal, B.; Shamij, M.H.; Switzer, A.; Pathan, A.A.; Abozaid, S.M.; Haken, ten B.; Stenbeck, G.; Sim, R.B.; Kishore, U.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are attractive drug delivery vehicles for targeted organ-specific as well as systemic therapy. However, their interaction with the immune system offers an intriguing challenge to the success of nanotherapeutics in vivo. Recently, we showed that pristine and derivatised carbon nanotubes

  1. Adaptive immune response to whole cell pertussis vaccine reflects vaccine quality: A possible complementation to the Pertussis Serological Potency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonakker, M E; Verhagen, L M; van der Maas, L; Metz, B; Uittenbogaard, J P; van de Waterbeemd, B; van Els, C A C M; van Eden, W; Hendriksen, C F M; Sloots, A; Han, W G H

    2016-08-17

    Whole cell Bordetella pertussis (wP) vaccines are still used in many countries to protect against the respiratory disease pertussis. The potency of whole-cell pertussis vaccine lots is determined by an intracerebral challenge test (the Kendrick test). This test is criticized due to lack of immunological relevance of the read-out after an intracerebral challenge with B. pertussis. The alternative in vivo test, which assesses specific antibody levels in serum after wP vaccination, is the Pertussis Serological Potency test (PSPT). Although the PSPT focuses on a parameter that contributes to protection, the protective immune mechanisms after wP vaccination includes more elements than specific antibody responses only. In this study, additional parameters were investigated, i.e. circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, antibody specificity and T helper cell responses and it was evaluated whether they can be used as complementary readout parameters in the PSPT to assess wP lot quality. By deliberate manipulation of the vaccine preparation procedure, a panel of high, intermediate and low quality wP vaccines were made. The results revealed that these vaccines induced similar IL-6 and IP10 levels in serum 4h after vaccination (innate responses) and similar antibody levels directed against the entire bacterium. In contrast, the induced antibody specificity to distinct wP antigens differed after vaccination with high, intermediate and low quality wP vaccines. In addition, the magnitude of wP-induced Th cell responses (Th17, Th1 and Th2) was reduced after vaccination with a wP vaccine of low quality. T cell responses and antibody specificity are therefore correlates of qualitative differences in the investigated vaccines, while the current parameter of the PSPT alone was not sensitive enough to distinguish between vaccines of different qualities. This study demonstrates that assessment of the magnitude of Th cell responses and the antigen specificity of antibodies induced by w

  2. Cell-mediated immunity in the rheumatoid diseases. I. Skin testing and mitogenic responses in sero-negative arthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebel, K; Sturrock, R D; Dick, W C; MacSween, R N

    1975-12-01

    Cellular immunity has been investigated in patients with various kinds of sero-negative arthritis. The incidence of cutaneous response to recall antigen streptokinase-streptodornase (SK-SD), and the ability to mount a primary cutaneous response to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) have been examined in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. The results were not significantly different from normal. In vitro lymphocyte transformation in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) has been measured using peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's disease. In comparison with a control group, significantly reduced responses were found to a low dose of PHA in the ankylosing spondylitis and Reiter disease patients. Significant increase in response occurred to a high dose of PHA, in patients with psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's disease, and to PWM in Reiter's disease patients. The in vitro results in the ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's disease patients suggest some abnormality in the T-cell population in sero-negative arthritis.

  3. Mosaic vaccines elicit CD8+ T cell responses in monkeys that confer immune coverage of diverse HIV strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Will [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Creation of a successful HIV vaccine will require the development of a strategy to generate cellular immunity with sufficient cross-clade breadth to deal with the extreme genetic diversity of the virus. Polyvalent mosaic immunogens derived from in silica recombination of natural strains of HIV are designed to induce cellular immune responses that maximally cover the sequence diversity of circulating virus isolates. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with plasmid DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine constructs expressing either consensus immunogens or polyvalent mosaic immunogens elicited a CD4+ T lymphocyte-biased response with comparably broad epitope-specific total T lymphocyte specificities. However, immunization with the mosaic immunogens induced HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses with markedly greater depth and breadth. Therefore, the use of polyvalent mosaic immunogens is a promising strategy for a global vaccine for HIV.

  4. Protective immune responses in lawsonia intracellularis infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Boutrup, Torsten;

    and no increase in acute phase response after challenge with a pathogenic isolate. Here we show results from measurements of serology as well as cell-mediated immune responses from this experiment. We found that Lawsonia-specific IgA peaked in serum around day 17-24 after a primary infection in experimentally......Lawsonia intracellularis is the cause of porcine proliferative enteropathy, one of the major causes of antibiotics usage in modern pig production. L. intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium preferable infecting epithelial cells of pigs intestine. We have demonstrated earlier......, but exhibited a high, but short-lasting peak after re-infection. Specific IFN responses were also measured using a whole blood IFN-γ assay. These were very high in challenge infected and re-infected animals as compared to controls. These specific immune responses may contribute to the explanation of mechanisms...

  5. Cell mediated immunity to fungi: a reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina

    2008-09-01

    Protective immunity against fungal pathogens is achieved by the integration of two distinct arms of the immune system, the innate and adaptive responses. Innate and adaptive immune responses are intimately linked and controlled by sets of molecules and receptors that act to generate the most effective form of immunity for protection against fungal pathogens. The decision of how to respond will still be primarily determined by interactions between pathogens and cells of the innate immune system, but the actions of T cells will feed back into this dynamic equilibrium to regulate the balance between tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. In the last two decades, the immunopathogenesis of fungal infections and fungal diseases was explained primarily in terms of Th1/Th2 balance. Although Th1 responses driven by the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis are central to protection against fungi, other cytokines and T cell-dependent pathways have come of age. The newly described Th17 developmental pathway may play an inflammatory role previously attributed to uncontrolled Th1 responses and serves to accommodate the seemingly paradoxical association of chronic inflammatory responses with fungal persistence in the face of an ongoing inflammation. Regulatory T cells in their capacity to inhibit aspects of innate and adaptive antifungal immunity have become an integral component of immune resistance to fungi, and provide the host with immune defense mechanisms adequate for protection, without necessarily eliminating fungal pathogens which would impair immune memory--or causing an unacceptable level of tissue damage. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan metabolites contribute to immune homeostasis by inducing Tregs and taming overzealous or heightened inflammatory responses.

  6. Effects of confinement (110 and 240 days) on neuroendocrine stress response and changes of immune cells in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukèr, A; Smith, L; Christ, F; Larina, I; Nichiporuk, I; Baranov, V; Bobrovnik, E; Pastushkova, L; Messmer, K; Peter, K; Thiel, M

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of long-term confinement on stress-permissive neuroendocrine and immune responses in humans. Two groups of four male subjects were confined 240 days (group 240) or 110 days (group 110) in two space modules of 100 or 200 m3, respectively. During confinement, none of the volunteers developed psychic stress as could be examined and verified by a current stress test. However, in group 240 but not in group 110, the diurnal rhythm of cortisol secretion was slightly depressed and the urine excretion of norepinephrine significantly increased. The innate part of the immune system became activated as seen by a rise in the number of circulating granulocytes and the enhanced expression of beta2-integrins. In contrast, the ratio of T-helper to T-suppressor cells decreased. All these effects, observed during confinement, were even more pronounced in both groups when values of endocrinological and immunological parameters were compared between before and 1 wk after the end of the confinement period. Hence, return to normal life exerts pronounced effects to a much higher degree, irrespective of how long or under which conditions individuals were confined. Because the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction against recall antigens remained unaffected, it is to be presumed that confinement appears to induce distinct sympathoadrenergic activation and immunological changes but no clinically relevant immunosuppression.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE25/PPE41 protein complex induces activation and maturation of dendritic cells and drives Th2-biased immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Bao, Yige; Chen, Xuerong; Burton, Jeremy; Gong, Xueli; Gu, Dongqing; Mi, Youjun; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades innate host immune responses by parasitizing macrophages and causes significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A mycobacterial antigen that can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and elicit effective host innate immune responses will be vital to the development of an effective TB vaccine. The M. tuberculosis genes PE25/PPE41 encode proteins which have been associated with evasion of the host immune response. We constructed a PE25/PPE41 complex gene via splicing by overlapping extension and expressed it successfully in E. coli. We investigated whether this protein complex could interact with DCs to induce effective host immune responses. The PE25/PPE41 protein complex induced maturation of isolated mouse DCs in vitro, increasing expression of cell surface markers (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II), thereby promoting Th2 polarization via secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. In addition, PE25/PPE41 protein complex-activated DCs induced proliferation of mouse CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and a strong humoral response in immunized mice. The sera of five TB patients were also highly reactive to this antigen. These findings suggest that interaction of the PE25/PPE41 protein complex with DCs may be of great immunological significance.

  8. Toll-like Receptors 4 and 5 Cooperatively Initiate the Innate Immune Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijing; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Wu, Han; Wang, Qing; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Han, Daishu

    2016-03-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may cause epididymitis and impair male fertility. The mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to UPEC infection in the epididymis are not fully understood. This study showed that UPEC induced innate immune responses in mouse epididymal epithelial cells (EECs) through the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR5. Infection with UPEC significantly induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, in EECs through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Moreover, UPEC induced the production of type 1 interferons by EECs through the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3. The UPEC-induced innate immune responses were significantly reduced in the EECs of Tlr4 or Tlr5 knockout mice. The innate immune responses were further reduced in Tlr4 and Tlr5 double-knockout EECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TLR4 and TLR5 cooperatively initiated the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection in vivo. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection.

  9. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Wang, Chaoyuan [College of Life Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China); Su, Hanwen, E-mail: suhanwen-1@163.com [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Meixian, E-mail: xiangmeixian99@163.com [College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan (China)

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  10. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  11. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abildgaard Steffensen

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii. To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  12. Potent antigen-specific immune response induced by infusion of spleen cells coupled with succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl cyclohexane)-1-carboxylate (SMCC) conjugated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yixian; Werbel, Tyler; Wan, Suigui; Wu, Haitao; Li, Yaohua; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we report our recently developed new approach to inducing antigen-specific immune response. We use two nucleophilic substitution "click" chemistry processes to successfully couple protein antigens or peptides to mouse spleen cells or T cells by a heterobifunctional crosslinker, succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl cyclohexane)-1-carboxylate (SMCC) or sulfo-SMCC. SMCC and its water-soluble analog sulfo-SMCC contain N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester and maleimide groups, which allow stable covalent conjugation of amine- and sulfhydryl-containing molecules in trans. Protein coupling to cells relies on the free sulfhydryls (thiols) on cell surfaces and the free amines on protein antigens. Although the amount of protein coupled to cells is limited due to the limited number of cell surface thiols, the injection of spleen cells coupled with antigenic proteins, such as keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or ovalbumin (OVA), induces a potent antigen-specific immune response in vivo, which is even stronger than that induced by the injection of a large dose of protein plus adjuvants. In addition, short peptides coupled to purified splenic T cells also potently elicit peptide-specific T cell proliferation in vivo after injection. Further studies show that antigen-coupled spleen cell treatment leads to augmented IFN-γ-producing T cells. Our study provides a unique antigen delivery method that efficiently distributes antigen to the entire immune system, subsequently eliciting a potent antigen-specific immune response with enhanced IFN-γ production. The findings in the present study suggest that this antigen-cell coupling strategy could be employed in immunotherapy for cancers, infectious diseases as well as immune-mediated disorders.

  13. Cell-mediated immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum purified soluble antigens in sickle-cell trait subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayoumi, R A; Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H

    1990-01-01

    endemic area 300 km south of Khartoum. Antibodies to ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155/RESA) and to circumsporozoite (CS) protein (anti-NANP40) indicated equal exposure to falciparum malaria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs) from 20/35 (57%) Hb AS subjects compared with 10/24 (42......To determine the possible differences in the immune response to Plasmodium falciparum between sickle-cell trait (Hb AS) and normal haemoglobin (Hb AA) individuals, we examined 35 Hb AS and 24 Hb AA subjects matched for age and microenvironment. Their age was 2-55 years and all lived in a malaria......%) Hb AA subjects, responded to affinity-purified P. falciparum soluble antigens (SPAg). Of those responding to SPAg, 9 (26%) Hb AS subjects and only two (8%) Hb AA subjects had high responses. The mean proliferative response to SPAg of BMNCs from Hb AS individuals was significantly higher than in Hb AA...

  14. Adeno-associated virus activates an innate immune response in normal human cells but not in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laredj, Leila N; Beard, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a small, DNA-containing dependovirus with promising potential as a gene delivery vehicle. Given the variety of applications of AAV-based vectors in the treatment of genetic disorders, numerous studies have focused on the immunogenicity of recombinant AAV. In general, AAV vectors appear not to induce strong inflammatory responses. We have found that AAV2, when it infects the osteosarcoma cells U2OS, can initiate part of its replicative cycle in the absence of helper virus. This does not occur in untransformed cells. We set out to test whether the cellular innate antiviral defenses control this susceptibility and found that, in nonimmune normal human fibroblasts, AAV2 induces type I interferon production and release and the accumulation of nuclear promyelocytic leukemia bodies. AAV fails to mobilize this defense pathway in the U2OS cells. This permissiveness is in large part due to impairment of the viral sensing machinery in these cells. Our investigations point to Toll-like receptor 9 as a potential intracellular sensor that detects AAV2 and triggers the antiviral state in AAV-infected untransformed cells. Efficient sensing of the AAV genome and the ensuing activation of an innate antiviral response are thus crucial cellular events dictating the parvovirus infectivity in host cells.

