WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell growth control

  1. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Savannah; Takeda, Kazuyo; Stark, Felicity; Meierovics, Anda I.; Yabe, Idalia; Cowley, Siobhan C.

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells). Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates. PMID:26379269

  2. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah Maggio

    Full Text Available The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells. Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates.

  3. TOR and paradigm change: cell growth is controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael N

    2016-09-15

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of target of rapamycin (TOR), a highly conserved kinase and central controller of cell growth. In this Retrospective, I briefly describe the discovery of TOR and the subsequent elucidation of its cellular role. I place particular emphasis on an article by Barbet et al. from 1996, the first suggesting that TOR controls cell growth in response to nutrients. © 2016 Hall. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in plant cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussey, P.J.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Deeks, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Plant cells grow through increases in volume and cell wall surface area. The mature morphology of a plant cell is a product of the differential rates of expansion between neighboring zones of the cell wall during this process. Filamentous actin arrays are associated with plant cell growth, and the

  5. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  6. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  7. Growth control and differentiation in mammary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Borellini, F; Oka, T

    1989-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of the mammary gland are controlled by various hormones and other environmental factors. The role of hormones and growth factors in mammary development is discussed with regard to animal species, physiological stages, and the various experimental systems in vitro. In the female embryo, mammary morphogenesis is induced by the mesenchyme and is hormone independent, whereas androgens cause the partial necrosis of mammary epithelium in the male. Ductal growth during ado...

  8. The TOR Signaling Pathway in Spatial and Temporal Control of Cell Size and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suam Gonzalez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell size is amenable by genetic and environmental factors. The highly conserved nutrient-responsive Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway regulates cellular metabolic status and growth in response to numerous inputs. Timing and duration of TOR pathway activity is pivotal for both cell mass built up as well as cell cycle progression and is controlled and fine-tuned by the abundance and quality of nutrients, hormonal signals, growth factors, stress, and oxygen. TOR kinases function within two functionally and structurally discrete multiprotein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, that are implicated in temporal and spatial control of cell size and growth respectively; however, recent data indicate that such functional distinctions are much more complex. Here, we briefly review roles of the two complexes in cellular growth and cytoarchitecture in various experimental model systems.

  9. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptors, TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 production and autocrine growth control in osteosarcoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloen, P.; Jennings, C. L.; Gebhardt, M. C.; Springfield, D. S.; Mankin, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a polypeptide with multiple physiological functions. Isoforms of this growth factor have important roles in control of the cell cycle, in regulation of cell-cell interactions and in growth and development. Malignant transformation has been shown to be

  10. The bifunctional autophagic flux by 2-deoxyglucose to control survival or growth of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Ki Cheong; Yun, Mijin

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports using metabolism regulating drugs showed that nutrient deprivation was an efficient tool to suppress cancer progression. In addition, autophagy control is emerging to prevent cancer cell survival. Autophagy breaks down the unnecessary cytoplasmic components into anabolic units and energy sources, which are the most important sources for making the ATP that maintains homeostasis in cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been used as an anticancer reagent due to its inhibition of glycolysis. Prostate cancer cells (PC3) were treated with 2DG for 6 h or 48 h to analyze the changing of cell cycle and autophagic flux. Rapamycin and LC3B overexpressing vectors were administered to PC3 cells for autophagy induction and chloroquine and shBeclin1 plasmid were used to inhibit autophagy in PC3 cells to analyze PC3 cells growth and survival. The samples for western blotting were prepared in each culture condition to confirm the expression level of autophagy related and regulating proteins. We demonstrated that 2DG inhibits PC3 cells growth and had discriminating effects on autophagy regulation based on the different time period of 2DG treatment to control cell survival. Short-term treatment of 2DG induced autophagic flux, which increased microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) conversion rates and reduced p62 levels. However, 2DG induced autophagic flux is remarkably reduced over an extended time period of 2DG treatment for 48 h despite autophagy inducing internal signaling being maintained. The relationship between cell growth and autophagy was proved. Increased autophagic flux by rapamycin or LC3B overexpression powerfully reduced cell growth, while autophagy inhibition with shBeclin1 plasmid or chloroquine had no significant effect on regulating cell growth. Given these results, maintaining increased autophagic flux was more effective at inhibiting cancer cell progression than inhibition of

  11. Control of mitochondrial function and cell growth by the atypical cadherin Fat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Longyue L; Riascos-Bernal, Dario F; Chinnasamy, Prameladevi; Dunaway, Charlene M; Hou, Rong; Pujato, Mario A; O'Rourke, Brian P; Miskolci, Veronika; Guo, Liang; Hodgson, Louis; Fiser, Andras; Sibinga, Nicholas E S

    2016-11-24

    Mitochondrial products such as ATP, reactive oxygen species, and aspartate are key regulators of cellular metabolism and growth. Abnormal mitochondrial function compromises integrated growth-related processes such as development and tissue repair, as well as homeostatic mechanisms that counteract ageing and neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Physiologic mechanisms that control mitochondrial activity in such settings remain incompletely understood. Here we show that the atypical Fat1 cadherin acts as a molecular 'brake' on mitochondrial respiration that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation after arterial injury. Fragments of Fat1 accumulate in SMC mitochondria, and the Fat1 intracellular domain interacts with multiple mitochondrial proteins, including critical factors associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. SMCs lacking Fat1 (Fat1 KO ) grow faster, consume more oxygen for ATP production, and contain more aspartate. Notably, expression in Fat1 KO cells of a modified Fat1 intracellular domain that localizes exclusively to mitochondria largely normalizes oxygen consumption, and the growth advantage of these cells can be suppressed by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, which suggest that a Fat1-mediated growth control mechanism is intrinsic to mitochondria. Consistent with this idea, Fat1 species associate with multiple respiratory complexes, and Fat1 deletion both increases the activity of complexes I and II and promotes the formation of complex-I-containing supercomplexes. In vivo, Fat1 is expressed in injured human and mouse arteries, and inactivation of SMC Fat1 in mice potentiates the response to vascular damage, with markedly increased medial hyperplasia and neointimal growth, and evidence of higher SMC mitochondrial respiration. These studies suggest that Fat1 controls mitochondrial activity to restrain cell growth during the reparative, proliferative state induced by vascular injury. Given recent reports

  12. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  13. A CMI (cell metabolic indicator)-based controller for achieving high growth rate Escherichia coli cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Matthew E; Wang, Li; Padmakumar, Ajay; Burg, Timothy C; Harcum, Sarah W; Groff, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of biopharmaceuticals are produced in Escherichia coli, where each new product and strain currently requires a high degree of growth characterization in benchtop and industrial bioreactors to achieve economical production protocols. The capability to use a standard set of sensors to characterize a system quickly without the need to conduct numerous experiments to determine stable growth rate for the strain would significantly decrease development time. This paper presents a cell metabolic indicator (CMI) which provides better insight into the E. coli metabolism than a growth rate value. The CMI is the ratio of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of the culture and the base addition rate (BAR) required to keep pH at a desired setpoint. The OUR and BAR are measured using a off-gas sensor and pH probe, respectively, and thus the CMI can be computed online. Experimental results demonstrate the relationship between CMI and the different cell metabolic states. A previously published model is augmented with acid production dynamics, allowing for comparison of the CMI-based controller with an open-loop controller in simulation. The CMI-based controller required little a priori knowledge about the E. coli strain in order to achieve a high growth rate. Since many different types of cells exhibit similar behaviors, the CMI concept can be extended to mammalian and stem cells.

  14. Slug controls stem/progenitor cell growth dynamics during mammary gland morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Mayssa; Idoux-Gillet, Ysia; Selmi, Abdelkader; Côme, Christophe; Faraldo, Maria-Luisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Savagner, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Morphogenesis results from the coordination of distinct cell signaling pathways controlling migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation, along stem/progenitor cell dynamics. To decipher this puzzle, we focused on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) "master genes". EMT has emerged as a unifying concept, involving cell-cell adhesion, migration and apoptotic pathways. EMT also appears to mingle with stemness. However, very little is known on the physiological role and relevance of EMT master-genes. We addressed this question during mammary morphogenesis. Recently, a link between Slug/Snai2 and stemness has been described in mammary epithelial cells, but EMT master genes actual localization, role and targets during mammary gland morphogenesis are not known and we focused on this basic question. Using a Slug-lacZ transgenic model and immunolocalization, we located Slug in a distinct subpopulation covering about 10-20% basal cap and duct cells, mostly cycling cells, coexpressed with basal markers P-cadherin, CK5 and CD49f. During puberty, Slug-deficient mammary epithelium exhibited a delayed development after transplantation, contained less cycling cells, and overexpressed CK8/18, ER, GATA3 and BMI1 genes, linked to luminal lineage. Other EMT master genes were overexpressed, suggesting compensation mechanisms. Gain/loss-of-function in vitro experiments confirmed Slug control of mammary epithelial cell luminal differentiation and proliferation. In addition, they showed that Slug enhances specifically clonal mammosphere emergence and growth, cell motility, and represses apoptosis. Strikingly, Slug-deprived mammary epithelial cells lost their potential to generate secondary clonal mammospheres. We conclude that Slug pathway controls the growth dynamics of a subpopulation of cycling progenitor basal cells during mammary morphogenesis. Overall, our data better define a key mechanism coordinating cell lineage dynamics and morphogenesis, and provide

  15. Slug controls stem/progenitor cell growth dynamics during mammary gland morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayssa Nassour

    Full Text Available Morphogenesis results from the coordination of distinct cell signaling pathways controlling migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation, along stem/progenitor cell dynamics. To decipher this puzzle, we focused on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT "master genes". EMT has emerged as a unifying concept, involving cell-cell adhesion, migration and apoptotic pathways. EMT also appears to mingle with stemness. However, very little is known on the physiological role and relevance of EMT master-genes. We addressed this question during mammary morphogenesis. Recently, a link between Slug/Snai2 and stemness has been described in mammary epithelial cells, but EMT master genes actual localization, role and targets during mammary gland morphogenesis are not known and we focused on this basic question.Using a Slug-lacZ transgenic model and immunolocalization, we located Slug in a distinct subpopulation covering about 10-20% basal cap and duct cells, mostly cycling cells, coexpressed with basal markers P-cadherin, CK5 and CD49f. During puberty, Slug-deficient mammary epithelium exhibited a delayed development after transplantation, contained less cycling cells, and overexpressed CK8/18, ER, GATA3 and BMI1 genes, linked to luminal lineage. Other EMT master genes were overexpressed, suggesting compensation mechanisms. Gain/loss-of-function in vitro experiments confirmed Slug control of mammary epithelial cell luminal differentiation and proliferation. In addition, they showed that Slug enhances specifically clonal mammosphere emergence and growth, cell motility, and represses apoptosis. Strikingly, Slug-deprived mammary epithelial cells lost their potential to generate secondary clonal mammospheres.We conclude that Slug pathway controls the growth dynamics of a subpopulation of cycling progenitor basal cells during mammary morphogenesis. Overall, our data better define a key mechanism coordinating cell lineage dynamics and morphogenesis, and

  16. Cell wall mechanics and growth control in plants: the role of pectins revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman eHöfte

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How is the extensibility of growing plant cell walls regulated ? In the past, most studies have focused on the role of the cellulose/xyloglucan network and the enigmatic wall-loosening agents expansins. Here we review first how in the closest relatives of the land plants, the Charophycean algae, cell wall synthesis is coupled to cell wall extensibility by a chemical Ca2+-exchange mechanism between Ca2+-pectate complexes. We next discuss evidence for the existence in terrestrial plants of a similar primitive Ca2+-pectate-based growth control mechanism in parallel to the more recent, land plant-specific, expansin-dependent process.

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 Controls Neural Stem Cell Activation in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinah Han

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs continuously produce new neurons within the adult mammalian hippocampus. NSCs are typically quiescent but activated to self-renew or differentiate into neural progenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms of NSC activation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adult hippocampal NSCs express vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR 3 and its ligand VEGF-C, which activates quiescent NSCs to enter the cell cycle and generate progenitor cells. Hippocampal NSC activation and neurogenesis are impaired by conditional deletion of Vegfr3 in NSCs. Functionally, this is associated with compromised NSC activation in response to VEGF-C and physical activity. In NSCs derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, VEGF-C/VEGFR3 mediates intracellular activation of AKT and ERK pathways that control cell fate and proliferation. These findings identify VEGF-C/VEGFR3 signaling as a specific regulator of NSC activation and neurogenesis in mammals.

  18. The synthetic inhibitor of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor PD166866 controls negatively the growth of tumor cells in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelli Mauro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many experimental data evidence that over-expression of various growth factors cause disorders in cell proliferation. The role of the Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGF in growth control is indisputable: in particular, FGF1 and its tyrosine kinase receptor (FGFR1 act through a very complex network of mechanisms and pathways. In this work we have evaluated the antiproliferative activity effect of PD166866, a synthetic molecule inhibiting the tyrosin kinase action of FGFR1. Methods Cells were routinely grown in Dulbecco Modified Eagle's medium supplemented with newborn serum and a penicillin-streptomycin mixture. Cell viability was evaluated by Mosmann assay and by trypan blue staining. DNA damage was assessed by in situ fluorescent staining with Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. Assessment of oxidative stress at membrane level was measured by quantitative analysis of the intra-cellular formation of malonyl-dialdheyde (MDA deriving from the decomposition of poly-unsaturated fatty acids. The expression of Poly-ADP-Ribose-Polymerase (PARP, consequent to DNA fragmentation, was evidenced by immuno-histochemistry utilizing an antibody directed against an N-terminal fragment of the enzyme. Results The bioactivity of the drug was investigated on Hela cells. Cytoxicity was assessed by the Mosmann assay and by vital staining with trypan blue. The target of the molecule is most likely the cell membrane as shown by the significant increase of the intracellular concentration of malonyl-dihaldheyde. The increase of this compound, as a consequence of the treatment with PD166866, is suggestive of membrane lipoperoxidation. The TUNEL assay gave a qualitative, though clear, indication of DNA damage. Furthermore we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase I. This enzyme is a sensor of nicks on the DNA strands and this supports the idea that treatment with the drug induces cell

  19. Natural killer cell-intrinsic type I IFN signaling controls Klebsiella pneumoniae growth during lung infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroni, Martina; Kavirayani, Anoop; Przybyszewska, Kornelia N.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a significant cause of nosocomial pneumonia and an alarming pathogen owing to the recent isolation of multidrug resistant strains. Understanding of immune responses orchestrating K. pneumoniae clearance by the host is of utmost importance. Here we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling protects against lung infection with K. pneumoniae by launching bacterial growth-controlling interactions between alveolar macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. Type I IFNs are important but disparate and incompletely understood regulators of defense against bacterial infections. Type I IFN receptor 1 (Ifnar1)-deficient mice infected with K. pneumoniae failed to activate NK cell-derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was required for bactericidal action and the production of the NK cell response-amplifying IL-12 and CXCL10 by alveolar macrophages. Bacterial clearance and NK cell IFN-γ were rescued in Ifnar1-deficient hosts by Ifnar1-proficient NK cells. Consistently, type I IFN signaling in myeloid cells including alveolar macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils was dispensable for host defense and IFN-γ activation. The failure of Ifnar1-deficient hosts to initiate a defense-promoting crosstalk between alveolar macrophages and NK cell was circumvented by administration of exogenous IFN-γ which restored endogenous IFN-γ production and restricted bacterial growth. These data identify NK cell-intrinsic type I IFN signaling as essential driver of K. pneumoniae clearance, and reveal specific targets for future therapeutic exploitations. PMID:29112952

  20. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kaori [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshizaki, Keigo [Section of Orthodontics, Division of Oral Health, Growth and Development, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arai, Shinsaku [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sanui, Terukazu [Section of Periodontology, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshiga, Daigo [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Nakamura, Seiji [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  1. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. → We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. → Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. → Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  2. Dynamic control of cell cycle and growth coupling by ecdysone, EGFR, and PI3K signaling in Drosophila histoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Ninov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell proliferation has been extensively studied in cultured cell systems that are characterized by coordinated growth and cell-cycle progression and relatively uniform cell size distribution. During the development of multicellular organisms, however, growth and division can be temporally uncoupled, and the signaling pathways that regulate these growth programs are poorly understood. A good model for analyzing proliferation control in such systems is the morphogenesis of the Drosophila adult abdominal epidermis by histoblasts. These cells undergo a series of temporally regulated transitions during which neither cell size nor division rate is constant. The proliferation of histoblasts during metamorphosis is uniquely amenable to clonal analysis in combination with live imaging. Thereby, we show that abdominal histoblasts, which grow while in G2 arrest during larval stages, enter a proliferative stage in the pupal period that is initiated by ecdysone-dependent string/Cdc25 phosphatase transcription. The proliferating histoblasts have preaccumulated stores of Cyclin E, which trigger an immediate S phase onset after mitosis. These rapid cell cycles lack a G1 phase and result in a progressive reduction of cell size. Eventually, the histoblasts proceed to a stage of slower proliferation that, in contrast to the preceding, depends on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling for progression through the G2/M transition and on insulin receptor/PI3K-mediated signaling for growth. These results uncover the developmentally programmed changes coupling the growth and proliferation of the histoblasts that form the abdominal epidermis of Drosophila. Histoblasts proceed through three distinct stages: growth without division, division without growth, and growth-coupled proliferation. Our identification of the signaling pathways and cell-cycle regulators that control these programs illustrates the power of in vivo time-lapse analyses after

  3. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  4. Mechanisms of Integrin-Mediated Growth Control in Normal, Transformed, and Neoplastic Breast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    in these processes may permit development of therapeutics which will inhibit the growth or metastasis of breast cancer cells. C. Purpose of the...isolation of breast cells (BC). These samples were removed from patients undergoing surgery at Swedish Hospital solely for diagnostic or therapeutic ... mammoplasty tissue supplied by Dr. Ron Tickman. Breast epithelial cells were isolated according to published protocols (Taylor-Papadimitriou and Stampfer, 7

  5. Fractones: extracellular matrix niche controlling stem cell fate and growth factor activity in the brain in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    The stem cell niche refers to a specific microenvironment where stem cells proliferate and differentiate to produce new specialized cells throughout an organism's adulthood. Growth factors are crucial signaling molecules that diffuse through the extracellular space, reach the stem cell niche, and ultimately promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, it is not well known how multiple growth factors, often with antagonistic activities, work together in the stem cell niche to select target stem cell populations and determine stem cell fate. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules play an important role in promoting growth factor access and activity in the stem cell niche. In the adult brain neurogenic zone, where neural stem cells (NSCs) reside, there exist specialized ECM structures, which we have named fractones. The processes of NSC allow them to come into contact with fractones and interact with its individual components, which include heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and laminins. We have demonstrated that fractone-associated HSPGs bind growth factors and regulate NSC proliferation in the neurogenic zone. Moreover, emerging results show that fractones are structurally altered in animal models with autism and adult hydrocephalus, as demonstrated by changes in fractone size, quantity, or HSPG content. Interestingly, ECM structures similar to fractones have been found throughout β-amyloid plaques in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Pathological fractones may cause imbalances in growth factor activity and impair neurogenesis, leading to inflammation and disorder. Generally speaking, these stem cell niche structures play a potentially vital role in controlling growth factor activity during both health and disease.

  6. Organic Gelators as Growth Control Agents for Stable and Reproducible Hybrid Perovskite-Based Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Masi, Sofia

    2017-03-03

    Low-molecular-weight organic gelators are widely used to influence the solidification of polymers, with applications ranging from packaging items, food containers to organic electronic devices, including organic photovoltaics. Here, this concept is extended to hybrid halide perovskite-based materials. In situ time-resolved grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements performed during spin coating reveal that organic gelators beneficially influence the nucleation and growth of the perovskite precursor phase. This can be exploited for the fabrication of planar n-i-p heterojunction devices with MAPbI3 (MA = CH3NH3+) that display a performance that not only is enhanced by ≈25% compared to solar cells where the active layer is produced without the use of a gelator but that also features a higher stability to moisture and a reduced hysteresis. Most importantly, the presented approach is straightforward and simple, and it provides a general method to render the film formation of hybrid perovskites more reliable and robust, analogous to the control that is afforded by these additives in the processing of commodity “plastics.”

  7. Control of tissue growth and cell transformation by the Salvador/Warts/Hippo pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (SWH pathway is an important regulator of tissue growth that is frequently subverted in human cancer. The key oncoprotein of the SWH pathway is the transcriptional co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP. YAP promotes tissue growth and transformation of cultured cells by interacting with transcriptional regulatory proteins via its WW domains, or, in the case of the TEAD1-4 transcription factors, an N-terminal binding domain. YAP possesses a putative transactivation domain in its C-terminus that is necessary to stimulate transcription factors in vitro, but its requirement for YAP function has not been investigated in detail. Interestingly, whilst the WW domains and TEAD-binding domain are highly conserved in the Drosophila melanogaster YAP orthologue, Yorkie, the majority of the C-terminal region of YAP is not present in Yorkie. To investigate this apparent conundrum, we assessed the functional roles of the YAP and Yorkie C-termini. We found that these regions were not required for Yorkie's ability to drive tissue growth in vivo, or YAP's ability to promote anchorage-independent growth or resistance to contact inhibition. However, the YAP transactivation domain was required for YAP's ability to induce cell migration and invasion. Moreover, a role for the YAP transactivation domain in cell transformation was uncovered when the YAP WW domains were mutated together with the transactivation domain. This shows that YAP can promote cell transformation in a flexible manner, presumably by contacting transcriptional regulatory proteins either via its WW domains or its transactivation domain.

  8. Transcription controls growth, cell kinetics and cholesterol supply to sustain ACTH responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert I Menzies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ACTH exposure is associated with adrenal hypertrophy and steroidogenesis. The underlying molecular processes in mice have been analysed by microarray, histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Synacthen infused for 2 weeks markedly increased adrenal mass and plasma corticosterone levels. Microarray analysis found greater than 2-fold changes in expression of 928 genes (P 4-fold and cross-sectional area of fasciculata cells was 2-fold greater. In contrast, genes associated with apoptosis (eg Casp12, Clu, were downregulated and apoptotic cells (Tunel staining were fewer (P < 0.001 and more widely distributed throughout the cortex. In summary, long-term steroidogenesis with ACTH excess is sustained by genes controlling cholesterol supply and adrenal mass. ACTH effects on adrenal morphology and genes controlling cell hypertrophy, proliferation and apoptosis suggest the involvement of different cell types and separate molecular pathways.

  9. Transcription controls growth, cell kinetics and cholesterol supply to sustain ACTH responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert I; Zhao, Xin; Mullins, Linda J; Mullins, John J; Cairns, Carolynn; Wrobel, Nicola; Dunbar, Donald R; Bailey, Matthew A; Kenyon, Christopher J

    2017-10-01

    Chronic ACTH exposure is associated with adrenal hypertrophy and steroidogenesis. The underlying molecular processes in mice have been analysed by microarray, histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Synacthen infused for 2 weeks markedly increased adrenal mass and plasma corticosterone levels. Microarray analysis found greater than 2-fold changes in expression of 928 genes ( P  4-fold and cross-sectional area of fasciculata cells was 2-fold greater. In contrast, genes associated with apoptosis (eg Casp12, Clu, ) were downregulated and apoptotic cells (Tunel staining) were fewer ( P  < 0.001) and more widely distributed throughout the cortex. In summary, long-term steroidogenesis with ACTH excess is sustained by genes controlling cholesterol supply and adrenal mass. ACTH effects on adrenal morphology and genes controlling cell hypertrophy, proliferation and apoptosis suggest the involvement of different cell types and separate molecular pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  10. Role of growth factors in control of pancreatic beta cell mass: focus on betatrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, Lynne L; Ardestani, Goli; Rhoads, David B

    2014-08-01

    Betatrophin is a newly described hormone, which potently stimulates beta cell replication in mice. This discovery has engendered great hope that it could prove clinically important in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Betatrophin, a 198-amino acid protein secreted by liver and adipose tissue, stimulates growth of pancreatic beta cell mass in insulin-resistant mice. Betatrophin has previously been named RIFL, lipasin, and ANGPLT8, and its salutory effects on lipid metabolism have been described in mouse and human studies. Serum betatrophin levels in humans correlate with improved adipose tissue lipid storage and lower serum triglyceride levels in the fed state, but do not correlate with insulin resistance or carbohydrate tolerance in humans. Betatrophin has not yet been shown to have an effect on beta cell replication in human pancreatic islets. Many endocrine and paracrine factors, of which betatrophin is the newest described, increase beta cell mass in murine models. None of these factors, including betatrophin, have displayed the same activity in clinical studies. This may reflect a profound species difference in beta cell regeneration pathways in mice and humans.

  11. The Spatiotemporal Control of Osteoblast Cell Growth, Behavior, and Function Dictated by Nanostructured Stainless Steel Artificial Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Udesh; Pan, Hsu-An; Shie, Meng-Je; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha S; Chen, Po-Chun; Chen, Wen Liang

    2017-12-01

    The successful application of a nanostructured biomaterial as an implant is strongly determined by the nanotopography size triggering the ideal cell response. Here, nanoporous topography on 304L stainless steel substrates was engineered to identify the nanotopography size causing a transition in the cellular characteristics, and accordingly, the design of nanostructured stainless steel surface as orthopedic implants is proposed. A variety of nanopore diameters ranging from 100 to 220 nm were fabricated by one-step electrolysis process and collectively referred to as artificial microenvironments. Control over the nanopore diameter was achieved by varying bias voltage. MG63 osteoblasts were cultured on the nanoporous surfaces for different days. Immunofluorescence (IF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to compare the modulation in cell morphologies and characteristics. Osteoblasts displayed differential growth parameters and distinct transition in cell behavior after nanopore reached a certain diameter. Nanopores with 100-nm diameter promoted cell growth, focal adhesions, cell area, viability, vinculin-stained area, calcium mineralization, and alkaline phosphatase activity. The ability of these nanoporous substrates to differentially modulate the cell behavior and assist in identifying the transition step will be beneficial to biomedical engineers to develop superior implant geometries, triggering an ideal cell response at the cell-nanotopography interface.

  12. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Mayo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments.

  13. Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling in Regulatory T Cells Controls T Helper-17 Cells and Tissue-Specific Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkel, Joanne E; Zhang, Dunfang; Zanvit, Peter; Chia, Cheryl; Zangarle-Murray, Tamsin; Jin, Wenwen; Wang, Songlin; Chen, WanJun

    2017-04-18

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) perform suppressive functions in disparate tissue environments and against many inflammatory insults, yet the tissue-enriched factor(s) that influence Treg cell phenotype and function remain largely unknown. We have shown a vital role for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signals in safe-guarding specific Treg cell functions. TGF-β signals were dispensable for steady-state Treg cell homeostasis and for Treg cell suppression of T cell proliferation and T helper-1 (Th1) cell differentiation. However, Treg cells require TGF-β signals to appropriately dampen Th17 cells and regulate responses in the gastrointestinal tract. TGF-β signaling maintains CD103 expression, promotes expression of the colon-specific trafficking molecule GPR15, and inhibits expression of GPR174, a receptor for lysophosphatidylserine, on Treg cells, collectively supporting the accumulation and retention of Treg cells in the colon and control of colitogenic responses. Thus, we reveal an unrecognized function for TGF-β signaling as an upstream factor controlling Treg cell activity in specific tissue environments. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    , we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks......Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...... involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process....

  15. The Secreted Protease PrtA Controls Cell Growth, Biofilm Formation and Pathogenicity in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouran, Hossein; Gillespie, Hyrum; Nascimento, Rafael; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Zaini, Paulo A.; Jacobson, Aaron; Phinney, Brett S.; Dolan, David; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P.; Antonova, Elena S.; Lindow, Steven E.; Mellema, Matthew S.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2016-01-01

    Pierce’s disease (PD) is a deadly disease of grapevines caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. Though disease symptoms were formerly attributed to bacteria blocking the plant xylem, this hypothesis is at best overly simplistic. Recently, we used a proteomic approach to characterize the secretome of X. fastidiosa, both in vitro and in planta, and identified LesA as one of the pathogenicity factors of X. fastidiosa in grapevines that leads to leaf scorching and chlorosis. Herein, we characterize another such factor encoded by PD0956, designated as an antivirulence secreted protease “PrtA” that displays a central role in controlling in vitro cell proliferation, length, motility, biofilm formation, and in planta virulence. The mutant in X. fastidiosa exhibited reduced cell length, hypermotility (and subsequent lack of biofilm formation) and hypervirulence in grapevines. These findings are supported by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses with corresponding plant infection data. Of particular interest, is the hypervirulent response in grapevines observed when X. fastidiosa is disrupted for production of PrtA, and that PD-model tobacco plants transformed to express PrtA exhibited decreased symptoms after infection by X. fastidiosa. PMID:27492542

  16. Opposing Post-transcriptional Control of InR by FMRP and LIN-28 Adjusts Stem Cell-Based Tissue Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Luhur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Although the intrinsic mechanisms that control whether stem cells divide symmetrically or asymmetrically underlie tissue growth and homeostasis, they remain poorly defined. We report that the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP limits the symmetric division, and resulting expansion, of the stem cell population during adaptive intestinal growth in Drosophila. The elevated insulin sensitivity that FMRP-deficient progenitor cells display contributes to their accelerated expansion, which is suppressed by the depletion of insulin-signaling components. This FMRP activity is mediated solely via a second conserved RNA-binding protein, LIN-28, known to boost insulin signaling in stem cells. Via LIN-28, FMRP controls progenitor cell behavior by post-transcriptionally repressing the level of insulin receptor (InR. This study identifies the stem cell-based mechanism by which FMRP controls tissue adaptation, and it raises the possibility that defective adaptive growth underlies the accelerated growth, gastrointestinal, and other symptoms that affect fragile X syndrome patients. : Luhur et al. report that FMRP acts via LIN-28 in progenitor cells to dampen the adaptive expansion of intestinal tissue in the fruit fly, raising the possibility that defective LIN28-mediated adaptive growth underlies some of the symptoms that affect fragile X syndrome patients. Keywords: FMRP, fmr1, LIN-28, insulin receptor, IIS, adaptive growth, tissue resizing, intestinal stem cell, insulin sensitivity

  17. Cell cycle control by components of cell anchorage

    OpenAIRE

    Gad, Annica

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular factors, such as growth factors and cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix, control when and where cells may proliferate. This control is abolished when a normal cell transforms into a tumour cell. The control of cell proliferation by cell anchorage was elusive and less well studied than the control by growth factors. Therefore, we aimed to clarify at what points in the cell cycle and through which molecular mechanisms cell anchorage controls cell cycle pro...

  18. The bantam microRNA acts through Numb to exert cell growth control and feedback regulation of Notch in tumor-forming stem cells in the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Chi; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Song, Yan; Gehrke, Stephan; Lu, Bingwei

    2017-05-01

    Notch (N) signaling is central to the self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs) and other tissue stem cells. Its deregulation compromises tissue homeostasis and contributes to tumorigenesis and other diseases. How N regulates stem cell behavior in health and disease is not well understood. Here we show that N regulates bantam (ban) microRNA to impact cell growth, a process key to NSC maintenance and particularly relied upon by tumor-forming cancer stem cells. Notch signaling directly regulates ban expression at the transcriptional level, and ban in turn feedback regulates N activity through negative regulation of the Notch inhibitor Numb. This feedback regulatory mechanism helps maintain the robustness of N signaling activity and NSC fate. Moreover, we show that a Numb-Myc axis mediates the effects of ban on nucleolar and cellular growth independently or downstream of N. Our results highlight intricate transcriptional as well as translational control mechanisms and feedback regulation in the N signaling network, with important implications for NSC biology and cancer biology.

  19. Endolysosomal membrane trafficking complexes drive nutrient-dependent TORC1 signaling to control cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Sen, Neelam D; Maeda, Tatsuya; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2014-04-01

    The rapamycin-sensitive and endomembrane-associated TORC1 pathway controls cell growth in response to nutrients in eukaryotes. Mutations in class C Vps (Vps-C) complexes are synthetically lethal with tor1 mutations and confer rapamycin hypersensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting a role for these complexes in TORC1 signaling. Vps-C complexes are required for vesicular trafficking and fusion and comprise four distinct complexes: HOPS and CORVET and their minor intermediaries (i)-CORVET and i-HOPS. We show that at least one Vps-C complex is required to promote TORC1 activity, with the HOPS complex having the greatest input. The vps-c mutants fail to recover from rapamycin-induced growth arrest and show low levels of TORC1 activity. TORC1 promotes cell growth via Sch9, a p70(S6) kinase ortholog. Constitutively active SCH9 or hyperactive TOR1 alleles restored rapamycin recovery and TORC1 activity of vps-c mutants, supporting a role for the Vps-C complexes upstream of TORC1. The EGO GTPase complex Exit from G0 Complex (EGOC) and its homologous Rag-GTPase complex convey amino acid signals to TORC1 in yeast and mammals, respectively. Expression of the activated EGOC GTPase subunits Gtr1(GTP) and Gtr2(GDP) partially suppressed vps-c mutant rapamycin recovery defects, and this suppression was enhanced by increased amino acid concentrations. Moreover, vps-c mutations disrupted EGOC-TORC1 interactions. TORC1 defects were more severe for vps-c mutants than those observed in EGOC mutants. Taken together, our results support a model in which distinct endolysosomal trafficking Vps-C complexes promote rapamycin-sensitive TORC1 activity via multiple inputs, one of which involves maintenance of amino acid homeostasis that is sensed and transmitted to TORC1 via interactions with EGOC.

  20. Controlled growth of semiconductor nanofilms within TiO₂ nanotubes for nanofilm sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaojia; Yu, Dongqi; Xiong, Feng-Qiang; Li, Mingrun; Yang, Zhou; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Li, Can

    2014-04-28

    Anodized TiO2 nanotubes were decorated by II-VI semiconductor nanofilms via atomic layer deposition (ALD) and further employed as photoanodes of semiconductor nanofilm sensitized solar cells (NFSCs) exhibiting superior photovoltaic performance.

  1. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 controls migration and malignant transformation but not cell growth and proliferation in PTEN-null lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finlay, D.K.; Sinclair, L.V.; Feijoo, C.; Waugh, C.M.; Hagenbeek, T.J.; Spits, H.; Cantrell, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In normal T cell progenitors, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase l (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation and activation of protein kinase B (PKB) is essential for the phosphorylation and inactivation of Foxo family transcription factors, and also controls T cell growth and proliferation. The current study

  2. Gr1(+) Cells Control Growth of YopM-Negative Yersinia pestis during Systemic Plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Z.; Kerschen, E.J.; Cohen, D.; Kaplan, A.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Straley, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    YopM, a protein toxin of Yersinia pestis, is necessary for virulence in a mouse model of systemic plague. We previously reported YopM-dependent natural killer (NK) cell depletion from blood and spleen samples of infected mice. However, in this study we found that infection with Y. pestis KIM5

  3. High-density polymer microarrays: identifying synthetic polymers that control human embryonic stem cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Zhang, Rong; Kalloudis, Michail; Koutsos, Vasileios; de Sousa, Paul A; Bradley, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication of high-density polymer microarray is described, allowing the simultaneous and efficient evaluation of more than 7000 different polymers in a single-cellular-based screen. These high-density polymer arrays are applied in the search for synthetic substrates for hESCs culture. Up-scaling of the identified hit polymers enables long-term cellular cultivation and promoted successful stem-cell maintenance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The steroid hormone ecdysone controls systemic growth by repressing dMyc function in Drosophila fat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoue, Rénald; Slaidina, Maija; Léopold, Pierre

    2010-06-15

    How steroid hormones shape animal growth remains poorly understood. In Drosophila, the main steroid hormone, ecdysone, limits systemic growth during juvenile development. Here we show that ecdysone controls animal growth rate by specifically acting on the fat body, an organ that retains endocrine and storage functions of the vertebrate liver and fat. We demonstrate that fat body-targeted loss of function of the Ecdysone receptor (EcR) increases dMyc expression and its cellular functions such as ribosome biogenesis. Moreover, changing dMyc levels in this tissue is sufficient to affect animal growth rate. Finally, the growth increase induced by silencing EcR in the fat body is suppressed by cosilencing dMyc. In conclusion, the present work reveals an unexpected function of dMyc in the systemic control of growth in response to steroid hormone signaling. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Homeostatic Mass Control in Gastric Non-Neoplastic Epithelia under Infection of Helicobacter pylori: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of Cell Growth, Stem Cells and Programmed Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kenji; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Aikou, Takashi; Murata, Fusayoshi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated homeostatic mass control in non-neoplastic gastric epithelia under Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection in the macroscopically normal-appearing mucosa resected from the stomach with gastric cancer, immunohistochemically analyzing the proliferation, kinetics of stem cells and programmed cell death occurring in them. Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells were found dominantly in the elongated neck portion, sparsely in the fundic areas and sporadically in the stroma with chronic infiltrates. CD117 could monitor the kinetics of gastric stem cells and showed its expression in two stages of gastric epithelial differentiation, namely, in transient cells from the gastric epithelial stem cells to the foveolar and glandular cells in the neck portion and in what are apparently progenitor cells from the gastric stem cells in the stroma among the infiltrates. Most of the nuclei were positive for ssDNA in the almost normal mucosa, suggesting DNA damage. Cleaved caspase-3-positive foveolar cells were noted under the surface, suggesting the suppression of apoptosis in the surface foveolar cells. Besides such apoptosis of the foveolar cells, in the severely inflamed mucosa apoptotic cells were found in the neck portion where most of the cells were Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells. Beclin-1 was recognized in the cytoplasm and in a few nuclei of the fundic glandular cells, suggesting their autophagic cell death and mutated beclin-1 in the nuclei. Taken together, the direct and indirect effects of HP infection on the gastric epithelial proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death suggested the in-situ occurrence of gastric cancer under HP infection

  6. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  7. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  8. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and α-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin

  9. Controllable thin film crystal growth of a novel squaraine molecule in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Brad; Spencer, Susan; Bougher, Cortney; Brown, Jesse; Kelley, Kyle; Heaphy, Patrick; Murcia, Victor; Gallivan, Cameron; Monfette, Amber; Andersen, John; Cody, Jeremy; Coffey, Tonya; Collison, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    We will discuss the formation, structures, and properties of squarine and squarine-PCBM blend thin-films using Atomic Force Microscopy, electrical characterization, UV-VIS-NIR, and Thin-film Xray Diffraction. Film properties are inferred from spectroscopic measurements and are correlated with crystallinity as determined by TFXRD and AFM. A comprehensive explanation of DiPSQ(OH)2 structures is provided and related to measured efficiencies up to 4.3. By controlling the blend ratio and other fabrication conditions, crystalline regions of higher mobility can be developed so as to make significant gains in power conversion efficiency, necessary to achieve long term goals for commercially viable NIR-active OPV devices. AppState Office of Student Research; Synthesis by Cody group. BRC thanks ORAU Junior Faculty Enhancement Award. SDS, CPG and AM thank DOE Award number DE-FG36-08GO88110. CJC and JAC thank NSF award number CBET-1236372.

  10. Impact of adjuvant inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases on tumor growth delay and local tumor control after fractionated irradiation in human squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zips, Daniel; Hessel, Franziska; Krause, Mechthild; Schiefer, Yvonne; Hoinkis, Cordelia; Thames, Howard D.; Haberey, Martin; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previous experiments have shown that adjuvant inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor after fractionated irradiation prolonged tumor growth delay and may also improve local tumor control. To test the latter hypothesis, local tumor control experiments were performed. Methods and materials: Human FaDu and UT-SCC-14 squamous cell carcinomas were studied in nude mice. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (50 mg/kg body weight b.i.d.) was administered for 75 days after irradiation with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Tumor growth time and tumor control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) were determined and compared to controls (carrier without PTK787/ZK222584). Results: Adjuvant administration of PTK787/ZK222584 significantly prolonged tumor growth time to reach 5 times the volume at start of drug treatment by an average of 11 days (95% confidence interval 0.06;22) in FaDu tumors and 29 days (0.6;58) in UT-SCC-14 tumors. In both tumor models, TCD 50 values were not statistically significantly different between the groups treated with PTK787/ZK222584 compared to controls. Conclusions: Long-term inhibition of angiogenesis after radiotherapy significantly reduced the growth rate of local recurrences but did not improve local tumor control. This indicates that recurrences after irradiation depend on vascular endothelial growth factor-driven angiogenesis, but surviving tumor cells retain their clonogenic potential during adjuvant antiangiogenic treatment with PTK787/ZK222584

  11. The Role of Controlled Surface Topography and Chemistry on Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Attachment, Growth and Self-Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Melanie; Williams, Rachel; Downes, Joni; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2017-09-14

    The success of stem cell therapies relies heavily on our ability to control their fate in vitro during expansion to ensure an appropriate supply. The biophysical properties of the cell culture environment have been recognised as a potent stimuli influencing cellular behaviour. In this work we used advanced plasma-based techniques to generate model culture substrates with controlled nanotopographical features of 16 nm, 38 nm and 68 nm in magnitude, and three differently tailored surface chemical functionalities. The effect of these two surface properties on the adhesion, spreading, and self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were assessed. The results demonstrated that physical and chemical cues influenced the behaviour of these stem cells in in vitro culture in different ways. The size of the nanotopographical features impacted on the cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation, while the chemistry influenced the cell self-renewal and differentiation.

  12. Co-ordinate regulation of growth factor receptors and lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 controls cell activation by exogenous lysophosphatidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilquil, C; Ling, Z C; Singh, I; Buri, K; Zhang, Q X; Brindley, D N

    2001-11-01

    The serum-derived lipid growth factors, lysophosphatidate (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), activate cells selectively through different members of a family of endothelial differentiation gene (EDG) receptors. Activation of EDG receptors by LPA and S1P provides a variety of signalling cascades depending upon the G-protein coupling of the different EDG receptors. This leads to chemotactic and mitogenic responses, which are important in wound healing. For example, LPA stimulates fibroblast division and S1P stimulates the chemotaxis and division of endothelial cells leading to angiogenesis. Counteracting these effects of LPA and S1P, are the actions of lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPP, or phosphatidate phosphohydrolases, Type 2). The isoform LPP-1 is expressed in the plasma membrane with its active site outside the cell. This enzyme is responsible for 'ecto-phosphatase' activity leading to the degradation of exogenous lipid phosphate mediators, particularly LPA. Expression of LPP-1 decreases cell activation by exogenous LPA. The mechanism for this is controversial and several mechanisms have been proposed. Evidence will be presented that the LPPs cross-talk with EDG and other growth factor receptors, thus, regulating the responses of the cells to lipid phosphate mediators of signal transduction.

  13. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Danis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients.

  14. Distinct CCR2(+) Gr1(+) cells control growth of the Yersinia pestis ΔyopM mutant in liver and spleen during systemic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhan; Uittenbogaard, Annette M; Cohen, Donald A; Kaplan, Alan M; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Straley, Susan C

    2011-02-01

    We are using a systemic plague model to identify the cells and pathways that are undermined by the virulence protein YopM of the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis. In this study, we pursued previous findings that Gr1(+) cells are required to selectively limit growth of ΔyopM Y. pestis and that CD11b(+) cells other than polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are selectively lost in spleens infected with parent Y. pestis. When PMNs were ablated from mice, ΔyopM Y. pestis grew as well as the parent strain in liver but not in spleen, showing that these cells are critical for controlling growth of the mutant in liver but not spleen. In mice lacking expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2, wild-type growth was restored to ΔyopM Y. pestis in both organs. In spleen, the Gr1(+) cells differentially recruited by parent and ΔyopM Y. pestis infections were CCR2(+) Gr1(+) CD11b(+) CD11c(Lo-Int) MAC3(+) iNOS(+) (inducible nitric oxide synthase-positive) inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs), and their recruitment to spleen from blood was blocked when YopM was present in the infecting strain. Consistent with influx of iDCs being affected by YopM in spleen, the growth defect of the ΔyopM mutant was relieved by the parent Y. pestis strain in a coinfection assay in which the parent strain could affect the fate of the mutant in trans. In a mouse model of bubonic plague, CCR2 also was shown to be required for ΔyopM Y. pestis to show wild-type growth in skin. The data imply that YopM's pathogenic effect indirectly undermines signaling through CCR2. We propose a model for how YopM exerts its different effects in liver and spleen.

  15. Kidney tubular-cell secretion of osteoblast growth factor is increased by kaempferol: a scientific basis for "the kidney controlling the bone" theory of Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mian; Li, Shun-xiang; Xiao, Jiang-feng; Wang, Jian; Lozanoff, Scott; Zhang, Zhi-guang; Luft, Benjamin J; Johnson, Francis

    2014-09-01

    To study, at the cytological level, the basic concept of Chinese medicine that "the Kidney (Shen) controls the bone". Kaempferol was isolated form Rhizoma Drynariae (Gu Sui Bu, GSB) and at several concentrations was incubated with opossum kidney (OK) cells, osteoblasts (MC3T3 E1) and human fibroblasts (HF) at cell concentrations of 2×10(4)/mL. Opossum kidney cell-conditioned culture media with kaempferol at 70 nmol/L (70kaeOKM) and without kaempferol (0OKM) were used to stimulate MC3T3 E1 and HF proliferation. The bone morphological protein receptors I and II (BMPR I and II) in OK cells were identified by immune-fluorescence staining and Western blot analysis. Kaempferol was found to increase OK cell growth (Pkaempferol increases kidney cell secretion of OGF. Neither of these media had any significant effect on HF growth. Kaempferol also was found to increase the level of the BMPR II in OK cells. This lends strong support to the original idea that the Kidney has a significant influence over bone-formation, as suggested by some long-standing Chinese medical beliefs, kaempferol may also serve to stimulate kidney repair and indirectly stimulate bone formation.

  16. Controlled Growth and the Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Cultivation with Defined Medium on Extracellular Matrix-Coated Micropatterned Dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Chiemi; Miyajima, Hiroshi; Yoda, Yusuke; Imazato, Hideo; Yamamoto, Takako; Gomi, Shinichi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Kenichi; Sasaki, Tetsuji; Kawamata, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we introduce a new serum-free defined medium (SPM) that supports the cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) on recombinant human vitronectin-N (rhVNT-N)-coated dishes after seeding with either cell clumps or single cells. With this system, there was no need for an intervening sequential adaptation process after moving hPSCs from feeder layer-dependent conditions. We also introduce a micropatterned dish that was coated with extracellular matrix by photolithographic technology. This procedure allowed the cultivation of hPSCs on 199 individual rhVNT-N-coated small round spots (1 mm in diameter) on each 35-mm polystyrene dish (termed "patterned culture"), permitting the simultaneous formation of 199 uniform high-density small-sized colonies. This culture system supported controlled cell growth and maintenance of undifferentiated hPSCs better than dishes in which the entire surface was coated with rhVNT-N (termed "non-patterned cultures"). Non-patterned cultures produced variable, unrestricted cell proliferation with non-uniform cell growth and uneven densities in which we observed downregulated expression of some self-renewal-related markers. Comparative flow cytometric studies of the expression of pluripotency-related molecules SSEA-3 and TRA-1-60 in hPSCs from non-patterned cultures and patterned cultures supported this concept. Patterned cultures of hPSCs allowed sequential visual inspection of every hPSC colony, giving an address and number in patterned culture dishes. Several spots could be sampled for quality control tests of production batches, thereby permitting the monitoring of hPSCs in a single culture dish. Our new patterned culture system utilizing photolithography provides a robust, reproducible and controllable cell culture system and demonstrates technological advantages for the mass production of hPSCs with process quality control.

  17. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  18. Bacterial Cell Wall Growth, Shape and Division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, A.; Terrak, M.; den Blaauwen, T.; Vollmer, W.; Remaut, H.; Fronzes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a bacterial cell is maintained by its peptidoglycan sacculus that completely surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth the sacculus is enlarged by peptidoglycan synthesis complexes that are controlled by components linked to the cytoskeleton and, in Gram-negative bacteria, by

  19. Controlled synthesis of ZnO branched nanorod arrays by hierarchical solution growth and application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiaoming; Peng Lihua; Shang Xiaoying; Zhang Zhengguo

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the controlled synthesis of ZnO branched nanorod arrays on fluorine-doped SnO 2 -coated glass substrates by the hierarchical solution growth method. In the secondary growth, the concentration of Zn(NO 3 ) 2 /hexamethylenetetramine plays an important role in controlling the morphology of the branched nanorod arrays, besides that of diaminopropane used as a structure-directing agent to induce the growth of branches. The population density and morphology of the branched nanorod arrays depend on those of the nanorod arrays obtained from the primary growth, which can be modulated though the concentration of Zn(NO 3 ) 2 /hexamethylenetetramine in the primary growth solution. The dye-sensitized ZnO branched nanorod arrays exhibit much stronger optical absorption as compared with its corresponding primary nanorod arrays, suggesting that the addition of the branches improves light harvesting. The dye-sensitized solar cell based on the optimized ZnO branched nanorod array reaches a conversion efficiency of 1.66% under the light radiation of 1000 W/m 2 . The branched nanorod arrays can also be applied in other application fields of ZnO.

  20. Ethylene Antagonizes Salt-Induced Growth Retardation and Cell Death Process via Transcriptional Controlling of Ethylene-, BAG- and Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Ling; Lin, Ying-Chao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Li, Lei-Peng; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The existing question whether ethylene is involved in the modulation of salt-induced cell death to mediate plant salt tolerance is important for understanding the salt tolerance mechanisms. Here, we employed Arabidopsis plants to study the possible role of ethylene in salt-induced growth inhibition and programmed cell death (PCD) profiles. The root length, DNA ladder and cell death indicated by Evan's blue detection were measured by compared to the control or salt-stressed seedlings. Secondly, the protoplasts isolated from plant leaves and dyed with Annexin V-FITC were subjected to flow cytometric (FCM) assay. Our results showed that ethylene works effectively in seedling protoplasts, antagonizing salt-included root retardation and restraining cell death both in seedlings or protoplasts. Due to salinity, the entire or partial insensitivity of ethylene signaling resulted in an elevated levels of cell death in ein2-5 and ein3-1 plants and the event were amended in ctr1-1 plants after salt treatment. The subsequent experiment with exogenous ACC further corroborated that ethylene could modulate salt-induced PCD process actively. Plant Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family genes are recently identified to play an extensive role in plant PCD processes ranging from growth, development to stress responses and even cell death. Our result showed that salinity alone significantly suppressed the transcripts of BAG6, BAG7 and addition of ACC in the saline solution could obviously re-activate BAG6 and BAG7 expressions, which might play a key role to inhibit the salt-induced cell death. In summary, our research implies that ethylene and salinity antagonistically control BAG family-, ethylene-, and senescence-related genes to alleviate the salt-induced cell death.

  1. MicroRNA-26a/cyclin-dependent kinase 5 axis controls proliferation, apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Floriana Maria; Inguscio, Alessandra; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Cortesi, Alice; Elia, Leonardo; Quintavalle, Manuela

    2017-06-22

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most frequent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite a favorable therapeutic response to first-line chemo-immunotherapy, still 30-40% of patients is refractory, or relapse after this treatment. Thus, alternative strategies must be sought. Previous studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is involved in tumor development and progression, and it may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, its role in modulating DLBCL growth and progression remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that CDK5 and its activator, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activator 1 (CDK5R1 or p35), are overexpressed in DLBCL cell lines and that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and activity is dependent on CDK5 expression in DLBCL. Using public data sets, we also demonstrate that patients with DLBCL show a higher expression of CDK5 compared with healthy individuals. By using loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that CDK5's activity regulates proliferation and survival of DLBCL cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulating gene expression and are involved in cancer initiation and progression. We identify miR-26a as direct regulator of p35 expression and CDK5 activity. We show that miR-26a expression is lower in DLBCL cell lines compared to B lymphocytes and that its ectopic expression leads to a drastic reduction of DLBCL tumor growth in vivo and decreased proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and survival in vitro. Remarkably, concomitant overexpression of a 3'-UTR-truncated form of p35 promoted tumor growth in vivo and cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and cell survival in vitro. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role for miR-26a and CDK5 together in the survival and growth of DLBCL cells, suggesting the existence of potential novel therapeutic targets for the

  2. Quality control system response to stochastic growth of amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lizana, Ludvig; Otzen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model describing aggregation of misfolded proteins and degradation by the protein quality control system in a single cell. Aggregate growth is contrasted by the cell quality control system, that attacks them at different stages of the growth process, with an efficiency t...

  3. Card9 controls Dectin‐1‐induced T‐cell cytotoxicity and tumor growth in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Tobias; Heidegger, Simon; Wintges, Alexander; Bscheider, Michael; Bek, Sarah; Fischer, Julius C.; Eisenkolb, Gabriel; Schmickl, Martina; Spoerl, Silvia; Peschel, Christian; Poeck, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the C‐type lectin receptor Dectin‐1 by β‐glucans triggers multiple signals within DCs that result in activation of innate immunity. While these mechanisms can potently prime CD8+ cytotoxic T‐cell (CTL) responses without additional adjuvants, the Dectin‐1 effector pathways that control CTL induction remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that Dectin‐1‐induced CTL cross‐priming in mice does not require inflammasome activation but strictly depends on the adapter protein Card9 in vitro. In vivo, Dectin‐1‐mediated Card9 activation after vaccination drives both expansion and activation of Ag‐specific CTLs, resulting in long‐lasting CTL responses that are sufficient to protect mice from tumor challenge. This Dectin‐1‐induced antitumor immune response was independent of NK cell function and completely abrogated in Card9‐deficient mice. Thus, our results demonstrate that Dectin‐1‐triggered Card9 signaling but not inflammasome activation can potently cross‐prime Ag‐specific CTLs, suggesting that this pathway would be a candidate for immunotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:28295265

  4. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  5. Elastic Deformations During Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K. C.

    2010-03-01

    The wide variety of shapes and sizes found in bacterial species is almost universally defined by the cell wall, which is a cross-linked network of the material peptidoglycan. In recent years, cell shape has been shown to play a critical role in regulating many important biological functions including attachment, dispersal, motility, polar differentiation, predation, and cellular differentiation. In previous work, we have shown that the spatial organization of the peptidoglycan network can change the mechanical equilibrium of the cell wall and result in changes in cell shape. However, experimental data on the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan is currently limited. Here, we describe a straightforward, inexpensive approach for extracting the mechanical properties of bacterial cells in gels of user-defined stiffness, using only optical microscopy to match growth kinetics to the predictions of a continuum model of cell growth. Using this simple yet general methodology, we have measured the Young's modulus for bacteria ranging across a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and cell wall thicknesses, and our method can easily be extended to other commonly studied bacteria. This method makes it possible to rapidly determine how changes in genotype and biochemistry affect the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and may be particularly relevant for studying the relationship between cell shape and structure, the genetic and molecular control of the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and the identification of antibiotics and other small molecules that affect and specifically modify the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Our work also suggests that bacteria may utilize peptidoglycan synthesis to transduce mechanosensory signals from local environment.

  6. Inferring the Impact of Regulatory Mechanisms that Underpin CD8+ T Cell Control of B16 Tumor GrowthIn vivoUsing Mechanistic Models and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, David J; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    A major barrier for broadening the efficacy of immunotherapies for cancer is identifying key mechanisms that limit the efficacy of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Yet, identifying these mechanisms using human samples and mouse models for cancer remains a challenge. While interactions between cancer and the immune system are dynamic and non-linear, identifying the relative roles that biological components play in regulating anti-tumor immunity commonly relies on human intuition alone, which can be limited by cognitive biases. To assist natural intuition, modeling and simulation play an emerging role in identifying therapeutic mechanisms. To illustrate the approach, we developed a multi-scale mechanistic model to describe the control of tumor growth by a primary response of CD8+ T cells against defined tumor antigens using the B16 C57Bl/6 mouse model for malignant melanoma. The mechanistic model was calibrated to data obtained following adenovirus-based immunization and validated to data obtained following adoptive transfer of transgenic CD8+ T cells. More importantly, we use simulation to test whether the postulated network topology, that is the modeled biological components and their associated interactions, is sufficient to capture the observed anti-tumor immune response. Given the available data, the simulation results also provided a statistical basis for quantifying the relative importance of different mechanisms that underpin CD8+ T cell control of B16F10 growth. By identifying conditions where the postulated network topology is incomplete, we illustrate how this approach can be used as part of an iterative design-build-test cycle to expand the predictive power of the model.

  7. The histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA acts in synergism with fenretinide and doxorubicin to control growth of rhabdoid tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerl, Kornelius; Eveslage, Maria; Jung, Manfred; Meisterernst, Michael; Frühwald, Michael; Ries, David; Unland, Rebecca; Borchert, Christiane; Moreno, Natalia; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jürgens, Heribert; Kool, Marcel; Görlich, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumors are highly aggressive malignancies affecting infants and very young children. In many instances these tumors are resistant to conventional type chemotherapy necessitating alternative approaches. Proliferation assays (MTT), apoptosis (propidium iodide/annexin V) and cell cycle analysis (DAPI), RNA expression microarrays and western blots were used to identify synergism of the HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitor SAHA with fenretinide, tamoxifen and doxorubicin in rhabdoidtumor cell lines. HDAC1 and HDAC2 are overexpressed in primary rhabdoid tumors and rhabdoid tumor cell lines. Targeting HDACs in rhabdoid tumors induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. On the other hand HDAC inhibition induces deregulated gene programs (MYCC-, RB program and the stem cell program) in rhabdoid tumors. These programs are in general associated with cell cycle progression. Targeting these activated pro-proliferative genes by combined approaches of HDAC-inhibitors plus fenretinide, which inhibits cyclinD1, exhibit strong synergistic effects on induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, HDAC inhibition sensitizes rhabdoid tumor cell lines to cell death induced by chemotherapy. Our data demonstrate that HDAC inhibitor treatment in combination with fenretinide or conventional chemotherapy is a promising tool for the treatment of chemoresistant rhabdoid tumors

  8. Tyrosine Kinase Expressed in Hepatocellular Carcinoma, TEC, Controls Pluripotency and Early Cell Fate Decisions of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells via Regulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanova, Tereza; Konecna, Zaneta; Zbonakova, Zuzana; La Venuta, Giuseppe; Zoufalova, Karolina; Jelinkova, Sarka; Varecha, Miroslav; Rotrekl, Vladimir; Krejci, Pavel; Nickel, Walter; Dvorak, Petr; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) require signaling provided by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors. This can be initiated by the recombinant FGF2 ligand supplied exogenously, but hPSC further support their niche by secretion of endogenous FGF2. In this study, we describe a role of tyrosine kinase expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (TEC) kinase in this process. We show that TEC-mediated FGF2 secretion is essential for hPSC self-renewal, and its lack mediates specific differentiation. Following both short hairpin RNA- and small interfering RNA-mediated TEC knockdown, hPSC secretes less FGF2. This impairs hPSC proliferation that can be rescued by increasing amounts of recombinant FGF2. TEC downregulation further leads to a lower expression of the pluripotency markers, an improved priming towards neuroectodermal lineage, and a failure to develop cardiac mesoderm. Our data thus demonstrate that TEC is yet another regulator of FGF2-mediated hPSC pluripotency and differentiation. Stem Cells 2017;35:2050-2059. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  9. In-situ Raman spectroscopy. A method to study and control the growth of microcrystalline silicon for thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthmann, Stefan

    2012-08-22

    of the in-situ method. The initial phase of deposition is of great importance for the performance of a {mu}cSi:H thin-film solar cell. Hence the dependence of the evolution of the crystalline volume fraction during initial layer growth on the properties of the underlying seed layer was studied in-situ. A seed layer dependent increase and subsequent stabilization of the crystalline volume fraction was observed. By actively controlling the deposition parameters based on these results it was possible to reduce the observed inhomogeneity of the Raman crystallinity in growth direction. A possible application of in-situ Raman spectroscopy as basis of an active process control was studied by testing the ability of in-situ Raman spectroscopy to detect fluctuations of the deposition parameters on the example of a disturbance of the process gas flow. It was possible to detect the reaction of the layer growth on a change of deposition conditions in-situ. By correlating the in-situ measurements to results obtained on solar-cells it was found that - unless the process fluctuation happens during the initial phase of deposition - it is possible to maintain state-of-the art solar cell performance by an active process control. By modulating the plasma emission synchronized to the Raman measurements the signal-to-noise level of the Raman measurements was reduced. Two deposition regimes were distinguished by their characteristic plasma induced temperature increase. In situ measurements show that an active control of the substrate heater results in a stabilized temperature of the growing layer throughout the deposition of a {mu}cSi:H film. (orig.)

  10. Expression of Pit-1 in nonsomatotrope cell lines induces human growth hormone locus control region histone modification and hGH-N transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Katherine A; Jefferson, Holly S; Karschner, Vesna A; Shewchuk, Brian M

    2009-07-03

    The POU domain transcription factor Pit-1 is expressed in somatotropes, lactotropes, and thyrotropes of the anterior pituitary. Pit-1 is essential for the establishment of these lineages during development and regulates the expression of genes encoding the peptide hormones secreted by each cell type, including the growth hormone gene expressed in somatotropes. In contrast to rodent growth hormone loci, the human growth hormone (hGH) locus is regulated by a distal locus control region (LCR), which is required in cis for the proper expression of the hGH gene cluster in transgenic mice. The hGH LCR mediates a domain of histone acetylation targeted to the hGH locus that is associated with distal hGH-N activation, and the discrete determinants of this activity coincide with DNaseI hypersensitive site (HS) I of the LCR. The identification of three in vitro Pit-1 binding sites within the HS-I region suggested a model in which Pit-1 binding at HS-I initiates the chromatin modification mechanism associated with hGH LCR activity. To test this hypothesis directly and to determine whether Pit-1 expression is sufficient to confer hGH locus histone acetylation and activate hGH-N transcription from an inactive locus, we expressed Pit-1 in nonpituitary cell types. We show that Pit-1 expression established a domain of histone hyperacetylation at the LCR and hGH-N promoter in these cells similar to that observed in pituitary chromatin. This was accompanied by the activation of hGH-N transcription and an increase in intergenic and CD79b transcripts proximal to HS-I. These effects were coincident with Pit-1 occupancy at HS-I and the hGH-N promoter and were observed irrespective of the basal histone modification status of HS-I in the heterologous cell line. These findings are consistent with a role for Pit-1 as an initiating factor in hGH locus activation during somatotrope ontogeny, acting through binding sites at HS-I of the hGH LCR.

  11. Integrated RNA- and protein profiling of fermentation and respiration in diploid budding yeast provides insight into nutrient control of cell growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yuchen; Lardenois, Aurélie; Walther, Thomas; Horecka, Joe; Stuparevic, Igor; Law, Michael J; Lavigne, Régis; Evrard, Bertrand; Demougin, Philippe; Riffle, Michael; Strich, Randy; Davis, Ronald W; Pineau, Charles; Primig, Michael

    2015-04-24

    Diploid budding yeast undergoes rapid mitosis when it ferments glucose, and in the presence of a non-fermentable carbon source and the absence of a nitrogen source it triggers sporulation. Rich medium with acetate is a commonly used pre-sporulation medium, but our understanding of the molecular events underlying the acetate-driven transition from mitosis to meiosis is still incomplete. We identified 263 proteins for which mRNA and protein synthesis are linked or uncoupled in fermenting and respiring cells. Using motif predictions, interaction data and RNA profiling we find among them 28 likely targets for Ume6, a subunit of the conserved Rpd3/Sin3 histone deacetylase-complex regulating genes involved in metabolism, stress response and meiosis. Finally, we identify 14 genes for which both RNA and proteins are detected exclusively in respiring cells but not in fermenting cells in our sample set, including CSM4, SPR1, SPS4 and RIM4, which were thought to be meiosis-specific. Our work reveals intertwined transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms acting when a MATa/α strain responds to nutritional signals, and provides molecular clues how the carbon source primes yeast cells for entering meiosis. Our integrated genomics study provides insight into the interplay between the transcriptome and the proteome in diploid yeast cells undergoing vegetative growth in the presence of glucose (fermentation) or acetate (respiration). Furthermore, it reveals novel target genes involved in these processes for Ume6, the DNA binding subunit of the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the co-repressor Sin3. We have combined data from an RNA profiling experiment using tiling arrays that cover the entire yeast genome, and a large-scale protein detection analysis based on mass spectrometry in diploid MATa/α cells. This distinguishes our study from most others in the field-which investigate haploid yeast strains-because only diploid cells can undergo meiotic development

  12. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an increasing part...

  13. Controlled chondrogenesis from adipose-derived stem cells by recombinant transforming growth factor-β3 fusion protein in peptide scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Dan, Yang; Yang, Shu-hua; Liu, Guo-hui; Shao, Zeng-wu; Yang, Cao; Xiao, Bao-jun; Liu, Xiangmei; Wu, Shuilin; Zhang, Tainjin; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are promising for cartilage repair due to their easy accessibility and chondrogenic potential. Although chondrogenesis of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is well established in vitro, clinical tissue engineering requires effective and controlled delivery of TGF-β in vivo. In this work, a self-assembled peptide scaffold was employed to construct cartilages in vivo through the chondrogenesis from ADSCs controlled by recombinant fusion protein LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 that was transfected by lentiviral vectors. During this course, the addition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can trigger the release of mTGF-β3 from the recombinant fusion protein of LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 in the combined scaffolds, thus stimulating the differentiation of ADSCs into chondrogenesis. The specific expression of cartilage genes was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The expression of chondrocytic markers was obviously upregulated to a higher level compared to the one by commonly used TGF-β3 alone. After 3 weeks of in vitro culturing, the hybrids with differentiated chondrogenesis were then injected subcutaneously into nude mice and retrieved after 4 weeks of culturing in vivo. Histological analysis also confirmed that the recombinant fusion protein was more effective for the formation of cartilage matrix than the cases either with TGF-β3 alone or without LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 (P<0.05). This study demonstrates that controlled local delivery of the LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 constructs can accelerate differentiation of ADSCs into the cartilage in vivo, which indicates the great potential of this hybrid in rapid therapy of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The neuropeptide schistosomin and haemolymph from parasitized snails induce similar changes in excitability in neuroendocrine cells controlling reproduction and growth in a freshwater snail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, P. L.; de Jong-Brink, M.; ter Maat, A.; Pieneman, A. W.; Lodder, J. C.; Kits, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    Infection of the snail Lymnaea stagnalis with the schistosome parasite Trichobilharzia ocellata results in inhibition of reproduction and in giant growth. Parasite-related effects on the neuroendocrine centres that control these processes were studied electrophysiologically. Haemolymph from infected

  15. Separating growth from elastic deformation during cell enlargement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proseus, T.E.; Boyer, J.S. (Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies); Ortega, J.K.E. (Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-02-01

    Plants change size by deforming reversibly (elastically) whenever turgor pressure changes, and by growing. The elastic deformation is independent of growth because it occurs in nongrowing cells. Its occurrence with growth has prevented growth from being observed alone. The authors investigated whether the two processes could be separated in internode cells of Chara corallina Klien ex Willd., em R.D.W. by injecting or removing cell solution with a pressure probe to change turgor while the cell length was continuously measured. Cell size changed immediately when turgor changed, and growth rates appeared to be altered. Low temperature eliminated growth but did not alter the elastic effects. This allowed elastic deformation measured at low temperature to be subtracted from elongation at warm temperature in the same cell. After te subtraction, growth alone could be observed for the first time. Alternations in turgor caused growth to change rapidly to a new, steady rate with no evidence of rapid adjustments in wall properties. This turgor response, together with the marked sensitivity of growth to temperature, suggested that the growth rate was not controlled by inert polymer extension but rather by the biochemical reactions that include a turgor-sensitive step.

  16. Receptor control in mesenchymal stem cell engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; García, Andrés J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    Materials science offers a powerful tool to control mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and differentiation into functional phenotypes. A complex interplay between the extracellular matrix and growth factors guides MSC phenotypes in vivo. In this Review, we discuss materials-based bioengineering approaches to direct MSC fate in vitro and in vivo, mimicking cell-matrix-growth factor crosstalk. We first scrutinize MSC-matrix interactions and how the properties of a material can be tailored to support MSC growth and differentiation in vitro, with an emphasis on MSC self-renewal mechanisms. We then highlight important growth factor signalling pathways and investigate various materials-based strategies for growth factor presentation and delivery. Integrin-growth factor crosstalk in the context of MSC engineering is introduced, and bioinspired material designs with the potential to control the MSC niche phenotype are considered. Finally, we summarize important milestones on the road to MSC engineering for regenerative medicine.

  17. The Arabidopsis lue1 mutant defines a katanin p60 ortholog involved in hormonal control of microtubule orientation during cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouquin, Thomas; Mattsson, Ole; Naested, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    -severing protein (AtKSS). Complementation of lue1 with the wild-type AtKSS gene restored both wild-type stature and luciferase reporter levels. Hormonal responses of lue1 to ethylene and gibberellins revealed inappropriate cortical microtubule reorientation during cell growth. Moreover, a fusion between the At...