  15. Humoral Immune Response in Tuberculous Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous pleuritis is a good human model to understand the local and protective immune response against tuberculosis, due to the self-limitedness of the disease. Although the cellular immune response has been well characterised in tuberculous pleurisy, much less is known about the humoral immune response operating at the site of infection. To understand the humoral immune response, B cells were enumerated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMC of tuberculous (TP and non-tuberculous pleuritis patients (NTP. The levels of IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies for PPD, culture filtrate (CF and sonicate antigens (Son Ag were assessed in plasma (BL and pleural fluid (PF and a western blot was carried out with the CF antigen. The percentage of CD19+B-cells was similar in PBMC and PFMC of TP patients but was significantly lower in PFMCs of NTP patients. The IgG levels for PPD and CF antigens were higher in PF of TP than NTP patients. The antigen recognition patterns did not differ in plasma and pleural fluid of the same patient in both groups pointing out the passive diffusion of the plasma to the pleura. The antigens 25, 31, 33, 70, 110, 124 and 132 kDa were recognized exclusively by the TP patients. Thus our study showed that the local humoral response in TP did not differ from the systemic response. However, the humoral response differed in TP patients when compared to NTP patients.

  16. Role of T cell TGF beta signaling in intestinal cytokine responses and helminthic immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonization with helminthic parasites down-regulates inflammation in murine colitis and improves activity scores in human inflammatory bowel disease. Helminths induce mucosal regulatory T cells, which are important for intestinal immunologic homeostasis. Regulatory T cell function involves cytoki...

  17. Memory T-Cell-Mediated Immune Responses Specific to an Alternative Core Protein in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Christine; Parroche, Peggy; Lavergne, Jean Pierre; Duverger, Blandine; Vieux, Claude; Dubois, Valérie; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Trépo, Christian; Gebuhrer, Lucette; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Penin, François; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies have described the synthesis of an alternative reading frame form of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein that was named F protein or ARFP (alternative reading frame protein) and includes a domain coded by the +1 open reading frame of the RNA core coding region. The expression of this protein in HCV-infected patients remains controversial. We have analyzed peripheral blood from 47 chronically or previously HCV-infected patients for the presence of T lymphocytes and antibodies specific to the ARFP. Anti-ARFP antibodies were detected in 41.6% of the patients infected with various HCV genotypes. Using a specific ARFP 99-amino-acid polypeptide as well as four ARFP predicted class I-restricted 9-mer peptides, we show that 20% of the patients display specific lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon, interleukin-10, or both cytokines. Patients harboring three different viral genotypes (1a, 1b, and 3) carried T lymphocytes reactive to genotype 1b-derived peptides. In longitudinal analysis of patients receiving therapy, both core and ARFP-specific T-cell- and B-cell-mediated responses were documented. The magnitude and kinetics of the HCV antigen-specific responses differed and were not linked with viremia or therapy outcome. These observations provide strong and new arguments in favor of the synthesis, during natural HCV infection, of an ARFP derived from the core sequence. Moreover, the present data provide the first demonstration of the presence of T-cell-mediated immune responses directed to this novel HCV antigen. PMID:15367612

  18. CXC chemokine ligand 10 controls viral infection in the central nervous system: evidence for a role in innate immune response through recruitment and activation of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifilo, Matthew J; Montalto-Morrison, Cynthia; Stiles, Linda N; Hurst, Kelley R; Hardison, Jenny L; Manning, Jerry E; Masters, Paul S; Lane, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    How chemokines shape the immune response to viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) has largely been considered within the context of recruitment and activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. However, chemokines are expressed early following viral infection, suggesting an important role in coordinating innate immune responses. Herein, we evaluated the contributions of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in promoting innate defense mechanisms following coronavirus infection of the CNS. Intracerebral infection of RAG1(-/-) mice with a recombinant CXCL10-expressing murine coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus) resulted in protection from disease and increased survival that correlated with a significant increase in recruitment and activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the CNS. Accumulation of NK cells resulted in a reduction in viral titers that was dependent on gamma interferon secretion. These results indicate that CXCL10 expression plays a pivotal role in defense following coronavirus infection of the CNS by enhancing innate immune responses.

  19. Exosomes Isolated from Ascites of T-Cell Lymphoma-Bearing Mice Expressing Surface CD24 and HSP-90 Induce a Tumor-Specific Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menay, Florencia; Herschlik, Leticia; De Toro, Julieta; Cocozza, Federico; Tsacalian, Rodrigo; Gravisaco, María José; Di Sciullo, María Paula; Vendrell, Alejandrina; Waldner, Claudia I.; Mongini, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including endosome-derived nanovesicles (exosomes), are involved in cell–cell communication. Through transfer of their molecular contents, extracellular nanovesicles can alter the function of recipient cells. Due to these characteristics, EVs have shown potential as a new alternative for cancer immunotherapy. Tumor exosomes isolated from malignant ascites can activate dendritic cells, thereby priming the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. However, a suppressive role on tumor immune response has also been reported, suggesting that the neoplastic stage of carcinogenesis and the microenvironment where tumor cells grow may influence the amount of EVs released by the cell. This neoplastic stage and microenvironment may also impact EVs’ components such as proteins and miRNA, determining their biological behavior. Most T-cell lymphomas have an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. Consequently, complementary alternative therapies are needed to improve the survival rates achieved with conventional treatments. In this work, we have characterized EVs isolated from ascites of mice bearing a very aggressive murine T-cell lymphoma and have studied their immunogenic properties. Small EVs were isolated by differential centrifugation, ultrafiltration, and ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g on a sucrose cushion. The EVs were defined as exosomes by their morphology and size analyzed by electron microscopy, their floating density on a sucrose gradient, as well as their expression of endosome marker proteins ALIX, TSG-101; the tetraspanins CD63, CD9, and CD81. In addition, they contain tumor antigens, the marker for malignancy CD24, the heat shock protein HSP-70, and an unusual surface expression of HSP-90 was demonstrated. The administration of EVs isolated from ascites (EVs A) into naïve-syngeneic mice induced both humoral and cellular immune responses that allowed the rejection of subsequent tumor challenges. However

  20. Immune responsiveness in a mouse model of combined adoptive immunotherapy with NK and dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cui

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: NK cells and DCs adoptive immunotherapy targeted the tumor and exhibited improved therapeutic efficacy as compared to that of the cells given alone. This strategy could induce tumorigenic immunological memory and suggests that mixed NK cells and DCs adoptive immunotherapy offers therapeutic options against cancer.

  1. CXCR5-transduced bone marrow-derived dendritic cells traffic to B cell zones of lymph nodes and modify antigen-specific immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Tse; Hwang, Sam T

    2002-05-15

    Skin-derived migratory dendritic cells (DC), in contrast to bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC), express CXCR5, respond to the chemokine CXC ligand 13 (CXCL13) in vitro, and are capable of migrating to B cell zones (BCZ) in lymph nodes (LN) in vivo. Herein, we analyzed the surface phenotype of skin-derived migratory DC and found that 15-35% of MHC class II(high) cells showed high levels of expression of CXCR5 but expressed low levels of DEC205, a suggested characteristic of dermal-type DC in mice. To study the effects of CXCR5 on the trafficking dynamics of DC, we stably expressed CXCR5 in BMDC by retroviral gene transduction. CXCR5 was detected by flow cytometry on transduced cells, which responded to CXCL13 in vitro in chemotaxis assays (3-fold over nontransduced BMDC, p BMDC were observed in BCZ of draining LN. Mice were vaccinated with CXCR5- and vector-BMDC that were pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to induce Ag-specific cellular and humoral immune responses. Mice injected with CXCR5-BMDC (vs vector-BMDC) demonstrated marginally less footpad swelling in response to intradermal injection of KLH. Interestingly, significantly higher levels of KLH-specific IgG (p BMDC compared with mice immunized with vector-transduced BMDC. Thus, CXCR5 is predominantly expressed by dermal-type DC. Moreover, CXCR5 directs BMDC to BCZ of LN in vivo and modifies Ag-specific immune responses induced by BMDC vaccination.

  2. MiR674 inhibits the neuraminidase-stimulated immune response on dendritic cells via down-regulated Mbnl3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Chen, Ya T; Xia, Jing; Yang, Qian

    2016-08-02

    Neuraminidase (NA), a structural protein of the H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV), can facilitate viral invasion of the upper airway by cleaving the sialic acid moieties on mucin. Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells whose immune functions, such as presenting antigens and activating lymphocytes, can be regulated by microRNAs. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of miRNA-induced repression of immune responses in mouse DCs. First, we screened for and verified the miRNAs induced by NA. Then, we showed that, consistent with the H9N2 virus treatment, the viral NA up-regulated the expression of miR-155, miR-674, and miR-499 in DCs; however, unlike H9N2 virus treatment, the presence of NA was associated with reduced expression of miR-181b1. Our results suggest that NA significantly increased DC surface markers CD80 and MHCII and enhanced the ability of activating lymphocytes and secreting cytokines compared with HA, NP and M2. Meanwhile, we found that miR-674 and miR-155 over-expression increased all surface markers of DC. Nevertheless, by inhibiting the expression of miR-674 and miR-155, NA lost the ability to promote DC maturation. Furthermore, we predicted and demonstrated that Pgm2l1, Aldh18a1, Camk1d, and Mbnl3 were the target genes of miR-674. Among them, Mbnl3 interference strongly blocked the mature DCs. Collectively, our data shed new light on the roles of and mechanisms involved in the repression of DCs by miRNAs, which may contribute to efforts to develop a prophylaxis for the influenza virus.

  3. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Basset

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (restimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP, the adjuvant (LT-R192G or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  4. Innate immune sensing and response to influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulendran, Bali; Maddur, Mohan S

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a substantial threat to human and animal health worldwide. Recent studies in mouse models have revealed an indispensable role for the innate immune system in defense against influenza virus. Recognition of the virus by innate immune receptors in a multitude of cell types activates intricate signaling networks, functioning to restrict viral replication. Downstream effector mechanisms include activation of innate immune cells and, induction and regulation of adaptive immunity. However, uncontrolled innate responses are associated with exaggerated disease, especially in pandemic influenza virus infection. Despite advances in the understanding of innate response to influenza in the mouse model, there is a large knowledge gap in humans, particularly in immunocompromised groups such as infants and the elderly. We propose here, the need for further studies in humans to decipher the role of innate immunity to influenza virus, particularly at the site of infection. These studies will complement the existing work in mice and facilitate the quest to design improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies against influenza.

  5. Regulatory T-cells have a prominent role in the immune modulated vaccine response by specific oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Land, Belinda; Schijf, Marcel; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Schouten, Bastiaan; Boon, Louis; Garssen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells are increasingly important in vaccine strategies. In a Flu-vaccination model the role of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and the immune modulation by orally supplied prebiotic oligosaccharides consisting of scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS, were assessed using anti-CD25 (PC61) me

  6. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Reza Khosravi; David J Erle

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote ...

  7. Cellular Immune Responses for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen Recognized by T Cells 3 in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Arai, Kuniaki; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Fushimi, Kazumi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Kazutoshi; Terashima, Takeshi; Kitahara, Masaaki; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells 3 (SART3), a tumor-associated antigen expressed in many cancers, functions in tumor rejection. In this study, we investigated its usefulness as an immunotherapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods The expression of SART3 in hepatoma cell lines and HCC tissues was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses. Two peptides derived from SART3 (SART3109 and SART3315) were used for immunological analysis. T-cell responses were investigated by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 47 patients, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in 8 of 47 patients with HCC. The safety of immunotherapy using a SART3-derived peptide was investigated by vaccinations of SART3109 in 12 patients with HCC (trial registration: UMIN000005677). Results The immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses showed that SART3 was expressed in six HCC cell lines, and in HCC tissues including of alpha-fetoprotein-negative individuals. SART3-specific CTLs were generated by stimulating PBMCs with the peptides, and they showed cytotoxicity against HCC cells expressing the protein. Of the 47 HCC patients, 25.5% and 10.6% showed significant responses to SART3109 and SART3315, respectively. The infiltration of SART3109-specific IFN-γ-producing CTLs into the tumor site was confirmed. In the vaccination study, no severe adverse events were observed, and the peptide-specific CTLs were newly induced in four of five patients tested. Conclusions SART3 is an immunotherapeutic candidate, and peptides from this antigen may be applied in HCC immunotherapy. Trial Registration UMIN000005677 PMID:28114424

  8. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  9. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  10. Lichenoid reaction as a potential immune response marker of intratreatment histological response during successful vismodegib treatment for a giant basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosko, Scott W; Chu, Melinda B; Mattox, Adam R; Richart, John M; Burkemper, Nicole M; Slutsky, Jordan B

    2015-01-01

    We report an 83 year-old patient with a 13 × 7.5 cm(2) basal cell carcinoma (BCC) successfully treated with the combination of vismodegib and minimal surgery. On Day 109, a 0.9 cm papule suspicious for residual BCC was seen centrally within a large pink atrophic plaque. This lesion was excised; pathology confirmed BCC with negative surgical margins. Simultaneously, suspecting noncontiguous histologic response, we performed 21 biopsies at the periphery of the pretreatment tumor location. Seventeen (17/21, 81%) revealed lichenoid dermatitis. No tumor was seen on any. We believe the lichenoid dermatitis observed is a novel finding for two reasons. First, it may be considered a marker of a positive intratreatment response. This may help guide clinicians on the optimal treatment duration of vismodegib to maximize efficacy and mitigate side effects. Second, we think it suggests an additional mechanism of vismodegib action, possibly via local immune effects. Further investigations are warranted.