  18. The Arabidopsis lue1 mutant defines a katanin p60 ortholog involved in hormonal control of microtubule orientation during cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouquin, Thomas; Mattsson, Ole; Naested, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    -severing protein (AtKSS). Complementation of lue1 with the wild-type AtKSS gene restored both wild-type stature and luciferase reporter levels. Hormonal responses of lue1 to ethylene and gibberellins revealed inappropriate cortical microtubule reorientation during cell growth. Moreover, a fusion between the At...... in response to plant hormones....

  19. p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells and its expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors promoting cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Sophie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p8 is a stress-induced protein with multiple functions and biochemically related to the architectural factor HMG-I/Y. We analyzed the expression and function of p8 in pancreatic cancer-derived cells. Methods Expression of p8 was silenced in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and BxPc-3 by infection with a retrovirus expressing p8 RNA in the antisense orientation. Cell growth was measured in control and p8-silenced cells. Influence on p8 expression of the induction of intracellular pathways promoting cellular growth or growth arrest was monitored. Results p8-silenced cells grew more rapidly than control cells transfected with the empty retrovirus. Activation of the Ras→Raf→MEK→ERK and JNK intracellular pathways down-regulated p8 expression. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 up-regulates expression of p8. Conversely, p38 or TGFβ-1 induced p8 expression whereas the specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 down-regulated p8 expression. Finally, TGFβ-1 induction was in part mediated through p38. Conclusions p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. p8 expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors that promote cell growth. These results suggest that p8 belongs to a pathway regulating the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

  20. Cells competition in tumor growth poroelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraldi, Massimiliano; Carotenuto, Angelo R.

    2018-03-01

    Growth of biological tissues has been recently treated within the framework of Continuum Mechanics, by adopting heterogeneous poroelastic models where the interaction between soft matrix and interstitial fluid flow is coupled with inelastic effects ad hoc introduced to simulate the macroscopic volumetric growth determined by cells division, cells growth and extracellular matrix changes occurring at the micro-scale level. These continuum models seem to overcome some limitations intrinsically associated to other alternative approaches based on mass balances in multiphase systems, because the crucial role played by residual stresses accompanying growth and nutrients walkway is preserved. Nevertheless, when these strategies are applied to analyze solid tumors, mass growth is usually assigned in a prescribed form that essentially copies the in vitro measured intrinsic growth rates of the cell species. As a consequence, some important cell-cell dynamics governing mass evolution and invasion rates of cancer cells, as well as their coupling with feedback mechanisms associated to in situ stresses, are inevitably lost and thus the spatial distribution and the evolution with time of the growth inside the tumor -which would be results rather than inputs- are forced to enter in the model simply as data. In order to solve this paradox, it is here proposed an enhanced multi-scale poroelastic model undergoing large deformations and embodying inelastic growth, where the net growth terms directly result from the "interspecific" predator-prey (Volterra/Lotka-like) competition occurring at the micro-scale level between healthy and abnormal cell species. In this way, a system of fully-coupled non-linear PDEs is derived to describe how the fight among cell species to grab the available common resources, stress field, pressure gradients, interstitial fluid flows driving nutrients and inhomogeneous growth all simultaneously interact to decide the tumor fate.

  1. Growing Out of Stress: The Role of Cell- and Organ-Scale Growth Control in Plant Water-Stress Responses[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Neil E.

    2016-01-01

    Water is the most limiting resource on land for plant growth, and its uptake by plants is affected by many abiotic stresses, such as salinity, cold, heat, and drought. While much research has focused on exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular signaling events governing water-stress responses, it is also important to consider the role organismal structure plays as a context for such responses. The regulation of growth in plants occurs at two spatial scales: the cell and the organ. In this review, we focus on how the regulation of growth at these different spatial scales enables plants to acclimate to water-deficit stress. The cell wall is discussed with respect to how the physical properties of this structure affect water loss and how regulatory mechanisms that affect wall extensibility maintain growth under water deficit. At a higher spatial scale, the architecture of the root system represents a highly dynamic physical network that facilitates access of the plant to a heterogeneous distribution of water in soil. We discuss the role differential growth plays in shaping the structure of this system and the physiological implications of such changes. PMID:27503468

  2. Cell growth and division cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of the cell cycle in its present form was introduced more than three decades ago. Studying incorporation of DNA precursors by autoradiography, these authors observed that DNA synthesis in individual cells was discontinuous and occupied a discrete portion of the cell life (S phase). Mitotic division was seen to occur after a certain period of time following DNA replication. A distinct time interval between mitosis and DNA replication was also apparent. Thus, the cell cycle was subdivided into four consecutive phases, G/sub 1/, S, G/sub 2/, and M. The G/sub 1/ and G/sub 2/ phases represented the ''gaps'' between mitosis and the start of DNA replication, and between the end of DNA replication and the onset of mitosis, respectively. The cell cycle was defined as the interval between the midpoint of mitosis and the midpoint of the subsequent mitosis of the daughter cell(s). The authors' present knowledge on the cell cycle benefited mostly from the development of four different techniques: autoradiography, time-lapse cinematography, cell synchronization and flow cytometry. Of these, autoradiography has been the most extensively used, especially during the past two decades. By providing a means to analyse incorporation of precursors of DNA, RNA or proteins by individual cells and, in combination with various techniques of cell synchronization, autoradiography yielded most of the data fundamental to the current understanding of the cell cycle-related phenomena. Kinetics of cell progression through the cell cycle could be analysed in great detail after development of such sophisticated autoradiographic approaches as measurements of the fraction of labeled mitoses (''FLM curves'') or multiple sequential cell labelling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR

  3. Hypoxia-controlled EphA3 marks a human endometrium-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell that supports vascular growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine To

    Full Text Available Eph and ephrin proteins are essential cell guidance cues that orchestrate cell navigation and control cell-cell interactions during developmental tissue patterning, organogenesis and vasculogenesis. They have been extensively studied in animal models of embryogenesis and adult tissue regeneration, but less is known about their expression and function during human tissue and organ regeneration. We discovered the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3, an Eph family member with critical functions during human tumour progression, in the vascularised tissue of regenerating human endometrium and on isolated human endometrial multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (eMSCs, but not in other highly vascularised human organs. EphA3 affinity-isolation from human biopsy tissue yielded multipotent CD29+/CD73+/CD90+/CD146+ eMSCs that can be clonally propagated and respond to EphA3 agonists with EphA3 phosphorylation, cell contraction, cell-cell segregation and directed cell migration. EphA3 silencing significantly inhibited the ability of transplanted eMSCs to support neovascularisation in immunocompromised mice. In accord with established roles of Eph receptors in mediating interactions between endothelial and perivascular stromal cells during mouse development, our findings suggest that HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3 on human MSCs functions during the hypoxia-initiated early stages of adult blood vessel formation.

  4. Lack of MHC class II molecules favors CD8+T-cell infiltration into tumors associated with an increased control of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoul, Nada; Tang, Alexandre; Desrues, Belinda; Oberkampf, Marine; Fayolle, Catherine; Ladant, Daniel; Sainz-Perez, Alexander; Leclerc, Claude

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of immune tolerance and homeostasis as well as for preventing autoimmune diseases, but their impact on the survival of cancer patients remains controversial. In the TC-1 mouse model of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related carcinoma, we have previously demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacy of the CyaA-E7-vaccine, targeting the HPV-E7 antigen, progressively declines with tumor growth, in correlation with increased intratumoral recruitment of Tregs. In the present study, we demonstrated that these TC-1 tumor-infiltrating Tregs were highly activated, with increased expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Both intratumoral effector CD4 + T-cells (Teffs) and Tregs expressed high levels of PD-1, but anti-PD-1 antibody treatment did not impact the growth of the TC-1 tumor nor restore the therapeutic effect of the CyaA-E7 vaccine. To analyze the mechanisms by which Tregs are recruited to the tumor site, we used MHC-II KO mice with drastically reduced numbers of CD4 + effector T-cells. We demonstrated that these mice still had significant numbers of Tregs in their lymphoid organs which were recruited to the tumor. In MHC-II KO mice, the growth of the TC-1 tumor was delayed in correlation with a strong increase in the intratumoral recruitment of CD8 + T-cells. In addition, in mice that spontaneously rejected their tumors, the infiltration of E7-specific CD8 + T-cells was significantly higher than in MHC-II KO mice with a growing tumor. These results demonstrate that tumor-specific CD8 + T-cells can be efficiently activated and recruited in the absence of MHC class II molecules and of CD4 + T-cell help.

  5. Tbx2 controls lung growth by direct repression of the cell cycle inhibitor genes Cdkn1a and Cdkn1b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüdtke, Timo H.-W.; Farin, Henner F.; Rudat, Carsten; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Petry, Marianne; Barnett, Phil; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Kispert, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate organ development relies on the precise spatiotemporal orchestration of proliferation rates and differentiation patterns in adjacent tissue compartments. The underlying integration of patterning and cell cycle control during organogenesis is insufficiently understood. Here, we have

  6. TGF-β-Dependent Growth Arrest and Cell Migration in Benign and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Are Antagonistically Controlled by Rac1 and Rac1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Catharina; von der Ohe, Juliane; Hass, Ralf; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2017-07-20

    Despite improvements in diagnosis and treatment, breast cancer is still the most common cancer type among non-smoking females. TGF-β can inhibit breast cancer development by inducing cell cycle arrest in both, cancer cells and, as part of a senescence program in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). Moreover, TGF-β also drives cell migration and invasion, in part through the small GTPases Rac1 and Rac1b. Depletion of Rac1b or Rac1 and Rac1b in MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-435s breast cancer cells by RNA interference enhanced or suppressed, respectively, TGF-β1-induced migration/invasion. Rac1b depletion in MDA-MB-231 cells also increased TGF-β-induced p21 WAF1 expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Senescent HMEC (P15/P16), when compared to their non-senescent counterparts (P11/P12), presented with dramatically increased migratory activity. These effects were paralleled by elevated expression of genes associated with TGF-β signaling and metastasis, downregulated Rac1b, and upregulated Rac1. Our data suggest that acquisition of a motile phenotype in HMEC resulted from enhanced autocrine TGF-β signaling, invasion/metastasis-associated gene expression, and a shift in the ratio of antimigratory Rac1b to promigratory Rac1. We conclude that although enhanced TGF-β signaling is considered antioncogenic in HMEC by suppressing oncogene-induced transformation, this occurs at the expense of a higher migration and invasion potential.

  7. TGF-β-Dependent Growth Arrest and Cell Migration in Benign and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Are Antagonistically Controlled by Rac1 and Rac1b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Melzer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in diagnosis and treatment, breast cancer is still the most common cancer type among non-smoking females. TGF-β can inhibit breast cancer development by inducing cell cycle arrest in both, cancer cells and, as part of a senescence program in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC. Moreover, TGF-β also drives cell migration and invasion, in part through the small GTPases Rac1 and Rac1b. Depletion of Rac1b or Rac1 and Rac1b in MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-435s breast cancer cells by RNA interference enhanced or suppressed, respectively, TGF-β1-induced migration/invasion. Rac1b depletion in MDA-MB-231 cells also increased TGF-β-induced p21WAF1 expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Senescent HMEC (P15/P16, when compared to their non-senescent counterparts (P11/P12, presented with dramatically increased migratory activity. These effects were paralleled by elevated expression of genes associated with TGF-β signaling and metastasis, downregulated Rac1b, and upregulated Rac1. Our data suggest that acquisition of a motile phenotype in HMEC resulted from enhanced autocrine TGF-β signaling, invasion/metastasis-associated gene expression, and a shift in the ratio of antimigratory Rac1b to promigratory Rac1. We conclude that although enhanced TGF-β signaling is considered antioncogenic in HMEC by suppressing oncogene-induced transformation, this occurs at the expense of a higher migration and invasion potential.

  8. Planning instruments to control urban growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to plan and control urban development in peri-urban areas. But if no planning is done, the result will often be unsustainable, including widespread, dispersed and uncoordinated urban growth. Spatial planning based on zoning remains the most important planning instrument and its...... success depend on regional coordination. Incentive based instruments may contrbute to growth management, but only few examples are available and their effects on urban growth patterns yet to be seen....

  9. Cell adhesion and growth on ion-implanted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Suk; Kaibara, M.; Iwaki, M.; Sasabe, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Kusakabe, M.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion and growth of endothelial cells on ion-implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane surface were investigated. Ions of Na + , N 2 + , O 2 + , Ar + and Kr + were implanted to the polymer surface with ion fluences between 1 x 10 15 and 3 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at energy of 150 KeV at room temperature. Ion-implanted polymers were characterized by FT-IR-ATR an Raman spectroscopies. The adhesion and proliferation of bovine aorta endothelial cells on ion-implanted polymer surface were observed by an optical microscope. The rate of growth of BAECs on ion-implanted PSt was faster than that on non-implanted PSt. Complete cell adhesion and growth were observed on ion-implanted SPU, whereas the adhesion and growth of BAECs on the non-implanted SPU was not observed. It was attempted to control the cell culture on the ion-implanted domain fabricated using a mask. (author)

  10. Mitotic Gene Bookmarking: An Epigenetic Mechanism for Coordination of Lineage Commitment, Cell Identity and Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic control of gene expression contributes to dynamic responsiveness of cellular processes that include cell cycle, cell growth and differentiation. Mitotic gene bookmarking, retention of sequence-specific transcription factors at target gene loci, including the RUNX regulatory proteins, provide a novel dimension to epigenetic regulation that sustains cellular identity in progeny cells following cell division. Runx transcription factor retention during mitosis coordinates physiological control of cell growth and differentiation in a broad spectrum of biological conditions, and is associated with compromised gene expression in pathologies that include cancer.

  11. Computer control of shielded cell operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffords, W.R. III.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a computer system to remotely control shielded cell operations. System hardware, software, and design criteria are discussed. We have designed a computer-controlled buret that provides a tenfold improvement over the buret currently in service. A computer also automatically controls cell analyses, calibrations, and maintenance. This system improves conditions for the operators by providing a safer, more efficient working environment and is expandable for future growth and development

  12. Cell control with agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir Peter Boots; Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill

    2000-01-01

    A software system is described that uses the agent concept in the Cell Control layer. Important design goals are: the system continues as good as possible after a process crash, crashed processes are recreated whenever possible, and equivalent workstations are allocated dynamically. This project is

  13. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  14. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase as a novel regulator of 17β-estradiol-induced cell growth through a control of the estrogen receptor/IGF-1 receptor/PDZK1 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hogyoung; Tarhuni, Abdelmetalab; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Boulares, A Hamid

    2015-07-17

    We and others have extensively investigated the role of PARP-1 in cell growth and demise in response to pathophysiological cues. Most of the clinical trials on PARP inhibitors are targeting primarily estrogen receptor (ER) negative cancers with BRCA-deficiency. It is surprising that the role of the enzyme has yet to be investigated in ER-mediated cell growth. It is noteworthy that ER is expressed in the majority of breast cancers. We recently showed that the scaffolding protein PDZK1 is critical for 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced growth of breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that E2-induced PDZK1 expression is indirectly regulated by ER and requires IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). The breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and BT474 were used as ER(+) cell culture models. Thieno[2,3-c]isoquinolin-5-one (TIQ-A) and olaparib (AZD2281) were used as potent inhibitors of PARP. PARP-1 knockdown by shRNA was used to show specificity of the effects to PARP-1. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of PARP inhibition on estrogen-induced growth of breast cancer cells and examine whether the potential effect is linked to PDZK1 and IGF-1R expression. Our results show that PARP inhibition pharmacologically by TIQ-A or olaparib or by PARP-1 knockdown blocked E2-dependent growth of MCF-7 cells. Such inhibitory effect was also observed in olaparib-treated BT474 cells. The effect of PARP inhibition on cell growth coincided with an efficient reduction in E2-induced PDZK1 expression. This effect was accompanied by a similar decrease in the cell cycle protein cyclin D1. PARP appeared to regulate E2-induced PDZK1 at the mRNA level. Such regulation may be linked to a modulation of IGF-1R as PARP inhibition pharmacologically or by PARP-1 knockdown efficiently reduced E2-induced expression of the receptor at the protein and mRNA levels. Overall, our results show for the first time that PARP regulates E2-mediated cell growth by controlling the ER/IGF-1R/PDZK1 axis. These findings suggest that the

  15. Linking stem cell function and growth pattern of intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalheim, Torsten; Quaas, Marianne; Herberg, Maria; Braumann, Ulf-Dietrich; Kerner, Christiane; Loeffler, Markus; Aust, Gabriela; Galle, Joerg

    2018-01-15

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) require well-defined signals from their environment in order to carry out their specific functions. Most of these signals are provided by neighboring cells that form a stem cell niche, whose shape and cellular composition self-organize. Major features of this self-organization can be studied in ISC-derived organoid culture. In this system, manipulation of essential pathways of stem cell maintenance and differentiation results in well-described growth phenotypes. We here provide an individual cell-based model of intestinal organoids that enables a mechanistic explanation of the observed growth phenotypes. In simulation studies of the 3D structure of expanding organoids, we investigate interdependences between Wnt- and Notch-signaling which control the shape of the stem cell niche and, thus, the growth pattern of the organoids. Similar to in vitro experiments, changes of pathway activities alter the cellular composition of the organoids and, thereby, affect their shape. Exogenous Wnt enforces transitions from branched into a cyst-like growth pattern; known to occur spontaneously during long term organoid expansion. Based on our simulation results, we predict that the cyst-like pattern is associated with biomechanical changes of the cells which assign them a growth advantage. The results suggest ongoing stem cell adaptation to in vitro conditions during long term expansion by stabilizing Wnt-activity. Our study exemplifies the potential of individual cell-based modeling in unraveling links between molecular stem cell regulation and 3D growth of tissues. This kind of modeling combines experimental results in the fields of stem cell biology and cell biomechanics constituting a prerequisite for a better understanding of tissue regeneration as well as developmental processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantifying the entropic cost of cellular growth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; De Martino, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Viewing the ways a living cell can organize its metabolism as the phase space of a physical system, regulation can be seen as the ability to reduce the entropy of that space by selecting specific cellular configurations that are, in some sense, optimal. Here we quantify the amount of regulation required to control a cell's growth rate by a maximum-entropy approach to the space of underlying metabolic phenotypes, where a configuration corresponds to a metabolic flux pattern as described by genome-scale models. We link the mean growth rate achieved by a population of cells to the minimal amount of metabolic regulation needed to achieve it through a phase diagram that highlights how growth suppression can be as costly (in regulatory terms) as growth enhancement. Moreover, we provide an interpretation of the inverse temperature β controlling maximum-entropy distributions based on the underlying growth dynamics. Specifically, we show that the asymptotic value of β for a cell population can be expected to depend on (i) the carrying capacity of the environment, (ii) the initial size of the colony, and (iii) the probability distribution from which the inoculum was sampled. Results obtained for E. coli and human cells are found to be remarkably consistent with empirical evidence.

  17. MicroRNA networks regulated by all-trans retinoic acid and Lapatinib control the growth, survival and motility of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaki, Mami; Paroni, Gabriela; Zanetti, Adriana; Gianni, Maurizio; Bolis, Marco; Lupi, Monica; Tsykin, Anna; Goodall, Gregory J.; Garattini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    SKBR3-cells, characterized by ERBB2/RARA co-amplification, represent a subgroup of HER2+ breast-cancers sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and Lapatinib. In this model, the two agents alone or in combination modulate the expression of 174 microRNAs (miRs). These miRs and predicted target-transcripts are organized in four interconnected modules (Module-1 to -4). Module-1 and Module-3 consist of ATRA/Lapatinib up-regulated and potentially anti-oncogenic miRs, while Module-2 contains ATRA/Lapatinib down-regulated and potentially pro-oncogenic miRs. Consistent with this, the expression levels of Module-1/-3 and Module-2 miRs are higher and lower, respectively, in normal mammary tissues relative to ductal-carcinoma-in-situ, invasive-ductal-carcinoma and metastases. This indicates associations between tumor-progression and the expression profiles of Module-1 to -3 miRs. Similar associations are observed with tumor proliferation-scores, staging, size and overall-survival using TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) data. Forced expression of Module-1 miRs, (miR-29a-3p; miR-874-3p) inhibit SKBR3-cell growth and Module-3 miRs (miR-575; miR-1225-5p) reduce growth and motility. Module-2 miRs (miR-125a; miR-193; miR-210) increase SKBR3 cell growth, survival and motility. Some of these effects are of general significance, being replicated in other breast cancer cell lines representing the heterogeneity of this disease. Finally, our study demonstrates that HIPK2-kinase and the PLCXD1-phospholipase-C are novel targets of miR-193a-5p/miR-210-3p and miR-575/miR-1225-5p, respectively. PMID:25961594

  18. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved...... in beta cell differentiation and proliferation may lead to new ways of forming beta cells for treatment of diabetes in man....

  19. Amyloid beta-mediated epigenetic alteration of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 controls cell survival in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam; Lyu, Dahyun; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2014-01-01

    Swedish double mutation (KM670/671NL) of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is reported to increase toxic amyloid β (Aβ) production via aberrant cleavage at the β-secretase site and thereby cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Previously, our transcriptome sequence analyses revealed global expressional modifications of over 600 genes in APP-Swedish mutant-expressing H4 (H4-sw) cells compared to wild type H4 cells. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) is one gene that showed significantly decreased mRNA expression in H4-sw cells. In this study, we investigated the functional role of IGFBP3 in AD pathogenesis and elucidated the mechanisms regulating its expression. We observed decreased IGFBP3 expression in the H4-sw cell line as well as the hippocampus of AD model transgenic mice. Treatment with exogenous IGFBP3 protein inhibited Aβ1-42- induced cell death and caspase-3 activity, whereas siRNA-mediated suppression of IGFBP3 expression induced cell death and caspase-3 cleavage. In primary hippocampal neurons, administration of IGFBP3 protein blocked apoptotic cell death due to Aβ1-42 toxicity. These data implicate a protective role for IGFBP3 against Aβ1-42-mediated apoptosis. Next, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP3 expression in AD pathogenesis. We observed abnormal IGFBP3 hypermethylation within the promoter CpG island in H4-sw cells. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored IGFBP3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Chronic exposure to Aβ1-42 induced IGFBP3 hypermethylation at CpGs, particularly at loci -164 and -173, and subsequently suppressed IGFBP3 expression. Therefore, we demonstrate that expression of anti-apoptotic IGFBP3 is regulated by epigenetic DNA methylation, suggesting a mechanism that contributes to AD pathogenesis.

  20. The Enhancing Effect of g-Cyclodextrin Inclusion on g-Tocotrienol-dependent Negative Growth Control of Mesothelioma Cells in a Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yano T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer with no effective treatment options. Of phytochemicals, tocotrienol (T3, a member of vitamin E, is one of the most potent anti-mesothelioma agents, but the effectiveness in vivo is quite limited, due to its low bioavailability. In this study, we investigated if the oral treatment of -T3 inclusion with -cyclodextrin (CD could improve the bioavailability and anticancer activity of the T3.Findings: Using nude mice bearing MSTO-211H cells (a human malignant mesothelioma cell line, the effect of T3 inclusion with -CD on -T3 level in tumor tissues, tumor growth,and its related mRNA levels were examined. The difference of tumor growth between the two groups had no statistical significance, but the latter showed a lower tendency compared with the former. In linked with this observation, the level of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA required for in vivo tumor growth in -T3 inclusion with -CD group was lower than that in -T3 group, on the contrary, the level of -T3 level showed an opposite tendency.Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that the bioavailability of -T3 was improved by an oral administration of a novel -T3 inclusion complex with CD. Furthermore, the improvement of the bioavailability contributed to the increase of anticancer activity of -T3 in vivo.

  1. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved......Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...

  2. β-Catenin activation regulates tissue growth non-cell autonomously in the hair stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschene, Elizabeth R; Myung, Peggy; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Sun, Thomas Yang; Taketo, Makoto M; Saotome, Ichiko; Greco, Valentina

    2014-03-21

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for tissue regeneration. However, it is unclear how β-catenin controls stem cell behaviors to coordinate organized growth. Using live imaging, we show that activation of β-catenin specifically within mouse hair follicle stem cells generates new hair growth through oriented cell divisions and cellular displacement. β-Catenin activation is sufficient to induce hair growth independently of mesenchymal dermal papilla niche signals normally required for hair regeneration. Wild-type cells are co-opted into new hair growths by β-catenin mutant cells, which non-cell autonomously activate Wnt signaling within the neighboring wild-type cells via Wnt ligands. This study demonstrates a mechanism by which Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls stem cell-dependent tissue growth non-cell autonomously and advances our understanding of the mechanisms that drive coordinated regeneration.

  3. Mechanical control of growth: ideas, facts and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Kenneth D; Shraiman, Boris I

    2017-12-01

    In his classic book On Growth and Form , D'Arcy Thompson discussed the necessity of a physical and mathematical approach to understanding the relationship between growth and form. The past century has seen extraordinary advances in our understanding of biological components and processes contributing to organismal morphogenesis, but the mathematical and physical principles involved have not received comparable attention. The most obvious entry of physics into morphogenesis is via tissue mechanics. In this Review, we discuss the fundamental role of mechanical interactions between cells induced by growth in shaping a tissue. Non-uniform growth can lead to accumulation of mechanical stress, which in the context of two-dimensional sheets of tissue can specify the shape it assumes in three dimensions. A special class of growth patterns - conformal growth - does not lead to the accumulation of stress and can generate a rich variety of planar tissue shapes. Conversely, mechanical stress can provide a regulatory feedback signal into the growth control circuit. Both theory and experiment support a key role for mechanical interactions in shaping tissues and, via mechanical feedback, controlling epithelial growth. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Modeling and control of greenhouse crop growth

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Francisco; Guzmán, José Luis; Ramírez-Arias, Armando

    2015-01-01

    A discussion of challenges related to the modeling and control of greenhouse crop growth, this book presents state-of-the-art answers to those challenges. The authors model the subsystems involved in successful greenhouse control using different techniques and show how the models obtained can be exploited for simulation or control design; they suggest ideas for the development of physical and/or black-box models for this purpose. Strategies for the control of climate- and irrigation-related variables are brought forward. The uses of PID control and feedforward compensators, both widely used in commercial tools, are summarized. The benefits of advanced control techniques—event-based, robust, and predictive control, for example—are used to improve on the performance of those basic methods. A hierarchical control architecture is developed governed by a high-level multiobjective optimization approach rather than traditional constrained optimization and artificial intelligence techniques.  Reference trajector...

  5. MicroRNA-34b and MicroRNA-34c are targets of p53 and cooperate in control of cell proliferation and adhesion-independent growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corney, David C; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Godwin, Andrew K; Wang, Wei; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2007-09-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a recently discovered class of noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. Recent evidence indicates that miRNAs may play an important role in cancer. However, the mechanism of their deregulation in neoplastic transformation has only begun to be understood. To elucidate the role of tumor suppressor p53 in regulation of miRNAs, we have analyzed changes in miRNA microarray expression profile immediately after conditional inactivation of p53 in primary mouse ovarian surface epithelium cells. Among the most significantly affected miRNAs were miR-34b and miR-34c, which were down-regulated 12-fold according to quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis. Computational promoter analysis of the mir-34b/mir-34c locus identified the presence of evolutionarily conserved p53 binding sites approximately 3 kb upstream of the miRNA coding sequence. Consistent with evolutionary conservation, mir-34b/mir-34c were also down-regulated in p53-null human ovarian carcinoma cells. Furthermore, as expected from p53 binding to the mir-34b/c promoter, doxorubicin treatment of wild-type, but not p53-deficient, cells resulted in an increase of mir-34b/mir-34c expression. Importantly, miR-34b and miR-34c cooperate in suppressing proliferation and soft-agar colony formation of neoplastic epithelial ovarian cells, in agreement with the partially overlapping spectrum of their predicted targets. Taken together, these results show the existence of a novel mechanism by which p53 suppresses such critical components of neoplastic growth as cell proliferation and adhesion-independent colony formation.

  6. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL -1 levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL -1 ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL -1 . © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Perception and regulatory principles of microbial growth control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin S Khonsari

    Full Text Available Fast growth represents an effective strategy for microbial organisms to survive in competitive environments. To accomplish this task, cells must adapt their metabolism to changing nutrient conditions in a way that maximizes their growth rate. However, the regulation of the growth related metabolic pathways can be fundamentally different among microbes. We therefore asked whether growth control by perception of the cell's intracellular metabolic state can give rise to higher growth than by direct perception of extracellular nutrient availability. To answer this question, we created a simplified dynamical computer model of a cellular metabolic network whose regulation was inferred by an optimization approach. We used this model for a competing species experiment, where a species with extracellular nutrient perception competes against one with intracellular nutrient perception by evaluating their respective average growth rate. We found that the intracellular perception is advantageous under situations where the up and down regulation of pathways cannot follow the fast changing nutrient availability in the environment. In this case, optimal regulation ignores any other nutrients except the most preferential ones, in agreement with the phenomenon of catabolite repression in prokaryotes. The corresponding metabolic pathways remain activated, despite environmental fluctuations. Therefore, the cell can take up preferential nutrients as soon as they are available without any prior regulation. As a result species that rely on intracellular perception gain a relevant fitness advantage in fluctuating nutrient environments, which enables survival by outgrowing competitors.

  8. Perception and regulatory principles of microbial growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonsari, Armin S; Kollmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Fast growth represents an effective strategy for microbial organisms to survive in competitive environments. To accomplish this task, cells must adapt their metabolism to changing nutrient conditions in a way that maximizes their growth rate. However, the regulation of the growth related metabolic pathways can be fundamentally different among microbes. We therefore asked whether growth control by perception of the cell's intracellular metabolic state can give rise to higher growth than by direct perception of extracellular nutrient availability. To answer this question, we created a simplified dynamical computer model of a cellular metabolic network whose regulation was inferred by an optimization approach. We used this model for a competing species experiment, where a species with extracellular nutrient perception competes against one with intracellular nutrient perception by evaluating their respective average growth rate. We found that the intracellular perception is advantageous under situations where the up and down regulation of pathways cannot follow the fast changing nutrient availability in the environment. In this case, optimal regulation ignores any other nutrients except the most preferential ones, in agreement with the phenomenon of catabolite repression in prokaryotes. The corresponding metabolic pathways remain activated, despite environmental fluctuations. Therefore, the cell can take up preferential nutrients as soon as they are available without any prior regulation. As a result species that rely on intracellular perception gain a relevant fitness advantage in fluctuating nutrient environments, which enables survival by outgrowing competitors.

  9. Plasticity of tumor cell invasion: governance by growth factors and cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenthal, Julia; Takes, Robert; Friedl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Tumor cell migration, the basis for metastatic dissemination, is an adaptive process which depends upon coordinated cell interaction with the environment, influencing cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal dynamics and extracellular matrix remodeling. Growth factors and cytokines, released within the reactive tumor microenvironment and their intracellular effector signals strongly impact mechanocoupling functions in tumor cells and thereby control the mode and extent of tumor invasion, including collective and single-cell migration and their interconversions. Besides their role in controlling tumor cell growth and survival, cytokines and growth factors thus provide complex orchestration of the metastatic cascade and tumor cell adaptation to environmental challenge. We here review the mechanisms by which growth factors and cytokines control the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment, and the consequences for the efficacy and plasticity of invasion programs and metastasis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Meniscus Imaging for Crystal-Growth Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon crystal growth monitored by new video system reduces operator stress and improves conditions for observation and control of growing process. System optics produce greater magnification vertically than horizontally, so entire meniscus and melt is viewed with high resolution in both width and height dimensions.

  11. Calcium pectate chemistry controls growth rate of Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proseus, Timothy E; Boyer, John S

    2006-01-01

    Pectin, a normal constituent of cell walls, caused growth rates to accelerate to the rates in living cells when supplied externally to isolated cell walls of Chara corallina. Because this activity was not reported previously, the activity was investigated. Turgor pressure (P) was maintained in isolated walls or living cells using a pressure probe in culture medium. Pectin from various sources was supplied to the medium. Ca and Mg were the dominant inorganic elements in the wall. EGTA or pectin in the culture medium extracted moderate amounts of wall Ca and essentially all the wall Mg, and wall growth accelerated. Removing the external EGTA or pectin and replacing with fresh medium returned growth to the original rate. A high concentration of Ca2+ quenched the accelerating activity of EGTA or pectin and caused gelling of the pectin, physically inhibiting wall growth. Low pH had little effect. After the Mg had been removed, Ca-pectate in the wall bore the longitudinal load imposed by P. Removal of this Ca caused the wall to burst. Live cells and isolated walls reacted similarly. It was concluded that Ca cross-links between neighbouring pectin molecules were strong wall bonds that controlled wall growth rates. The central role of Ca-pectate chemistry was illustrated by removing Ca cross-links with new pectin (wall "loosening"), replacing vacated cross-links with new Ca2+ ("Ca2+-tightening"), or adding new cross-links with new Ca-pectate that gelled ("gel tightening"). These findings establish a molecular model for growth that includes wall deposition and assembly for sustained growth activity.

  12. Colloidal Gold--Collagen Protein Core--Shell Nanoconjugate: One-Step Biomimetic Synthesis, Layer-by-Layer Assembled Film, and Controlled Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Linyin; Ma, Guanghui; Liu, Lei; Dai, Luru; Li, Junbai; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-11

    The biogenic synthesis of biomolecule-gold nanoconjugates is of key importance for a broad range of biomedical applications. In this work, a one-step, green, and condition-gentle strategy is presented to synthesize stable colloidal gold-collagen core-shell nanoconjugates in an aqueous solution at room temperature, without use of any reducing agents and stabilizing agents. It is discovered that electrostatic binding between gold ions and collagen proteins and concomitant in situ reduction by hydroxyproline residues are critically responsible for the formation of the core-shell nanoconjugates. The film formed by layer-by-layer assembly of such colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates can notably improve the mechanical properties and promote cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. Thus, the colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates synthesized by such a straightforward and clean manner, analogous to a biomineralization pathway, provide new alternatives for developing biologically based hybrid biomaterials toward a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Optimization of processing parameters on the controlled growth of ZnO nanorod arrays for the performance improvement of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yi-Mu; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2011-01-01

    High-transparency and high quality ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on the ITO substrates by a two-step chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The effects of processing parameters including reaction temperature (25-95 o C) and solution concentration (0.01-0.1 M) on the crystal growth, alignment, optical and electrical properties were systematically investigated. It has been found that these process parameters are critical for the growth, orientation and aspect ratio of the nanorod arrays, showing different structural and optical properties. Experimental results reveal that the hexagonal ZnO nanorod arrays prepared under reaction temperature of 95 o C and solution concentration of 0.03 M possess highest aspect ratio of ∼21, and show the well-aligned orientation and optimum optical properties. Moreover the ZnO nanorod arrays based heterojunction electrodes and the solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (SS-DSSCs) were fabricated with an improved optoelectrical performance. -- Graphical abstract: The ZnO nanorod arrays demonstrate well-alignment, high aspect ratio (L/D∼21) and excellent optical transmittance by low-temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD). Display Omitted Research highlights: → Investigate the processing parameters of CBD on the growth of ZnO nanorod arrays. → Optimization of CBD process parameters: 0.03 M solution concentration and reaction temperature of 95 o C. → The prepared ZnO samples possess well-alignment and high aspect ratio (L/D∼21). → An n-ZnO/p-NiO heterojunction: great rectifying behavior and low leakage current. → SS-DSSC has J SC of 0.31 mA/cm 2 and V OC of 590 mV, and an improved η of 0.059%.

  14. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Promotes Cell Migration, Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Kollmar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of established extrahepatic colorectal metastasis, we analyzed whether stromal cellderived factor (SDF 1 stimulates tumor cell migration in vitro, angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: Using chemotaxis chambers, CT26.WT colorectal tumor cell migration was studied under stimulation with different concentrations of SDF-1. To evaluate angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo, green fluorescent protein-transfected CT26.WT cells were implanted in dorsal skinfold chambers of syngeneic BALB/c mice. After 5 days, tumors were locally exposed to SDF-1. Cell proliferation, tumor microvascularization, growth were studied during a further 9-day period using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry. Tumors exposed to PBS only served as controls. RESULTS:In vitro, > 30% of unstimulated CT26.WT cells showed expression of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. On chemotaxis assay, SDF-1 provoked a dose-dependent increase in cell migration. In vivo, SDF-1 accelerated neovascularization, induced a significant increase in tumor growth. Capillaries of SDF-1-treated tumors showed significant dilation. Of interest, SDF-1 treatment was associated with a significantly increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a downregulation of cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that the CXC chemokine SDF-1 promotes tumor cell migration in vitro, tumor growth of established extrahepatic metastasis in vivo due to angiogenesis-dependent induction of tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

  15. Growth inhibitory effects of quercetin on bladder cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Feugang, Jean Magloire; Konarski, Patricia; Wang, Jian; Lu, Jianzhong; Fu, Shengjun; Ma, Baoliang; Tian, Binqiang; Zou, Changping; Wang, Zhingping

    2006-09-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in many fruits and vegetables, belongs to an extensive class of polyphenolic compounds. Previous studies reported that quercetin inhibits the proliferation of various cancer cells and tumor growth in animal models. We investigated the growth inhibition and colony formation of quercetin on three bladder cancer cells (EJ, J82 and T24). The expression of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes such as P53, Survivin, PTEN, as well as the methylation status of these genes was also evaluated. We observed that quercetin induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Quercetin (100 micromolars) significantly inhibited EJ, T24 and J82 cell growth accompanied by an increase in the G0/G1 phase. In all cell lines, quercetin decreased the expression of mutant P53 and Survivin proteins. However, there was no change in the level of PTEN protein. Moreover, the DNA methylation levels of the estrogen receptor (Er-beta), P16INK4a and RASSF1A were strongly decreased (from 35 to 70%) in the quercetin-treated group compared to the control. In conclusion, our study suggested that quercetin inhibits growth, colony formation and hypermethylation of bladder cancer cell lines. Quercetin-induced apoptosis might be associated with a decrease in mutant P53 and Survivin proteins.

  16. Hypoxia is a key regulator of limbal epithelial stem cell growth and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Chris; Yang, Sufang; Muttuvelu, Danson

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth and differentiation of limbal epithelial stem cell cultures could be controlled through manipulation of the oxygen tension. Limbal epithelial cells were isolated from corneoscleral disks, and cultured using either feeder cells in a growth ...

  17. The role of control in entrepreneurial growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Fleck, Emma; Krueger, Norris

    as a proxy for entrepreneurial intentions. However, little research has attempted to establish the underlying mechanisms that produce or inhibit the development of self-efficacy. Social cognitive theory links self-efficacy to the exercise of personal control. Extending these findings to entrepreneurship......In this article we seek to extend previous work on control by developing a theoretical framework for understanding the role of control in entrepreneurship. We explore power-control theory as a tool for understanding the risk-related behaviours among entrepreneurs. Self-efficacy has long been used...... of socialization in the family, and in particular to patriarchal dominance. Taking our departure from the critical realist approach, we propose a research framework for understanding the role of control and self-efficacy in determining entrepreneurial growth....

  18. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  19. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  1. Nerve growth factor interactions with mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, A; Pantalone, A; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are involved in neurogenic inflammation where there is vasodilation and plasma protein extravasion in response to this stimulus. Nerve growth factor (NGF), identified by Rita Levi Montalcini, is a neurotrophin family compound which is important for survival of nociceptive neurons during their development. Therefore, NGF is an important neuropeptide which mediates the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. It also exerts its proinflammatory action, not only on mast cells but also in B and T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils. Human mast cells can be activated by neuropeptides to release potent mediators of inflammation, and they are found throughout the body, especially near blood vessels, epithelial tissue and nerves. Mast cells generate and release NGF after degranulation and they are involved in iperalgesia, neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. NGF is also a potent degranulation factor for mast cells in vitro and in vivo, promoting differentiation and maturation of these cells and their precursor, acting as a co-factor with interleukin-3. In conclusion, these studies are focused on cross-talk between neuropeptide NGF and inflammatory mast cells.

  2. Self-assembled nanofiber coatings for controlling cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros, Raquel C.; Gelens, Edith; Bulten, Erna; Tuin, Annemarie; de Jong, Menno R; Kuijer, Roel; van Kooten, Theo G

    Nanofibers are thought to enhance cell adhesion, growth, and function. We demonstrate that the choice of building blocks in self-assembling nanofiber systems can be used to control cell behavior. The use of 2 D-coated, self-assembled nanofibers in controlling lens epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and

  3. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  4. Nuclear Ras2-GTP controls invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype.

  5. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... that transferrin is the only obligatory factor whereas growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and TRH had modulating effects. A heat-labile heparin binding serum factor which stimulated thymidine incorporation but not cell proliferation was demonstrated in human serum. Measurements...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  6. Molecular Control of Interdigital Cell Death and Cell Differentiation by Retinoic Acid during Digit Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elena Díaz-Hernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The precise coordination of cell death and cell differentiation during the formation of developing digits is essential for generating properly shaped limbs. Retinoic acid (RA has a fundamental role in digit development; it promotes or inhibits the molecular expression of several critical genes. This control of gene expression establishes molecular cascades that enable both the commencement of cell death and the inhibition of cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on the antagonistic functions between RA and fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling in the control of cell death and between RA and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling in the control of cell differentiation.

  7. Influence of radiosterilized cells on cells L1210 growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaise, E.P.; Decheva-Ninova, Z.; Tubiana, M.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of cells sterilized by acute X-irradiation is investigated on the growth of L 1210 cells. For this purpose young male mice DBA 2 are injected intraperitoneally or hypodermically with suspension of either live cells or live and sterile cells. The effect is considered according to survival time of treated animals and the number of leukemic cells examined in dynamics after their intraperitoneal incorporation or according to tumor size after their hypodermical incorporation. In both cases the incorporation of sterile cells has an inhibitory effect - life duration of treated mice is increased. This common effect disappears if animals are previously irradiated with 350 R. The sterile cells have also a local stimulating effect when incorporated hypodermically - time for their duplication is reduced from 15,8 to 13,7 hours. This stimulation is much more expressed when the recipients are previously irradiated - the time for tumor cells duplication being 12,2 hours. Direct stimulating effect of sterilized cells is not established when they are intraperitoneally incorporated. (author)

  8. Controlled Crystal Grain Growth in Mixed Cation-Halide Perovskite by Evaporated Solvent Vapor Recycling Method for High Efficiency Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Youhei; Kogo, Atsushi; Udagawa, Yosuke; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro; Sanehira, Yoshitaka; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2017-06-07

    We developed a new and simple solvent vapor-assisted thermal annealing (VA) procedure which can reduce grain boundaries in a perovskite film for fabricating highly efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs). By recycling of solvent molecules evaporated from an as-prepared perovskite film as a VA vapor source, named the pot-roast VA (PR-VA) method, finely controlled and reproducible device fabrication was achieved for formamidinium (FA) and methylammonium (MA) mixed cation-halide perovskite (FAPbI 3 ) 0.85 (MAPbBr 3 ) 0.15 . The mixed perovskite was crystallized on a low-temperature prepared brookite TiO 2 mesoporous scaffold. When exposed to very dilute solvent vapor, small grains in the perovskite film gradually unified into large grains, resulting in grain boundaries which were highly reduced and improvement of photovoltaic performance in PSC. PR-VA-treated large grain perovskite absorbers exhibited stable photocurrent-voltage performance with high fill factor and suppressed hysteresis, achieving the best conversion efficiency of 18.5% for a 5 × 5 mm 2 device and 15.2% for a 1.0 × 1.0 cm 2 device.

  9. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sha; Wang Yijuan; Deng, Tianzheng; Jin Fang; Liu Shouxin; Zhang Yongjie; Feng Feng; Jin Yan

    2008-01-01

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 μm) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signals Inversely Regulate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Activity to Control Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Quiescence, Propagation, and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Ylow stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  11. Growth of cells superinoculated onto irradiated and nonirradiated confluent monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, H.; Ueo, H.; Sugimachi, K.

    1990-01-01

    We prepared confluent monolayers of normal BALB/c 3T3 cells and compared differences in the growth of four types of cells superinoculated onto these nonirradiated and irradiated monolayers. The test cells were normal BALB/c 3T3 A31 cells, a squamous cell carcinoma from a human esophageal cancer (KSE-1), human fetal fibroblasts, and V-79 cells from Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Cell growth was checked by counting the cell number, determining [3H]thymidine incorporation and assessing colony formation. We found that on nonirradiated monolayers, colony formation of human fetal fibroblasts and normal BALB/c 3T3 cells was completely inhibited. On irradiated cells, test cells did exhibit some growth. KSE-1 cells, which had a low clonogenic efficiency on plastic surfaces, formed colonies on both irradiated and nonirradiated cells. On these monolayers, the clonogenic efficiency of V-79 cells was also higher than that on plastic surfaces. We conclude that the nonirradiated monolayer of BALB/c 3T3 cells completely inhibits the growth of superinoculated normal BALB/c 3T3 and human fetal fibroblasts, while on the other hand, they facilitate the growth of neoplastic KSE-1 and V-79 cells by providing a surface for cell adherence and growth, without affecting the presence of normal cells in co-cultures

  12. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Scaling-up vaccine production: implementation aspects of a biomass growth observer and controller

    OpenAIRE

    Soons, Z.I.T.A.; IJssel, van den, J.; Pol, van der, L.A.; Straten, van, G.; Boxtel, van, A.J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This study considers two aspects of the implementation of a biomass growth observer and specific growth rate controller in scale-up from small- to pilot-scale bioreactors towards a feasible bulk production process for whole-cell vaccine against whooping cough. The first is the calculation of the oxygen uptake rate, the starting point for online monitoring and control of biomass growth, taking into account the dynamics in the gas-phase. Mixing effects and delays are caused by amongst ...

  14. BRD7 expression and c-Myc activation forms a double-negative feedback loop that controls the cell proliferation and tumor growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by targeting oncogenic miR-141.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yukun; Zhao, Ran; Wei, Yanmei; Li, Mengna; Wang, Heran; Niu, Weihong; Zhou, Yao; Qiu, Yuanzheng; Fan, Songqing; Zhan, Yihao; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Zheng; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Ming

    2018-03-20

    miR-141 is up-regulated and plays crucial roles in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the molecular mechanism underlying the dysregulation of miR-141 is still obscure. Thus, the ChIP-PCR was performed to identify the c-Myc-binding sites in miR-141 and BRD7. qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry assays were used to detect the expression of miR-141 and its up/down stream molecules. The rescue experiments on the c-Myc/miR-141 axis were performed in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the levels of mature miR-141, pre-miR-141 and pri-miR-141 were downregulated in c-Myc knockdown NPC cells. Meanwhile, c-Myc transactivates the expression of miR-141 by binding its promoter region. Moreover, BRD7 was identified as a co-factor of c-Myc to negatively regulate the activation of c-Myc/miR-141 axis, as well as a direct target of c-Myc. Moreover, restoration of miR-141 in c-Myc knockdown NPC cells notably rescued the effect of c-Myc on cell proliferation and tumor growth, as well as the blocking of PTEN/AKT pathway. Additionally, the expression of c-Myc was positively correlated with that of miR-141 and the clinical stages of NPC patients and negatively associated with the expression of BRD7. Our findings demonstrated that BRD7 expression and c-Myc activation forms a negative feedback loop to control the cell proliferation and tumor growth by targeting miR-141. These observations provide new mechanistic insights into the dysregulation of miR-141 expression and a promising therapeutic option for NPC.

  15. Andrographolide inhibits growth of acute promyelocytic leukaemia cells by inducing retinoic acid receptor-independent cell differentiation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikam, Shiamala D; Manikam, Shiamala T; Stanslas, Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The growth inhibiting potential of andrographolide was evaluated in three acute promyelocytic leukaemia cell line models (HL-60, NB4 and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-resistant NB4-R2). In elucidating the mechanisms of growth inhibition, a special emphasis was placed on assessing the induction of differentiation and apoptosis by andrographolide in the primary acute promyelocytic leukaemia NB4 cells. The compound was 2- and 3-fold more active in inhibiting the growth of HL-60 and NB4-R2 cells compared with NB4 cells, respectively. At IC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the cells (compared with medium only treated control cells) is inhibited; 4.5 microM) the compound exhibited strong cell-differentiating activity in NB4 cells, similar to ATRA (IC50 1.5 microM). In the presence of a pure retinoic acid receptor antagonist AGN193109, the growth inhibition of NB4 cells by ATRA was reversed, whereas the activity of andrographolide was not affected. This clearly suggested that andrographolide's cell differentiating activity to induce growth inhibition of NB4 cells most likely occurred via a retinoic acid receptor-independent pathway. At higher concentration (2xIC50), andrographolide was an efficient inducer of apoptosis in NB4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest andrographolide and its derivatives, apparently with a novel cell differentiating mechanism and with ability to induce apoptosis, might be beneficial in the treatment of primary and ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

  16. Cell cycle controls: potential targets for chemical carcinogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Afshari, C A; Barrett, J C

    1993-01-01

    The progression of the cell cycle is controlled by the action of both positive and negative growth regulators. The key players in this activity include a family of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, which are themselves regulated by other kinases and phosphatases. Maintenance of balanced cell cycle controls may be directly linked to genomic stability. Loss of the check-points involved in cell cycle control may result in unrepaired DNA damage during DNA synthesis or mitosis leading to genet...

  17. Cell cycle control factors and skeletal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ogasawara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the oral and maxillofacial region, conditions such as delayed bone healing after tooth extraction, bone fracture, trauma-induced bone or cartilage defects, and tumors or birth defects are common, and it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that control skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, in order to establish new treatment strategies for these conditions. Multiple studies have been conducted to investigate the involvement of factors that may be crucial for skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, including transcription factors, growth factors and cell cycle factors. Several genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors have been generated in research seeking to identify cell cycle factor(s involved in the differentiation of cells, carcinogenesis, etc. Many groups have also reported the importance of cell cycle factors in the differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and other cell types. Herein, we review the phenotypes of the genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors with a particular focus on the size, body weight and skeletal abnormalities of the mice, and we discuss the potential of cell cycle factors as targets of clinical applications.

  18. Effect of laser modified surface microtopochemistry on endothelial cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, A C; Rouais, F; Lazare, S; Bordenave, L; Baquey, Ch

    2007-02-15

    The introduction of microelectronics technology in the area of biological sciences has brought forth previously unforeseeable applications such as DNA or protein biochips, miniaturized, multiparametric biosensors for high performance multianalyte assays, DNA sequencing, biocomputers, and substrates for controlled cell growth (i.e. tissue engineering). We developed and investigated a new method using "cold" excimer laser beam technology combined with microlithographical techniques to create surfaces with well defined 3D microdomains in order to delineate critical microscopic surface features governing cell-material interactions. Microfabricated surfaces with microgrooves 30-3 microm deep, 10 - 1 microm wide spaced 30 microm apart were obtained with micron resolution, by "microsculpturing" polymer model surfaces using a computer controlled laser KrF excimer beam coupled with a microlithographic projection technique. The laser beam after exiting a mask was focused onto the polymer target surface via an optical setup allowing for a 10-fold reduction of the mask pattern. Various 3D micropatterned features were obtained at the micron level. Reproducible submicron features could also be obtained using this method. Subsequently, model human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured on the laser microfabricated surfaces in order to study the effects of specific microscopic surface features on cell deposition and orientation. Cell deposition patterns were found to be microstructure dependant, and showed cell orientation dependency for features in the cell range dimension, a behaviour significantly different from that of a previously studied cell model (osteoprogenitor cell). This model may be a promising in so far as it is very rapid (a time frame less than a second per square centimeter of micropatterned surface) and provides further insights into the effects of surface microtopography on cell response with possible applications in the field of biosensors

  19. The cytoskeleton in plant and fungal cell tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitmann, A.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Tip-growing cells have a particular lifestyle that is characterized by the following features: (1) the cells grow in one direction, forming a cylindrical tube; (2) tip-growing cells are able to penetrate their growth environment, thus having to withstand considerable external forces; (3) the growth

  20. Growth Control and Optics of Organic Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2005-01-01

      Light-emitting organic nanofibers made of phenyl molecules like para-hexaphenyl (p-6P) and grown on muscovite mica form a model system well-suited for the study of optics in the sub-wavelength regime. We demonstrate that p-6P nanofibers can be grown with high control of the morphology of indivi......  Light-emitting organic nanofibers made of phenyl molecules like para-hexaphenyl (p-6P) and grown on muscovite mica form a model system well-suited for the study of optics in the sub-wavelength regime. We demonstrate that p-6P nanofibers can be grown with high control of the morphology...... of individual nanoaggregates and also of the mutual alignment of aggregates by the use of appropriate growth conditions and substrate surfaces. The nanofibers can be detached from the substrate, thus allowing one to study the optical response under a huge variety of fundamentally different conditions, from...... individual floating aggregates to dense bunches of interacting aggregates. We show examples of linear and nonlinear optical properties of the blue-light-emitting aggregates and mention possible applications in future submicrometer-sized optoelectronics....

  1. Characteristics of MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells and their effect on hair growth in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegielski, Marek; Izykowska, Ilona; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Bochnia, Marek; Calkosinski, Ireneusz; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We characterized growth factors produced by MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells and attempted to apply those cells to stimulate hair growth in rabbits. We evaluated the gene and protein expression of growth factors by immunocytochemical and molecular biology techniques in MIC-1 cells. An animal model was used to assess the effects of xenogenous stem cells on hair growth. In the experimental group, rabbits were intradermally injected with MIC-1 stem cells, whereas the control group rabbits were given vehicle-only. After 1, 2 and 4 weeks, skin specimen were collected for histological and immunohistochemical tests. MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells express growth factors, as confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increase in the number of hair follicles, as well as the amount of secondary hair in the follicles, without an immune response in animals injected intradermally with MIC-1 cells, compared to animals receiving vehicle-alone. MIC-1 cells accelerated hair growth in rabbits due to the activation of cells responsible for the regulation of the hair growth cycle through growth factors. Additionally, the xenogenous cell implant did not induce immune response.

  2. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2016-03-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment.

  3. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Giordano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment.

  4. SBDS-deficiency results in deregulation of reactive oxygen species leading to increased cell death and decreased cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar, Chhaya; Das, Bikul; Yeger, Herman; Dror, Yigal

    2010-12-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by reduced hematopoietic and exocrine pancreatic cell numbers and a marked propensity for leukemia. Most patients have mutations in the SBDS gene. We previously reported that SBDS-deficient cells overexpress Fas, undergo accelerated spontaneous and Fas-mediated apoptosis and grow slowly. However the mechanism of how SBDS regulates apoptosis remains unknown. Several studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate cell growth and spontaneous and Fas-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that SBDS-deficiency disrupts ROS regulation and subsequently increases sensitivity to Fas stimulation and reduced cell growth. SBDS was knocked down in HeLa cervical cancer cells and TF-1 myeloid cells using short hairpin RNA. ROS levels were evaluated by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Apoptosis and cell growth were evaluated with and without antioxidants by annexin V/propidium iodide and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays, respectively. We found that shRNA mediated SBDS-knockdown resulted in a significant increase in ROS levels compared to control cells. Fas stimulation further increased ROS levels in the SBDS-knockdown HeLa cells more than in the controls. Importantly, balancing ROS levels by antioxidants rescued SBDS-deficient cells from spontaneous and Fas-mediated apoptosis and reduced cell growth. ROS levels are increased in SBDS-deficient cells, which leads to increased apoptosis and decreased cell growth. Increased baseline and Fas-mediated ROS levels in SBDS-deficient cells can enhance the sensitivity to Fas stimulation. By balancing ROS levels, antioxidants can improve cell growth and survival in SBDS-deficient cells.

  5. Severe cell reduction in the future brain cortex in human growth-restricted fetuses and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Grethe B; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bogdanović, Nenad

    2007-01-01

    with controls. The daily increase in brain cells in the future cortex was only half of that of the controls. In the 3 other developmental zones, no significant differences in cell numbers could be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: IUGR in humans is associated with a severe reduction in cortical growth...

  6. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turajane, Thana; Chaveewanakorn, Ukrit; Fongsarun, Warachaya; Aojanepong, Jongjate

    2017-01-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA) that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS) and repeated intra-articular (IA) autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs) with growth factor addition (GFA) and hyaluronic acid (HA) versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF]) and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p < 0.033). Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout. PMID:29056974

  7. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thana Turajane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS and repeated intra-articular (IA autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs with growth factor addition (GFA and hyaluronic acid (HA versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF] and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p<0.033. Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout.

  8. E-cadherin homophilic ligation inhibits cell growth and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of other cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2007-01-01

    growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-cadherin protein attached to microspheres. We find that E-cadherin ligation alone reduces the frequency...... of cells entering the S phase, demonstrating that E-cadherin ligation directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. E-cadherin binding to beta-catenin is required for cell growth inhibition, but beta-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity is not involved in growth inhibition resulting from...... homophilic binding. Neither E-cadherin binding to p120-catenin nor beta-catenin binding to alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, is required for growth inhibition. E-cadherin ligation also inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated growth signaling by a beta...

  9. Growth inhibitory activity of Ankaferd hemostat on primary melanoma cells and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Turk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ankaferd hemostat is the first topical hemostatic agent about the red blood cell–fibrinogen relations tested in the clinical trials. Ankaferd hemostat consists of standardized plant extracts including Alpinia officinarum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Thymus vulgaris, Urtica dioica, and Vitis vinifera. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Ankaferd hemostat on viability of melanoma cell lines. Methods: Dissimilar melanoma cell lines and primary cells were used in this study. These cells were treated with different concentrations of Ankaferd hemostat to assess the impact of different dosages of the drug. All cells treated with different concentrations were incubated for different time intervals. After the data had been obtained, one-tailed T-test was used to determine whether the Ankaferd hemostat would have any significant inhibitory impact on cell growth. Results: We demonstrated in this study that cells treated with Ankaferd hemostat showed a significant decrease in cell viability compared to control groups. The cells showed different resistances against Ankaferd hemostat which depended on the dosage applied and the time treated cells had been incubated. We also demonstrated an inverse relationship between the concentration of the drug and the incubation time on one hand and the viability of the cells on the other hand, that is, increasing the concentration of the drug and the incubation time had a negative impact on cell viability. Conclusion: The findings in our study contribute to our knowledge about the anticancer impact of Ankaferd hemostat on different melanoma cells.

  10. Economic growth and carbon emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    The question about whether environmental improvement is compatible with continued economic growth remains unclear and requires further study in a specific context. This study intends to provide insight on the potential for carbon emissions control in the absence of international agreement, and connect the empirical analysis with theoretical framework. The Chinese electricity generation sector is used as a case study to demonstrate the problem. Both social planner and private problems are examined to derive the conditions that define the optimal level of production and pollution. The private problem will be demonstrated under the emission regulation using an emission tax, an input tax and an abatement subsidy respectively. The social optimal emission flow is imposed into the private problem. To provide tractable analytical results, a Cobb-Douglas type production function is used to describe the joint production process of the desired output and undesired output (i.e., electricity and emissions). A modified Hamiltonian approach is employed to solve the system and the steady state solutions are examined for policy implications. The theoretical analysis suggests that the ratio of emissions to desired output (refer to 'emission factor'), is a function of productive capital and other parameters. The finding of non-constant emission factor shows that reducing emissions without further cutting back the production of desired outputs is feasible under some circumstances. Rather than an ad hoc specification, the optimal conditions derived from our theoretical framework are used to examine the relationship between desired output and emission level. Data comes from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Electric Power Yearbook and provincial information of electricity generation for the year of 1993-2003 are used to estimate the Cobb-Douglas type joint production by the full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method. The empirical analysis shed light on the optimal

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Emeli M., E-mail: Emeli.Nilsson@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Brokken, Leon J.S., E-mail: Leon.Brokken@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Haerkoenen, Pirkko L., E-mail: Pirkko.Harkonen@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  13. Scaling-up vaccine production: implementation aspects of a biomass growth observer and controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soons, Z.I.T.A.; IJssel, van den J.; Pol, van der L.A.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This study considers two aspects of the implementation of a biomass growth observer and specific growth rate controller in scale-up from small- to pilot-scale bioreactors towards a feasible bulk production process for whole-cell vaccine against whooping cough. The first is the calculation

  14. Time-dependent effect of orchidectomy on vascular nitric oxide and thromboxane A2 release. Functional implications to control cell proliferation through activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta del Campo

    Full Text Available This study analyzes whether the release of nitric oxide (NO and thromboxane A2 (TXA2 depends on the time lapsed since gonadal function is lost, and their correlation with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. For this purpose, aortic and mesenteric artery segments from control and 6-weeks or 5-months orchidectomized rats were used to measure NO and TXA2 release. The results showed that the basal and acetylcholine (ACh-induced NO release were decreased 6 weeks post-orchidectomy both in aorta and mesenteric artery, but were recovered 5 months thereafter up to levels similar to those found in arteries from control rats. The basal and ACh-induced TXA2 release increased in aorta and mesenteric artery 6 weeks post-orchidectomy, and was maintained at high levels 5 months thereafter. Since we previously observed that orchidectomy, which decreased testosterone level, enlarged the muscular layer of mesenteric arteries, the effect of testosterone on VSMC proliferation was analyzed. The results showed that treatment of cultured VSMC with testosterone downregulated mitogenic signaling pathways initiated by the ligand-dependent activation of the EGFR. In contrast, the EGFR pathways were constitutively active in mesenteric arteries of long-term orchidectomized rats. Thus, the exposure of mesenteric arteries from control rats to epidermal growth factor (EGF induced the activation of EGFR signaling pathways. However, the addition of EGF to arteries from orchidectomized rats failed to induce a further activation of these pathways. In conclusion, this study shows that the release of NO depends on the time lapsed since the gonadal function is lost, while the release of TXA2 is already increased after short periods post-orchidectomy. The alterations in these signaling molecules could contribute to the constitutive activation of the EGFR and its downstream signaling pathways after long period

  15. The primary cilium is a sensory organelle that regulates growth control and tissue homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schneider, Linda; Clement, Christian Alexandro

    2006-01-01

    The growth-arrest specific receptor tyrosine kinase, PDGFRa, is up-regulated and targeted to the primary cilium during growth arrest in NIH3T3 cells and primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and PDGF-AA-stimulated fibroblast cycle entrance is regulated through activation of cili...... fibroblasts might be to interact with growth factors and extracellular matrix to control cell survival and growth, and likely migration, and to continuously monitor the mechanical stress on the tissue through modulation of Ca2+-dependent signaling in the primary cilium....

  16. Pluripotency gene expression and growth control in cultures of peripheral blood monocytes during their conversion into programmable cells of monocytic origin (PCMO: evidence for a regulatory role of autocrine activin and TGF-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Ungefroren

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that peripheral blood monocytes can be converted in vitro to a stem cell-like cell termed PCMO as evidenced by the re-expression of pluripotency-associated genes, transient proliferation, and the ability to adopt the phenotype of hepatocytes and insulin-producing cells upon tissue-specific differentiation. However, the regulatory interactions between cultured cells governing pluripotency and mitotic activity have remained elusive. Here we asked whether activin(s and TGF-β(s, are involved in PCMO generation. De novo proliferation of PCMO was higher under adherent vs. suspended culture conditions as revealed by the appearance of a subset of Ki67-positive monocytes and correlated with down-regulation of p21WAF1 beyond day 2 of culture. Realtime-PCR analysis showed that PCMO express ActRIIA, ALK4, TβRII, ALK5 as well as TGF-β1 and the βA subunit of activin. Interestingly, expression of ActRIIA and ALK4, and activin A levels in the culture supernatants increased until day 4 of culture, while levels of total and active TGF-β1 strongly declined. PCMO responded to both growth factors in an autocrine fashion with intracellular signaling as evidenced by a rise in the levels of phospho-Smad2 and a drop in those of phospho-Smad3. Stimulation of PCMO with recombinant activins (A, B, AB and TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of Smad2 but not Smad3. Inhibition of autocrine activin signaling by either SB431542 or follistatin reduced both Smad2 activation and Oct4A/Nanog upregulation. Inhibition of autocrine TGF-β signaling by either SB431542 or anti-TGF-β antibody reduced Smad3 activation and strongly increased the number of Ki67-positive cells. Furthermore, anti-TGF-β antibody moderately enhanced Oct4A/Nanog expression. Our data show that during PCMO generation pluripotency marker expression is controlled positively by activin/Smad2 and negatively by TGF-β/Smad3 signaling, while relief from growth inhibition is primarily the

  17. The Target of Rapamycin and Mechanisms of Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Tee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, now referred to as mechanistic target of rapamycin is considered as the master regulator of cell growth. A definition of cell growth is a build-up of cellular mass through the biosynthesis of macromolecules. mTOR regulation of cell growth and cell size is complex, involving tight regulation of both anabolic and catabolic processes. Upon a growth signal input, mTOR enhances a range of anabolic processes that coordinate the biosynthesis of macromolecules to build cellular biomass, while restricting catabolic processes such as autophagy. mTOR is highly dependent on the supply of nutrients and energy to promote cell growth, where the network of signalling pathways that influence mTOR activity ensures that energy and nutrient homeostasis are retained within the cell as they grow. As well as maintaining cell size, mTOR is fundamental in the regulation of organismal growth. This review examines the complexities of how mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 enhances the cell’s capacity to synthesis de novo proteins required for cell growth. It also describes the discovery of mTORC1, the complexities of cell growth signalling involving nutrients and energy supply, as well as the multifaceted regulation of mTORC1 to orchestrate ribosomal biogenesis and protein translation.

  18. RANKL induces organized lymph node growth by stromal cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Estelle; Duheron, Vincent; Decossas, Marion; Lézot, Frédéric; Berdal, Ariane; Chea, Sylvestre; Golub, Rachel; Bosisio, Mattéo R; Bridal, S Lori; Choi, Yongwon; Yagita, Hideo; Mueller, Christopher G

    2012-02-01

    RANK and its ligand RANKL play important roles in the development and regulation of the immune system. We show that mice transgenic for Rank in hair follicles display massive postnatal growth of skin-draining lymph nodes. The proportions of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stromal cells and their organization are maintained, with the exception of an increase in B cell follicles. The hematopoietic cells are not activated and respond to immunization by foreign Ag and adjuvant. We demonstrate that soluble RANKL is overproduced from the transgenic hair follicles and that its neutralization normalizes lymph node size, inclusive area, and numbers of B cell follicles. Reticular fibroblastic and vascular stromal cells, important for secondary lymphoid organ formation and organization, express RANK and undergo hyperproliferation, which is abrogated by RANKL neutralization. In addition, they express higher levels of CXCL13 and CCL19 chemokines, as well as MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 cell-adhesion molecules. These findings highlight the importance of tissue-derived cues for secondary lymphoid organ homeostasis and identify RANKL as a key molecule for controlling the plasticity of the immune system.

  19. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also led to marked accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), a breaker of DNA strand in HCT116 cells. ..... regulating cell proliferation described in the literature have been related to malignant transformation [12]. Thus, we assumed that bergenin-induced cell growth inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest.

  20. Genetic and Nongenetic Determinants of Cell Growth Variation Assessed by High-Throughput Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Siegal, Mark L.; Gresham, David

    2013-01-01

    In microbial populations, growth initiation and proliferation rates are major components of fitness and therefore likely targets of selection. We used a high-throughput microscopy assay, which enables simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of microcolonies, to determine the sources and extent of growth rate variation in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in different glucose environments. We find that cell growth rates are regulated by the extracellular concentration of glucose as proposed by Monod (1949), but that significant heterogeneity in growth rates is observed among genetically identical individuals within an environment. Yeast strains isolated from different geographic locations and habitats differ in their growth rate responses to different glucose concentrations. Inheritance patterns suggest that the genetic determinants of growth rates in different glucose concentrations are distinct. In addition, we identified genotypes that differ in the extent of variation in growth rate within an environment despite nearly identical mean growth rates, providing evidence that alleles controlling phenotypic variability segregate in yeast populations. We find that the time to reinitiation of growth (lag) is negatively correlated with growth rate, yet this relationship is strain-dependent. Between environments, the respirative activity of individual cells negatively correlates with glucose abundance and growth rate, but within an environment respirative activity and growth rate show a positive correlation, which we propose reflects differences in protein expression capacity. Our study quantifies the sources of genetic and nongenetic variation in cell growth rates in different glucose environments with unprecedented precision, facilitating their molecular genetic dissection. PMID:23938868

  1. [Genetic control of growth and development of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Phenotypic selection of mutants among strains of the Peterhof genetic collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitavichius, D

    2001-06-01

    Results of identifying phenotypes intrinsic to mutations of genes that regulate the activity of the signal transduction pathway of RAS-cyclic adenosinemonophosphate in six strains belonging to the Peterhof genetic collection of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented: an increase or decrease in the amount of the accumulated glycogen, resistance or sensitivity to heat shock and nitrogen starvation, and the growth and viability in media containing unfermentable carbon sources (potassium acetate, ethanol, and glycerol) at temperatures 30 and 70 degrees C. Collectively these phenotypic characteristics in five examined yeast strains can be interpreted as indicating disturbances in the activity of the RAS/cAMP pathway. However, the discrepancies revealed between cellular phenotypes in these strains and in the strains with a decreased or increased activity of the RAS/cAMP pathway did not allow them to be assigned to a particular functional activity group. The inconsistencies between phenotypes detected in this study may be prerequisites for the identification of new genes responsible for this signal transduction pathway or new mutations in the known genes that determine other phenotypic combinations.