  11. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids on the structure and immune response of IPEC-J2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vallespín, B; Vahjen, W; Zentek, J

    2016-10-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) have been suggested as an alternative to the use of antibiotics in animal nutrition with promising results. First, we studied the sensitivity of Salmonella Enteritidis and an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain against caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. A porcine in vitro model using the porcine cell line IPEC-J2 was used to test the effects of MCFAs on structural and immunological traits without and with a concomitant challenge with E. coli or S. Enteritidis. The three MCFAs exerted an inhibitory effect on bacterial growth, stronger for C12 than C8 or C10, S. Enteritidis being more sensitive than the E. coli strain. Flow cytometry showed a numeric concentration dependent increase in the adhesion of E. coli or S. Enteritidis to IPEC-J2 cells. Measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance after bacterial challenge showed negative effects of all MCFAs on IPEC-J2 cells at the highest concentrations. Immune parameters were affected by C8, since a concentration dependent effect starting at 5 mM was observed for mRNA expression of IL-6 and TLR-4 (up-regulated) and IL-8 (down-regulated). TLR-4 was up-regulated with C10 at 2 and 5 mM. The three MCFAs affected also the epithelial morphology through down-regulation of Occludin and up-regulation of Claudin-4 expression. In conclusion, the three MCFAs under study influenced bacterial growth rates and modified the gene expression to a different degree in the cell line IPEC-J2 but the effect on the morphological structure and response of the cells after bacterial challenge could not be assessed. Although these tests show a prior estimation of MCFAs effects in intestinal epithelium, in vivo confirmation is still needed.

  12. [Immune response to influenza vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I; Corral, J; Arranz, A; Foruria, A; Landa, V; Lejarza, J R; Marijuán, L; Martínez, J M

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigated the level of immunity of the population against three strains of the influenza virus (A Chile/1/83 -A Philippines/2/82 and B URSS/100/83) before and three months after vaccination, and the immune response to whole virus vaccine as compared with fragmented virus vaccine. A high percentage of the population had titers greater than or equal to 1/10 before vaccination for the Chile (54%) and Philippines (65.7%) strains, while titers against the URSS strain were lower (25.4%). There was a definitive increase in antibody titer in the vaccinated population, although it was lower than expected. The overall response to both vaccines, with protecting titers greater than or equal to 1/40 after vaccination was 65.2% for the Chile strain, 74.6% for the Philippines strain, and 15% for the URSS strain. No differences in the overall immune response were found between the groups vaccinated with whole and fragmented virus.

  13. Efficient induction of anti-tumor immune response in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma via dendritic cells expressing MAGE-A3 and CALR antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinli; Song, Na; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yang; Li, JiJia; Ding, Jianqiao; Tong, Zhuang

    2015-06-01

    Despite advances in the various treatment options for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), its prognosis is still very poor with a 5-year survival rate of only 14-22%. Recently, among the various therapeutic approaches, the focus has shifted to immunotherapy, specifically immunotherapy involving dendritic cells (DCs), which depends on their maturation and antigen presentation to effector immune cells. Recent studies have suggested that melanoma-associated antigen 3 (MAGE-A3) is a potential immunotherapeutic target and also a candidate for the development of an anti-tumor vaccine. Calreticulin (CALR) has been shown to support induction of DC maturation. Therefore, in this study, we overexpressed MAGE-A3 and CALR on DCs and studied their potential to generate anti-tumor immune responses. We observed that adenovirus (Ad)-infected DCs overexpressing CALR and MAGE-A3 showed enhanced expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR markers. Also, these DCs secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-12, which induces the T helper type 1 cell (Th1) response, and a lower level of IL-10, a negative regulator of the Th1 response. Furthermore, CALR/MAGE-A3-infected DCs stimulated CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in turn secreted higher levels of interferon-γ, which induced cytotoxic effects on ESCC cells expressing MAGE-A3. In conclusion, our results revealed the potential of CALR/MAGE-A3-infected DCs to elicit a MAGE-A3-specific anti-tumor immunogenic response in ESCC. This proof-of-principle study may promote the future design and development of DC-based effective immunotherapy against ESCC.

  14. Modulation of the cellular immune response during Plasmodium falciparum infections in sickle cell trait individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Theander, T G; Abdulhadi, N H

    1992-01-01

    Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from P. falciparum-infected individuals with and without the sickle cell trait at diagnosis and 7 days after treatment. HbAA and HbAS patients were compared for levels of plasma soluble IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) and the in vitro...

  15. Lipoxin A₄ modulates adaptive immunity by decreasing memory B-cell responses via an ALX/FPR2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Serhan, Charles N; Phipps, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Specialized proresolving mediators are endogenous bioactive lipid molecules that play a fundamental role in the regulation of inflammation and its resolution. Lipoxins and other specialized proresolving mediators have been identified in important immunological tissues including bone marrow, spleen, and blood. Lipoxins regulate functions of the innate immune system including the promotion of monocyte recruitment and increase macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A major knowledge gap is whether lipoxins influence adaptive immune cells. Here, we analyzed the actions of lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and its receptor ALX/FPR2 on human and mouse B cells. LXA₄ decreased IgM and IgG production on activated human B cells through ALX/FPR2-dependent signaling, which downregulated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. LXA₄ also inhibited human memory B-cell antibody production and proliferation, but not naïve B-cell function. Lastly, LXA₄ decreased antigen-specific antibody production in an OVA immunization mouse model. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the actions of lipoxins on human B cells, demonstrating a link between resolution signals and adaptive immunity. Regulating antibody production is crucial to prevent unwanted inflammation. Harnessing the ability of lipoxins to decrease memory B-cell antibody production can be beneficial to threat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.

  16. Histological Architecture Underlying Brain–Immune Cell–Cell Interactions and the Cerebral Response to Systemic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is now known to actively interact with the immune system under non-inflammatory conditions, the site of cell–cell interactions between brain parenchymal cells and immune cells has been an open question until recently. Studies by our and other groups have indicated that brain structures such as the leptomeninges, choroid plexus stroma and epithelium, attachments of choroid plexus, vascular endothelial cells, cells of the perivascular space, circumventricular organs, and astrocytic endfeet construct the histological architecture that provides a location for intercellular interactions between bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage cells and brain parenchymal cells under non-inflammatory conditions. This architecture also functions as the interface between the brain and the immune system, through which systemic inflammation-induced molecular events can be relayed to the brain parenchyma at early stages of systemic inflammation during which the blood–brain barrier is relatively preserved. Although brain microglia are well known to be activated by systemic inflammation, the mechanism by which systemic inflammatory challenge and microglial activation are connected has not been well documented. Perturbed brain–immune interaction underlies a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including ischemic brain injury, status epilepticus, repeated social defeat, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Proinflammatory status associated with cytokine imbalance is involved in autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and depression. In this article, we propose a mechanism connecting systemic inflammation, brain–immune interface cells, and brain parenchymal cells and discuss the relevance of basic studies of the mechanism to neurological disorders with a special emphasis on sepsis-associated encephalopathy and preterm brain injury. PMID:28154566

  17. Study on the immune responses against pancreatic cancer induced by mucin 4 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA co-transfected dendritic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-tumor immune response induced by human pancreatic cancer mucin 4mRNA and human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT)mRNA cotransfected dendritic cells(DC),and to provide the experimental evidences for the treatment of pancreatic cancer with multi-epitope loaded DC vaccine.Methods DC were isolated from peripheral DC.

  18. Levamisole promotes murine bone marrow derived dendritic cell activation and drives Th1 immune response in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yubing; Wang, Ting; Xiu, Lei; Shi, Xiaojie; Bian, Ziyao; Zhang, Yongli; Ruhan, A; Wang, Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Our lab previously found that levamisole (LMS) as an adjuvant enhanced the efficacy of vaccine against infectious pathogens. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. In this study, we showed that BALB/c bone marrow-derived DC stimulated with LMS resulted in enhanced cell-surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHC class II, as well as enhanced production of IL-12p70, TNF-α and IL-1β. Interestingly, the LMS activated DCs were able to stimulate CD4(+) T cell proliferation and facilitated Th1 differentiation by increasing the secretion of IFN-γ in an allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction. Furthermore, to confirm the in vitro data, we investigated the effect of LMS on antigen-specific antibody and cytokine production in BALB/c mice. Immunization with LMS plus OVA showed that anti-OVA IgG2a and IFN-γ were increased significantly compared with OVA alone in BALB/c mice. In conclusion, our results suggested that murine bone marrow-derived DC, played a crucial role in the effect of LMS on the induction of Th1 responses, which probably was due to its ability to promote DC maturation and secrete proinflammatory cytokines.

  19. Strong innate immune response and cell death in chicken splenocytes infected with genotype VIId Newcastle disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zenglei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotype VIId Newcastle disease virus (NDV isolates induce more severe damage to lymphoid tissues, especially to the spleen, when compared to virulent viruses of other genotypes. However, the biological basis of the unusual pathological changes remains largely unknown. Methods Virus replication, cytokine gene expression profile and cell death response in chicken splenocytes infected with two genotype VIId NDV strains (JS5/05 and JS3/05, genotype IX NDV strain F48E8 and genotype IV NDV strain Herts/33 were evaluated. Statistical significance of differences between experimental groups was determined using the Independent-Samples T test. Results JS5/05 and JS3/05 caused hyperinduction of type I interferons (IFNs (IFN-α and -β during detection period compared to F48E8 and Herts/33. JS5/05 increased expression level of IFN-γ gene at 6 h post-inoculation (pi and JS3/05 initiated sustained activation of IFN-γ within 24 h pi, whereas transcriptional levels of IFN-γ remained unchanged at any of the time points during infection of F48E8 and Herts/33. In addition, compared to F48E8 and Herts/33, JS3/05 and JS5/05 significantly increased the amount of free nucleosomal DNA in splenocytes at 6 and 24 h pi respectively. Annexin-V and Proidium iodid (PI double staining of infected cells showed that cell death induced by JS3/05 and JS5/05 was characterized by marked necrosis compared to F48E8 and Herts/33 at 24 h pi. These results indicate that genotype VIId NDV strains JS3/05 and JS5/05 elicited stronger innate immune and cell death responses in chicken splenocytes than F48E8 and Herts/33. JS5/05 replicated at a significantly higher efficiency in splenocytes than F48E8 and Herts/33. Early excessive cell death induced by JS3/05 infection partially impaired virus replication. Conclusions Viral dysregulaiton of host response may be relevant to the severe pathological manifestation in the spleen following genotype VIId NDV infection.

  20. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  1. Immune and inflammatory responses in TNF alpha-deficient mice: a critical requirement for TNF alpha in the formation of primary B cell follicles, follicular dendritic cell networks and germinal centers, and in the maturation of the humoral immune response

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the role of TNF alpha in the development of in vivo immune response we have generated TNF alpha-deficient mice by gene targeting. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and fertile, develop lymph nodes and Peyer's patches and show no apparent phenotypic abnormalities, indicating that TNF alpha is not required for normal mouse development. In the absence of TNF alpha mice readily succumb to L. monocytogenes infections and show reduced contact hypersensitivity responses. Furthermore, ...

  2. CD8 T cells in innate immune responses: using STAT4-dependent but antigen-independent pathways to gamma interferon during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ramirez, Jenny E; Tarrio, Margarite L; Kim, Kwangsin; Demers, Delia A; Biron, Christine A

    2014-10-21

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ), with antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions, can be produced by T cells following stimulation through their T cell receptors (TCRs) for antigen. The innate cytokines type 1 IFNs and interleukin-12 (IL-12) can also stimulate IFN-γ production by natural killer (NK) but not naive T cells. High basal expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4), used by type 1 IFN and IL-12 to induce IFN-γ as well as CD25, contributes to the NK cell responses. During acute viral infections, antigen-specific CD8 T cells are stimulated to express elevated STAT4 and respond to the innate factors with IFN-γ production. Little is known about the requirements for cytokine compared to TCR stimulation. Primary infections of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) demonstrated that although the elicited antigen-specific CD8 T cells acquired STAT4-dependent innate cytokine responsiveness for IFN-γ and CD25 induction ex vivo, TCR stimulation induced these through STAT4-independent pathways. During secondary infections, LCMV-immune CD8 T cells had STAT4-dependent IFN-γ expression at times of innate cytokine induction but subsequently expanded through STAT4-independent pathways. At times of innate cytokine responses during infection with the antigen-distinct murine cytomegalovirus virus (MCMV), NK and LCMV-immune CD8 T cells both had activation of pSTAT4 and IFN-γ. The T cell IFN-γ response was STAT4 and IL-12 dependent, but antigen-dependent expansion was absent. By dissecting requirements for STAT4 and antigen, this work provides novel insights into the endogenous regulation of cytokine and proliferative responses and demonstrates conditioning of innate immunity by experience. Importance: Understanding the regulation and function of adaptive immunity is key to the development of new and improved vaccines. Its CD8 T cells are activated through antigen-specific receptors to contribute to long

  3. Stochastic optimal therapy for enhanced immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Robert F; Ghigliazza, Raffaele

    2004-10-01

    Therapeutic enhancement of humoral immune response to microbial attack is addressed as the stochastic optimal control of a dynamic system. Without therapy, the modeled immune response depends upon the initial concentration of pathogens in a simulated attack. Immune response can be augmented by agents that kill the pathogen directly, that stimulate the production of plasma cells or antibodies, or that enhance organ health. Using a generic mathematical model of immune response to the infection (i.e., of the dynamic state of the system), previous papers demonstrated optimal (open-loop) and neighboring-optimal (closed-loop) control solutions that defeat the pathogen and preserve organ health, given initial conditions that otherwise would be lethal [Optimal Contr. Appl. Methods 23 (2002) 91, Bioinformatics 18 (2002) 1227]. Therapies based on separate and combined application of the agents were derived by minimizing a quadratic cost function that weighted both system response and drug usage, providing implicit control over harmful side effects. Here, we focus on the effects that corrupted or incomplete measurements of the dynamic state may have on neighboring-optimal feedback control. Imperfect measurements degrade the precision of feedback adjustments to therapy; however, optimal state estimation allows the feedback strategy to be implemented with incomplete measurements and minimizes the expected effects of measurement error. Complete observability of the perturbed state for this four state example is provided by measurement of four of the six possible pairs of two variables, either set of three variables, or all four variables. The inclusion of state estimation extends the applicability of optimal control theory for developing new therapeutic protocols to enhance immune response.

  4. Dual Pressure from Antiretroviral Therapy and Cell-Mediated Immune Response on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Annika C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Barbour, Jason D.; Heiken, Brandon D.; Younger, Sophie R.; Hoh, Rebecca; Lane, Meghan; Sällberg, Matti; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Demarest, James F.; Liegler, Teri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte pressure can lead to the development of viral escape mutants, with consequent loss of immune control. Antiretroviral drugs also exert selection pressures on HIV, leading to the emergence of drug resistance mutations and increased levels of viral replication. We have determined a minimal epitope of HIV protease, amino acids 76 to 84, towards which a CD8+ T-lymphocyte response is directed. This epitope, which is HLA-A2 restricted, includes two amino acids that commonly mutate (V82A and I84V) in the face of protease inhibitor therapy. Among 29 HIV-infected patients who were treated with protease inhibitors and who had developed resistance to these drugs, we show that the wild-type PR82V76-84 epitope is commonly recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in HLA-A2-positive patients and that the CTL directed to this epitope are of high avidity. In contrast, the mutant PR82A76-84 epitope is generally not recognized by wild-type-specific CTL, or when recognized it is of low to moderate avidity, suggesting that the protease inhibitor-selected V82A mutation acts both as a CTL and protease inhibitor escape mutant. Paradoxically, the absence of a mutation at position 82 was associated with the presence of a high-avidity CD8+ T-cell response to the wild-type virus sequence. Our results indicate that both HIV type 1-specific CD8+ T cells and antiretroviral drugs provide complex pressures on the same amino acid sequence of the HIV protease gene and, thus, can influence viral sequence evolution. PMID:12767994

  5. MicroRNAs in inflammation and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J; Rao, D S

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression in the immune system. In a few short years, their mechanism of action has been described in various cell lineages within the immune system, targets have been defined and their unique contributions to immune cell function have been examined. Certain miRNAs serve in important negative feedback loops in the immune system, whereas others serve to amplify the response of the immune system by repressing inhibitors of the response. Here, we review some of the better understood mechanisms as well as some emerging concepts of miRNA function. Future work will likely involve defining the function of specific miRNAs in specific immune cell lineages and to utilize them in the design of therapeutic strategies for diseases involving the immune system.

  6. Cell-mediated immune response to Leishmania chagasi experimental infection of BALB/c immunosuppressed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, presents a significant impact on immunosupressed patients. This study aimed to evaluate Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. Spleen cells stimulated or not with L. chagasi were cultured for cytokine quantification (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 by sandwich ELISA. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were determined by means of culture microtitration. Immunosuppressed groups showed statistically lower spleen weight and CD4-cell percentage in blood on the day of infection and produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines on other days of the study. The other infected groups, weather immunosupressed or not, also produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were not statistically different among the groups. It was concluded that L. chagasi infection was not affected by dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression, probably due the reversible effect of the treatment.

  7. Strategy for eliciting antigen-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a cryptic CTL epitope of merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Bianca P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a relatively new addition to the expanding category of oncovirus-induced cancers. Although still comparably rare, the number of cases has risen dramatically in recent years. Further complicating this trend is that MCC is an extremely aggressive neoplasm with poor patient prognosis and limited treatment options for advanced disease. The causative agent of MCC has been identified as the merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. The MCPyV-encoded large T (LT antigen is an oncoprotein that is theorized to be essential for virus-mediated tumorigenesis and is therefore, an excellent MCC antigen for the generation of antitumor immune responses. As a foreign antigen, the LT oncoprotein avoids the obstacle of immune tolerance, which normally impedes the development of antitumor immunity. Ergo, it is an excellent target for anti-MCC immunotherapy. Since tumor-specific CD8+ T cells lead to better prognosis for MCC and numerous other cancers, we have generated a DNA vaccine that is capable of eliciting LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-CRT/LT encodes the LT antigen linked to a damage-associated molecular pattern, calreticulin (CRT, as it has been demonstrated that the linkage of CRT to antigens promotes the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Results The present study shows that DNA vaccine-induced generation of LT-specific CD8+ T cells is augmented by linking CRT to the LT antigen. This is relevant since the therapeutic effects of the pcDNA3-CRT/LT DNA vaccine is mediated by LT-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine produced demonstrably more LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine was also able to confer LT-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated protective and therapeutic effects to prolong the survival of mice with LT-expressing tumors. In the interest of determining the LT epitope which most MCC-specific CD8+ T cells recognize, we identified the amino acid sequence of the

  8. Syngeneic immune response to rat tracheal epithelial cells transformed in vitro by N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braslawsky, G.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Steele, V.; Kennel, S.J.; Nettesheim, P.

    1981-01-01

    Two cell lines (2-10-1 and 8-10-2) derived by exposure of primary tracheal explants to MNNG in vitro were not tumorigenic in syngeneic F-334 rats or athymic BALb/c (nu/nu) mice at early passage, but became tumorigenic at late passage. These cell lines are therefore suited to study the expression of neoantigens during neoplastic development. Transplantation resistance to late-passage, tumorigenic cells was induced in syngeneic rats using an immunization protocol of repeated cell inoculation and tumour ablation. Spleen cells from such animals were reactive in 20h microcytotoxicity assays against neoplastic cell lines, but unreactive to normal tracheal epithelial cells. Similarly, immune spleen cells co-cultivated in vitro for 6 days with irradiated neoplastic cell lines before assay for microcytotoxicity were strongly reactive, whereas co-cultivation with normal epithelial cells did not stimulate reactivity. Antibody to these neoplastic cell lines was demonstrated in sera of tumor-resistant rats by an indirect radiolabelled-antibody binding test and by indirect immunofluorescence. There was no significant binding to normal tracheal epithelial cell outgrowths.

  9. Morbidity from malaria and immune responses to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with sickle cell trait in The Gambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, S J; Bennett, S; Riley, E M

    1993-01-01

    Morbidity from Plasmodium falciparum malaria and humoral and in vitro cellular immune responses to defined malaria antigens were measured in rural Gambian children with haemoglobin phenotype AS (HbAS) and in those with a normal haemoglobin (HbAA). In a survey undertaken during the dry season, HbA...

  10. Modeling and analysis of innate immune responses induced by the host cells against hepatitis C virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obaid, Ayesha; Ahmad, Jamil; Naz, Anam; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Anjum, Sadia; Raza, Abida; Baumbach, Jan; Ali, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of complex systems such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and host immunomodulatory response is an open challenge for biologists. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in immune evasion by HCV, we present a simplified formalization of the highly dynamic system c

  11. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a pro

  12. Hantaan virus infection induces both Th1 and ThGranzyme B+ cell immune responses that associated with viral control and clinical outcome in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses infection causing severe emerging diseases with high mortality rates in humans has become public health concern globally. The potential roles of CD4(+T cells in viral control have been extensively studied. However, the contribution of CD4(+T cells to the host response against Hantaan virus (HTNV infection remains unclear. Here, based on the T-cell epitopes mapped on HTNV glycoprotein, we studied the effects and characteristics of CD4(+T-cell responses in determining the outcome of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. A total of 79 novel 15-mer T-cell epitopes on the HTNV glycoprotein were identified, among which 20 peptides were dominant target epitopes. Importantly, we showed the presence of both effective Th1 responses with polyfunctional cytokine secretion and ThGranzyme B(+ cell responses with cytotoxic mediators production against HTNV infection. The HTNV glycoprotein-specific CD4(+T-cell responses inversely correlated with the plasma HTNV RNA load in patients. Individuals with milder disease outcomes showed broader epitopes targeted and stronger CD4(+T-cell responses against HTNV glycoproteins compared with more severe patients. The CD4(+T cells characterized by broader antigenic repertoire, stronger polyfunctional responses, better expansion capacity and highly differentiated effector memory phenotype(CD27-CD28-CCR7-CD45RA-CD127(hi would elicit greater defense against HTNV infection and lead to much milder outcome of the disease. The host defense mediated by CD4(+T cells may through the inducing antiviral condition of the host cells and cytotoxic effect of ThGranzyme B+ cells. Thus, these findings highlight the efforts of CD4(+T-cell immunity to HTNV control and provide crucial information to better understand the immune defense against HTNV infection.

  13. Identification of genetic loci in Lactobacillus plantarum that modulate the immune response of dendritic cells using comparative genome hybridization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Hemert, S. van; Taverne, N.; Wels, M.W.W.; Vos, P. de; Bron, P.A.; Savelkoul, H.F.; Bilsen, J. van; Kleerebezem, M.; Wells, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial mucosal immunomodulatory effects. Beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotics have been established in the treatment and prevention of various intestinal

  14. Identification of genetic loci in Lactobacillus plantarum that modulate the immune response of dendritic cells using comparative genome hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Hemert, S. van; Taverne, N.; Wels, M.; Vos, P. de; Bron, P.A.; Savelkoul, H.F.; Bilsen, J. van; Kleerebezem, M.; Wells, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial mucosal immunomodulatory effects. Beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotics have been established in the treatment and prevention of various intestinal

  15. Burn Wound gammadelta T-Cells Support a Th2 and Th17 Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    MC. Biologic therapies in clinical development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Clin Rheumatol 2005;11(3 Suppl):S45–54. 25. Kupetsky EA...Mathers AR, Ferris LK. Anti-cytokine therapy in the treatment of psoriasis . Cytokine 2013;61:704–12. 26. Greenblatt MB, Vrbanac V, Vbranac V, et al...disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), psoriasis , and graft vs host disease.24–27 Gamma-δ T-cells are functionally specialized and are involved in

  16. Chronic active hepatitis induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr mouse is associated with a Th1 cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whary, M T; Morgan, T J; Dangler, C A; Gaudes, K J; Taylor, N S; Fox, J G

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-gamma in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter.

  17. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) shapes both innate and CD8(+) T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, James D; Daffis, Stephane; Lazear, Helen M; Cho, Hyelim; Suthar, Mehul S; Gale, Michael; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN)-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/-) mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV) infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/-) cells and mice. IRF-1(-/-) mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/-) macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/-) fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+) T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+) T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/-) mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+) T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response.

  18. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  19. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  20. Ovine model for studying pulmonary immune responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.

    1984-11-25

    Anatomical features of the sheep lung make it an excellent model for studying pulmonary immunity. Four specific lung segments were identified which drain exclusively to three separate lymph nodes. One of these segments, the dorsal basal segment of the right lung, is drained by the caudal mediastinal lymph node (CMLN). Cannulation of the efferent lymph duct of the CMLN along with highly localized intrabronchial instillation of antigen provides a functional unit with which to study factors involved in development of pulmonary immune responses. Following intrabronchial immunization there was an increased output of lymphoblasts and specific antibody-forming cells in efferent CMLN lymph. Continuous divergence of efferent lymph eliminated the serum antibody response but did not totally eliminate the appearance of specific antibody in fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. In these studies localized immunization of the right cranial lobe served as a control. Efferent lymphoblasts produced in response to intrabronchial antigen were labeled with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine and their migrational patterns and tissue distribution compared to lymphoblasts obtained from the thoracic duct. The results indicated that pulmonary immunoblasts tend to relocate in lung tissue and reappear with a higher specific activity in pulmonary lymph than in thoracic duct lymph. The reverse was observed with labeled intestinal lymphoblasts. 35 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Syngeneic immune response to rat tracheal epithelial cells transformed in vitro by N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Braslawsky, G. R.; Steele, V.; Kennel, S. J.; Nettesheim, P.

    1981-01-01

    Two cell lines (2-10-1 and 8-10-2) derived by exposure to primary tracheal explants to MNNG in vitro were not tumorigenic in syngeneic F-344 rats or athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice at early passage, but became tumorigenic at late passage. These cell lines are therefore suited to study the expression of neoantigens during neoplastic development. Transplantation resistance to late-passage, tumorigenic cells was indicated in syngeneic rats using an immunization protocol of repeated cell inoculation ...

  2. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura De Simone

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in

  3. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  4. ADARs and the Balance Game between Virus Infection and Innate Immune Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Sara; Galeano, Federica; Locatelli, Franco; Gallo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    All viruses that have dsRNA structures at any stages of their life cycle may potentially undergo RNA editing events mediated by the ADAR enzymes. Indeed, an increasing number of studies that describe A-to-I sequence changes in viral genomes and/or transcripts, consistent with ADAR deaminase activity, are reported. These modifications can appear either as hyperediting during persistent viral infections or as specific RNA editing events in viral dsRNAs. It is now well established that ADAR enzymes can affect viruses and viral interaction with the host cell in both an editing-dependent and -independent manner, with ADARs acting as pro- or anti-viral factors. Despite the discovery of editing events on viral RNAs dates back to thirty years ago, the biological consequences of A-to-I changes during viral infection is still far to be completely elucidated. In this review, past and recent studies on the importance of ADAR enzymes on several viruses will be examined.