  2. The role of hormones and growth factors in the cellular proliferation control in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armelin, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    A review is done about fibroblast proliferation, its control by classic hormones and hormonal growth factors, showing their main implications and the stage of this research at present. The control exerted on fibronlast proliferation by hormonal growth factors and classic hormones is demonstrated. The existence of basic mechanisms valid for all types of cells is suggested. Experiences are carried out with the aim of finding growth mutants useful in the elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms involved in growth regulation. Radiactive precursors and autoradiographic techniques are used in the research. (M.A.) [pt

  3. One year growth hormone replacement therapy does not alter colonic epithelial cell proliferation in growth hormone deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; van Gorkom, BAP; Sluiter, WJ; de Vries, Emma; Kleibeuker, JH; Dullaart, RPF

    OBJECTIVE Increased colonic epithelial cell proliferation has been found in various conditions associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer including acromegaly. In a placebo-controlled study we determined the effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in GH deficient adults on the

  4. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  5. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  6. Biomaterials for the programming of cell growth in oral tissues: The possible role of APA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Marco; Giacomelli, Luca; Larosa, Claudio

    2011-01-06

    Examples of programmed tissue response after the interaction of cells with biomaterials are a hot topic in current dental research. We propose here the use of anodic porous alumina (APA) for the programming of cell growth in oral tissues. In particular, APA may trigger cell growth by the controlled release of specific growth factors and/or ions. Moreover, APA may be used as a scaffold to promote generation of new tissue, due to the high interconnectivity of pores and the high surface roughness displayed by this material.

  7. Mechanism of divergent growth factor effects in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy; Haack-Sorensen, M.

    2005-01-01

    Closely related signals often lead to very different cellular outcomes. We found that the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells into bone-forming cells is stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We used mass spectrometry-based proteomics...... it as a possible control point. Indeed, chemical inhibition of PI3K in PDGF-stimulated cells removed the differential effect of the two growth factors, bestowing full differentiation effect onto PDGF. Thus, quantitative proteomics can directly compare entire signaling networks and discover critical differences...

  8. Fluidic control over cell proliferation and chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Microscopic flows are almost always stable and laminar that allows precise control of chemical environment in micro-channels. We describe design and operation of several microfluidic devices, in which various types of environments are created for different experimental assays with live cells. In a microfluidic chemostat, colonies of non-adherent bacterial and yeast cells are trapped in micro-chambers with walls permeable for chemicals. Fast chemical exchange between the chambers and nearby flow-through channels creates essentially chemostatic medium conditions in the chambers and leads to exponential growth of the colonies up to very high cell densities. Another microfluidic device allows creation of linear concentration profiles of a pheromone (α-factor) across channels with non-adherent yeast cells, without exposure of the cells to flow or other mechanical perturbation. The concentration profile remains stable for hours enabling studies of chemotropic response of the cells to the pheromone gradient. A third type of the microfluidic devices is used to study chemotaxis of human neutrophils exposed to gradients of a chemoattractant (fMLP). The devices generate concentration profiles of various shapes, with adjustable steepness and mean concentration. The ``gradient'' of the chemoattractant can be imposed and reversed within less than a second, allowing repeated quantitative experiments.

  9. Cell cycle control across the eukaryotic kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Schnittger, Arp

    2013-07-01

    Almost two billion years of evolution have generated a vast and amazing variety of eukaryotic life with approximately 8.7 million extant species. Growth and reproduction of all of these organisms depend on faithful duplication and distribution of their chromosomes to the newly forming daughter cells in a process called the cell cycle. However, most of what is known today about cell cycle control comes from a few model species that belong to the unikonts; that is, to only one of five 'supergroups' that comprise the eukaryotic kingdom. Recently, analyzing species from distantly related clades is providing insights into general principles of cell cycle regulation and shedding light on its evolution. Here, referring to animal and fungal as opposed to non-unikont systems, especially flowering plants from the archaeplastid supergroup, we compare the conservation of central cell cycle regulator functions, the structure of network topologies, and the evolutionary dynamics of substrates of core cell cycle kinases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  11. Investment, Control of Corruption and Economic Growth in MENA region

    OpenAIRE

    Mtiraoui, Abderraouf

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to study the interaction between the control of corruption, investment and economic growth in the MENA region. Our empirical essay attempts to clarify the direct and indirect control of corruption on economic growth through investment in the period 1984-2012 in the MENA region while using the model of simultaneous equations.

  12. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  13. Another Brick in the Cell Wall: Biosynthesis Dependent Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  14. Microtubules Growth Rate Alteration in Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B. Alieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how microtubules contribute to the dynamic reorganization of the endothelial cell (EC cytoskeleton, we established an EC model expressing EB3-GFP, a protein that marks microtubule plus-ends. Using this model, we were able to measure microtubule growth rate at the centrosome region and near the cell periphery of a single human EC and in the EC monolayer. We demonstrate that the majority of microtubules in EC are dynamic, the growth rate of their plus-ends is highest in the internal cytoplasm, in the region of the centrosome. Growth rate of microtubule plus-ends decreases from the cell center toward the periphery. Our data suggest the existing mechanism(s of local regulation of microtubule plus-ends growth in EC. Microtubule growth rate in the internal cytoplasm of EC in the monolayer is lower than that of single EC suggesting the regulatory effect of cell-cell contacts. Centrosomal microtubule growth rate distribution in single EC indicated the presence of two subpopulations of microtubules with “normal” (similar to those in monolayer EC and “fast” (three times as much growth rates. Our results indicate functional interactions between cell-cell contacts and microtubules.

  15. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na + , K + , and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. [Inhibition of rhodiola on the growth of EVC-304 cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiu-lan; Yang, Feng; Chen, Rong-hua; Ga, Bu; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Shi-fu; Zhang, Jing-ling

    2006-07-01

    To observe the effect of rhodiola on human umbilical vein endothelial cell line EVC-304. EVC-304 was cultured and divided into two groups: control group and rhodiola-treated group. Three days after treatment, cell survival rate-drug concentration curve was obtained by counting the survival cells, and cells in each group were stained by Wright's stain and observed under microscope. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The survival cells in rhodiola-treated group was much less than those in control group. More cells in rhodiola-treated group stayed in G(1) phase while less in S phase when compared with those in control group by FCM. Rhodiola can inhibit the growth of human endothelial cell line EVC-304, perhaps through inhibiting the proliferation of the cells. This may lay the foundation for the mechanism study and clinical application of rhodiola in prevention of pulmonary artery hypertension.

  18. Macropinocytosis, mTORC1 and cellular growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sei; Pacitto, Regina; Inoki, Ken; Swanson, Joel

    2018-04-01

    The growth and proliferation of metazoan cells are driven by cellular nutrient status and by extracellular growth factors. Growth factor receptors on cell surfaces initiate biochemical signals that increase anabolic metabolism and macropinocytosis, an actin-dependent endocytic process in which relatively large volumes of extracellular solutes and nutrients are internalized and delivered efficiently into lysosomes. Macropinocytosis is prominent in many kinds of cancer cells, and supports the growth of cells transformed by oncogenic K-Ras. Growth factor receptor signaling and the overall metabolic status of the cell are coordinated in the cytoplasm by the mechanistic target-of-rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1), which positively regulates protein synthesis and negatively regulates molecular salvage pathways such as autophagy. mTORC1 is activated by two distinct Ras-related small GTPases, Rag and Rheb, which associate with lysosomal membranes inside the cell. Rag recruits mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface where Rheb directly binds to and activates mTORC1. Rag is activated by both lysosomal luminal and cytosolic amino acids; Rheb activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase, Akt, and the tuberous sclerosis complex-1/2. Signals for activation of Rag and Rheb converge at the lysosomal membrane, and several lines of evidence support the idea that growth factor-dependent endocytosis facilitates amino acid transfer into the lysosome leading to the activation of Rag. This review summarizes evidence that growth factor-stimulated macropinocytosis is essential for amino acid-dependent activation of mTORC1, and that increased solute accumulation by macropinocytosis in transformed cells supports unchecked cell growth.

  19. THE OCCURRENCE, GROWTH AND CONTROL OF PATHOGENS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The approaches that can be used to minimise the risk of foodborne diseases through consumption of fermented foods include improved hygiene, use of starter cultures, use of protective cultures and the use of a combination of factors that inhibit the growth of microorganisms (multiple hurdles). The use of concepts such as ...

  20. Effects of several physiochemical factors on cell growth and gallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of gallic acid in cell suspension culture of Acer ginnala Maxim was studied. Some physiochemical factors and chemical substances effect on the cell growth and the production of gallic acid were investigated. Cells harvested from plant tissue culture were extracted and applied to high performance liquid ...

  1. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakubo Emi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. Methods We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Results Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Conclusion Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors.

  2. Effect of NCAM-transfection on growth and invasion of a human cancer cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Bock, E; Jirus, S

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the human transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was transfected into the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Transfectants with a homogeneous expression of NCAM showed a restricted capacity for penetration of an artificial...... basement membrane. However, when injected into nude mice, both control and NCAM-expressing cell lines produced equally invasive tumors. Tumors generated from NCAM-transfected cells were heterogeneous, containing NCAM-positive as well as NCAM-negative areas, indicating the existence of host factors capable...... of modulating NCAM expression in vivo. In nude mice, NCAM-transfected cells developed tumors with longer latency periods and slower growth rates than tumors induced by NCAM-negative control cells, implying that NCAM may be involved not only in adhesive and motile behavior of tumor cells but also in their growth...

  3. Vegetation growth patterns on six rock-covered UMTRA Project disposal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    This study assessed vegetation growth patterns, the potential impacts of vegetation growth on disposal cell cover integrity, and possible measures that could be taken to monitor and/or control plant growth, where necessary, on six Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project rock-covered disposal cells. A large-scale invasion of volunteer plants was observed on the Shiprock and Burrell disposal cells. Plant growth at the South Clive, Green River, and Tuba City disposal cells was sparse except for the south rock apron and south slope of the Tuba City disposal cell, where windblown sand had filled up part of the rock cover and plant growth was observed. The rock-covered topslope of the Collins Ranch disposal cell was intentionally covered with topsoil and vegetated. Plant roots growing on the disposal cells are changing the characteristics of the cover by drying out the radon barrier, encouraging the establishment of soil-building processes in the bedding and radon barrier layers, creating channels in the radon barrier, and facilitating ecological succession, which could lead to the establishment of additional deep-rooted plants on the disposal cells. If left unchecked, plant roots would reach the tailings at the Burrell and Collins Ranch disposal cells within a few years, likely resulting in the transport of contaminants out of the cells

  4. Form planning Control to growth management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2016-01-01

    -right government decided to transfer national planning functions from the Ministry of the Environment (Miljøministeriet) to the Danish Business Authority (Erhvervsstyrelsen). This was done in the midst of an on-going political debate over ‘simplifying’ the Planning Act to facilitate more economic growth....... In this light, Danish spatial planning continues to align with prevailing neo-liberal minded government agendas and thereby ends up reflecting the ideologies and interests of the government in place. In contrast with the social welfarist objectives of the 1970s, these governmental preferences have indirectly...... caused that spatial planning be regarded more as a cost than an asset. Accordingly, it is evident that the Danish planning domain has progressively lost political clout and the focus is changed towards facilitation and management of economic growth....

  5. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-lin Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 µg/L to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  6. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Yi, Ho-Keun; Nam, Sang-Yun; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2009-01-01

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  7. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  8. Synergism between inositol polyphosphates and TOR kinase signaling in nutrient sensing, growth control, and lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The networks that govern carbon metabolism and control intracellular carbon partitioning in photosynthetic cells are poorly understood. Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved growth regulator that integrates nutrient signals and modulates cell growth in eukaryotes, though the TOR signaling ...

  9. Coating and selective deposition of nanofilm on silicone rubber for cell adhesion and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hua; Lvov, Yuri M; Mills, David K; Jennings, Merilyn; Alexander, Jonathan S; Jones, Steven A

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed method for surface modification, layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly, has been applied to silicone, and its ability to encourage endothelial cell growth and control cell growth patterns has been examined. The surfaces studied consisted of a precursor, with alternating cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI) and anionic sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) layers followed by alternating gelatin and poly-D-lysine (PDL) layers. Film growth increased linearly with the number of layers. Each PSS/PEI bilayer was 3 nm thick, and each gelatin/PDL bilayer was 5 nm thick. All layers were more hydrophilic than the unmodified silicone rubber surface, as determined from contact angle measurements. The contact angle was primarily dictated by the outermost layer. Of the coatings studied, gelatin was the most hydrophilic. A film of (PSS/PEI)4/(gelatin/PDL)4/ gelatin was highly favorable for cell adhesion and growth, in contrast to films of (PSS/PEI)8 or (PSS/PEI)8/PSS. Cell growth patterns were successfully controlled by selective deposition of microspheres on silicone rubber, using microcontact printing with a silicone stamp. Cell adhesion was confined to the region of microsphere deposition. These results demonstrate that the LbL self-assembly technique provides a general approach to coat and selectively deposit films with nanometer thickness on silicone rubber. Furthermore, they show that this method is a viable technique for controlling cellular adhesion and growth.

  10. Growth of fibroblasts and endothelial cells on wettability gradient surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The growth, spreading, and shape of human skin fibroblasts (PK 84) and human umbilical cord endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) and dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DOGS) gradient surfaces were investigated in the presence of serum proteins. Gradient surfaces were prepared on glass using

  11. Energy, control and DNA structure in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijker, J.E.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Gomes, A. Vaz

    1995-01-01

    Maintenance (let alone growth) of the highly ordered living cell is only possible through the continuous input of free energy. Coupling of energetically downhill processes (such as catabolic reactions) to uphill processes is essential to provide this free energy and is catalyzed by enzymes either...... control cell physiology. Indeed, in the living cell homeostatic control mechanisms might exist for the free-energy transduction pathways so as to prevent perturbation of cellular function when the Gibbs energy supply is compromised. This presentation addresses the extent to which the intracellular ATP...... level is involved in the control of cell physiology, how the elaborate control of cell function may be analyzed theoretically and quantitatively, and if this can be utilized selectively to affect certain cell types....

  12. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  13. Controlled growth of polyaniline fractals on HOPG through potentiodynamic electropolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjya, Dhrubajyoti; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit

    2012-04-10

    Polyaniline (PANI) in fractal dimension has been electrodeposited reproducibly on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) from 0.2 M aniline in 1 M aqueous HCl solution by potentiodynamic sweeping in the range of -0.2 to 0.76 V vs Ag/AgCl at room temperature. Fractal growth of PANI dendrimers is affected by diffusion limited polymerization (DLP) at a sweep rate of 15 mV s(-1) for 43 min. This type of PANI dendrimer is prepared for the first time on such large area HOPG substrate by electrochemical technique using rather simple cell setup. The fractal dimension has been determined by chronoamperometry (CA) and box counting technique and is found to vary from 1.4 to 1.9 with the duration of electropolymerization. The sweep rate, terminal oxidation potential, and the diverse surface anisotropy of the HOPG surface are found to be crucial factors in controlling the growth of such PANI fractals. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. Effects of x-irradiation on cell division, oxygen consumption, and growth medium pH of an insect cell line cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval, T.M.; Myser, W.C.; Hink, W.F.

    1975-01-01

    Cultured Trichoplusia ni cells in exponential growth were administered x-ray doses of 10,000 R and then subcultured. The untreated cell population began exponential growth within a few hours after subculture, eventually reaching stationary growth phase 96 hr later at a cell density of 2.08 x 10 6 cells/ml, whereas the irradiated cell population did not change for 24 hr after irradiation and then began exponential growth at a rate similar to that of control cells, also reaching stationary phase at 96 hr, but at a cell density of 0.93 x 10 6 cells/ml, which is less than half the maximum density of controls. From 24 to 96 hr after treatment, the x-irradiated cells were characterized by an increased consumption of oxygen that was nearly twice the amount utilized by control cells. The pH of the cell growth medium increases over 96 hr from 6.3 to 6.6 for irradiated as well as for untreated cultures, but since the number of x-rayed cells is less than half the number of untreated cells, the pH increase, per cell, of medium from irradiated cultures is about twice that of medium from control cultures

  15. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  16. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  17. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase H1 controls growth hormone receptor signaling and systemic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecka, Iwona; Patrignani, Claudia; Pescini, Rosanna; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Perrin, Dominique; Xue, Yingzi; Yasenchak, Jason; Clark, Ann; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Zaratin, Paola; Valenzuela, David; Rommel, Christian; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2007-11-30

    Several protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been implicated in the control of growth hormone receptor (GHR) signaling, but none have been shown to affect growth in vivo. We have applied a battery of molecular and cellular approaches to test a family-wide panel of PTPs for interference with GHR signaling. Among the subset of PTPs that showed activity in multiple readouts, we selected PTP-H1/PTPN3 for further in vivo studies and found that mice lacking the PTP-H1 catalytic domain show significantly enhanced growth over their wild type littermates. In addition, PTP-H1 mutant animals had enhanced plasma and liver mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, as well as increased bone density and mineral content. These observations point to a controlling role for PTP-H1 in modulating GHR signaling and systemic growth through insulin-like growth factor 1 secretion.

  18. Cell surface engineering to control cellular interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Custódio, Catarina A.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface composition determines all interactions of the cell with its environment, thus cell functions such as adhesion, migration and cell–cell interactions can potentially be controlled by engineering and manipulating the cell membrane. Cell membranes present a rich repertoire of molecules, therefore a versatile ground for modification. However the complex and dynamic nature of the cell surface is also a major challenge for cell surface engineering that should also involve strategies co...

  19. Radiation and neuroregulatory control of growth hormone secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvy-Stuart, A.L.; Wallace, W.H.B.; Shalet, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Cranial irradiation frequently results in growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Patients with radiation-induced GH deficiency usually remain responsive to exogenous growth hormone releasing hormone, implying radiation damages the hypothalamus rather than the pituitary. Little is known about the effect of cranial irradiation on the neuroendocrine control of GH secretion. This study was to determine the effect of cranial irradiation on somatostatin tone. (Author)

  20. Controlled Directional Growth of TiO2 Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In, Su-il; Hou, Yidong; Abrams, Billie

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how the anodization direction and growth rate of vertically aligned, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube (NT) arrays can be controlled and manipulated by the local concentration of O-2 in the electrolyte. This leads to the growth of highly active TiO2 NT arrays directly on nonconducting s...

  1. Gas-Jet Meniscus Control in Ribbon Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Vonroos, O.

    1983-01-01

    Gas jet used to control shape of meniscus and thus to regulate ribbon thickness in vertical silicon-ribbon growth. Gas jet also cools ribbon, increasing maximum possible pull speed for silicon, contact angle of 11 degrees plus or minus 1 degree required for constant thickness ribbon growth. Cooling effect of gas jet increases maximum possible pull speed.

  2. Modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between human smooth muscle cells by leukocyte-derived growth factors and cytokines in relation to atherogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, A.

    1997-01-01


    In this thesis, the effect of leukocyte-derived growth factors and cytokines on GJIC between SMC was investigated. GJIC is regarded as an important mechanism in the control of cell growth, cell differentiation and tissue homeostasis. Disturbance of SMC growth control is regarded to be a

  3. Phosphoinositide turnover in cell growth and transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischman, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Interaction of cells with various stimuli triggers a common signal transduction pathway involving breakdown and resynthesis of the minor membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). Hydrolysis of PIP 2 by phospholipase C generates two key catabolites-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ) and diacylglycerol (DAG)-which mediate and amplify cellular responses. These studies provide evidence for potential involvement of this pathway in oncogenic transformation and cell cycle progression. Altered levels of PIP 2 and its breakdown products were found in cells transformed by ras oncogenes, in contrast to untransformed counterparts. Steady-state levels of PIP 2 , DAG and inositol phosphates were measured in NIH 3T3 and NRK cells metabolically labelled with 3 H-glycerol and 3 H-inositol. DAG and inositol phosphate levels were significantly elevated by 2.5-3 fold in the transformed cells while levels of PIP 2 were decreased. These findings suggest that the ras protein may activate phospholipase C. Elevated DAG content in the transformed cells was also measured by phosphorylation of DAG using a partially purified DAG kinase, indicating that the differences seen could not be attributed to differences in labelling between the cell lines

  4. Minoxidil Promotes Hair Growth through Stimulation of Growth Factor Release from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nahyun; Shin, Soyoung; Song, Sun U; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2018-02-28

    Minoxidil directly promotes hair growth via the stimulation of dermal papilla (DP) and epithelial cells. Alternatively, there is little evidence for indirect promotion of hair growth via stimulation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). We investigated whether minoxidil stimulates ASCs and if increased growth factor secretion by ASCs facilitates minoxidil-induced hair growth. Telogen-to-anagen induction was examined in mice. Cultured DP cells and vibrissae hair follicle organ cultures were used to further examine the underlying mechanisms. Subcutaneous injection of minoxidil-treated ASCs accelerated telogen-to-anagen transition in mice, and increased hair weight at day 14 post-injection. Minoxidil did not alter ASC proliferation, but increased migration and tube formation. Minoxidil also increased the secretion of growth factors from ASCs, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF), and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C). Minoxidil increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and concomitant upregulation of PD-ECGF and PDGF-C mRNA levels were attenuated by an ERK inhibitor. Subcutaneous injection of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C enhanced anagen induction in mice, and both CXCL1 and PDGF-C increased hair length in ex vivo organ culture. Treatment with CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C also increased the proliferation index in DP cells. Finally, topical application of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C with 2% minoxidil enhanced anagen induction when compared to minoxidil alone. Minoxidil stimulates ASC motility and increases paracrine growth factor signaling. Minoxidil-stimulated secretion of growth factors by ASCs may enhance hair growth by promoting DP proliferation. Therefore, minoxidil can be used as an ASC preconditioning agent for hair regeneration.

  5. No Stress! Relax! Mechanisms Governing Growth and Shape in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which plant cells control growth and shape are the result of the coordinated action of many events, notably cell wall stress relaxation and turgor-driven expansion. The scalar nature of turgor pressure would drive plant cells to assume spherical shapes; however, this is not the case, as plant cells show an amazing variety of morphologies. Plant cell walls are dynamic structures that can display alterations in matrix polysaccharide composition and concentration, which ultimately affect the wall deformation rate. The wide varieties of plant cell shapes, spanning from elongated cylinders (as pollen tubes and jigsaw puzzle-like epidermal cells, to very long fibres and branched stellate leaf trichomes, can be understood if the underlying mechanisms regulating wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal dynamics are addressed. This review aims at gathering the available knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regulating expansion, growth and shape in plant cells by putting a special emphasis on the cell wall-cytoskeleton system continuum. In particular, we discuss from a molecular point of view the growth mechanisms characterizing cell types with strikingly different geometries and describe their relationship with primary walls. The purpose, here, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of the multitude of events through which plant cells manage to expand and control their final shapes.

  6. Radiation adaptive response for the growth of cultured glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Miura, Y.; Kano, M.; Toda, T.; Urano, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To examine the molecular mechanism of radiation adaptive response (RAR) for the growth of cultured glial cells and to investigate the influence of aging on the response, glial cells were cultured from young and aged rats (1 month and 24 months old). RAR for the growth of glial cells conditioned with a low dose of X-rays and subsequently exposed to a high dose of X-rays was examined for cell number and BrdU incorporation. Involvement of the subcellular signaling pathway factors in RAR was investigated using their inhibitors, activators and mutated glial cells. RAR was observed in cells cultured from young rats, but was not in cells from aged rats. The inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppressed RAR. The activators of PKC instead of low dose irradiation also caused RAR. Moreover, glial cells cultured from severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mice (CB-17 scid) and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells from AT patients showed no RAR. These results indicated that PKC, ATM, DNAPK and/or PI3K were involved in RAR for growth and BrdU incorporation of cultured glial cells and RAR decreased with aging. Proteomics data of glial cells exposed to severe stress of H 2 O 2 or X-rays also will be presented in the conference since little or no difference has not been observed with slight stress yet

  7. Leptin Regulation of Mammary Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pighetti, Gina

    2000-01-01

    .... The studies of this proposal were designed to test the hypothesis that the interaction of leptin with its receptor regulates normal and pathologic mammary epithelial cell proliferation and/or differentiation...

  8. The Expression of BTS-2 Enhances Cell Growth and Invasiveness in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quoc Thang; Oue, Naohide; Yamamoto, Yuji; Shigematsu, Yoshinori; Sekino, Yohei; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Uraoka, Naohiro; Tiwari, Mamata; Yasui, Wataru

    2017-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of cancer in developed countries. Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2) gene, which encodes BST2 transmembrane glycoprotein, is overexpressed in several cancer types. In the present study, we analyzed the expression and function of BST2 in RCC. BST2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 123 RCC cases. RNA interference was used to inhibit BST2 expression in a RCC cell line. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that 32% of the 123 RCC cases were positive for BST2. BST2 expression was positively associated with tumour stage. Furthermore, BST2 expression was an independent predictor of survival in patients with RCC. BST2 siRNA-transfected Caki-1 cells displayed significantly reduced cell growth and invasive activity relative to negative control siRNA-transfected cells. These results suggest that BST2 plays an important role in the progression of RCC. Because BST2 is expressed on the cell membrane, BST2 is a good therapeutic target for RCC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Wall extensibility: its nature, measurement and relationship to plant cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cells is controlled principally by processes that loosen the wall and enable it to expand irreversibly. The central role of wall relaxation for cell expansion is reviewed. The most common methods for assessing the extension properties of plant cell walls ( wall extensibility') are described, categorized and assessed critically. What emerges are three fundamentally different approaches which test growing cells for their ability (a) to enlarge at different values of turgor, (b) to induce wall relaxation, and (c) to deform elastically or plastically in response to an applied tensile force. Analogous methods with isolated walls are similarly reviewed. The results of these different assays are related to the nature of plant cell growth and pertinent biophysical theory. I argue that the extensibilities' measured by these assays are fundamentally different from one another and that some are more pertinent to growth than others.

  11. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities above 500...

  12. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  13. Virtual microstructural leaf tissue generation based on cell growth modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abera, M.K.; Retta, M.A.; Verboven, P.; Nicolai, B.M.; Berghuijs, H.; Struik, P.

    2016-01-01

    A cell growth algorithm for virtual leaf tissue generation is presented based on the biomechanics of plant cells in tissues. The algorithm can account for typical differences in epidermal layers, palisade mesophyll layer and spongy mesophyll layer which have characteristic differences in the

  14. Ataxia-telangiectasia cell extracts confer radioresistant DNA synthesis on control cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, R.; Lavin, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated in greater detail the radioresistant DNA synthesis universally observed in cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). The approach employed in this study was to permeabilize cells with lysolecithin after gamma-irradiation and thus facilitate the introduction of cell extract into these cells. This permeabilization can be reversed by diluting the cells in growth medium. Cells treated in this way show the characteristic inhibition (control cells) or lack of it (A-T cells) after exposure to ionizing radiation. Introduction of A-T cells extracts into control cells prevented the radiation-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis normally observed in these cells. A-T cell extracts did not change the level of radioresistant DNA synthesis in A-T cells. Control cell extracts on the other hand did not influence the pattern of inhibition of DNA synthesis in either cell type. It seems likely that the agent involved is a protein because of its heat lability and sensitivity to trypsin digestion. It has a molecular weight (MW) in the range 20-30 000 D. The development of this assay system for a factor conferring radioresistant DNA synthesis on control cells provides a means of purifying this factor, and ultimately an approach to identifying the gene responsible

  15. Growth and production kinetics of human x mouse and mouse hybridoma cells at reduced temperature and serum content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borth, N; Heider, R; Assadian, A; Katinger, H

    1992-09-01

    The growth and production kinetics of a mouse hybridoma cell line and a human-mouse heterohybridoma were analyzed under conditions of reduced temperature and serum content. The mouse hybridoma P24 had a constant cell specific production rate and RNA content, while the heterohybridoma 3D6-LC4 showed growth associated production kinetics and an increased RNA content at higher growth rates. This behaviour of 3D6-LC4 cells can be explained by the unusual cell cycle kinetics of this line, which can be arrested in any phase under growth limiting conditions, so that a low growth rate does not result in a greater portion of high producing G1-phase cells. Substrate limitation changes the cell cycle distribution of this cell line to a greater extent than low temperature or serum content, which indicates that this stress factor exerts a greater physiological control than assumed.

  16. Selective modulation of protein kinase isozymes by the site-selective analog 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate provides a biological means for control of human colon cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ally, S.; Tortora, G.; Clair, T.

    1988-01-01

    Differential expression of type I and type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase isozymes has been linked to growth regulation and differentiation. The authors examined the expression of protein kinase isozymes in the LS 174T human colon cancer cell line during 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP)-induced growth inhibition. Two species of R II (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type II) with apparent M r 52,000 (R II 52 ) and M r 56,000 (R II 56 ) and a single species of R I (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type I) with M r 48,000 were identified in the cancer cells. R I and both forms of R II were covalently labeled with 8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic [ 32 P]monophosphate, and two anti-R II antibodies that exclusively recognize either R II 52 or R II 56 resolved two forms of the R II receptors. 8-Cl-cAMP caused transcriptional activation of the R II 52 receptor gene and inactivation of the R I receptor gene. Thus, differential regulation of various forms of cAMP receptor proteins is involved in 8-Cl-cAMP-induced regulation of cancer cell growth, and nuclear translocation of R II 52 receptor protein appears to be an early event in such differential regulation

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito, E-mail: hhorinou@ncc.go.jp [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Furuta, Koh [Department of Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuta, Koji [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC.

  18. Mechanical characterization of yeast cells: effects of growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, A; Kampen, I; Kwade, A

    2015-10-01

    Industrial biotechnology uses microbiological cells to produce a wide range of products. While the organisms in question are well understood regarding their genetic and molecular properties, less is known about their mechanical properties. Previous work has established a testing procedure for single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells using a Nanoindenter equipped with a Flat Punch probe, allowing the compression between two parallel surfaces. The resulting force-displacement curves clearly showed the bursting of the cells and served to determine characteristic values such as the bursting force, bursting energy and relative deformation. This study examined the mechanical characteristics of yeast cells under the influence of varying cultivation parameters, namely the pH value, temperature, aeration rate, stirrer speed and culture medium composition. It was observed that only temperature and medium composition showed significant effect on the mechanical properties of the cells. Higher temperatures during cultivation caused lower bursting forces and energies. Further analysis of the data showed that the mechanical characteristics of the cells were only influenced by parameters which also had an influence on the growth rate. In conclusion, higher growth rates result in a lower mechanical strength of the yeast cells. This study provides data on the influence of growth conditions on the mechanical properties of yeast cells. Single cell compression tests on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells indicate that higher growth rates result in a lower mechanical strength of the cells. As in biotechnological processes mechanical degradation is often part of the downstream process to release the product from the micro-organisms, the knowledge about the mechanical properties of the cells is relevant for process optimization. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Plasticity in sunflower leaf and cell growth under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céccoli, G; Bustos, D; Ortega, L I; Senn, M E; Vegetti, A; Taleisnik, E

    2015-01-01

    A group of sunflower lines that exhibit a range of leaf Na(+) concentrations under high salinity was used to explore whether the responses to the osmotic and ionic components of salinity can be distinguished in leaf expansion kinetics analysis. It was expected that at the initial stages of the salt treatment, leaf expansion kinetics changes would be dominated by responses to the osmotic component of salinity, and that later on, ion inclusion would impose further kinetics changes. It was also expected that differential leaf Na(+) accumulation would be reflected in specific changes in cell division and expansion rates. Plants of four sunflower lines were gradually treated with a relatively high (130 mm NaCl) salt treatment. Leaf expansion kinetics curves were compared in leaves that were formed before, during and after the initiation of the salt treatment. Leaf areas were smaller in salt-treated plants, but the analysis of growth curves did not reveal differences that could be attributed to differential Na(+) accumulation, since similar changes in leaf expansion kinetics were observed in lines with different magnitudes of salt accumulation. Nevertheless, in a high leaf Na(+) -including line, cell divisions were affected earlier, resulting in leaves with proportionally fewer cells than in a Na(+) -excluding line. A distinct change in leaf epidermal pavement shape caused by salinity is reported for the first time. Mature pavement cells in leaves of control plants exhibited typical lobed, jigsaw-puzzle shape, whereas in treated plants, they tended to retain closer-to-circular shapes and a lower number of lobes. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  1. Effect of growth media modifications on cell biomass and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth media dependency of S. frigidimarina in terms of its growth behavior in response to modifications made to the media as well as its potential to produce PUFAs was evaluated. S. frigidimarina was cultured in conventional shake-flasks and controlled bioreactors with a batch-type procedure using different media ...

  2. Mechanical behavior of cells within a cell-based model of wheat leaf growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Zubairova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the principles and mechanisms of cell growth coordination in plant tissue remains an outstanding challenge for modern developmental biology. Cell-based modeling is a widely used technique for studying the geometric and topological features of plant tissue morphology during growth. We developed a quasi-one-dimensional model of unidirectional growth of a tissue layer in a linear leaf blade that takes cell autonomous growth mode into account. The model allows for fitting of the visible cell length using the experimental cell length distribution along the longitudinal axis of a wheat leaf epidermis. Additionally, it describes changes in turgor and osmotic pressures for each cell in the growing tissue. Our numerical experiments show that the pressures in the cell change over the cell cycle, and in symplastically growing tissue, they vary from cell to cell and strongly depend on the leaf growing zone to which the cells belong. Therefore, we believe that the mechanical signals generated by pressures are important to consider in simulations of tissue growth as possible targets for molecular genetic regulators of individual cell growth.