  5. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  6. Cellular immune responses to respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    When a respiratory virus successfully infects the lungs, cascades of immune responses are initiated aimed to remove the pathogen. Immediate non-specific protection is provided by the innate immune system and this reduces the viral load during the first days of infection. The adaptive immune response

  7. OMOLOGICAL AND HETEROLOGICAL ANTIBODY AND T CELL IMMUNE RESPONSES TO LIVE ATTENUATED INFLUENZA VACCINE A (H5N2 AND A (H7N3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Naykhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From the beginning of 21th century outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian flu are registered from time to time. These viruses are considered as one of the possible causes of the next pandemia. The development of avian influenza vaccines is one of the WHO priorities. The aim of this work was to study antibody and cellular immune responses to avian A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs. We examined serum antibodies (HAI assay, microneutralization assay, ELISA, local antibodies (ELISA and virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ central memory and effector memory T cells. Two doses vaccination of healthy volunteers with A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 LAIVs induced homological antibody and cellular immune responses (i. e. serum and local antibody conversions, virus-specific memory T cell growth. These vaccines also stimulated heterological immunity (heterological serum and local antibodies and T cells. Heterological immune response intensity depended on antigenic structure of vaccine strain and heterological virus, particularly on HA type. 

  8. Modeling and analysis of innate immune responses induced by the host cells against hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Ayesha; Ahmad, Jamil; Naz, Anam; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Anjum, Sadia; Raza, Abida; Baumbach, Jan; Ali, Amjad

    2015-05-01

    An in-depth understanding of complex systems such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and host immunomodulatory response is an open challenge for biologists. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in immune evasion by HCV, we present a simplified formalization of the highly dynamic system consisting of HCV, its replication cycle and host immune responses at the cellular level using hybrid Petri net (HPN). The approach followed in this study comprises of step wise simulation, model validation and analysis of host immune response. This study was performed with an objective of making correlations among viral RNA levels, interferon (IFN) production and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) induction. The results correlate with the biological data verifying that the model is very useful in predicting the dynamic behavior of the signaling proteins in response to a stimulus. This study implicates that HCV infection is dependent upon several key factors of the host immune response. The effect of host proteins on limiting viral infection is effectively overruled by the viral pathogen. This study also analyzes activity levels of RNase L, miR-122, IFN, ISGs and PKR induction and inhibition of TLR3/RIG1 mediated pathways in response to targeted manipulation in the presence of HCV. The results are in complete agreement at the time of writing with the published expression studies and western blot experiments. Our model also provides some biological insights regarding the role of PKR in the acute infection of HCV. It might help to explain why many patients fail to clear acute HCV infection while others, with low ISG basal levels, clear HCV spontaneously. The described methodology can easily be reproduced, which suitably supports the study of other viral infections in a formal, automated and expressive manner. The Petri net-based modeling approach applied here may provide valuable insights for study design and analyses to evaluate other disease associated integrated pathways

  9. CD4+ T-cell loss and delayed expression of modulators of immune responses at mucosal sites of vaccinated macaques following SIV(mac251) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, M; Boasso, A; Ma, Z-M; Cecchinato, V; Venzon, D; Doster, M N; Tsai, W P; Shearer, G M; Fuchs, D; Felber, B K; Pavlakis, G N; Miller, C J; Franchini, G

    2008-11-01

    Systemic immunization of macaques with a combination of DNA-poxvirus-based vaccines confers protection from high level of both systemic and mucosal viral replication following rectal exposure to the pathogenic SIV(mac251). Here we investigated early post-infection events in rectal and vaginal tissues, and found that the loss of CCR5+CD4+ T cells was equivalent in vaccinated and control macaques, despite a three logs reduction at mucosal sites of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA in the vaccinated group. Even though a normal CD4+ T cell number is not reconstituted at mucosal sites in either group, vaccination appeared to confer a better preservation of the CD4+ CCR5+ T cells that replenish these sites. Analysis of rectal tissues RNA following challenge exposure demonstrated a decreased expression in vaccinated macaques of transforming growth factor-beta, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, FoxP3, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an immune suppressive enzyme expressed by dendritic cells that converts tryptophan to kynurenine and limits T-cell responses. Accordingly, the ratio of kynurenine and tryptophan in the plasma was significantly reduced in the vaccinated animals respect to the controls. Thus, preexisting adaptive immune responses induced by these vaccine modalities, although they do not protect from CD4+ T-cell depletion, nevertheless, they contain SIV(mac251) replication and delay expression of markers of T-cell activation and/or suppression at mucosal sites.

  10. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory......Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector...... immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells...

  11. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  12. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency.

  13. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Melo, Sandrine; Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Ramé, Christelle; Olivier, Michel; Soubieux, Denis; Marc, Daniel; Simon, Gaëlle; Herrler, Georg; Berri, Mustapha; Dupont, Joëlle; Meurens, François

    2014-04-09

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells - NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection.

  14. Anti-CD20 as the B cells targeting agent in the combined therapy to modulate anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A inhibitor mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien eLiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibody formation against transgene products can represent a major complication following gene therapy with treatment of genetic diseases, such as hemophilia A. Although successful approaches have been developed to prevent the formation of anti-factor VIII (FVIII antibodies, innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses in FVIII-primed subjects are still lacking. Anti-FVIII neutralizing antibodies circulate for long periods in part due to persistence of memory B cells. Anti-CD20 targets a variety of B cells (pre-B cells to mature/memory cells; therefore, we investigated the impact of B cell depletion on anti-FVIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice using anti-CD20 combined with regulatory T (Treg cell expansion using IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin. We found that anti-CD20 alone can partially modulate anti-FVIII immune responses in both unprimed and FVIII-primed hemophilia A mice. Moreover, in mice treated with anti-CD20 + IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + rapamycin + FVIII, anti-FVIII antibody titers were significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with regimens targeting only B or T cells. In addition, titers remained low after a second challenge with FVIII plasmid . Treg cells and activation markers were transiently and significantly increased in the groups treated with IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes ; however,significant B cell depletion was obtained in anti-CD20-treated groups. Importantly, both FVIII-specific antibody-secreting cells and memory B cells were significantly reduced in mice treated with combination therapy. This study demonstrates that a combination regimen is highly promising as a treatment option for modulating anti-FVIII antibodies and facilitating induction of long-term tolerance to FVIII in hemophilia A mice.

  15. Innate Response to Human Cancer Cells with or without IL-2 Receptor Common γ-Chain Function in NOD Background Mice Lacking Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishime, Chiyoko; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Katano, Ikumi; Monnai, Makoto; Goda, Nobuhito; Mizushima, Tomoko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masato; Murata, Mitsuru; Suematsu, Makoto; Wakui, Masatoshi

    2015-08-15

    Immunodeficient hosts exhibit high acceptance of xenogeneic or neoplastic cells mainly due to lack of adaptive immunity, although it still remains to be elucidated how innate response affects the engraftment. IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγc) signaling is required for development of NK cells and a subset of dendritic cells producing IFN-γ. To better understand innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, we examined amounts of metastatic foci in the livers after intrasplenic transfer of human colon cancer HCT116 cells into NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc (null) (NOG) hosts. The intravital microscopic imaging of livers in the hosts depleted of NK cells and/or macrophages revealed that IL-2Rγc function critically contributes to elimination of cancer cells without the need for NK cells and macrophages. In the absence of IL-2Rγc, macrophages play a role in the defense against tumors despite the NOD Sirpa allele, which allows human CD47 to bind to the encoded signal regulatory protein α to inhibit macrophage phagocytosis of human cells. Analogous experiments using human pancreas cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells provided findings roughly similar to those from the experiments using HCT116 cells except for lack of suppression of metastases by macrophages in NOG hosts. Administration of mouse IFN-γ to NOG hosts appeared to partially compensate lack of IL-2Rγc-dependent elimination of transferred HCT116 cells. These results provide insights into the nature of innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, aiding in developing tumor xenograft models in experimental oncology.

  16. Chitin modulates innate immune responses of keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin, after cellulose the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, is an essential component of exoskeletons of crabs, shrimps and insects and protects these organisms from harsh conditions in their environment. Unexpectedly, chitin has been found to activate innate immune cells and to elicit murine airway inflammation. The skin represents the outer barrier of the human host defense and is in frequent contact with chitin-bearing organisms, such as house-dust mites or flies. The effects of chitin on keratinocytes, however, are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that chitin stimulates keratinocytes and thereby modulates the innate immune response of the skin. Here we show that chitin is bioactive on primary and immortalized keratinocytes by triggering production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Chitin stimulation further induced the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR TLR4 on keratinocytes at mRNA and protein level. Chitin-induced effects were mainly abrogated when TLR2 was blocked, suggesting that TLR2 senses chitin on keratinocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We speculate that chitin-bearing organisms modulate the innate immune response towards pathogens by upregulating secretion of cytokines and chemokines and expression of MyD88-associated TLRs, two major components of innate immunity. The clinical relevance of this mechanism remains to be defined.

  17. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis.

  18. Functional characterization of Foxp3-specific spontaneous immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne Købke; Munir, S; Andersen, Anders Woetmann;

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are associated with an impaired prognosis in several cancers. The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) is generally expressed in Tregs. Here, we identify and characterize spontaneous cytotoxic immune responses to Foxp3-expressing cells...... in peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cancer patients. These immune responses were directed against a HLA-A2-restricted peptide epitope derived from Foxp3. Foxp3-reactive T cells were characterized as cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. These cells recognized dendritic cells incubated with recombinant Foxp3 protein...... readily killed by the Foxp3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The spontaneous presence of Foxp3-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses suggest a general role of such T cells in the complex network of immune regulation as such responses may eliminate Tregs, that is, suppression of the suppressors...

  19. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yimin Sun; Hanhan Li; Alan N. Langnas; Yong Zhao

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class Ⅱ+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6) :440-446.

  20. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YiminSun; HanhanLi; AlanN.Langnas

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class II+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):440-446.

  1. Bovine colostrum enhances natural killer cell activity and immune response in a mouse model of influenza infection and mediates intestinal immunity through toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eric B; Mallet, Jean-François; Duarte, Jairo; Matar, Chantal; Ritz, Barry W

    2014-04-01

    Oral administration of bovine colostrum affects intestinal immunity, including an increased percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. However, effects on NK cell cytotoxic activity and resistance to infection as well as a potential mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of bovine colostrum (La Belle, Inc, Bellingham, WA) on the NK cytotoxic response to influenza infection and on toll-like receptor (TLR) activity in a primary intestinal epithelial cell culture. We hypothesized that colostrum would increase NK cell activity and that TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking would reduce interleukin 6 production by epithelial cells in response to contact stimulation with colostrum. Four-month-old female C57BL/6 mice were supplemented with 1 g of colostrum per kilogram of body weight before and after infection with influenza A virus (H1N1). Animals were assessed for weight loss, splenic NK cell activity, and lung virus titers. Colostrum-supplemented mice demonstrated less reduction in body weight after influenza infection, indicating a less severe infection, increased NK cell cytotoxicity, and less virus burden in the lungs compared with controls. Colostrum supplementation enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity and improved the immune response to primary influenza virus infection in mice. To investigate a potential mechanism, a primary culture of small intestine epithelial cells was then stimulated with colostrum. Direct activation of epithelial cells resulted in increased interleukin 6 production, which was inhibited with TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking antibodies. The interaction between colostrum and immunity may be dependent, in part, on the interaction of colostrum components with innate receptors at the intestinal epithelium, including TLR-2 and TLR-4.

  2. Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    coated Tran- swell filters (Figure 7H), as did recombi - nant TGF-β1 (2 pg/ml). Invasion through Trans- well filters in response to both efferocyto...Biosystems) and amplified using the murine cDNA-specific prim- ers (Integrated DNA Technologies) listed in Supplemental Methods, along with SYBR Green...genotyped by PCR of genomic DNA as previously described(30). Female virgin mice were randomized into 2 groups: (a) 1 group that remained virgin, and (b) 1

  3. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR.

  4. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    biospecimens followed protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). Leukocyte concentrates...Antitumor Immunity and Checkpoint Immunotherapy. Cancer immunology research 2, 926-936 (2014). 17. Wherry, E.J. T cell exhaustion. Nat Immunol 12, 492... Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New

  5. Effect of bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination on CD4+Foxp3+ T cells during acquired immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela I; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Arnett, Kimberly; Shanley, Crystal A; Podell, Brendan; Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2016-04-01

    Increasing information has shown that many newly emerging strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including the highly prevalent and troublesome Beijing family of strains, can potently induce the emergence of Foxp3(+)CD4 Tregs Although the significance of this is still not fully understood, we have previously provided evidence that the emergence of this population can significantly ablate the protective effect of BCG vaccination, causing progressive fatal disease in the mouse model. However, whether the purpose of this response is to control inflammation or to directly dampen the acquired immune response is still unclear. In the present study, we have shown, using both cell depletion and adoptive transfer strategies, that Tregs can have either properties. Cell depletion resulted in a rapid, but transient, decrease in the lung bacterial load, suggesting release or temporary re-expansion of effector immunity. Transfer of Tregs into Rag2(-/-)or marked congenic mice worsened the disease course and depressed cellular influx of effector T cells into the lungs. Tregs from infected donors seemed to preferentially depress the inflammatory response and granulocytic influx. In contrast, those from BCG-vaccinated and then challenged donors seemed more focused on depression of acquired immunity. These qualitative differences might be related to increasing knowledge reflecting the plasticity of the Treg response.

  6. Effects of feed supplementation with glycine chelate and iron sulfate on selected parameters of cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Łukasz; Kwiecień, Małgorzata; Marek, Agnieszka; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Kalinowski, Marcin; Laskowska, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Because little is known about the impact of chelated (Fe-Gly, Fe-Gly+F) and inorganic (FeSO4, FeSO4+F) iron products on immune response parameters in broiler chickens, the objective of the study was to determine the effects of inorganic and organic forms of iron on selected parameters of the cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens by assessing the percentage of CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD25(+), and MHC Class II lymphocytes, as well as the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio and IL-2 concentration in the peripheral blood. The experiments were conducted using 50day-old Ross 308 roosters. The test material was peripheral blood. Flow cytometry was used to determine selected cell-mediated immune response parameters. The results obtained indicate that the use of iron chelates in the diet of broiler chickens may stimulate cellular defense mechanisms. As a result of the experiment an increase was observed in the percentage of Th1, mainly T CD4(+) and T CD8(+). It was also noted that application of chelated iron can increase production of T CD8(+) cytotoxic cells and IL-2, which promotes the body's natural response to developing inflammation. There were no changes in T CD4(+), T CD8(+), T CD25(+) or MHC II lymphocyte subpopulations in the chickens following application of the inorganic form of iron.

  7. Antibody and T cell responses induced in chickens immunized with avian influenza virus N1 and NP DNA vaccine with chicken IL-15 and IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian-Lam; Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Yeap, Swee Keong; Mohamed Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ideris, Aini; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2013-12-01

    We had examined the immunogenicity of a series of plasmid DNAs which include neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes from avian influenza virus (AIV). The interleukin-15 (IL-15) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) as genetic adjuvants were used for immunization in combination with the N1 and NP AIV genes. In the first trial, 8 groups of chickens were established with 10 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens per group while, in the second trial 7 SPF chickens per group were used. The overall N1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titer in chickens immunized with the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 was higher compared to the chickens immunized with the pDis/N1 and this suggesting that chicken IL-15 could play a role in enhancing the humoral immune response. Besides that, the chickens that were immunized at 14-day-old (Trial 2) showed a higher N1 antibody titer compared to the chickens that were immunized at 1-day-old (Trial 1). Despite the delayed in NP antibody responses, the chickens co-administrated with IL-15 were able to induce earlier and higher antibody response compared to the pDis/NP and pDis/NP+pDis/IL-18 inoculated groups. The pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 inoculated chickens also induced higher CD8+ T cells increase than the pDis/N1 group in both trials (P0.05) in inducing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells when co-administered with the pDis/IL-18 in both trials in comparison to the pDis/NP. Our data suggest that the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 combination has the potential to be used as a DNA vaccine against AIV in chickens.

  8. Enhanced early innate and T cell-mediated responses in subjects immunized with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minang, Jacob T; Inglefield, Jon R; Harris, Andrea M; Lathey, Janet L; Alleva, David G; Sweeney, Diane L; Hopkins, Robert J; Lacy, Michael J; Bernton, Edward W

    2014-11-28

    NuThrax™ (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed with CPG 7909 Adjuvant) (AV7909) is in development. Samples obtained in a phase Ib clinical trial were tested to confirm biomarkers of innate immunity and evaluate effects of CPG 7909 (PF-03512676) on adaptive immunity. Subjects received two intramuscular doses of commercial BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA), or two intramuscular doses of one of four formulations of AV7909. IP-10, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated 24-48 h after administration of AV7909 formulations, returning to baseline by Day 7. AVA (no CPG 7909) resulted in elevated IL-6 and CRP, but not IP-10. Another marker of CpG, transiently decreased absolute lymphocyte counts (ALCs), correlated with transiently increased IP-10. Cellular recall responses to anthrax protective antigen (PA) or PA peptides were assessed by IFN-γ ELISpot assay performed on cryopreserved PBMCs obtained from subjects prior to immunization and 7 days following the second immunization (study day 21). One-half of subjects that received AV7909 with low-dose (0.25mg/dose) CPG 7909 possessed positive Day 21 T cell responses to PA. In contrast, positive T cell responses occurred at an 11% average rate (1/9) for AVA-treated subjects. Differences in cellular responses due to dose level of CPG 7909 were not associated with differences in humoral anti-PA IgG responses, which were elevated for recipients of AV7909 compared to recipients of AVA. Serum markers at 24 or 48 h (i.e. % ALC decrease, or increase in IL-6, IP-10, or CRP) correlated with the humoral (antibody) responses 1 month later, but did not correlate with cellular ELISpot responses. In summary, biomarkers of early responses to CPG 7909 were confirmed, and adding a CpG adjuvant to a vaccine administered twice resulted in increased T cell effects relative to vaccine alone. Changes in early biomarkers correlated with subsequent adaptive humoral immunity but not cellular immunity.

  9. Primary Immunization with a Triple Diphtheria-Tetanus-Whole Cell Pertussis Vaccine in Iranian Infants: An Analysis of Antibody Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei Saeed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Universal vaccination of neonates and children against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis has had a tremendous impact on the control of these infectious diseases worldwide. Immunization by the triple diphtheria, tetanus and whole cell pertussis vaccine (DTwP has been applied in Iran for almost 50 years. Periodic assessment of immunogenicity of this vaccine is an important aspect of successful mass vaccination programs. The present study was performed to assess the antibody response against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis in a group of Iranian infants vaccinated with a local DTwP vaccine. In this prospective study, 330 infants received primary vaccination at 2, 4 and 6 months of age with DTwP vaccine manufactured by Razi Institute of Iran. Blood samples were taken 2-4 weeks after the third dose to assess seroprotection and geometric mean titers (GMT of specific antibodies. Among the 283 infants who completed the vaccination course, 98.2% and 100% developed antibodies against diphtheria and tetanus, respectively. The GMT of antibodies to tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, were 2.09 IU/ml, 2.08 IU/ml and 8.73 EU/ml, respectively. Comparison of the results obtained from this study with those from previous studies performed in other countries revealed a similar GMT and protection rates for diphtheria and tetanus components. In the absence of well-established serological criteria, judgment about protection rate against pertussis has not been possible. A prospective vaccination study using the local DTwP vaccine in parallel to a WHO approved standard vaccine, could enable assessment of immunogenicity of the pertussis component.

  10. Pilot Study on the Use of DNA Priming Immunization to Enhance Y. pestis LcrV-Specific B Cell Responses Elicited by a Recombinant LcrV Protein Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that DNA immunization is powerful in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses in both animal and human studies. However, there is limited information on the mechanism of this effect. In particular, it is not known whether DNA immunization can also enhance the development of antigen-specific B cell development. In this report, a pilot study was conducted using plague LcrV immunogen as a model system to determine whether DNA immunization is able to enhance LcrV-specific B cell development in mice. Plague is an acute and often fatal infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis. Humoral immune responses provide critical protective immunity against plague. Previously, we demonstrated that a DNA vaccine expressing LcrV antigen can protect mice from lethal mucosal challenge. In the current study, we further evaluated whether the use of a DNA priming immunization is able to enhance the immunogenicity of a recombinant LcrV protein vaccine, and in particular, the development of LcrV-specific B cells. Our data indicate that DNA immunization was able to elicit high-level LcrV antibody responses when used alone or as part of a prime-boost immunization approach. Most significantly, DNA immunization was also able to increase the levels of LcrV-specific B cell development. The finding that DNA immunization can enhance antigen-specific B cell responses is highly significant and will help guide similar studies in other model antigen systems.

  11. Natural functional SNPs in miR-155 alter its expression level, blood cell counts and immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available miR-155 has been confirmed to be a key factor in immune responses in humans and other mammals. Therefore, investigation of variations in miR-155 could be useful for understanding the differences in immunity between individuals. In this study, four SNPs in miR-155 were identified in mice (Mus musculus and humans (Homo sapiens. In mice, the four SNPs were closely linked and formed two miR-155 haplotypes (A and B. Ten distinct types of blood parameters were associated with miR-155 expression under normal conditions. Additionally, 4 and 14 blood parameters were significantly different between these two genotypes under normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation conditions, respectively. Moreover, the expression levels of miR-155, the inflammatory response to LPS stimulation and the lethal ratio following Salmonella typhimurium infection were significantly increased in mice harboring the AA genotype. Further, two SNPs, one in the loop region and the other near the 3' terminal of pre-miR-155, were confirmed to be responsible for the differential expression of miR-155 in mice. Interestingly, two additional SNPs, one in the loop region and the other in the middle of miR-155*, modulated the function of miR-155 in humans. Predictions of secondary RNA structure using RNAfold showed that these SNPs affected the structure of miR-155 in both mice and humans. Our results provide novel evidence of the natural functional SNPs of miR-155 in both mice and humans, which may affect the expression levels of mature miR-155 by modulating its secondary structure. The SNPs of human miR-155 may be considered as causal mutations for some immune-related diseases in the clinic. The two genotypes of mice could be used as natural models for studying the mechanisms of immune diseases caused by abnormal expression of miR-155 in humans.

  12. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells.

  13. Co-incubation with IL-18 potentiates antigen-specific IFN-γ response in a whole-blood stimulation assay for measurement of cell-mediated immune responses in pigs experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Boesen, Henriette Toft; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft

    2011-01-01

    The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult to evalu......The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult...

  14. Immune response associated with nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, F M; Kripke, M L

    1997-10-01

    It is now clear that UV radiation causes nonmelanoma skin cancer in at least two ways: by causing permanent changes in the genetic code and by preventing immunologic recognition of mutant cells. These are interacting rather than separate mechanisms. Damage to DNA results in disregulation of cellular proliferation and initiates immune suppression by stimulating the production of suppressive cytokines. These cytokines contribute to the loss of immunosurveillance. Ultraviolet radiation has both local and systemic immunosuppressive effects. Locally, it depletes and alters antigen-presenting LC at the site of UV irradiation. Systemic suppression results when Ts cells are induced, by altered LC, by inflammatory macrophages that enter the skin following UV irradiation, or by the action of cytokines. Damage to DNA appears to be one of the triggering events in inducing systemic immunosuppression via the release of immunosuppressive cytokines and mediators. Immunologic approaches to treating skin cancers so far have concentrated on nonspecifically stimulating immune cells that infiltrate these tumors, but induction of specific immune responses against these tumors with antitumor vaccines has received little attention as yet. Preventive measures include sun avoidance and the use of sunscreens to prevent DNA damage by UV light. Future strategies may employ means to reverse UV-induced immunosuppression by using anti-inflammatory agents, biologicals that accelerate DNA repair or prevent the generation of immunosuppressive cytokines, and specific immunotherapy with tumor antigens. New approaches for studying the immunology of human skin cancers are needed to accelerate progress in this field.

  15. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell

  16. A preliminary study to evaluate the immune responses induced by immunization of dogs with inactivated Ehrlichia canis organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Mahan

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia canis is an intracellular pathogen that causes canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Although the role of antibody responses cannot be discounted, control of this intracellular pathogen is expected to be by cell mediated immune responses. The immune responses in dogs immunized with inactivated E. canis organisms in combination with Quil A were evaluated. Immunization provoked strong humoral and cellular immune responses, which were demonstrable by Western blotting and lymphocyte proliferation assays. By Western blotting antibodies to several immunodominant E. canis proteins were detected in serum from immunized dogs and antibody titres increased after each immunization. The complement of immunogenic proteins recognized by the antisera were similar to those recognized in serum from infected dogs. Upon challenge with live E. canis, rapid anamnestic humoral responses were detected in the serum of immunized dogs and primary antibody responses were detected in the serum from control dogs. Following immunization, a lymphocyte proliferative response (cellular immunity was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNs of immunized dogs upon stimulation with E. canis antigens. These responses were absent from non-immunized control dogs until after infection with live E. canis, when antigen specific-lymphocyte proliferation responses were also detected in the PBMNs of the control dogs. It can be thus concluded that immunization against canine monocytic ehrlichiosis may be feasible. However, the immunization regimen needs to be optimized and a detailed investigation needs to be done to determine if this regimen can prevent development of acute and chronic disease.

  17. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  18. Evasion by stealth: inefficient immune activation underlies poor T cell response and severe disease in SARS-CoV-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincun Zhao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome caused substantial morbidity and mortality during the 2002-2003 epidemic. Many of the features of the human disease are duplicated in BALB/c mice infected with a mouse-adapted version of the virus (MA15, which develop respiratory disease with high morbidity and mortality. Here, we show that severe disease is correlated with slow kinetics of virus clearance and delayed activation and transit of respiratory dendritic cells (rDC to the draining lymph nodes (DLN with a consequent deficient virus-specific T cell response. All of these defects are corrected when mice are treated with liposomes containing clodronate, which deplete alveolar macrophages (AM. Inhibitory AMs are believed to prevent the development of immune responses to environmental antigens and allergic responses by interacting with lung dendritic cells and T cells. The inhibitory effects of AM can also be nullified if mice or AMs are pretreated with poly I:C, which directly activate AMs and rDCs through toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3. Further, adoptive transfer of activated but not resting bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC protect mice from lethal MA15 infection. These results may be relevant for SARS in humans, which is also characterized by prolonged virus persistence and delayed development of a SARS-CoV-specific immune response in individuals with severe disease.