  3. Tempol inhibits growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2012-03-01

    A stable nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-osyl (Tempol) is widely used as an antioxidant in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of Tempol on the growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell cycle and cell death. Tempol dose-dependently decreased the growth of As4.1 cells with an IC50 of ~1 mM at 48 h. DNA flow cytometry analysis and BrdU staining indicated that Tempol induced S phase arrest, which is accompanied by a downregulation of cyclin A. Tempol also induced apoptotic cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆Ψm), an activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Furthermore, Tempol increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MEK and JNK inhibitors significantly attenuated a growth inhibition in Tempol-treated As4.1 cells. In conclusion, Tempol inhibited the growth of As4.1 cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Tempol also activated ERK and JNK signaling, which was responsible for cell growth inhibition. Our present data provide useful information for the toxicological effects of Tempol in juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell growth inhibition and cell death.

  4. Control of Microbial Growth in Alginate/Polydopamine Core/Shell Microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Park, So-Young; Han, Sang Woo; Lee, Hee-Seung; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Choi, Insung S

    2015-10-01

    Microbial microencapsulation not only protects microorganisms from harmful environments by physically isolating them from the outside media but also has the potential to tailor the release profile of the encapsulated cells. However, the microbial release has not yet been controlled tightly, leading to undesired detrimental exposure of microorganisms to the outside. In this work, we suggest a simple method for controlling the cell release by suppressing the microbial growth in the microbeads. Alginate microbeads, encapsulating yeast cells, were coated with ultrathin but robust polydopamine shells, and the resulting core/shell structures effectively reduced the growth rate, while maintaining the cell viability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bretlau, P

    1993-01-01

    , the cells above the basal cell layer were positive for both TGF-alpha and EGF. The same staining pattern was observed in oral mucosa obtained from healthy persons. In moderately to well differentiated carcinomas, the immunoreactivity was mainly confined to the cytologically more differentiated cells, thus......Forty oral squamous cell carcinomas have been investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The same cases were recently characterized for the expression of EGF-receptors. TGF-alpha was detected...... previous results confirms the existence of TGF-alpha, EGF, and EGF-receptors in the majority of oral squamous cell carcinomas and their metastases....

  6. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  7. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-01-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  8. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  9. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  10. Genetic and physiological controls of growth under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris; Caldeira, Cecilio F; Welcker, Claude

    2014-04-01

    The sensitivity of expansive growth to water deficit has a large genetic variability, which is higher than that of photosynthesis. It is observed in several species, with some genotypes stopping growth in a relatively wet soil, whereas others continue growing until the lower limit of soil-available water. The responses of growth to soil water deficit and evaporative demand share an appreciable part of their genetic control through the colocation of quantitative trait loci as do the responses of the growth of different organs to water deficit. This result may be caused by common mechanisms of action discussed in this paper (particularly, plant hydraulic properties). We propose that expansive growth, putatively linked to hydraulic processes, determines the sink strength under water deficit, whereas photosynthesis determines source strength. These findings have large consequences for plant modeling under water deficit and for the design of breeding programs.

  11. Raman spectrum reveals Mesenchymal stem cells inhibiting HL60 cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Fang, Shaoyin; Zhang, Daosen; Zhang, Qinnan; Lu, Xiaoxu; Tian, Jindong; Fan, Jinping; Zhong, Liyun

    2017-04-01

    Though some research results reveals that Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability of inhibiting tumor cells proliferation, it remains controversial about the precise interaction mechanism during MSCs and tumor cells co-culture. In this study, combing Raman spectroscopic data and principle component analysis (PCA), the biochemical changes of MSCs or Human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cells during their co-culture were presented. The obtained results showed that some main Raman peaks of HL60 assigned to nucleic acids or proteins were greatly higher in intensity in the late stage of co-culture than those in the early stage of co-culture while they were still lower relative to the control group, implicating that the effect of MSCs inhibiting HL60 proliferation appeared in the early stage but gradually lost the inhibiting ability in the late stage of co-culture. Moreover, some other peaks of HL60 assigned to proteins were decreased in intensity in the early stage of co-culture relative to the control group but rebounded to the level similar to the control group in the late stage, showing that the content and structure changes of these proteins might be generated in the early stage but returned to the original state in the late stage of co-culture. As a result, in the early stage of MSCs-HL60 co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation of HL60 was lowered relative to its control group, the proliferation rate of HL60 cells was decreased. And in the late stage of co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation was rebounded, the reverse transfer of Raman peaks within 875-880 cm- 1 appeared, thus MSCs lost the ability to inhibit HL60 growth and HL60 proliferation was increased. In addition, it was observed that the peak at 811 cm- 1, which is a marker of RNA, was higher in intensity in the late stage than that in the control group, indicating that MSCs might be differentiated into myofibroblast-like MSCs. In addition, PCA results also exhibited

  12. Model of fission yeast cell shape driven by membrane-bound growth factors and the cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Drake

    Full Text Available Fission yeast serves as a model for how cellular polarization machinery consisting of signaling molecules and the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulates cell shape. In this work, we develop mathematical models to investigate how these cells maintain a tubular shape of approximately constant diameter. Many studies identify active Cdc42, found in a cap at the inner membrane of growing cell tips, as an important regulator of local cell wall remodeling, likely through control of exocyst tethering and the targeting of other polarity-enhancing structures. First, we show that a computational model with Cdc42-dependent local cell wall remodeling under turgor pressure predicts a relationship between spatial extent of growth signal and cell diameter that is in agreement with prior experiments. Second, we model the consequences of feedback between cell shape and distribution of Cdc42 growth signal at cell tips. We show that stability of cell diameter over successive cell divisions places restrictions on their mutual dependence. We argue that simple models where the spatial extent of the tip growth signal relies solely on geometrical alignment of confined microtubules might lead to unstable width regulation. Third, we study a computational model that combines a growth signal distributed over a characteristic length scale (as, for example, by a reaction-diffusion mechanism with an axis-sensing microtubules system that places landmarks at positions where microtubule tips touch the cortex. A two-dimensional implementation of this model leads to stable cell diameter for a wide range of parameters. Changes to the parameters of this model reproduce straight, bent, and bulged cell shapes, and we discuss how this model is consistent with other observed cell shapes in mutants. Our work provides an initial quantitative framework for understanding the regulation of cell shape in fission yeast, and a scaffold for understanding this process on a more molecular

  13. Definition study for temperature control in advanced protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyce, Thomas A.; Rosenberger, Franz; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the technical requirements for an expedient application of temperature control to advanced protein crystal growth activities are defined. Lysozome was used to study the effects of temperature ramping and temperature gradients for nucleation/dissolution and consecutive growth of sizable crystals and, to determine a prototype temperature program. The solubility study was conducted using equine serum albumin (ESA) which is an extremely stable, clinically important protein due to its capability to bind and transport many different small ions and molecules.

  14. The Arabidopsis ARGOS-LIKE gene regulates cell expansion during organ growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxin; Poh, Huay Mei; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2006-07-01

    Cell expansion, and its coordination with cell division, plays a critical role in the growth and development of plant organs. However, the genes controlling cell expansion during organogenesis are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Arabidopsis gene, ARGOS-LIKE (ARL), which has some sequence homology to the ARGOS gene, is involved in this process. Reduced expression or overexpression of ARL in Arabidopsis results in smaller or larger cotyledons and leaves as well as other lateral organs, respectively. Anatomical examination of cotyledons and leaves in ARL transgenic plants demonstrates that the alteration in size can be attributed to changes in cell size rather than cell number, indicating that ARL plays a role in cell expansion-dependent organ growth. ARL is upregulated by brassinosteroid (BR) and this induction is impaired in the BR-insensitive mutant bri1, but not in the BR-deficient mutant det2. Ectopic expression of ARL in bri1-119 partially restores cell growth in cotyledons and leaves. Our results suggest that ARL acts downstream of BRI1 and partially mediates BR-related cell expansion signals during organ growth.

  15. Molecular analysis of the effects of Piroxicam and Cisplatin on mesothelioma cells growth and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdina, Alessandra; Cardillo, Irene; Nebbioso, Angela; Galati, Rossella; Menegozzo, Simona; Altucci, Lucia; Sacchi, Ada; Baldi, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been proposed for prevention and treatment of a variety of human cancers. Piroxicam, in particular, has been recently shown to exert significant anti-tumoral activity in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) on mesothelioma cells. However, the mechanisms through which NSAIDs regulate the cell cycle as well as the signal pathways involved in the growth inhibition, remain unclear. In the present study, using two mesothelioma cell lines, MSTO-211H and NCI-H2452, we have investigated the influence of piroxicam alone and in association with CDDP on proliferation, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. In both cell lines a significant effect on cell growth inhibition, respect to the control, was observed with all the drugs tested. Moreover, treatment with piroxicam or CDDP alone altered the cell cycle phase distribution as well as the expression of some cell cycle regulatory proteins in both cell lines. These effects were increased, even if in a not completely overlapping manner, after treatment with the association of piroxicam and CDDP. In particular, the two drugs in NCI cell line had a synergistic effect on apoptosis, probably through activation of caspase 8 and caspase 9, while the most evident targets among the cell cycle regulators were cyclin D1 and p21waf1. These results suggest that the association of piroxicam and CDDP specifically triggers cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in different mesothelioma cell lines and may hold promise in the treatment of mesothelioma. PMID:18498639

  16. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  17. Actin polymerization drives polar growth in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Luis Alfredo Bañuelos; Sanchez, Rosana; Hernandez-Barrera, Alejandra; Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Torres, Luis Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the actin cytoskeleton is a prime regulator of cell polarity, growth, and cytoplasmic streaming. Tip growth, as observed in root hairs, caulonema, and pollen tubes, is governed by many factors, including calcium gradients, exocytosis and endocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and the cytoskeleton. Several studies indicate that the polymerization of G-actin into F-actin also contributes to tip growth. The structure and function of F-actin within the apical dome is variable, ranging from a dense meshwork to sparse single filaments. The presence of multiple F-actin structures in the elongating apices of tip-growing cells suggests that this cytoskeletal array is tightly regulated. We recently reported that sublethal concentrations of fluorescently labeled cytochalasin could be used to visualize the distribution of microfilament plus ends using fluorescence microscopy, and found that the tip region of the growing root hair cells of a legume plant exhibits a clear response to the nodulation factors secreted by Rhizobium. (1) In this current work, we expanded our analysis using confocal microscopy and demonstrated the existence of highly dynamic fluorescent foci along Arabidopsis root hair cells. Furthermore, we show that the strongest fluorescence signal accumulates in the tip dome of the growing root hair and seems to be in close proximity to the apical plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we propose that actin polymerization within the dome of growing root hair cells regulates polar growth.

  18. Combination of imatinib and clotrimazole enhances cell growth inhibition in T47D breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawi, Tarek M K; Sadik, Nermin A H; Fahim, Sally A; Shouman, Samia A

    2015-05-25

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used as targeted cancer therapy. However, mono-targeting by IM does not always achieve full tumor eradication and thus it is recommended to combine IM with other anticancer agents. Clotrimazole (CLT) is an antifungal azole derivative with promising anticancer effects due to inhibiting the activity of glycolytic enzymes. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of combining CLT with IM on breast cancer cell line in an attempt to establish effective new combination. T47D human breast cancer cell line was treated with different concentrations of IM and/or CLT for 48 h. IM-CLT interaction was determined by isobologram equation and combination index. Cell viability was confirmed by measuring LDH activity. As indicators of glycolysis inhibition, the expression of hexokinase-2 (HK-2) and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1) plus the activity of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) were determined. In addition, glucose consumption and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production were measured. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia inducible factor-α (HIF-α) were also determined as they are modulators for glycolysis. This study demonstrated that IM or CLT synergistically inhibited cell growth in T47D as shown by combination and dose reduction indices. The combination of 15 μM IM and 20 μM CLT significantly decreased glucose consumption, activity of both PK and intracellular LDH, while increased leaked LDH, VEGF and NO in the medium compared to each drug alone. Furthermore the combination decreased gene expression of HK-2, PFK-1 and ATP content compared to the control. In conclusion, the synergistic effect of CLT on IM cytotoxicity in T47D cell line maybe mediated through inhibition of glycolysis and increasing both NO and VEGF. Further studies are required to confirm the efficiency and safety of this combination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  19. Peptidoglycan synthesis machinery in Agrobacterium tumefaciens during unipolar growth and cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Todd A; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zupan, John R; Zik, Justin J; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2014-05-27

    The synthesis of peptidoglycan (PG) in bacteria is a crucial process controlling cell shape and vitality. In contrast to bacteria such as Escherichia coli that grow by dispersed lateral insertion of PG, little is known of the processes that direct polar PG synthesis in other bacteria such as the Rhizobiales. To better understand polar growth in the Rhizobiales Agrobacterium tumefaciens, we first surveyed its genome to identify homologs of (~70) well-known PG synthesis components. Since most of the canonical cell elongation components are absent from A. tumefaciens, we made fluorescent protein fusions to other putative PG synthesis components to assay their subcellular localization patterns. The cell division scaffolds FtsZ and FtsA, PBP1a, and a Rhizobiales- and Rhodobacterales-specific l,d-transpeptidase (LDT) all associate with the elongating cell pole. All four proteins also localize to the septum during cell division. Examination of the dimensions of growing cells revealed that new cell compartments gradually increase in width as they grow in length. This increase in cell width is coincident with an expanded region of LDT-mediated PG synthesis activity, as measured directly through incorporation of exogenous d-amino acids. Thus, unipolar growth in the Rhizobiales is surprisingly dynamic and represents a significant departure from the canonical growth mechanism of E. coli and other well-studied bacilli. Many rod-shaped bacteria, including pathogens such as Brucella and Mycobacteriu, grow by adding new material to their cell poles, and yet the proteins and mechanisms contributing to this process are not yet well defined. The polarly growing plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens was used as a model bacterium to explore these polar growth mechanisms. The results obtained indicate that polar growth in this organism is facilitated by repurposed cell division components and an otherwise obscure class of alternative peptidoglycan transpeptidases (l

  20. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.; Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  1. Cell pairing ratio controlled micro-environment with valve-less electrolytic isolation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-01-01

    We present a ratio controlled cell-to-cell interaction chip using valve-less isolation. We incorporated electrolysis in a microfluidic channel. In each microfluidic chamber, we loaded two types of different cells at various pairing ratios. More than 80% of the microchambers were successfully loaded with a specific target pairing ratio. For the proof of concept, we have demonstrated the cell-to-cell interaction between prostate cancer cells and muscle stem cells can be controlled by cell pairing ratios through growth factor secretion. The experimental data shows that sealing of microenvironment by air generated from electrolysis does not affect cell viability and cell interaction assay results. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...... biosynthesis of pancreatic beta-cells in monolayer culture. In culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 2% normal human serum islets or dissociated islet cells from newborn rats maintained their insulin-producing capacity. When supplemented with 1-1000 ng/ml pituitary or recombinant human GH the islet cells...... was accompanied with a continuous increase in insulin release to the culture medium reaching a 10- 20-fold increase after 2-3 months with a half-maximal effect at about 10 ng/ml human GH. The biosynthesis of (pro)insulin was markedly increased with a normal rate of conversion of proinsulin to insulin...

  3. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Dvořáková, D.; Hampl, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 580, - (2006), s. 2869-2874 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA ČR GA301/03/1122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Fibroblast growth factor 2 * Embryonic stem cell * Hematopoietic progenitor cell Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2006

  4. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  5. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  6. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji, E-mail: tanaka-kj@igakuken.or.jp; Saeki, Yasushi, E-mail: saeki-ys@igakuken.or.jp

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus on the Growth of Human Colonic Carcinoma Cell Line HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhung-Yuan; Hsieh, You-Miin; Huang, Chun-Chih; Tsai, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-10

    This study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus cells and supernatants on the growth of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Our study results indicated that the PM153 strain exhibits the best adhesion ability and the highest survival in the gastrointestinal tract simulation experiment. Furthermore, after an 8-h co-culture of PM153 and HT-29 cells, the PM153 strain can induce the secretion of nitric oxide from the HT-29 cells. In addition, after the co-culture of the BCRC17010 strain (10⁸ cfu/mL) and HT-29 cells, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the HT-29 cells was 1.19, which showed a significant difference from the other control and LAB groups ( p strain exerts a pro-apoptotic effect on the HT-29 cells. Upon co-culture with HT-29 cells for 4, 8 and 12 h, the BCRC14625 strain (10⁸ cfu/mL) demonstrated a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity ( p strains have ability to inhibit the growth of the colorectal cancer cell line HT-29 Bax/Bcl-2 pathway or NO production. In summary, we demonstrated that the BCRC17010 strain, good abilities of adhesion and increased LDH release, was the best probiotic potential for inhibition of HT-29 growth amongst the seven LAB strains tested in vitro.

  8. Experimental Modification of Rat Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function During and After Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Salada, T.; Nye, P.; Grossman, E. J.; Lane, P. K.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Space-flown rats show a number of flight-induced changes in the structure and function of pituitary Growth Hormone (GH) cells after in vitro postflight testing. To evaluate the possible effects of microgravity on GH cells themselves, freshly dispersed rat anterior pituitary gland cells were seeded into vials containing serum +/- 1 micron HydroCortisone (HC) before flight. Five different cell preparations were used: the entire mixed-cell population of various hormone-producing cell types, cells of density less than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 1), cells of density greater than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 2), and cells prepared from either the dorsal or ventral part of the gland. Relative to ground control samples, bioactive GH released from dense cells during flight was reduced in HC-free medium but was increased in HC-containing medium. Band I and mixed cells usually showed opposite HC-dependent responses. Release of bioactive GH from ventral flight cells was lower; postflight responses to GH-releasing hormone challenge were reduced, and the cytoplasmic area occupied by GH in the dense cells was greater. Collectively, the data show that the chemistry and cellular makeup of the culture system modifies the response of GH cells to microgravity. As such, these cells offer a system to identify gravisensing mechanisms in secretory cells in future microgravity research.

  9. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimitoshi Kohno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143 regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, aurora kinase B (AURKB and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM. However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  10. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), aurora kinase B (AURKB) and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM). However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells) and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division

  11. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Hiroto, E-mail: h-izumi@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Kohno, Kimitoshi [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-19

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), aurora kinase B (AURKB) and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM). However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells) and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  12. The cytoskeleton in plant cell growth: lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, M.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, we compare expansion of intercalary growing cells, in which growth takes place over a large surface, and root hairs, where expansion occurs at the tip only. Research that pinpoints the role of the cytoskeleton and the cytoplasmic free calcium in both root hairs and intercalary

  13. Early posthatch starvation decreases satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, O; Geyra, A; Barak, M; Uni, Z; Sklan, D

    2000-04-01

    The effect of posthatch starvation on skeletal muscle growth and satellite cell proliferation was examined in chicks. Chicks were either fed or starved for 48 h posthatch (d 0-d 2, d 2-d 4 or d 4-d 6) and then refed for 41 d. Body and breast muscle weights were significantly lower in starved chicks than in fed controls throughout the experiment. Histochemical staining revealed that skeletal muscle fiber development in the starved group lagged behind that of the fed group. Starvation from d 2 to 4 and d 4 to 6 posthatch had a progressively lesser effect than did immediate posthatch starvation (P < 0.05). In vitro culturing of breast muscle satellite cells revealed that DNA synthesis and number of cells per gram of muscle in the fed chicks peaked on d 2 and d 3, and then declined. In contrast, DNA synthesis in the cells of starved chicks declined on d 2 and increased on d 3 when chicks were refed. A similar pattern was seen for the number of cells per gram muscle; however, in general cell numbers tended to be higher in the starved group than in controls (P < 0.1). The results obtained with cultured cells were parallel with in situ immunostaining with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in breast muscle from experimental chicks, and with growth hormone receptor expression. These results suggest that satellite cell cultures are a reliable tool for evaluating muscle growth in postnatal chickens. We conclude that sufficient feed in the immediate postnatal period is critical for satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle development and is thus important for optimal muscle growth.

  14. SATB2 expression increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Feng; Jordan, Ashley; Kluz, Thomas; Shen, Steven; Sun, Hong; Cartularo, Laura A.; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a protein that binds to the nuclear matrix attachment region of the cell and regulates gene expression by altering chromatin structure. In our previous study, we reported that SATB2 gene expression was induced in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells transformed by arsenic, chromium, nickel and vanadium. In this study, we show that ectopic expression of SATB2 in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell-line BEAS-2B increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, meanwhile, shRNA-mediated knockdown of SATB2 significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth in Ni transformed BEAS-2B cells. RNA sequencing analyses of SATB2 regulated genes revealed the enrichment of those involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell-movement pathways. Our evidence supports the hypothesis that SATB2 plays an important role in BEAS-2B cell transformation. - Highlights: • We performed SATB2 overexpression in the BEAS-2B cell line. • We performed SATB2 knockdown in a Ni transformed BEAS-2B cell line. • SATB2 induced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell migration. • SATB2 knockdown significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth. • We identified alterations in gene involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion.

  15. Microcapsule Technology for Controlled Growth Factor Release in Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Porta, Giovanna; Ciardulli, Maria C; Maffulli, Nicola

    2018-06-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have relied on engineered 3-dimensional (3D) scaffolds to provide architectural templates that can mimic the native cell environment. Among the several technologies proposed for the fabrication of 3D scaffold, that can be attractive for stem cell cultivation and differentiation, moulding or bioplotting of hydrogels allow the stratification of layers loaded with cells and with specific additives to obtain a predefined microstructural organization. Particularly with bioplotting technology, living cells, named bio-ink, and additives, such as biopolymer microdevices/nanodevices for the controlled delivery of growth factors or biosignals, can be organized spatially into a predesigned 3D pattern by automated fabrication with computer-aided digital files. The technologies for biopolymer microcarrier/nanocarrier fabrication can be strategic to provide a controlled spatiotemporal delivery of specific biosignals within a microenvironment that can better or faster address the stem cells loaded within it. In this review, some examples of growth factor-controlled delivery by biopolymer microdevices/nanodevices embedded within 3D hydrogel scaffolds will be described, to achieve a bioengineered 3D interactive microenvironment for stem cell differentiation. Conventional and recently proposed technologies for biopolymer microcapsule fabrication for controlled delivery over several days will also be illustrated and critically discussed.

  16. Protein kinase A is involved in the control of morphology and branching during aerobic growth of Mucor circinelloides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübbehüsen, Tina Louise; Polo, V.G.; Rossi, S.

    2004-01-01

    and colony morphology suggested a role for PKAR in the control of morphology and branching. Here strain KFA121, which overexpresses the M. circinelloides pkaR gene, was used to quantify growth and branching under different aerobic growth conditions in a flow-through cell by computerized image analysis...

  17. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  18. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs

  20. Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

  1. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. The Role of Control in Entrepreneurial Growth: An alternative explanation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Jones, Sally; Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard

    -related behaviours of entrepreneurs and use this theory to link self-efficacy to the exercise of personal control. Extending findings from social learning theory to entrepreneurship and drawing on PCT, we suggest that women’s suggested lower growth aspirations have socialized origins. Based on PCT, we argue this may...... to investigate the underlying gender differences in mechanisms that enhance or reduce risk-taking behaviour. Aim: This paper develops a theoretical framework for understanding the role of control in entrepreneurship. We explore power-control theory (PCT) as a social cognitive tool for understanding risk...... and boys are socialized in the family. Contribution: We develop a research framework for testing propositions concerning the role of power-control in the family and the spillover effects that PCT has on entrepreneurial growth. We extend PCT into the entrepreneurship domain and offer new insights...

  3. Expert system for controlling plant growth in a contained environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George A. (Inventor); Lanoue, Mark Allen (Inventor); Bethel, Matthew (Inventor); Ryan, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In a system for optimizing crop growth, vegetation is cultivated in a contained environment, such as a greenhouse, an underground cavern or other enclosed space. Imaging equipment is positioned within or about the contained environment, to acquire spatially distributed crop growth information, and environmental sensors are provided to acquire data regarding multiple environmental conditions that can affect crop development. Illumination within the contained environment, and the addition of essential nutrients and chemicals are in turn controlled in response to data acquired by the imaging apparatus and environmental sensors, by an "expert system" which is trained to analyze and evaluate crop conditions. The expert system controls the spatial and temporal lighting pattern within the contained area, and the timing and allocation of nutrients and chemicals to achieve optimized crop development. A user can access the "expert system" remotely, to assess activity within the growth chamber, and can override the "expert system".

  4. Walking along the Fibroblast Growth Factor 10 Route: A Key Pathway to Understand the Control and Regulation of Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cell-Lineage Formation during Lung Development and Repair after Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie El Agha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic research on embryonic lung development offers unique opportunities to make important discoveries that will impact human health. Developmental biologists interested in the molecular control of branching morphogenesis have intensively studied the developing lung, with its complex and seemingly stereotyped ramified structure. However, it is also an organ that is linked to a vast array of clinical problems in humans such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature babies and emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, fibrosis, and cancer in adults. Epithelial stem/progenitor cells reside in niches where they interact with specific extracellular matrices as well as with mesenchymal cells; the latter are still poorly characterized. Interactions of epithelial stem/progenitor cells with their microenvironments are usually instructive, controlling quiescence versus activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. During the past 18 years, Fgf10 has emerged not only as a marker for the distal lung mesenchyme during early lung development, but also as a key player in branching morphogenesis and a critical component of the niche for epithelial stem cells. In this paper, we will present the current knowledge regarding the lineage tree in the lung, with special emphasis on cell-lineage decisions in the lung mesenchyme and the role of Fgf10 in this context.

  5. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R

    1983-01-01

    receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry either......Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a low-molecular-weight polypeptide (G. Carpenter and S. Cohen, 1979, Annu. Rev. Biochem. 48, 193-216), stimulates the proliferation and keratinisation of cultured embryonic epidermis (S. Cohen, 1965, Dev. Biol. 12, 394-407) and promotes epidermal growth, thickening......, and keratinisation when injected into neonatal mice (S. Cohen and G.A. Elliott, 1963, J. Invest. Dermatol, 40, 1-5). We have determined the distribution of the available receptors for epidermal growth factor in rat skin using autoradiography following incubation of explants with 125I-labelled mouse EGF. EGF...

  6. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients....... The malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant...... T cells enhance proliferation of the malignant cells in an SE- and MHC class II-dependent manner. Furthermore, SE and, in addition, alloantigen presentation by malignant CTCL cells to irradiated nonmalignant CD4(+) T-cell lines also enhance proliferation of the malignant cells. The growth...

  7. Ethanolic extracts of herbal supplement Equiguard suppress growth and control gene expression in CWR22Rv1 cells representing the transition of prostate cancer from androgen dependence to hormone refractory status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M

    2008-01-01

    Dietary supplements and botanical products are widely used by patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (CaP) as a primary or adjuvant form of treatment for their medical conditions in the United States. Many of the available products are complex mixtures composed of extracts from foreign plants, whose mechanism of action typically is not systematically and rigorously investigated. Laboratory studies employing precisely defined conditions and referenced methodologies are essential not only for standardization and characterization of the products, but are also important requisites for providing scientific evidence and molecular insights in regard to the clinical efficacies some of these products purportedly demonstrate. In previous studies from this laboratory, we serendipitously observed that Equiguard, a dietary supplement formulated with extracts from nine Chinese herbs for preventing decline in renal functions associated with the aging process, contain 70% ethanol-extractable ingredients that displayed potent growth inhibitory activities in androgen-dependent (AD) LNCaP and androgen-independent (AI) DU-145 and PC-3 cells. Moreover, significant reduction in expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) also occurred in Equiguard-treated LNCaP cells. Although these results offer the possibility that Equiguard confers chemoprevention for CaP, it remains undetermined whether Equiguard functions in CaP cell types that represent the transition of AD to the AI status. Further, details of its mechanism of action have not been fully elucidated. The studies described in this report focusing on CWR22Rv1 cells are intended to fill these gaps. These cells express AR and PSA, yet show weak responsiveness to androgens and largely proliferate in an AI-independent manner - features that mimic AD --> AI in clinically advanced disease. Using the CWR22Rv1 cells, we showed that 70% ethanolic extracts of Equiguard effectively suppressed colony formation

  8. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  9. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task. Continuous Liquid Feed Czochralski Growth. [for solar cell fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of equipment and processes to demonstrate continuous growth of crystals by the Czochralski method suitable for producing single silicon crystals for use in solar cells is presented. The growth of at least 150 kg of mono silicon crystal, 150 mm in diameter is continuous from one growth container. A furnace with continuous liquid replenishment of the growth crucible, accomplished by a meltdown system with a continuous solid silicon feed mechanism and a liquid transfer system, with associated automatic feedback controls is discussed. Due to the silicon monoxide build up in the furnace and its retarding effect on crystal growth the furnace conversion for operation in the low pressure range is described. Development of systems for continuous solid recharging of the meltdown chamber for various forms of poly silicon is described.

  10. A versatile Czochralski crystal growth system with automatic diameter control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Metzl, R.; Wang, W. S.; Choi, J.

    1995-07-01

    A versatile Czochralski crystal pulling system with automatic diameter control for the growth of nonlinear optical oxide crystals is discussed. Pure and doped bulk single crystals of bismuth silicon oxide (Bi12SiO20) have been successfully grown using this system. The system consists of a regular Czochralski type pulling system with provision for continuous weighing of the growing crystal to provide feedback for power control.

  11. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of Quality Protein Maize. The trial consisted of factorial combinations of eight weed control treatments which include application of (Atrazine + Acetochlor +. Terbuthylazine at a ratio of 1:1:1, Atrazine + Metolachlor at a ratio of 1:2 each at 3.0 and 4.0kg a.i/ha, Atrazine at. 4.0 ...

  12. The Vatican & Population Growth Control: Why an American Confrontation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Stephen D.

    1983-01-01

    The Vatican, because of its position on population growth, threatens the security of all nations. Catholic countries with right-wing dictatorships cannot confront the Vatican on family planning and survive. U.S. Catholics must confront the Vatican on this issue. American lay Catholics must break the American church away from the Vatican control.…

  13. Interface controlled growth of nanostructures in discontinuous Ag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The growth of discontinuous thin films of Ag and Au by low energy ion beam sputter deposition is reported. The study ... nance of the metal nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range of wavelengths from 400 to 700 nm by controlling the film–substrate ... on lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithogra-.

  14. Control of specific growth rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoep, J.L.; Mrwebi, M; Schuurmans, J.M.; Rohwer, J.M.; Teixeira De Mattos, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution we resolve the long-standing dispute whether or not the Monod constant (KS), describing the overall affinity of an organism for its growth-limiting substrate, can be related to the affinity of the transporter for that substrate (KM). We show how this can be done via the control

  15. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 rainy seasons at the Institute for Agricultural Research Samaru, in the Northern guinea savanna zone of Nigeria to evaluate the effects of weed control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of Quality Protein Maize. The trial consisted of factorial ...

  16. Attenuation of NK cells facilitates mammary tumor growth in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajovic, Nevena; Jurisevic, Milena; Pantic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Gordana; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Lukic, Miodrag L; Jovanovic, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    Diabetic patients have higher incidence and mortality of cancer. Recent study revealed that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress is involved in the acceleration of tumor metastasis. We used model of high-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes to investigate its effect on tumor growth and modulation of antitumor immune response of 4T1 murine breast cancer in BALB/c mice. Diabetes accelerated tumor appearance, growth and weight, which was associated with decreased NK cells cytotoxicity against 4T1 tumor cells in vitro Diabetes reduced frequencies of systemic NKG2D + , perforin + , granzyme + , IFN-γ + and IL-17 + NK cells, while increased level of PD-1 expression and production of IL-10 in NK cells. Diabetes decreased percentage of NKG2D + NK cells and increased percentage of PD-1 + NK cells also in primary tumor. Diabetes increased accumulation of IL-10 + Tregs and TGF-β + myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in spleen and tumor. Diabetic sera in vitro significantly increased the percentage of KLRG-1 + and PD-1 + NK cells, decreased the percentage of IFN-γ + NK cells, expression of NKp46 and production of perforin, granzyme, CD107a and IL-17 per NK cell in comparison to glucose-added mouse sera and control sera. Significantly increased percentages of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) producing MDSCs and dendritic cells (DC) were found in the spleens of diabetic mice prior to tumor induction. 1- methyl -DL- tryptophan , specific IDO inhibitor, almost completely restored phenotype of NK cells cultivated in diabetic sera. These findings indicate that diabetes promotes breast cancer growth at least in part through increased accumulation of immunosuppressive cells and IDO-mediated attenuation of NK cells. © 2018 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines.In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug.These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  18. Rat hepatic stellate cells alter the gene expression profile and promote the growth, migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Liu, Bin-Bin; Jia, Qin-An; Dong, Yin-Ying; Xia, Yun-Hong; Ye, Sheng-Long

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and their paracrine secretions, on hepatocellular cancer cell growth and gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Differentially expressed genes in McA-RH7777 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells following non-contact co-culture with activated stellate cells, were identified by a cDNA microarray. The effect of the co-injection of HCC cells and activated HSCs on tumor size in rats was also investigated. Non-contact co-culture altered the expression of 573 HCC genes by >2-fold of the control levels. Among the six selected genes, ELISA revealed increased protein levels of hepatic growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9). Incubation of HCC cells with medium conditioned by activated HSCs significantly increased the proliferation rate (Pexpression profile of HCC cells and affected their growth, migration and invasiveness. The results from the present study indicate that the interaction between the activated HSCs and HCC has an important role in the development of HCC.

  19. Exogenous p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) decreases growth of lung cancer A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Ju; Zhang, Xia-Li; Luo, Da-Ya; Zhu, Wei-Feng; Wan, Hui-Fang; Yang, Jun-Ping; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Wan, Fu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influence of exogenous p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells and transplanted tumor cell growth in nude mice. A549 cells were divided into the following groups: control, non- carrier (NC), PUMA (transfected with pCEP4- (HA) 2-PUMA plasmid), DDP (10 μg/mL cisplatin treatment) and PUMA+DDP (transfected with pCEP4-(HA)2-PUMA plasmid and 10 μg/mL cisplatin treatment). The MTT method was used to detect the cell survival rate. Cell apoptosis rates were measured by flow cytometry, and PUMA, Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression levels were measured by Western blotting. Compared to the control group, the PUMA, DDP and PUMA+DDP groups all had significantly decreased A549 cell proliferation (pPUMA+DDP group. Conversely, the apoptosis rates of the three groups were significantly increased (PPUMA and DDP treatments were synergistic. Moreover, Bax protein levels significantly increased (pPUMA+DDP group was significantly higher than in the single DDP or PUMA groups. Exogenous PUMA effectively inhibited lung cancer A549 cell proliferation and transplanted tumor growth by increasing Bax protein levels and reducing Bcl-2 protein levels.