  19. LSm14A Plays a Critical Role in Antiviral Immune Responses by Regulating MITA Level in a Cell-Specific Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Tian; Yang, Qing; Li, Mi; Zhong, Bo; Ran, Yong; Liu, Li-Li; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Yi; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2016-06-15

    Viral infection triggers induction of antiviral cytokines and effectors, which are critical mediators of innate antiviral immune response. It has been shown that the processing body-associated protein LSm14A is involved in the induction of antiviral cytokines in cell lines but in vivo evidence is lacking. By generating LSm14A-deficient mice, in this study, we show that LSm14A plays a critical and specific role in the induction of antiviral cytokines in dendritic cells (DCs) but not in macrophages and fibroblasts. Induction of antiviral cytokines triggered by the DNA viruses HSV-1 and murid herpesvirus 68 and the RNA virus vesicular stomatitis virus but not Sendai virus was impaired in Lsm14a(-/-) DCs, which is correlated to the functions of the adaptor protein MITA/STING in the antiviral signaling pathways. LSm14A deficiency specifically downregulated MITA/STING level in DCs by impairing its nuclear mRNA precursor processing and subsequently impaired antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses. Our findings reveal a nuclear mRNA precursor processing and cell-specific regulatory mechanism of antiviral immune responses.

  20. Interleukin-7 produced by intestinal epithelial cells in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection plays a major role in innate immunity against this pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Jiang-Yuan; Yu, Qing; Jin, Jun-O

    2015-08-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) engages multiple mechanisms to overcome chronic viral infections, but the role of IL-7 in bacterial infections, especially enteric bacterial infections, remains unclear. Here we characterized the previously unexplored role of IL-7 in the innate immune response to the attaching and effacing bacterium Citrobacter rodentium. C. rodentium infection induced IL-7 production from intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IL-7 production from IECs in response to C. rodentium was dependent on gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing NK1.1(+) cells and IL-12. Treatment with anti-IL-7Rα antibody during C. rodentium infection resulted in a higher bacterial burden, enhanced intestinal damage, and greater weight loss and mortality than observed with the control IgG treatment. IEC-produced IL-7 was only essential for protective immunity against C. rodentium during the first 6 days after infection. An impaired bacterial clearance upon IL-7Rα blockade was associated with a significant decrease in macrophage accumulation and activation in the colon. Moreover, C. rodentium-induced expansion and activation of intestinal CD4(+) lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells was completely abrogated by IL-7Rα blockade. Collectively, these data demonstrate that IL-7 is produced by IECs in response to C. rodentium infection and plays a critical role in the protective immunity against this intestinal attaching and effacing bacterium.

  1. Targeting antigens to Dec-205 on dendritic cells induces a higher immune response in chickens: Hemagglutinin of avian influenza virus example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Zúñiga, David; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Espino-Solís, Gerardo Pavel; Quintero-Hernández, Verónica; Olvera-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Díaz-Salinas, Marco Aurelio; López, Susana; Possani, Lourival Domingos

    2016-12-09

    It is widely known that targeting a variety of antigens to the DEC-205 receptor on dendritic cells (DCs) significantly potentiate immunity. This communication reports the development of a new murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the chicken DEC-205, using as immunogen the carbohydrate recognition domain-2 (CRD-2) heterologously expressed. This mAb recognizes a protein band of 250kDa by immunoprecipitation analysis and shows strong cross-reactivity with human and pig DEC-205. Furthermore, the hemagglutinin (HA) of avian influenza H5N2 virus was cloned and expressed using insect cell-baculovirus expression system. We chemically conjugated the anti-chicken DEC-205 antibody with the highly purified HA to direct the antigen to the dendritic cells and evaluate the immune response elicited in vivo by this conjugate. A single dose of chemical conjugate was sufficient to elicit a strong immune response in chickens as early as fourteen days after priming. In addition, the conjugate induced an earlier and higher response compared to unconjugated HA. These results suggest that the strategy described here has potential to be used in the future design and development of successful vaccines against different chicken infectious diseases with direct impact in biotechnology and veterinary fields.

  2. Influence of the invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by hepatitis B virus on immune response of the patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Tong-jing; ZHANG Lian; HOU Jin-lin; ZHANG Ming-xia; YANG Jie; LUO Kang-xian

    2001-01-01

    To explore the influence of HBV invasion into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on the immune response of patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: The cytokine levels in the culture supernatant of PBMC from 56 patients with chronic hepatitis B were determined by ELISA, and PCR was employed to amplify the HBV DNA. Results: The levels of IFN-γ in patients with hepatitis B was lower than thoset of the control, but the difference was not statistically significant, while the levels of IL-4 were significantly higher than those of the control (P<0.01). The serum levels of HBV DNA were negatively correlated with that of IFN-y in culture supernatants of PBMC. Thirty-five patients positive of HBV DNA in the PBMCs were identified from 56 patients with hepatitis B,and their IFN-γ level proved to be significantly different. Conclusions: Th2 cell-mediated immune response is predominant in chronic hepatitis B which is associated with the chronicity of HBV infection. HBV invasion into the PBMCs may affect Th1 and Th2 cell-mediated immune response of the patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  3. Sex-Specific Effects of High Yolk Androgen Levels on Constitutive and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Nestlings of an Altricial Passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Jaime; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Puerta, Marisa; Gil, Diego

    Avian embryos are exposed to yolk androgens that are incorporated into the egg by the ovulating female. These steroids can affect several aspects of embryo development, often resulting in increases in overall size or the speed of growth of different traits. However, several studies suggest that they also entail immune costs to the offspring. In this study, we explored whether variation in yolk androgen concentration affected several measures of the constitutive and cell-mediated immune axes in the spotless starling (Sturnus unicolor). Using a within-brood design, we injected different doses of androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) into the eggs. Our study showed that experimentally increased yolk androgens led to sex-specific immunosuppression in both the innate and adaptive axes of the immune system. Both cell-mediated immune response (CMI) and lysozyme activity decreased with increasing androgen levels injected into the egg in the case of male nestlings, whereas there were no effects on females. The effects that we found were always linear: no quadratic or threshold patterns were detected. We found no effects of the experimental treatment in hemolysis or agglutination capacity, but these measures were negatively correlated with CMI, suggesting negative correlation among different branches of the immune system. Blood (trypanosomes and hemosporidians) and intestinal (coccidia) parasites were not affected by the experimental increase of yolk androgen levels. Our results show that in our study species yolk androgens induce immunosuppression in some axes of the male nestling immune system. Further studies should analyze the proximate causes for these contrasting effects in different axes of the immune system and the reason for the differential impact on males and females.

  4. Innate immune response to viral infection of the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Hayley; Wark, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are the most common infectious illnesses, though they are usually self-limiting and confined to the respiratory tract. The rapid identification of viruses and their effective elimination with minimal local and systemic inflammation is a testament to the efficiency of the innate immune response within the airways and lungs. A failure of this response appears to occur in those with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where viral infection is an important trigger for acute exacerbations. The innate immune response to viruses requires their early detection through pathogen recognition receptors and the recruitment of the efficient antiviral response that is centred around the release of type 1 interferons. The airway epithelium provides both a barrier and an early detector for viruses, and interacts closely with cells of the innate immune response, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, to eliminate infection and trigger a specific adaptive immune response.

  5. Non structural protein of avian influenza A (H11N1 virus is a weaker suppressor of immune responses but capable of inducing apoptosis in host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Non-Structural (NS1 protein of Influenza A viruses is an extensively studied multifunctional protein which is commonly considered as key viral component to fight against host immune responses. Even though there has been a lot of studies on the involvement of NS1 protein in host immune responses there are still ambiguities regarding its role in apoptosis in infected cells. Interactions of NS1 protein with host factors, role of NS1 protein in regulating cellular responses and apoptosis are quite complicated and further studies are still needed to understand it completely. Results NS1 genes of influenza A/Chicken/India/WBNIV2653/2008 (H5N1 and A/Aquatic bird/India/NIV-17095/2007(H11N1 were cloned and expressed in human embryonic kidney (293T cells. Microarray based approach to study the host cellular responses to NS1 protein of the two influenza A viruses of different pathogenicity showed significant differences in the host gene expression profile. NS1 protein of H5N1 resulted in suppression of IFN-β mediated innate immune responses, leading to down-regulation of the components of JAK-STAT pathway like STAT1 which further suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines like CXCL10 and CCL5. The degree of suppression of host immune genes was found considerable with NS1 protein of H11N1 but was not as prominent as with H5N1-NS1. TUNEL assay analyses were found to be positive in both the NS1 transfected cells indicating both H5N1 as well as H11N1 NS1 proteins were able to induce apoptosis in transfected cells. Conclusions We propose that NS1 protein of both H5N1 and H11N1 subtypes of influenza viruses are capable of influencing host immune responses and possess necessary functionality to support apoptosis in host cells. H11N1, a low pathogenic virus without any proven evidence to infect mammals, contains a highly potential NS1 gene which might contribute to greater virus virulence in different gene combinations.

  6. Immune response induction in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The primary function of the immune response is protection of the host against infection with pathogens, including viruses. Since viruses can infect any tissue of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS), it is logical that cells of the immune system should equally have access to all...... tissues. Nevertheless, the brain and spinal cord are noted for their lack of immune presence. Relative to other organ systems, the CNS appears immunologically privileged. Furthermore, when immune responses do occur in the CNS, they are frequently associated with deleterious effects such as inflammatory...

  7. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  8. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anipindi, Varun C.; Dizzell, Sara E.; Nguyen, Philip V.; Shaler, Christopher R.; Chu, Derek K.; Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Liang, Hong; Swift, Stephanie; Nazli, Aisha; Kafka, Jessica K.; Bramson, Jonathan; Xing, Zhou; Jordana, Manel; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P.; Stampfli, Martin R.; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2) confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway. PMID:27148737

  9. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anipindi, Varun C; Bagri, Puja; Roth, Kristy; Dizzell, Sara E; Nguyen, Philip V; Shaler, Christopher R; Chu, Derek K; Jiménez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Liang, Hong; Swift, Stephanie; Nazli, Aisha; Kafka, Jessica K; Bramson, Jonathan; Xing, Zhou; Jordana, Manel; Wan, Yonghong; Snider, Denis P; Stampfli, Martin R; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-05-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2) confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway.

  10. Estradiol Enhances CD4+ T-Cell Anti-Viral Immunity by Priming Vaginal DCs to Induce Th17 Responses via an IL-1-Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun C Anipindi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental studies have shown that estradiol (E2 confers protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism. Better protection in E2-treated mice, immunized against genital HSV-2, coincided with earlier recruitment and higher proportions of Th1 and Th17 effector cells in the vagina post-challenge, compared to placebo-treated controls. Vaginal APCs isolated from E2-treated mice induced 10-fold higher Th17 and Th1 responses, compared to APCs from progesterone-treated, placebo-treated, and estradiol-receptor knockout mice in APC-T cell co-cultures. CD11c+ DCs in the vagina were the predominant APC population responsible for priming these Th17 responses, and a potent source of IL-6 and IL-1β, important factors for Th17 differentiation. Th17 responses were abrogated in APC-T cell co-cultures containing IL-1β KO, but not IL-6 KO vaginal DCs, showing that IL-1β is a critical factor for Th17 induction in the genital tract. E2 treatment in vivo directly induced high expression of IL-1β in vaginal DCs, and addition of IL-1β restored Th17 induction by IL-1β KO APCs in co-cultures. Finally, we examined the role of IL-17 in anti-HSV-2 memory T cell responses. IL-17 KO mice were more susceptible to intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, compared to WT controls, and vaginal DCs from these mice were defective at priming efficient Th1 responses in vitro, indicating that IL-17 is important for the generation of efficient anti-viral memory responses. We conclude that the genital mucosa has a unique microenvironment whereby E2 enhances CD4+ T cell anti-viral immunity by priming vaginal DCs to induce Th17 responses through an IL-1-dependent pathway.

  11. Study of biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and molecular oxidative damage in patients with dermal bioimplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Olga; Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernández-Figueras, Teresa; Vilches, Angel; Llurba, Elisa; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Several soft-tissue dermal fillers have been reported to provoke immunogenicity and may cause adverse reactions despite claims regarding their safety. This study aimed to assess biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and oxidative stress in 169 patients with dermal bioimplants. To this end, we analysed plasma concentrations of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the chitinase-like proteins chitotriosidase and YKL-40 and molecular oxidative damage. The present study shows, for the first time, that the components of innate immunity: chitotriosidase and YKL-40, are significantly higher in patients with certain bioimplants and these markers of monocyte/macrophage activation rose progressively as adverse reactions (AR) evolved. Plasma MPO levels increased 4-fold in filler users with AR and 3-fold in those without. Analysis by filler type showed subjects injected with calcium hydroxylapatite, methacrylate, acrylamides and silicone to have values significantly above those of non-filler subjects for at least two plasma biomarkers, probably because the afore-mentioned biomaterials are permanent and prone to trigger AR in the long term. By contrast, hyaluronic acid alone elicited little immune response. Plasma concentrations of markers of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were found to be significantly higher in users of four of the nine dermal fillers studied. These diffusible products of molecular peroxidation would stem from the reaction catalysed by MPO that generates potent oxidants, leading to cell oxidative damage which, in turn, may exert deleterious effects on the organism. Overall, the results of this study on the effects of a range of dermal fillers point to chronic activation of the immune response mediated by macrophages and PMNs. The increases in plasma of MPO, chitotriosidase and YKL-40 proteins and products of macromolecular peroxidation suggests that these molecules could serve as blood-based biochemical markers and alert to the

  12. Human Metapneumovirus Antagonism of Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Bao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a recently identified RNA virus belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family, which includes several major human and animal pathogens. Epidemiological studies indicate that hMPV is a significant human respiratory pathogen with worldwide distribution. It is associated with respiratory illnesses in children, adults, and immunocompromised patients, ranging from upper respiratory tract infections to severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Interferon (IFN represents a major line of defense against virus infection, and in response, viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN production as well as IFN signaling. Although the strategies of IFN evasion are similar, the specific mechanisms by which paramyxoviruses inhibit IFN responses are quite diverse. In this review, we will present an overview of the strategies that hMPV uses to subvert cellular signaling in airway epithelial cells, the major target of infection, as well as in primary immune cells.

  13. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  14. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Sensing by Human Trophoblasts Induces Innate Immune Responses and Recruitment of Maternal NK Cells: Potential Implications for Limiting Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Petroff, Margaret G; Warren, Bryce D; Jasti, Susmita; Linscheid, Caitlin; Ward, Ashley; Kramer, Anita; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Sheiko, Melissa A; Gale, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Winn, Virginia D; Rosen, Hugo R

    2015-10-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the world's most common blood-borne viral infection for which there is no vaccine. The rates of vertical transmission range between 3 and 6% with odds 90% higher in the presence of HIV coinfection. Prevention of vertical transmission is not possible because of lack of an approved therapy for use in pregnancy or an effective vaccine. Recently, HCV has been identified as an independent risk factor for preterm delivery, perinatal mortality, and other complications. In this study, we characterized the immune responses that contribute to the control of viral infection at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI) in the early gestational stages. In this study, we show that primary human trophoblast cells and an extravillous trophoblast cell line (HTR8), from first and second trimester of pregnancy, express receptors relevant for HCV binding/entry and are permissive for HCV uptake. We found that HCV-RNA sensing by human trophoblast cells induces robust upregulation of type I/III IFNs and secretion of multiple chemokines that elicit recruitment and activation of decidual NK cells. Furthermore, we observed that HCV-RNA transfection induces a proapoptotic response within HTR8 that could affect the morphology of the placenta. To our knowledge, for the first time, we demonstrate that HCV-RNA sensing by human trophoblast cells elicits a strong antiviral response that alters the recruitment and activation of innate immune cells at the MFI. This work provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of HCV-specific immunity at the MFI as well as novel insights into mechanisms that limit vertical transmission but may paradoxically lead to virus-related pregnancy complications.

  16. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...... cells and protective memory responses using adenoviral vectors, which seem to contrast with recent reports suggesting that an exhausted CD8(+) T cell phenotype is induced by inoculation with adenoviral vectors. Accordingly, we investigated the route and dose interrelationship for transgene-specific CD8......(+) T cells using adenoviral vectors encoding beta-galactosidase applied either s.c. or i.v. Irrespective of the route of inoculation, most of the adenoviral inoculum was found to disseminate systemically as the dose was raised beyond 10(9) particles. The number of transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells...

  17. Polarization of immune responses in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Wentzel, Annelieke S.; Spaink, Herman P.; Elks, Philip M.; Fink, Inge R.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we support taking polarized immune responses in teleost fish from a 'macrophage first' point of view, a hypothesis that reverts the dichotomous T helper (TH)1 and TH2 driving forces by building on the idea of conservation of innate immune responses in lower v

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de ...

  19. Breadth of T cell responses after immunization with adenovirus vectors encoding ancestral antigens or polyvalent papillomavirus antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2017-01-01

    to the other PV proteins. The PV sequences were fused to a T cell adjuvant, the murine invariant chain and encoded in a recombinant adenoviral vector which was administered to naïve outbred mice. By measuring T cell responses induced by these different vaccines and towards peptide pools representing 3...

  20. TUMOR-SPECIFIC IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of malignancies requires a search for new therapeutic approaches. E.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT is an effective anti-cancer treatment that involves administration of a photosensitizing dye followed by visible light irradiation of the tumor. Pre-clinical studies have shown that local photodynamic therapy enhances systemic antitumor immunity. Moreover, it is well known that the long-term effects of PDT depend on functioning of intact adaptive immune response. In this context, the immune system plays a fundamental role. Interestingly, the PDT action is associated with stimulation of systemic immune response against a locally treated tumor. In fact, PDT has been shown to effectively stimulate both innate and adaptive immune systems of the host, by triggering the release of various pro-inflammatory and acutephase response mediators thus leading to massive infiltration of the treated site with neutrophils, dendritic cells and other inflammatory cells. PDT efficacy depends, in part, on induction of tumor-specific immune response which is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK cells. The set of specific receptors enables NK cells to recognize surface molecules on the target cells. Expression of the latter molecules is indicative of viral infection, tumor formation, or cell stress (e.g., DNA damage. The NK cells are also involved into various biological processes in the organism, playing a critical role in immune surveillance, thus representing a potential tool for cancer therapy. It was shown that the tumor cells have increased sensitivity to NK cell-mediated lytic action following PDT. In this review, we further discuss potential relationships between PDT and antitumor immune response.

  1. The effect of garlic extract on growth, haematology and cell-mediated immune response of newborn goat kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Shokrollahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of different levels of garlic extract supplemented in milk on growth rate, haematology and cell–mediated immune response of Markhoz newborn goat kids. Twenty four newborn goat kids (aged 7+/-3days were randomly assigned to four groups. The groups consisted of control (received milk without garlic extract, T1, T2 and T3 which received milk supplemented with 62.5, 125 and 250 mg aqueous garlic extract per kg live weight per day for 42 days, respectively. Body weights were measured weekly throughout the experimental period. At day 42, about 10 ml blood samples were collected from each kid via the jugular vein for haematological study. Cell–mediated immune response was evaluated through double skin thickness after intradermal injection of phyto-hematogglutinin (PHA at day 21 and 42. Total gain was significantly higher for kids in T3 (P<0.05 compared with the control group. Average daily gain (ADG in T3 group in week 4–5 was higher (P<0.05. Significant differences in globulin (P<0.01, hemoglobin (Hb; P<0.001, hematocrit (PCV; P<0.001, erythrocyte (RBC; P<0.001, neutrophil (P<0.001, lymphocyte (P<0.001 and leukocyte (WBC; P<0.001 were observed among groups. Hb, PCV, RBC, lymphocytes and WBC were higher in kids given garlic extract supplementation. There was a significant difference of double skin thickness among the groups at day 42 (P<0.01. In conclusion, this study indicated that milk supplemented with aqueous garlic extract improved growth rate and immunity of newborn goat kids.

  2. cDNA immunization of mice with human thyroglobulin generates both humoral and T cell responses: a novel model of thyroid autoimmunity.

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    Eric M Jacobson

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin (Tg represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT, are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis.

  3. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  4. Use of a feline respiratory epithelial cell culture system grown at the air-liquid interface to characterize the innate immune response following feline herpesvirus 1 infection.

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    Nelli, Rahul K; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2016-03-02

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) accounts for 50% of viral upper respiratory diseases in domestic cats and is a significant cause of ocular diseases. Despite the clinical significance and high prevalence of FHV-1 infection, currently available vaccines cannot completely protect cats from infection and lifelong latency. FHV-1 infects via the mucous membranes and replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, but very little is known about the early innate immunity at this site. To address questions about immunity to FHV-1, feline respiratory epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI-FRECs) were established by collecting respiratory tracts from 6 healthy cats after euthanasia. Cells were isolated, cultured and characterized histologically and immunologically before infection with FHV-1. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine and chemokine responses were measured by real time PCR. ALI-FRECs morphologically resembled the natural airways of cats with multilayered columnar epithelial cells and cilia. Immunological properties of the natural airways were maintained in ALI-FRECs, as evidenced by the expression of TLRs, cytokines, chemokines, interferons, beta-defensins, and other regulatory genes. Furthermore, ALI-FRECs were able to support infection and replication of FHV-1, as well as modulate transcriptional regulation of various immune genes in response to infection. IL-1β and TNFα were increased in ALI-FRECs by 24hpi, whereas expression levels of IFN-α and TLR9 were not increased until 36hpi. In contrast, TLR3, GM-CSF and TGF-1β expression was down-regulated at 36hpi. The data presented show the development of a system ideal for investigating the molecular pathogenesis and immunity of FHV-1 or other respiratory pathogens.

  5. Characterisation of the xenogeneic immune response to microencapsulated fetal pig islet-like cell clusters transplanted into immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice.

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    Vijayaganapathy Vaithilingam

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation of microencapsulated fetal pig islet-like cell clusters (FP ICCs offers a potential cellular therapy for type 1 diabetes. Although microcapsules prevent direct contact of the host immune system with the xenografted tissue, poor graft survival is still an issue. This study aimed to characterise the nature of the host immune cells present on the engrafted microcapsules and effects on encapsulated FP ICCs that were transplanted into immunocompetent mice. Encapsulated FP ICCs were transplanted into the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6 mice. Grafts retrieved at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 post-transplantation were analysed for pericapsular fibrotic overgrowth (PFO, cell viability, intragraft porcine gene expression, macrophages, myofibroblasts and intraperitoneal murine cytokines. Graft function was assessed ex vivo by insulin secretion studies. Xenogeneic immune response to encapsulated FP ICCs was associated with enhanced intragraft mRNA expression of porcine antigens MIP-1α, IL-8, HMGB1 and HSP90 seen within the first two weeks post-transplantation. This was associated with the recruitment of host macrophages, infiltration of myofibroblasts and collagen deposition leading to PFO which was evident from day 7 post-transplantation. This was accompanied by a decrease in cell viability and loss of FP ICC architecture. The only pro-inflammatory cytokine detected in the murine peritoneal flushing was TNF-α with levels peaking at day 7 post transplantation. This correlated with the onset of PFO at day 7 implying activated macrophages as its source. The anti-inflammatory cytokines detected were IL-5 and IL-4 with levels peaking at days 1 and 7, respectively. Porcine C-peptide was undetectable at all time points post-transplantation. PFO was absent and murine intraperitoneal cytokines were undetectable when empty microcapsules were transplanted. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the macrophages are direct effectors of the xenogeneic

  6. Cell-mediated immune responses to Malassezia furfur serovars A, B and C in patients with pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis and controls.

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    Ashbee, H R; Ingham, E; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1994-06-01

    It has been postulated that patients with Malassezia furfur-associated dermatoses have a deficient cell-mediated immune response to M. furfur. This study examined the cell-mediated immune responses to M. furfur serovars A, B and C of 10 patients with pityriasis versicolor and 10 age- and sex-matched controls; and 10 patients with seborrheic dermatitis and 10 age- and sex-matched controls. The responses to each serovar of M. furfur were assessed using the lymphocyte transformation assay and the leukocyte migration inhibition assay. The lymphocyte transformation responses of the patients with pityriasis versicolor to M. furfur serovars A, B and C (0/10, 6/10 and 5/10 respectively) were not significantly different from those of controls (0/10, 2/10 and 1/10). However, for patients with seborrheic dermatitis, significantly more patients' lymphocytes responded to serovars B and C (6/10 and 6/10 respectively) than those of controls (1/10 and 1/10). No patient or control responded to serovar A. In the leukocyte migration inhibition assay, the leukocytes from a greater proportion of patients with pityriasis versicolor (5/7) responded to serovar B than controls (2/10); and the leukocytes from a greater proportion of patients with seborrheic dermatitis (4/10) responded to serovar C than controls (0/9). Thus, this data did not indicate the presence of any cell-mediated immune deficiency to M. furfur in patients with pityriasis versicolor or seborrheic dermatitis, as measured by the lymphocyte transformation assay or the leukocyte migration inhibition assay. The greater responsiveness of T lymphocytes from patients may indicate that T lymphocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  7. Cell wall degrading enzyme induced rice innate immune responses are suppressed by the type 3 secretion system effectors XopN, XopQ, XopX and XopZ of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

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    Sinha, Dipanwita; Gupta, Mahesh Kumar; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Ranjan, Ashish; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2013-01-01

    Innate immune responses are induced in plants and animals through perception of Damage Associated Molecular Patterns. These immune responses are suppressed by pathogens during infection. A number of studies have focussed on identifying functions of plant pathogenic bacteria that are involved in suppression of Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. In comparison, there is very little information on functions used by plant pathogens to suppress Damage Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. Xanthomonasoryzae pv. oryzae, a gram negative bacterial pathogen of rice, secretes hydrolytic enzymes such as LipA (Lipase/Esterase) that damage rice cell walls and induce innate immune responses. Here, we show that Agrobacterium mediated transient transfer of the gene for XopN, a X. oryzae pv. oryzae type 3 secretion (T3S) system effector, results in suppression of rice innate immune responses induced by LipA. A xopN (-) mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae retains the ability to suppress these innate immune responses indicating the presence of other functionally redundant proteins. In transient transfer assays, we have assessed the ability of 15 other X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S secreted effectors to suppress rice innate immune responses. Amongst these proteins, XopQ, XopX and XopZ are suppressors of LipA induced innate immune responses. A mutation in any one of the xopN, xopQ, xopX or xopZ genes causes partial virulence deficiency while a xopN (-) xopX (-) double mutant exhibits a greater virulence deficiency. A xopN (-) xopQ (-) xopX (-) xopZ (-) quadruple mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae induces callose deposition, an innate immune response, similar to a X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S(-) mutant in rice leaves. Overall, these results indicate that multiple T3S secreted proteins of X. oryzae pv. oryzae can suppress cell wall damage induced rice innate immune responses.

  8. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

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    Dirlei Nico

    Full Text Available Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36 responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we dem