  20. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  1. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  2. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R

    1983-01-01

    markedly with age. This decrease in receptor number is similar in trend to the known drop in basal cell [3H]thymidine labelling index which occurs over the same time period. The data suggest that the distribution of EGF receptors and EGF cell surface receptor number in skin are important in the spatial......, and keratinisation when injected into neonatal mice (S. Cohen and G.A. Elliott, 1963, J. Invest. Dermatol, 40, 1-5). We have determined the distribution of the available receptors for epidermal growth factor in rat skin using autoradiography following incubation of explants with 125I-labelled mouse EGF. EGF...... receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry either...

  3. TEAD mediates YAP-dependent gene induction and growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Ye, Xin; Yu, Jindan; Li, Li; Li, Weiquan; Li, Siming; Yu, Jianjun; Lin, Jiandie D; Wang, Cun-Yu; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Lai, Zhi-Chun; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2008-07-15

    The YAP transcription coactivator has been implicated as an oncogene and is amplified in human cancers. Recent studies have established that YAP is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Here we demonstrate that the TEAD family transcription factors are essential in mediating YAP-dependent gene expression. TEAD is also required for YAP-induced cell growth, oncogenic transformation, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. CTGF is identified as a direct YAP target gene important for cell growth. Moreover, the functional relationship between YAP and TEAD is conserved in Drosophila Yki (the YAP homolog) and Scalloped (the TEAD homolog). Our study reveals TEAD as a new component in the Hippo pathway playing essential roles in mediating biological functions of YAP.

  4. Evolution of the Min Protein Oscillation in E. coli Bacteria During Cell Growth and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Benjamin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    Cell division is a key step in the life of a bacterium. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that the cellular machinery is equally partitioned into two daughter cells of equal size. In E. coli, this is accomplished, in part, by the Min protein system, in which Min proteins oscillate along the long axis of the rod-shaped cells. We have used high magnification, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy to characterize in detail the oscillation in E. coli cells in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have used a microfluidic device to confine the bacteria into microchannels that allows us to track the evolution of the oscillation in cells as they grow and divide in LB growth media. In particular, we have tracked the loss of synchrony between the oscillations in the daughter cells following cell division.

  5. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  6. Induction of growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells in magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Ezatti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue engineering is generally defined as developing and changing the laboratory growth of molecules and cells in tissues or organs to replace and repair the damaged part of body. This study was carried out to stimulate the growth of cultured fibroblast cells by a physical electromagnetic method. Methods: First, an air-core coil was prepared and the cell culture plate was placed comfortably into the mold, then the plate containing the culture medium and human fibroblast cell along with air-core coil were placed in an incubator and then connected to the power supply. Thus, the sample underwent electromagnetic field at different times, and cell proliferation was studied by MTTassay. Results: Microscopic images indicated that the cells undergoing electromagnetic field (0.35 amps had a significant growth compared to the cells in control group in a definit range of stimulation. Conclusion: In conclusion, electromagnetic stimulation in a definite range led to cell proliferation and could be used as a positive factor in tissue engineering.

  7. Effect of the growth retardant Cycocel® in controlling the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... Hydroponic culture of Gladiolus tristis: Application of paclobutrazol for flowering and height control. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 7(3): 239-243. Ninnemann H, Zeevaart JAD, Kende H, Lang A (1964). The plant growth retardant CCC as an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis in. Fusarium moniliforme. Planta (Bert.) ...

  8. Cdc42 GTPase dynamics control directional growth responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra C.; Morrison, Emma; Milne, Stephen; Gonia, Sara; Gale, Cheryl A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polarized cells reorient their direction of growth in response to environmental cues. In the fungus Candida albicans, the Rho-family small GTPase, Cdc42, is essential for polarized hyphal growth and Ca2+ influx is required for the tropic responses of hyphae to environmental cues, but the regulatory link between these systems is unclear. In this study, the interaction between Ca2+ influx and Cdc42 polarity-complex dynamics was investigated using hyphal galvanotropic and thigmotropic responses as reporter systems. During polarity establishment in an applied electric field, cathodal emergence of hyphae was lost when either of the two Cdc42 apical recycling pathways was disrupted by deletion of Rdi1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or Bnr1, a formin, but was completely restored by extracellular Ca2+. Loss of the Cdc42 GTPase activating proteins, Rga2 and Bem3, also abolished cathodal polarization, but this was not rescued by Ca2+. Expression of GTP-locked Cdc42 reversed the polarity of hypha emergence from cathodal to anodal, an effect augmented by Ca2+. The cathodal directional cue therefore requires Cdc42 GTP hydrolysis. Ca2+ influx amplifies Cdc42-mediated directional growth signals, in part by augmenting Cdc42 apical trafficking. The Ca2+-binding EF-hand motif in Cdc24, the Cdc42 activator, was essential for growth in yeast cells but not in established hyphae. The Cdc24 EF-hand motif is therefore essential for polarity establishment but not for polarity maintenance. PMID:24385582

  9. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote vascular growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Roura

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are promising strategies to regenerate human injured tissues, including ischemic myocardium. Here, we examined the acquisition of properties associated with vascular growth by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs, and whether they promoted vascular growth in vivo. UCBMSCs were induced in endothelial cell-specific growth medium (EGM-2 acquiring new cell markers, increased Ac-LDL uptake, and migratory capacity as assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence, and invasion assays. Angiogenic and vasculogenic potentials could be anticipated by in vitro experiments showing self organization into Matrigel-mediated cell networks, and activation of circulating angiogenic-supportive myeloid cells. In mice, following subcutaneous co-injection with Matrigel, UCBMSCs modified to co-express bioluminescent (luciferases and fluorescent proteins were demonstrated to participate in the formation of new microvasculature connected with the host circulatory system. Response of UCBMSCs to ischemia was explored in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction (MI. UCBMSCs transplanted using a fibrin patch survived 4 weeks post-implantation and organized into CD31(+network structures above the infarcted myocardium. MI-treated animals showed a reduced infarct scar and a larger vessel-occupied area in comparison with MI-control animals. Taken together, the presented results show that UCBMSCs can be induced in vitro to acquire angiogenic and vasculogenic properties and contribute to vascular growth in vivo.

  10. Sporophytic control of pollen tube growth and guidance in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausser, Andreas; Kliwer, Irina; Srilunchang, Kanok-orn; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Pollen tube germination, growth, and guidance (progamic phase) culminating in sperm discharge is a multi-stage process including complex interactions between the male gametophyte as well as sporophytic tissues and the female gametophyte (embryo sac), respectively. Inter- and intra-specific crossing barriers in maize and Tripsacum have been studied and a precise description of progamic pollen tube development in maize is reported here. It was found that pollen germination and initial tube growth are rather unspecific, but an early, first crossing barrier was detected before arrival at the transmitting tract. Pollination of maize silks with Tripsacum pollen and incompatible pollination of Ga1s/Ga1s-maize silks with ga1-maize pollen revealed another two incompatibility barriers, namely transmitting tract mistargeting and insufficient growth support. Attraction and growth support by the transmitting tract seem to play key roles for progamic pollen tube growth. After leaving transmitting tracts, pollen tubes have to navigate across the ovule in the ovular cavity. Pollination of an embryo sac-less maize RNAi-line allowed the role of the female gametophyte for pollen tube guidance to be determined in maize. It was found that female gametophyte controlled guidance is restricted to a small region around the micropyle, approximately 50–100 μm in diameter. This area is comparable to the area of influence of previously described ZmEA1-based short-range female gametophyte signalling. In conclusion, the progamic phase is almost completely under sporophytic control in maize. PMID:19926683

  11. Process for control of cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, C. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method of controlling mitosis of biological cells was developed, which involved inducing a change in the intracellular ionic hierarchy accompanying the cellular electrical transmembrane potential difference (Esubm) of the cells. The ionic hierarchy may be varied by imposing changes on the relative concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), or by directly imposing changes in the physical Esubm level across the cell surface.

  12. Stochastic Modeling of Bacteria Cell Size Control and Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyan; Buceta, Javier

    Besides recent breakthroughs, there is a gap of knowledge about the mechanisms underlying cell size control and homeostasis. In this context, recent studies support the incremental rule in rod-shaped bacteria: cells add a constant length to their size before dividing which is independent of their size at birth. This growing pattern, when coupled with the mid-cell division mechanism, leads to size convergence and homeostasis. However, some aberrantly long mutant strains of E. coli, e.g. ΔFtsW, do not typically divide at the middle. Whether cell size control and homeostasis apply to those mutant backgrounds, or the role played by biomechanical cues, remain open questions. Here we present a combination of theoretical, experimental, and computational approaches to address these questions. First, we introduce a Markov chain model that describes either wild-type (wt) strains or growth-defective strains. Second, we propose a polymer-like model to account for the mechanical inputs. Finally, we test experimentally some of our predictions by using wt and conditional mutant (ΔFtsW) strains. Altogether, our preliminary studies suggest a way to unify the principles of cell size control and homeostasis of wt and growth-defective cell strains.

  13. Molecular genetic manipulation of Pichia pastoris SEC4 governs cell growth and glucoamylase secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.-H.; Chou, W.-I; Lin, S.-C.; Sheu, C.-C.; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2005-01-01

    We have previously engineered a recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 transformant, MSPGA-7, harboring seven copies of glucoamylase (GA) fused with modified signal peptide. High yield secretion of GA was achieved as an extra copy of SEC4 was integrated to the transformant. To elucidate the physiological role of SEC4, a dominant-negative mutant of SEC4, SEC4 S28N , was overexpressed under the control of alchohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter in P. pastoris strain MSPGA-7 as well as a set of host cells harboring multi-copy of wild type SEC4. We found that SEC4 S28N mutation in the key guanine nucleotide binding domain reduced guanine nucleotide binding affinity, hence it blocked the transport of vesicles required for targeting and fusion to the plasma membrane. The inhibitory levels of cell growth and GA secretion were correlated with the dosage of SEC4 S28N gene. In addition, overexpression of SEC4 driven by AOX1 promoter in MSPGA-7 improved the secretory production of GA, but demonstrated the delay of cell growth by increased gene dosage of SEC4. Interestingly, a limited level of Sec4p did not disturb the cell growth. It was because expression of only one copy of SEC4 resulted in delay of cell growth at an early stage while still maintaining high level Sec4p at long-term incubation. Accordingly, as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter was used to substitute AOX1 promoter to drive the SEC4 expression, enhanced GA secretion but not inhibition of cell growth was achieved. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SEC4 is essential for P. pastoris in regulating cell growth and heterologous protein secretion in a dosage-dependent manner

  14. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  15. Cell engineering of Escherichia coli allows high cell density accumulation without fed-batch process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcklund, Emma; Markland, Katrin; Larsson, Gen

    2008-01-01

    A set of mutations in the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) was used to create Escherichia coli strains with a reduced uptake rate of glucose. This allows a growth restriction, which is controlled on cellular rather than reactor level, which is typical of the fed-batch cultivation concept. Batch growth of the engineered strains resulted in cell accumulation profiles corresponding to a growth rate of 0.78, 0.38 and 0.25 h(-1), respectively. The performance of the mutants in batch cultivation was compared to fed-batch cultivation of the wild type cell using restricted glucose feed to arrive at the corresponding growth profiles. Results show that the acetate production, oxygen consumption and product formation were similar, when a recombinant product was induced from the lacUV5 promoter. Ten times more cells could be produced in batch cultivation using the mutants without the growth detrimental production of acetic acid. This allows high cell density production without the establishment of elaborate fed-batch control equipment. The technique is suggested as a versatile tool in high throughput multiparallel protein production but also for increasing the number of experiments performed during process development while keeping conditions similar to the large-scale fed-batch performance.

  16. Modeling bacterial population growth from stochastic single-cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Antonio A; Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-09-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  17. Video Bioinformatics Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Colony Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sabrina; Fonteno, Shawn; Satish, Shruthi; Bhanu, Bir; Talbot, Prue

    2010-01-01

    Because video data are complex and are comprised of many images, mining information from video material is difficult to do without the aid of computer software. Video bioinformatics is a powerful quantitative approach for extracting spatio-temporal data from video images using computer software to perform dating mining and analysis. In this article, we introduce a video bioinformatics method for quantifying the growth of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by analyzing time-lapse videos collected in a Nikon BioStation CT incubator equipped with a camera for video imaging. In our experiments, hESC colonies that were attached to Matrigel were filmed for 48 hours in the BioStation CT. To determine the rate of growth of these colonies, recipes were developed using CL-Quant software which enables users to extract various types of data from video images. To accurately evaluate colony growth, three recipes were created. The first segmented the image into the colony and background, the second enhanced the image to define colonies throughout the video sequence accurately, and the third measured the number of pixels in the colony over time. The three recipes were run in sequence on video data collected in a BioStation CT to analyze the rate of growth of individual hESC colonies over 48 hours. To verify the truthfulness of the CL-Quant recipes, the same data were analyzed manually using Adobe Photoshop software. When the data obtained using the CL-Quant recipes and Photoshop were compared, results were virtually identical, indicating the CL-Quant recipes were truthful. The method described here could be applied to any video data to measure growth rates of hESC or other cells that grow in colonies. In addition, other video bioinformatics recipes can be developed in the future for other cell processes such as migration, apoptosis, and cell adhesion. PMID:20495527

  18. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  20. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  1. Anisotropic cell growth-regulated surface micropatterns in flower petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flower petals have not only diverse macroscopic morphologies but are rich in microscopic surface patterns, which are crucial to their biological functions. Both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis are conducted to reveal the physical mechanisms underlying the formation of minute wrinkles on flower petals. Three representative flowers, daisy, kalanchoe blossfeldiana, and Eustoma grandiflorum, are investigated as examples. A surface wrinkling model, incorporating the measured mechanical properties and growth ratio, is used to elucidate the difference in their surface morphologies. The mismatch between the anisotropic epidermal cell growth and the isotropic secretion of surficial wax is found to dictate the surface patterns.

  2. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Modified atmospheric conditions controlling fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1997-01-01

    a competitive advantage over other fungi in moist conditions with high carbon dioxide levels, such as inside a roquefort cheese or in gas tight grain storage. The key to success in food packaging is to recognise the food ecosystem, as it enables us to identify which micro......Effective control of fungal growth on cheese under storage conditions is of great concern for the dairy industry. Therefore we designed a research project together with the Danish dairy industry on modelling fungal growth on cheese as affected by the combined effect of storage conditions (O2 and CO...

  4. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor-10 is a mitogen for urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagai, Shelly; Rubio, Eric; Cheng, Jang-Fang; Sweet, Robert; Thomas, Regi; Fuchs, Elaine; Grady, Richard; Mitchell, Michael; Bassuk, James A.

    2002-02-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF)-10 plays an important role in regulating growth, differentiation, and repair of the urothelium. This process occurs through a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the epithelium (urothelium). In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that (i) fibroblasts of the human lamina propria were the cell type that synthesized FGF-10 RNA and (ii) the FGF-10 gene is located at the 5p12-p13 locus of chromosome 5. Recombinant (r) preparations of human FGF-10 were found to induce proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and of transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF7-null mice in vivo. Mechanistic studies with human cells indicated two modes of FGF-10 action: (i) translocation of rFGF-10 into urothelial cell nuclei and (ii) a signaling cascade that begins with the heparin-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of surface transmembrane receptors. The normal urothelial phenotype, that of quiescence, is proposed to be typified by negligible levels of FGF-10. During proliferative phases, levels of FGF-10 rise at the urothelial cell surface and/or within urothelial cell nuclei. An understanding of how FGF-10 works in conjunction with these other processes will lead to better management of many diseases of the bladder and urinary tract.

  6. Angiogenesis gene expression in murine endothelial cells during post-pneumonectomy lung growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konerding Moritz A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although blood vessel growth occurs readily in the systemic bronchial circulation, angiogenesis in the pulmonary circulation is rare. Compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy is an experimental model with presumed alveolar capillary angiogenesis. To investigate the genes participating in murine neoalveolarization, we studied the expression of angiogenesis genes in lung endothelial cells. After left pneumonectomy, the remaining right lung was examined on days 3, 6, 14 and 21days after surgery and compared to both no surgery and sham thoracotomy controls. The lungs were enzymatically digested and CD31+ endothelial cells were isolated using flow cytometry cell sorting. The transcriptional profile of the CD31+ endothelial cells was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Focusing on 84 angiogenesis-associated genes, we identified 22 genes with greater than 4-fold regulation and significantly enhanced transcription (p

  7. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Joji; Bell-Loncella, Elisabeth T; Purazo, Marc L; Lu, Yifeng; Dorchak, Jesse; Clancy, Rebecca; Slavik, Julianna; Cutler, Mary Lou; Shriver, Craig D

    2016-02-12

    Previous studies suggest that certain transition metal complexes, such as cisplatin, are efficacious for treating various cancer types, including ovarian, lung, and breast. In order to further evaluate ruthenium (Ru) complexes as potential anti-cancer agents, we synthesized and evaluated Ru-arene complexes. Two complexes with the general formula [Ru (η (6)-p-cym) (N-N) Cl](+) were tested for their abilities to inhibit cancer cells. The complex with o-phenylenediamine as the N-N ligand (o-PDA) significantly inhibited growth of breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, SKBR-3, and SUM149), lymphoma (Raji), melanoma (Bowes), and osteosarcoma (HT1080); however, the complex with o-benzoquinonediimine (o-BQDI) was ineffective except for SUM149. In contrast, o-PDA failed to inhibit growth of human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A. Treatment of MDA-MBA-231 cells with o-PDA resulted in a significant reduction of productions of PDGF-AA, GM-CSF, and VEGF-A proteins at the transcriptional levels. Finally, we demonstrated that o-PDA synergistically inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell growth with cyclophosphamide but not doxorubicin or paclitaxel. These results suggest that Ru-arene complexes are promising anti-cancer drugs that inhibit progression and metastasis by blocking multiple processes for breast and other types of cancer.

  8. Complementary interactions between oxidative stress and auxins control plant growth responses at plant, organ, and cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Taras; Potters, Geert; Caubergs, Roland; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2005-08-01

    Plant stress responses are a key factor in steering the development of cells, tissues, and organs. However, the stress-induced signal transduction cascades that control localized growth and cell size/differentiation are not well understood. It is reported here that oxidative stress, exerted by paraquat or alloxan, induced localized cell proliferation in intact seedlings, in isolated root segments, and at the single cell level. Analysis of the stress-induced mitotic activity revealed that oxidative stress enhances auxin-dependent growth cycle reactivation. Based on the similarities between responses at plant, tissue, or single cell level, it is hypothesized that a common mechanism of reactive oxygen species enhanced auxin-responsiveness underlies the stress-induced re-orientation of growth, and that stress-induced effects on the protoplast growth cycle are directly relevant in terms of understanding whole plant behaviour.

  9. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  10. Well-Controlled Cell-Trapping Systems for Investigating Heterogeneous Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Koki; Abe, Yuta; Inoue, Kosuke; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2018-03-01

    Microfluidic systems have been developed for patterning single cells to study cell-cell interactions. However, patterning multiple types of cells to understand heterogeneous cell-cell interactions remains difficult. Here, it is aimed to develop a cell-trapping device to assemble multiple types of cells in the well-controlled order and morphology. This device mainly comprises a parylene sheet for assembling cells and a microcomb for controlling the cell-trapping area. The cell-trapping area is controlled by moving the parylene sheet on an SU-8 microcomb using tweezers. Gentle downward flow is used as a driving force for the cell-trapping. The assembly of cells on a parylene sheet with round and line-shaped apertures is demonstrated. The cell-cell contacts of the trapped cells are then investigated by direct cell-cell transfer of calcein via connexin nanopores. Finally, using the device with a system for controlling the cell-trapping area, three different types of cells in the well-controlled order are assembled. The correct cell order rate obtained using the device is 27.9%, which is higher than that obtained without the sliding parylene system (0.74%). Furthermore, the occurrence of cell-cell contact between the three cell types assembled is verified. This cell-patterning device will be a useful tool for investigating heterogeneous cell-cell interactions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A novel microculture kinetic assay (MiCK assay) for malignant cell growth and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, V D

    1994-01-01

    The THERMOmax microplate reader was adapted for monitoring the growth kinetics of human leukaemic OCI/AML-2 and mouse tumour J-774.1 cell lines in continuous culture. Fluid evaporation from wells, CO2 escape and contamination were prevented by hermetic sealing of the microcultures in wells of a 96-well microplate, thus enabling the cells to grow exponentially for 72 h under the conditions of the incubated microplate reader. For both OCI/AML-2 cells, which grow in suspension, and adherent J-774.1 cells, a linear correlation was demonstrated between the number of unstained cells seeded in a given microplate well and the optical density (OD) of that well. Therefore, the OD/time curve of the culture could be deemed to be its growth curve. By the use of the linear fit equation, the actual number of the cells in the wells was computable at any time point of the assay. In the chemosensitivity test, an inhibitory effect of ARA-C on the growth of the cells could be estimated by viewing of the growth curves plotted on the screen. The maximum kinetic rates (Vmax) of the curves in the control and the ARA-C-treated wells were compared, yielding a growth inhibition index (GII). Comparison of results of the kinetic chemosensitivity assay with those of a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay revealed that the novel assay is suitable for precise quantitation of the cell chemosensitivity, is more informative and has the added technical advantage of performance without recourse to radioactive or chemically hazardous substances.

  12. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  13. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  14. Controlling growth density and patterning of single crystalline silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tung-Hao; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Fu-Ken; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the usage of well-patterned Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a catalyst for one-dimensional growth of single crystalline Si nanowires (NWs) through the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The study reports the fabrication of monolayer Au NPs through the self-assembly of Au NPs on a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified silicon substrate. Results indicate that the spin coating time of Au NPs plays a crucial role in determining the density of Au NPs on the surface of the silicon substrate and the later catalysis growth of Si NWs. The experiments in this study employed optical lithography to pattern Au NPs, treating them as a catalyst for Si NW growth. The patterned Si NW structures easily produced and controlled Si NW density. This approach may be useful for further studies on single crystalline Si NW-based nanodevices and their properties.

  15. Effect of Schinus terebinthifolius on Candida albicans growth kinetics, cell wall formation and micromorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Lívia Araújo; Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Pereira, Tricia Murielly; de Souza, Andrade; Lima, Edeltrudes de Oliveira; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the anti-fungal activity of a tincture from Schinus terebinthifolius (Brazilian pepper tree) on Candida albicans (ATCC 289065), a micro-organism associated with fungal infections of the oral cavity. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration (MFC) were determined through microdilution technique, as well as the microbial growth curve of C. albicans promoted by S. terebinthifolius. In addition, this study investigated a possible activity of the product on the fungal cell wall and its biological activity on fungal morphology. Nystatin was used as control and all tests were performed in triplicate. S. terebinthifolius showed MIC of 312.5 µg/mL and MFC of 2500 µg/mL upon the strain tested, while Nystatin showed MIC and MFC of 6.25 µg/mL. As regards the microbial growth curve, S. terebinthifolius was able to significantly reduce the number of CFU/mL when compared to growth control until the time of 60 min. In the times 120 and 180 min there was no statistically significant difference between the growth control and the experimental product. S. terebinthifolius possibly acts on the fungal cell wall, once the sorbitol test indicated a MIC of 1250 µg/mL. In the fungal morphology, a reduction was observed of pseudo-hyphae, chlamydoconidia and blastoconidia in the presence of the experimental product. S. terebinthifolius showed anti-fungal activity against C. albicans, inhibiting, probably, the fungal cell wall formation.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus on the Growth of Human Colonic Carcinoma Cell Line HT-29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhung-Yuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus cells and supernatants on the growth of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. Our study results indicated that the PM153 strain exhibits the best adhesion ability and the highest survival in the gastrointestinal tract simulation experiment. Furthermore, after an 8-h co-culture of PM153 and HT-29 cells, the PM153 strain can induce the secretion of nitric oxide from the HT-29 cells. In addition, after the co-culture of the BCRC17010 strain (109 cfu/mL and HT-29 cells, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the HT-29 cells was 1.19, which showed a significant difference from the other control and LAB groups (p < 0.05, which therefore led to the inference that the BCRC17010 strain exerts a pro-apoptotic effect on the HT-29 cells. Upon co-culture with HT-29 cells for 4, 8 and 12 h, the BCRC14625 strain (109 cfu/mL demonstrated a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity (p < 0.05, causing harm to the HT-29 cell membrane; further, after an 8-h co-culture with the HT-29 cells, it induced the secretion of nitric oxide (NO from the HT-29 cells. Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains have ability to inhibit the growth of the colorectal cancer cell line HT-29 Bax/Bcl-2 pathway or NO production. In summary, we demonstrated that the BCRC17010 strain, good abilities of adhesion and increased LDH release, was the best probiotic potential for inhibition of HT-29 growth amongst the seven LAB strains tested in vitro.

  17. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O(3Pj) from 1.3 × 1016 to 2.3 × 1017 cm-2 s-1. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O(3Pj) ranging from 6 × 1016 to 2 × 1017 cm-3, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 1017 to 1 × 1018 cm-3; cells were inactivated by O(3Pj) doses exceeding 1 × 1018 cm-3, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O(3Pj).

  18. Soft fibrin gels promote selection and growth of tumorigenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Tan, Youhua; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Pingwei; Chen, Junwei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Huang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The identification of stem-cell-like cancer cells through conventional methods that depend on stem cell markers is often unreliable. We developed a mechanical method for selecting tumorigenic cells by culturing single cancer cells in fibrin matrices of ~100 Pa in stiffness. When cultured within these gels, primary human cancer cells or single cancer cells from mouse or human cancer cell lines grew within a few days into individual round colonies that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Subcutaneous or intravenous injection of 10 or 100 fibrin-cultured cells in syngeneic or severe combined immunodeficiency mice led to the formation of solid tumours at the site of injection or at the distant lung organ much more efficiently than control cancer cells selected using conventional surface marker methods or cultured on conventional rigid dishes or on soft gels. Remarkably, as few as ten such cells were able to survive and form tumours in the lungs of wild-type non-syngeneic mice.

  19. Radiosensitivity of different human tumor cells lines grown as multicellular spheroids determined from growth curves and survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwachoefer, J.H.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.; van Gasteren, J.J.; Hoogenhout, J.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.; Theeuwes, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Five human tumor cell lines were grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to determine whether multicellular tumor spheroids derived from different types of tumors would show tumor-type dependent differences in response to single-dose irradiation, and whether these differences paralleled clinical behavior. Multicellular tumor spheroids of two neuroblastoma, one lung adenocarcinoma, one melanoma, and a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue, were studied in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 (SCD50). Growth delay and cell survival analysis for the tumor cell lines showed sensitivities that correlated well with clinical behavior of the tumor types of origin. Similar to other studies on melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids our spheroid control dose50 results for the melanoma cell line deviated from the general pattern of sensitivity. This might be due to the location of surviving cells, which prohibits proliferation of surviving cells and hence growth of melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids. This study demonstrates that radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines can be evaluated in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 when grown as multicellular tumor spheroids. The sensitivity established from these evaluations parallels clinical behavior, thus offering a unique tool for the in vitro analysis of human tumor radiosensitivity

  20. Individual cell-based models of cell scatter of ARO and MLP-29 cells in response to hepatocyte growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Merks, Roeland M H; Preziosi, Luigi; Medico, Enzo

    2009-09-07

    The different behaviors of colonies of two cell lines, ARO (thyroid carcinoma-derived cells) and MLP-29 (mouse liver progenitor cells), in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are described deducing suitable cellular Potts models (CPM). It is shown how increased motility and decreased adhesiveness are responsible for cell-cell dissociation and tissue invasion in the ARO cells. On the other hand, it is shown that, in addition to the biological mechanisms above, it is necessary to include directional persistence in cell motility and HGF diffusion to describe the scattering and the branching processes characteristic of MLP-29 cells.

  1. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha; Button, Robert; Manzo, Michelle; McKissock, Barbara; Miller, Thomas; Gemeiner, Russel; Bennett, William; Hand, Evan

    2006-01-01

    Life-test data of Lithium-Ion battery cells is critical in order to establish their performance capabilities for NASA missions and Exploration goals. Lithium-ion cells have the potential to replace rechargeable alkaline cells in aerospace applications, but they require a more complex charging scheme than is typically required for alkaline cells. To address these requirements in our Lithium-Ion Cell Test Verification Program, a Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit was developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This unit gives researchers the ability to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and results in a substantial reduction in test costs as compared to individual cell testing. The Naval Surface Warfare Center at Crane, Indiana developed a power reduction scheme that works in conjunction with the Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit. This scheme minimizes the power dissipation required by the circuitry to prolong circuit life and improve its reliability.

  2. Calcium, calcium-sensing receptor and growth control in the colonic mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    A role for calcium in epithelial growth control is well-established in the colon and other tissues. In the colon, Ca2+ “drives” the differentiation process. This results in sequestration of ß-catenin in the cell surface / cytoskeletal complex, leaving ß-catenin unavailable to serve as a growth-promoting transcription enhancer in the nucleus. The signaling events that lead from Ca2+ stimulation to differentiation are not fully understood. A critical role for the extracellular calcium-sensing r...

  3. Zebularine inhibits the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Zebularine (Zeb) is a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor to that has an anti-tumor effect. Here, we evaluated the anti-growth effect of Zeb on A549 lung cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC50 of approximately 70 µM at 72 h. Cell cycle analysis indicated that Zeb induced an S phase arrest in A549 cells. Zeb also induced A549 cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm ), Bcl-2 decrease, Bax increase, p53 increase and activation of caspase-3 and -8. In contrast, Zeb mildly inhibited the growth of human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF) normal cells and lead to a G1 phase arrest. Zeb did not induce apoptosis in HPF cells. In relation to ROS level, Zeb increased ROS level in A549 cells and induced glutathione (GSH) depletion. The well-known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevented the death of Zeb-treated A549 cells. Moreover, Zeb increased the level of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in A549 cells. While the overexpression of TrxR1 attenuated death and ROS level in Zeb-treated A549 cells, the downregulation of TrxR1 intensified death and ROS level in these cells. In conclusion, Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The inhibition was influenced by ROS and TrxR1 levels. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-07-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise. Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction. Noise in the system can induce the phase transition. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10275099 and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province of China under Grant Nos. 021707 and 001182

  5. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasschaert, Robert N; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-05-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes.

  6. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation...... of the GH receptor. Two mutated cDNAs encoding truncated GH receptors, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454, respectively, were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected into the RIN cells. Both receptor mutants were expressed on the cell surface and displayed normal GH binding affinity. Whereas GH-R1......-638 had a molecular mass of about 110 kDa, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454 showed molecular masses of 49 and 80 kDa, respectively. Cells expressing GH-R1-454 internalized GH to a similar extent as cells transfected with the full length receptor and the parent cell line, but GH-R1-294-expressing cells showed...

  7. DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment abrogates 17 beta-estradiol-induced cell growth and restores expression of DNA repair genes in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Treas, Justin; Tyagi, Tulika; Gao, Weimin

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged exposure to elevated levels of estrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer. Though increased cell growth and loss of DNA repair capacity is one of the proposed mechanisms for estrogen-induced cancers, the mechanism through which estrogen induces cell growth and decreases DNA repair capacity is not clear. DNA hypermethylation is known to inactivate DNA repair genes and apoptotic response in cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the role of DNA hypermethylation in estrogen-induced cell growth and regulation of DNA repair genes expression in breast cancer cells. To achieve this objective, the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells either pretreated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) or untreated (as control) were exposed to 17 beta-estradiol (E2), and its effect on cell growth and expression of DNA repair genes were measured. The result revealed that 5-aza-dC abrogates the E2-induced growth in MCF-7 cells. An increased expression of OGG1, MSH4, and MLH1 by 5-aza-dC treatment alone, suggest the DNA hypermethylation as a potential cause for decreased expression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. The decreased expression of ERCC1, XPC, OGG1, and MLH1 by E2 alone and its restoration by co-treatment with 5-aza-dC further suggest that E2 reduces the expression of these DNA repair genes potentially through promoter hypermethylation. Reactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and abrogation of E2-induced cell growth by 5-aza-dC treatment suggest that estrogen causes increased growth in breast cancer cells potentially through the inhibition of MMR-mediated apoptotic response. In summary, this study suggests that estrogen increases cell growth and decreases the DNA repair capacity in breast cancer cells, at least in part, through epigenetic mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  9. TOR, the Gateway to Cellular Metabolism, Cell Growth, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenis, John

    2017-09-21

    Michael N. Hall is this year's recipient of the Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for the identification of the target of rapamycin, TOR. TOR is a master regulator of the cell's growth and metabolic state, and its dysregulation contributes to a variety of diseases, including diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, aging, and cancer, making the TOR pathway an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Systems-biology dissection of eukaryotic cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Justen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent article in BMC Biology illustrates the use of a systems-biology approach to integrate data across the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of budding yeast in order to dissect the relationship between nutrient conditions and cell growth. See research article http://jbiol.com/content/6/2/4 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/68

  11. Control points within the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures

  12. Ginger inhibits cell growth and modulates angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jennifer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc is a natural dietary component with antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. The ginger component [6]-gingerol has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects through mediation of NF-κB. NF-κB can be constitutively activated in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and may contribute towards increased transcription and translation of angiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ginger on tumor cell growth and modulation of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Methods The effect of ginger and the major ginger components on cell growth was determined in a panel of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. Activation of NF-κB and and production of VEGF and IL-8 was determined in the presence or absence of ginger. Results Ginger treatment of cultured ovarian cancer cells induced profound growth inhibition in all cell lines tested. We found that in vitro, 6-shogaol is the most active of the individual ginger components tested. Ginger treatment resulted in inhibition of NF-kB activation as well as diminished secretion of VEGF and IL-8. Conclusion Ginger inhibits growth and modulates secretion of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells. The use of dietary agents such as ginger may have potential in the treatment and prevention of ovarian cancer.

  13. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2

  14. Inhibition of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell growth following combination treatment with resveratrol and imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X J; Li, Y H

    2015-06-11

    To investigate the effect of treatment with resveratrol combined with imatinib mesylate on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, in vitro cultured human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells were incubated with different concentrations of resveratrol and imatinib mesylate when the cells were in the logarithmic phase. Next, the cell growth inhibition was evaluated using the MTT assay and cellular morphology observation. Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining. The results demonstrated that treatment with resveratrol (concentration-dependent) and imatinib mesylate showed significantly greater inhibition of K562 cell growth and a higher apoptosis rate of K562 cells than imatinib mesylate medication alone and the control group (P imatinib mesylate medication alone group showed significant inhibition of K562 cell growth and apoptosis rate of K562 cells compared to the control group (P imatinib mesylate and resveratrol are potent drug treatments for human chronic myelogenous leukemia, offering a promising means of inhibiting cell growth and apoptosis.

  15. Optimal control of algae growth by controlling CO 2 and nutrition flow using Pontryagin Maximum Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardlijah; Jamil, Ahmad; Hanafi, Lukman; Sanjaya, Suharmadi

    2017-09-01

    There are so many benefit of algae. One of them is using for renewable energy and sustainable in the future. The greater growth of algae will increasing biodiesel production and the increase of algae growth is influenced by glucose, nutrients and photosynthesis process. In this paper, the optimal control problem of the growth of algae is discussed. The objective function is to maximize the concentration of dry algae while the control is the flow of carbon dioxide and the nutrition. The solution is obtained by applying the Pontryagin Maximum Principle. and the result show that the concentration of algae increased more than 15 %.

  16. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Acetoacetate reduces growth and ATP concentration in cancer cell lines which over-express uncoupling protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadros Edward V

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that several human cancers are capable of uncoupling of mitochondrial ATP generation in the presence of intact tricarboxylic acid (TCA enzymes. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that ketone bodies can inhibit cell growth in aggressive cancers and that expression of uncoupling protein 2 is a contributing factor. The proposed mechanism involves inhibition of glycolytic ATP production via a Randle-like cycle while increased uncoupling renders cancers unable to produce compensatory ATP from respiration. Methods Seven aggressive human cancer cell lines, and three control fibroblast lines were grown in vitro in either 10 mM glucose medium (GM, or in glucose plus 10 mM acetoacetate [G+AcA]. The cells were assayed for cell growth, ATP production and expression of UCP2. Results There was a high correlation of cell growth with ATP concentration (r = 0.948 in a continuum across all cell lines. Controls demonstrated normal cell growth and ATP with the lowest density of mitochondrial UCP2 staining while all cancer lines demonstrated proportionally inhibited growth and ATP, and over-expression of UCP2 (p Conclusion Seven human cancer cell lines grown in glucose plus acetoacetate medium showed tightly coupled reduction of growth and ATP concentration. The findings were not observed in control fibroblasts. The observed over-expression of UCP2 in cancer lines, but not in controls, provides a plausible molecular mechanism by which acetoacetate spares normal cells but suppresses growth in cancer lines. The results bear on the hypothesized potential for ketogenic diets as therapeutic strategies.

  18. The Arabidopsis CDK inhibitor ICK3/KRP5 is rate limiting for primary root growth and promotes growth through cell elongation and endoreduplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bo; Nieuwland, Jeroen; Murray, James A H

    2013-02-01

    The coordination of plant cell division and expansion controls plant morphogenesis, development, and growth. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are not only key regulators of cell division but also play an important role in cell differentiation. In plants, CDK activity is modulated by the binding of INHIBITOR OF CDK/KIP-RELATED PROTEIN (ICK/KRP). Previously, ICK2/KRP2 has been shown to mediate auxin responses in lateral root initiation. Here are analysed the roles of all ICK/KRP genes in root growth. Analysis of ick/krp null-mutants revealed that only ick3/krp5 was affected in primary root growth. ICK3/KRP5 is strongly expressed in the root apical meristem (RAM), with lower expression in the expansion zone. ick3/krp5 roots grow more slowly than wildtype controls, and this results not from reduction of division in the proliferative region of the RAM but rather reduced expansion as cells exit the meristem. This leads to shorter final cell lengths in different tissues of the ick3/krp5 mutant root, particularly the epidermal non-hair cells, and this reduction in cell size correlates with reduced endoreduplication. Loss of ICK3/KRP5 also leads to delayed germination and in the mature embryo ICK3/KRP5 is specifically expressed in the transition zone between root and hypocotyl. Cells in the transition zone were smaller in the ick3/krp5 mutant, despite the absence of endoreduplication in the embryo suggesting a direct effect of ICK3/KRP5 on cell growth. It is concluded that ICK3/KRP5 is a positive regulator of both cell growth and endoreduplication.

  19. Research on crystal growth by using pressure as a control parameter; Atsuryoku seigyo ni yoru kessho seicho ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-31

    This research project aims to establish a technique for crystal growth using pressure as a principal control parameter, and combining it with a microgravity condition, to develop a novel process material fabrication. Since the solubility of materials depends on pressure, it is possible to control a supersaturated condition for crystal growth by changing pressure. The growth condition can be controlled precisely, which is not possible by conventional methods that vary temperature and other factors. On the other hand, because a concentration diffusing field is formed autonomically around crystals in association with their growth, density convection is generated under gravity as a result of difference in the concentrations, making the growth conditions severely complex and uncontrollable. Ideal crystal growth condition control may be possible if the pressure control is performed under micro-gravity by which generation of the density convection can be suppressed. Realization has been achieved on in-situ observation by using high-magnification microscope which uses a diamond anvil cell, development of a hydraulic type optic pressure cell, and a high- speed crystal growing technology by means of pressure control utilizing the cell. New findings were also obtained on effects of pressure on crystal forms, and the pressure induced solid phase transfer mechanism. 67 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Griseofulvin inhibits the growth of adrenocortical cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramann, E L; Willenberg, H S; Hildebrandt, B; Müller-Mattheis, V; Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A; Haase, M

    2013-04-01

    Supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy are associated with a malignant phenotype of tumor cells. Centrosomal clustering is a mechanism used by cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes to solve the threatening problem of multipolar spindles. Griseofulvin is an antifungal substance that interferes with the microtubule apparatus and inhibits centrosomal clustering. It has also been demonstrated that griseofulvin inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. However, it is not yet known whether treatment with griseofulvin inhibits growth of adrenocortical tumor cells. We studied the viability and antiproliferative effects of griseofulvin on cultured NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells using Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]-thymidine assays. For the detection of apoptosis we used a caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy techniques. We observed that incubation with griseofulvin for 24-48 h leads to a decrease in the viability and proliferation of NCI-H295R cells in a dose-dependent manner. Significant effects could be observed after incubation with griseofulvin as measured by Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]dT- uptake assays. Apoptosis of NCI-H295R cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 4.5-fold after incubation with griseofulvin 40 μM for 24 h as shown by caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy. With regard to new treatment strategies for adrenocortical cancer, griseofulvin, and possibly other agents, which interfere with the microtubule apparatus and inhibit centrosomal clustering, may turn out to be interesting targets for further research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (PFlow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  3. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  4. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico, E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro [Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  5. Gelatin Methacrylate Microspheres for Growth Factor Controlled Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15–90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor over conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite an order of magnitude greater gelatin content of GA MPs. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery. PMID:25463489

  6. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  7. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand...

  8. Human keloid cell characterization and inhibition of growth with human Wharton's jelly stem cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Subramanian, Arjunan; Srinivasan, Akshaya; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-05-01

    Keloids are firm rubbery growths that grow beyond the boundaries of human wounds and their treatment has met with limited success. Their properties and growth behavior have not been properly characterized and it has been suggested that a benign neoplastic stem cell-like phenotype in an altered cytokine microenvironment drives their uncontrolled cell proliferation. Modification of the stem cell niche may be an attractive approach to its prevention. We studied the growth behavior, stemness, and tumorigenic characteristics of keloid cells in prolonged culture. Since human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) secrete high levels of cytokines and have anti-tumorigenic properties we explored its role on the inhibition of keloid growth in vitro. Keloid cells grew readily in both adherent and sphere culture and expressed high levels of mesenchymal CD and tumor-associated fibroblast (TAF) markers up to passage 10. When they were exposed to repeat doses of hWJSC conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) and lysate (hWJSC-CL) every 72 h up to 9 days their growth was inhibited with a reduction in CD and TAF marker expression. On Days 3, 6, and 9 treated keloid cells showed linear decreases in cell proliferation (BrdU), increases in Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL-positive cells, interruptions of the cell cycle and inhibition of migration in scratch-wound assays. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR confirmed a significant downregulation of TAF and anti-apoptotic-related gene (SURVIVIN) expression and upregulation of autophagy-related (BAX, ATG5, ATG7, BECLIN-1) gene expression. The results suggest that hWJSCs or molecules secreted by them may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of keloids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Human growth hormone stimulates proliferation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rymaszewski, Z.; Cohen, R.M.; Chomczynski, P.

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors sought to determine whether this could be mediated by an effect of GH on proliferation of endothelial cells, and, for this purpose, established long-term cultures of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) from normal postmortem human eyes. High-purity hREC preparations were selected for experiments, based on immunogluorescence with acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-factor VIII-related antigen. Growth requirements for these cells were complex, including serum for maintenance at slow growth rates and additional mitogens for more rapid proliferation. Exposure of hREC to physiologic doses of human GH (hGH) resulted in 100% greater cell number vs. control but could be elicited only in the presence of serum. When differing serum conditions were compared, hGH stimulated [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation up to 1.6- to 2.2-fold under each condition and increased DNA content significantly in the presence of human, horse, and fetal calf serum. In summary, hREC respond to physiologic concentrations of hGH in vitro with enhanced proliferation. This specific effect of GH on retinal microvascular endothelial cells supports the hypothesis of role for GH in endothelial cell biology

  10. Basic theory of diameter control in Czochralski growth using the melt-weighing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, T.H.

    1986-04-01

    The unconfined crystal growth in the Czochralski configuration is recognized as a process which is quite dependent upon successful control of the shape determining conditions. In the paper attention is focused on the meniscus region, and its relevance to the crystal diameter behaviour is discussed. The dynamic stability of the configuration is analyzed according to the Surek criterion. In contrast to earlier zeroth order arguments, the system is shown to be inherently stable at normal growth conditions if the thermal impedance of the meniscus is taken into account. General difficulties associated with small diameter growth are pointed out. Reference is made to various growth monitoring arrangements, and the melt-weighing method is described in detail. Assuming uniform growth with a flat interface, the exact relation between the force experienced by a weighing cell and the growth parameters during both stationary and non-stationary conditions is derived. Growth at a constant angle is analyzed, and a new procedure for deriving the crystal diameter is suggested

  11. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billestrup, N.; Moeldrup, A.; Serup, P.; Nielsen, J.H.; Mathews, L.S.; Norstedt, G.

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, the authors have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and to contain a specific GH receptor mRNA that was not expressed in the parent cell line. The expression of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1.24 cells compared to 1.9-fold in the nontransfected RIN5-AH cells. The expression of the transfected receptor was stimulated 1.6- and 2.3-fold when cells were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 μM Zn 2+ was associated with an increased magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. They conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin biosynthesis in RIN5-AH cells

  12. Simvastatin and metformin inhibit cell growth in hepatitis C virus infected cells via mTOR increasing PTEN and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, José A; García-Valdecasas, Marta; Gil-Gómez, Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Gallego, Paloma; Ampuero, Javier; Gallego-Durán, Rocío; Pastor, Helena; Grande, Lourdes; Padillo, Francisco J; Muntané, Jordi; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been related to increased risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while metformin (M) and statins treatment seemed to protect against HCC development. In this work, we aim to identify the mechanisms by which metformin and simvastatin (S) could protect from liver cancer. Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV particles and treated with M+S. Human primary hepatocytes were treated with M+S. Treatment with both drugs inhibited Huh7.5 cell growth and HCV infection. In non-infected cells S increased translational controlled tumor protein (TCTP) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) proteins while M inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and TCTP. Simvastatin and metformin co-administered down-regulated mTOR and TCTP, while PTEN was increased. In cells infected by HCV, mTOR, TCTP, p62 and light chain 3B II (LC3BII) were increased and PTEN was decreased. S+M treatment increased PTEN, p62 and LC3BII in Huh7.5 cells. In human primary hepatocytes, metformin treatment inhibited mTOR and PTEN, but up-regulated p62, LC3BII and Caspase 3. In conclusion, simvastatin and metformin inhibited cell growth and HCV infection in vitro. In human hepatocytes, metformin increased cell-death markers. These findings suggest that M+S treatment could be useful in therapeutic prevention of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Simvastatin and metformin inhibit cell growth in hepatitis C virus infected cells via mTOR increasing PTEN and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Del Campo

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has been related to increased risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC while metformin (M and statins treatment seemed to protect against HCC development. In this work, we aim to identify the mechanisms by which metformin and simvastatin (S could protect from liver cancer. Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV particles and treated with M+S. Human primary hepatocytes were treated with M+S. Treatment with both drugs inhibited Huh7.5 cell growth and HCV infection. In non-infected cells S increased translational controlled tumor protein (TCTP and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN proteins while M inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and TCTP. Simvastatin and metformin co-administered down-regulated mTOR and TCTP, while PTEN was increased. In cells infected by HCV, mTOR, TCTP, p62 and light chain 3B II (LC3BII were increased and PTEN was decreased. S+M treatment increased PTEN, p62 and LC3BII in Huh7.5 cells. In human primary hepatocytes, metformin treatment inhibited mTOR and PTEN, but up-regulated p62, LC3BII and Caspase 3. In conclusion, simvastatin and metformin inhibited cell growth and HCV infection in vitro. In human hepatocytes, metformin increased cell-death markers. These findings suggest that M+S treatment could be useful in therapeutic prevention of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Simvastatin and metformin inhibit cell growth in hepatitis C virus infected cells via mTOR increasing PTEN and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Gómez, Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Gallego, Paloma; Ampuero, Javier; Gallego-Durán, Rocío; Pastor, Helena; Grande, Lourdes; Padillo, Francisco J.; Muntané, Jordi; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been related to increased risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while metformin (M) and statins treatment seemed to protect against HCC development. In this work, we aim to identify the mechanisms by which metformin and simvastatin (S) could protect from liver cancer. Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV particles and treated with M+S. Human primary hepatocytes were treated with M+S. Treatment with both drugs inhibited Huh7.5 cell growth and HCV infection. In non-infected cells S increased translational controlled tumor protein (TCTP) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) proteins while M inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and TCTP. Simvastatin and metformin co-administered down-regulated mTOR and TCTP, while PTEN was increased. In cells infected by HCV, mTOR, TCTP, p62 and light chain 3B II (LC3BII) were increased and PTEN was decreased. S+M treatment increased PTEN, p62 and LC3BII in Huh7.5 cells. In human primary hepatocytes, metformin treatment inhibited mTOR and PTEN, but up-regulated p62, LC3BII and Caspase 3. In conclusion, simvastatin and metformin inhibited cell growth and HCV infection in vitro. In human hepatocytes, metformin increased cell-death markers. These findings suggest that M+S treatment could be useful in therapeutic prevention of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:29385181

  15. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using [ 32 P]phosphorylase α as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at ∼5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase

  16. Cultivating liver cells on printed arrays of hepatocyte growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caroline N; Tuleuova, Nazgul; Lee, Ji Youn; Ramanculov, Erlan; Reddi, A Hari; Zern, Mark A; Revzin, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Growth factors are commonly present in soluble form during in vitro cell cultivation experiments in order to provide signals for cellular proliferation or differentiation. In contrast to these traditional experiments, we investigated solid-phase presentation of a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a protein important in liver development and regeneration, on microarrays of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In our experiments, HGF was mixed in solution with ECM proteins (collagen (I), (IV) or laminin) and robotically printed onto silane-modified glass slides. Primary rat hepatocytes were seeded onto HGF/ECM protein microarrays and formed cellular clusters that corresponded in size to the dimensions of individual protein spots (500 microm diameter). Analysis of liver-specific products, albumin and alpha1-antitrypsin, revealed several fold higher levels of expression of these proteins in hepatocytes cultured on HGF/ECM microarrays compared to cells cultivated on ECM proteins alone. In addition, cultivation of hepatocytes on HGF/ECM protein spots led to spontaneous reorganization of cellular clusters from a monolayer into three-dimensional spheroids. We also investigated the effects of surface-tethered HGF on hepatocytes co-cultivated with stromal cells and observed a significantly higher level of albumin in co-cultures where hepatocytes were stimulated by HGF/ECM spots compared to co-cultures created on ECM protein islands without the growth factor. In summary, our study suggests that incorporation of HGF into ECM protein microarrays has a profound and long-lasting effect on the morphology and phenotype of primary hepatocytes. In the future, the number of growth factors printed on ECM microarrays will be expanded to enable multiplexed and combinatorial screening of inducers of cellular differentiation or proliferation.

  17. How to determine control of growth rate in a chemostat. Using metabolic control analysis to resolve the paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, Jacky L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Groeneveld, Philip

    1994-01-01

    how, paradoxically, one can determine control of growth rate, of growth yield and of other fluxes in a chemostat. We develop metabolic control analysis for the chemostat. this analysis does not depend on the particular way in which specific growth rate varies with the concentration of the growth...

  18. Harnessing cell-material interaction to control cell fate: design ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat K Das

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... advancement in engineered hydrogel materials as such scaffold to control cell fate. Keywords. Extracellular matrix; hydrogel .... vided useful model systems to identify principles that would help design synthetic ..... tool to generate nanoscale periodic patterns that influ- enced stem cell differentiation.

  19. Harnessing cell-material interaction to control cell fate: design ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat K Das

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Harnessing cell-material interaction to control cell fate: design principle of advanced functional hydrogel materials. †. RAJAT K DAS. ∗. Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India. E-mail: rajat@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in. MS received 15 August 2017; revised 29 ...

  20. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  1. Crystalline silicon thin film growth by ECR plasma CVD for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licai Wang

    1999-07-01

    This thesis describes the background, motivation and work carried out towards this PhD programme entitled 'Crystalline Silicon Thin Film Growth by ECR Plasma CVD for Solar Cells'. The fundamental principles of silicon solar cells are introduced with a review of silicon thin film and bulk solar cells. The development and prospects for thin film silicon solar cells are described. Some results of a modelling study on thin film single crystalline solar cells are given which has been carried out using a commercially available solar cell simulation package (PC-1D). This is followed by a description of thin film deposition techniques. These include Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and Plasma-Assisted CVD (PACVD). The basic theory and technology of the emerging technique of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) PACVD, which was used in this research, are introduced and the potential advantages summarised. Some of the basic methods of material and cell characterisation are briefly described, together with the work carried out in this research. The growth by ECR PACVD at temperatures 2 illumination. The best efficiency in the ECR grown structures was 13.76% using an epitaxial emitter. Cell performance was analysed in detail and the factors controlling performance identified by fitting self-consistently the fight and dark current-voltage and spectral response data using PC-1D. Finally, the conclusions for this research and suggestions for further work are outlined. (author)

  2. Effect of Aspirin on Cell Growth of Human MG-63 Osteosarcoma Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. De Luna-Bertos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are commonly used in bone tissue repair treatment for their pharmacological action. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin, on osteoblast growth, using MG63 cell line as osteoblast model. MTT spectrophotometry results showed that 20, 100, and 1000 μM aspirin doses have an inhibitory effect on growth. Cell cycle analysis revealed that aspirin doses of 100 and 1000 μM arrest the cell cycle in phase GO/G1. Parallel apoptosis/necrosis studies showed no changes in comparison to control cells after treatment with 1 or 10 μM aspirin but a significantly increased percentage of cells in apoptosis at doses of 20, 100, and 1000 μM. We highlight that treatment of osteoblast-like cells with 1000 μM aspirin increased not only the percentage of cells in apoptosis but also the percentage of necrotic cells, which was not observed in aspirin treatments at lower doses.

  3. [The action of epidermal growth factor on the development of cultured striatum cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Díaz, L; Castellano-Benítez, O; Soto-Alonso, J; Rosillo-Martí, J C; de la Cuétara-Bernal, K

    1997-10-01

    Epidermic growth factor (EGF) has a neurotrophic mitogenic effect on different cell populations in the nervous system. This is modulated by the stage of development and microenvironment of the cells. In this paper we describe the action of EGF on embryonic striatum cells of a culture system dissociated from neurons and glias. The cell culture is prepared from 16-17 day rat embryos. In the system used, the cell population was cultured for 20-24 hours in a medium containing serum. This medium was later replaced by a mixture of specific nutrients and treated for 6 days with 20 mg/ml of EGF. The substitution of serum during the initial period of development led to an appreciable reduction in the living cells in the treated cultures and in the controls. The surviving cells were mainly cellular precursors, taking into account their morphological characteristics and capacity for proliferation. The effect of EGF was seen in an increase in the number of cells and was shown to be a stimulus to the proliferation of neuronal and astrocyte precursors. The specific activity of choline acetyl-transferases determined in the cultures at 16 days showed differentiation of a cholinergic neurons subpopulation, which responded to treatment with nerve growth factor with an increase in the activity of this enzyme.

  4. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    Full Text Available Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97 levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC progression. The VCP inhibitor(s (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay, and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05. Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05 as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001 by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control

  5. A multi-agent based cell controller

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Leitão; Francisco José de Oliveira Restivo; Goran Putnik

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the opportunity to use multi-agents technology in automation and distributed manufacturing systems and the expected improvements. To support the discussion, it is described a manufacturing cell control application developed using the multi-agent technology, and the results are compared with other control application developed in the past by some of the authors, using a traditional approach, for the same flexible manufacturing cell.

  6. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W.C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    Anterior pituitaries from small (250 g) and large (400 g) rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission were pooled and trypsinized into two single-cell suspensions. Compared with ground-based controls, flight cells appeared to contain more intracellular growth hormone (GH) but release less GH over a 6-day culture period, measured by radioimmunoassay. After implantation into hypophysectomized rats, both sets of flight cells released only 50% of the GH compared with the control cells. Glands from large flight rats contained 44% somatotrophs compared with 37% for controls; small animals showed no difference. There were no striking differences in somatotroph ultrastructure between cells in the four groups. Western blot analysis indicate that there were no major differences in immunoactive GH variants. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that small flight cells released much less of a high-molecular weight variant rich in GH bioactivity. The results suggest that GH cells from rats exposed to microgravity may experience secretory dysfunction. The possibility that this occurs directly at the pituitary cell level is discussed

  7. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  8. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  9. Cheiradone: a vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nessar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is associated with physiological (for example wound healing and pathological conditions (tumour development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are the major angiogenic regulators. We have identified a natural product (cheiradone isolated from a Euphorbia species which inhibited in vivo and in vitro VEGF- stimulated angiogenesis but had no effect on FGF-2 or EGF activity. Two primary cultures, bovine aortic and human dermal endothelial cells were used in in vitro (proliferation, wound healing, invasion in Matrigel and tube formation and in vivo (the chick chorioallantoic membrane models of angiogenesis in the presence of growth factors and cheiradone. In all cases, the concentration of cheiradone which caused 50% inhibition (IC50 was determined. The effect of cheiradone on the binding of growth factors to their receptors was also investigated. Results Cheiradone inhibited all stages of VEGF-induced angiogenesis with IC50 values in the range 5.20–7.50 μM but did not inhibit FGF-2 or EGF-induced angiogenesis. It also inhibited VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-1 and 2 with IC50 values of 2.9 and 0.61 μM respectively. Conclusion Cheiradone inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis by binding to VEGF receptors -1 and -2 and may be a useful investigative tool to study the specific contribution of VEGF to angiogenesis and may have therapeutic potential.

  10. Controllability analysis of decentralised linear controllers for polymeric fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Maria; Aguado, Joaquin; Ansede, Xavier; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-10

    This work deals with the control of polymeric fuel cells. It includes a linear analysis of the system at different operating points, the comparison and selection of different control structures, and the validation of the controlled system by simulation. The work is based on a complex non linear model which has been linearised at several operating points. The linear analysis tools used are the Morari resiliency index, the condition number, and the relative gain array. These techniques are employed to compare the controllability of the system with different control structures and at different operating conditions. According to the results, the most promising control structures are selected and their performance with PI based diagonal controllers is evaluated through simulations with the complete non linear model. The range of operability of the examined control structures is compared. Conclusions indicate good performance of several diagonal linear controllers. However, very few have a wide operability range. (author)

  11. Magnetic Control in Crystal Growth from a Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue

    Control of bulk melt crystal growth techniques is desirable for producing semiconductors with the highest purity and ternary alloys with tunable electrical properties. Because these molten materials are electrically conducting, external magnetic fields are often employed to regulate the flow in the melt. However, complicated by the coupled flow, thermal, electromagnetic and chemical physics, such magnetic control is typically empirical or even an educated guess. Two magnetic flow control mechanisms: flow damping by steady magnetic fields, and flow stirring by alternating magnetic fields, are investigated numerically. Magnetic damping during optically-heated float-zone crystal growth is modeled using a spectral collocation method. The Marangoni convection at the free melt-gas interface is suppressed when exposed to a steady axial magnetic field, measured by the Hartmann number Ha. As a result, detrimental flow instabilities are suppressed, and an almost quiescent region forms in the interior, ideal for single crystal growth. Using normal mode linear stability analyses, dominant flow instabilities are determined in a range applicable to experiments (up to Ha = 300 for Pr = 0.02, and up to Ha = 500 for Pr = 0.001). The hydrodynamic nature of the instability for small Prandtl number Pr liquid bridges is confirmed by energy analyses. Magnetic stirring is modeled for melt crystal growth in an ampule exposed to a transverse rotating magnetic field. Decoupled from the flow field at small magnetic Reynolds number, the electromagnetic field is first solved via finite element analysis. The flow field is then solved using the spectral element method. At low to moderate AC frequencies (up to a few kHz), the electromagnetic body force is dominant in the azimuthal direction, which stirs a steady axisymmetric flow primarily in the azimuthal direction. A weaker secondary flow develops in the meridional plane. However, at high AC frequencies (on the order of 10 kHz and higher), only

  12. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  13. Growth Control by Ethylene: Adjusting Phenotypes to the Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.; Sasidharan, R.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Plants phenotypically adjust to environmental challenges, and the gaseous plant hormone ethylene modulates many of these growth adjustments. Ethylene can be involved in environmentally induced growth inhibition as well as growth stimulation. Still, ethylene has long been considered a growth

  14. Hematopoietic growth factors including keratinocyte growth factor in allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggewiss, Ruth; Einsele, Hermann

    2007-07-01

    The aim of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is to cure patients of malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and immunodeficiency disorders by redirecting the immune system: the often described graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) or graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. Unfortunately, fulfillment of this goal is often hampered by relapse of the underlying disease, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), or severe opportunistic infections, which account for the majority of post-transplantation deaths. Moreover, studies of long-term survivors of transplantation indicate an accelerated immune aging due to the transplantation procedure itself, preceding chemo- or radiotherapy, and acute and chronic GVHD. Significant advances have been made towards overcoming these obstacles by enhancing immune reconstitution with hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or erythropoietin (EPO) or through the application of cytokines. In addition, there are approaches to promote the thymic-dependent development of naive T cells, which are prepared for the interaction with a multitude of pathogens. Examples are the application of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), neuroendocrine hormones such as growth hormone or prolactin, sex hormone ablation, or the invention of a three-dimensional artificial thymus based on a cytomatrix. Might these measures result in a higher rate of healthy and fully recovered patients? Here we review progress in each of these areas.

  15. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The dose-rate in internal emitter therapy is low and time-dependent as compared to external beam radiotherapy. Once the total absorbed dose delivered to a target tissue is calculated, however, most dosimetric analyses of radiopharmaceuticals are considered complete. To translate absorbed dose estimates obtained for internal emitter therapy to biologic effect, the growth characteristics, repair capacity, and radiosensitivity of the tumor must be considered. Tumor growth may be represented by the Gompertz equation in which tumor cells increase at an exponential growth rate that is itself decreasing at an exponential rate; as the tumor increases in size, the growth rate diminishes. The empirical Gompertz expression for tumor growth may be derived from a mechanistic model in which growth is represented by a balance between tumor-cell birth and loss. The birth rate is assumed to be fixed, while the cell loss rate is time-dependent and increases with tumor size. The birth rate of the tumors may be related to their potential doubling time. Multiple biopsies of individual tumors have demonstrated a heterogeneity in the potential doubling time of tumors. By extending the mechanistic model described above to allow for sub-populations of tumor cells with different birth rates, the effect of kinetic heterogeneity within a tumor may be examined. Model simulations demonstrate that the cell kinetic parameters of a tumor are predicted to change over time and measurements obtained using a biopsy are unlikely to reflect the kinetics of the tumor throughout its growth history. A decrease in overall tumor mass, in which each sub-population is reduced in proportion to its cell number, i.e., the log-kill assumption, leads to re-growth of a tumor that has a greater proliferation rate. Therapy that is linked to the potential doubling time or to the effective proliferation rate of the tumor may lead to re-growth of a tumor that is kinetically unchanged. The simplest model of

  16. GLP-1/Exendin-4 induces β-cell proliferation via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Joseph; Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Sheng, Qingfeng; Chen, Congde; Ming, Yung-Ching; Gittes, George

    2017-08-22

    Exendin-4 is a long acting glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue that is an agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Exendin-4 is used to clinically improve glucose tolerance in diabetic patients due to its ability to enhance insulin secretion. In rodents, and possibly in humans, exendin-4 can stimulate β-cell proliferation. The exact mechanism of action to induce β-cell proliferation is not well understood. Here, using a β-cell specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) null mouse, we show that exendin-4 induced an increase in proliferation and β-cell mass through EGFR. Thus, our study sheds light on the role of EGFR signaling in the effects of exendin-4 on the control of blood glucose metabolism and β-cell mass.

  17. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  18. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...

  19. Inhibition of Human Cervical Cancer Cell Growth by Ethanolic Extract of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Punarnava Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indian traditional medicine, Boerhaavia diffusa (punarnava roots have been widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, jaundice, enlargement of spleen, abdominal pain and as an anti-stress agent. Pharmacological evaluation of the crude ethanolic extract of B. diffusa roots has been shown to possess antiproliferative and immunomodulatory properties. The extract of B. diffusa was studied for anti-proliferative effects on the growth of HeLa cells and for its effect on cell cycle. Bio-assays of extracts from B. diffusa root showed that a methanol : chloroform fraction (BDF 5 had an antiproliferative effect on HeLa cells. After 48 h of exposure, this fraction at a concentration of 200 μg mL−1 significantly reduced cell proliferation with visible morphological changes in HeLa cells. Cell cycle analysis suggests that antiproliferative effect of BDF 5 could be due to inhibition of DNA synthesis in S-phase of cell cycle in HeLa cells, whereas no significant change in cell cycle was detected in control cells. The fraction BDF 5 caused cell death via apoptosis as evident from DNA fragmentation and caspase-9 activation. Thus the extract has potential to be evaluated in detail to assess the molecular mechanism-mediated anticancer activities of this plant.

  20. The resveratrol analogue trimethoxystilbene inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing multipolar cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Percario, Zulema; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2017-03-01

    Natural compounds are extensively studied for their potential use in traditional and non-traditional medicine. Several natural and synthetic Resveratrol analogues have shown interesting biological activities in the field of cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we have focused on the ability of Resveratrol and two methoxylated derivatives (Trimethoxystilbene and Pterostilbene) to inhibit human cancer cell growth particularly analyzing their ability to interfere with tubulin dynamics at mitosis. We show that Trimethoxystilbene, differently from Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, alters microtubule polymerization dynamics in HeLa cells specifically inducing multipolar spindles and mitotic arrest coupled to a reduction of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic death by mitotic catastrophe. This work demonstrates that the structural modification of Rsv causes substantial changes in the mechanism of action of the derivatives. The presence of three extra methyl groups renders Trimethoxy very efficient in impairing cell proliferation by inducing mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Control of growth mode of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2009-01-01

    We have conducted an experimental study to investigate the synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The synthesis of base and tip-type of CNTs was selectively controlled by changing the catalyst size, catalyst film thickness correlated with altering the NH 3 pretreatment plasma current. These types of CNT showed distinctive properties in nanotube structure, growth rate and vertical alignment, which were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in situ optical interference measurement. The vertically aligned behaviour of CNT was systematically studied by using a fine-patterned catalyst layer with diverse critical dimensions. Freestanding single CNT was successfully realized by optimum tip-type CNT growth, conventional photolithography and wet-etch process.

  2. Xanthine oxidase activity regulates human embryonic brain cells growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevorkian G. A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidase (XO; EC1.1.3.22 in cellular proliferation and differentiation has been suggested by the numerous investigations. We have proposed that XO might have undoubtedly important role during the development, maturation as well as the death of human embryos brain cells. Methods. Human abortion material was utilized for the cultivation of brain cells (E90. XO activity was measured by the formation of uric acid in tissue. Cell death was detected by the utility of Trypan Blue dye. Results. Allopurinol suppressed the XO activity in the brain tissue (0.12 ± 0.02; 0.20 ± 0.03 resp., p < 0.05. On day 12th the number of cells in the culture treated with the Allopurinol at the early stage of development was higher in comparison with the Control (2350.1 ± 199.0 vs 2123 ± 96 and higher in comparison with the late period of treatment (1479.6 ± 103.8, p < < 0.05. In all groups, the number of the dead cells was less than in Control, indicating the protective nature of Allopurinol as an inhibitor of XO. Conclusions. Allopurinol initiates cells proliferation in case of the early treatment of the human brain derived cell culture whereas at the late stages it has an opposite effect.

  3. Growth and apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by intense picosecond pulsed electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan HUA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the growth and apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by intense picosecond pulsed electric field(PEF in vitro.Methods HeLa cells cultured in vitro were divided into experimental group and control group(with or without intense picosecond PEF.With constant pulse width,frequency and voltage,the cells in experimental group were divided into 6 sub-groups according to the number of pulse(100,200,500,1000,1500,2000,the growth inhibition of HeLa cells by PEF and the dose-effect relationship were analyzed by MTT.Caspase 3 protein activity was detected in the cells in 500,1000 and 2000 sub-groups.Mitochondrial transmembrane potential was detected by rhodamine 123 staining with the cells in 2000 sub-groups.Results MTT assay demonstrated that intense picosecond PEF significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in dose-dependent manner.The survival rates of cells declined along with the increase in pulse number,and were 96.23%±0.76%,94.11%±2.42%,90.31%±1.77%,64.59%±1.59%,32.95%±0.73%,23.85%±2.38% and 100%,respectively,in 100,200,500,1000,1500,2000 sub-groups and control group(P < 0.01.The Caspase 3 protein activity was significantly enhanced by intense picosecond PEF,and the absorbancy indexes(A were 0.174±0.012,0.232±0.017,0.365±0.016 and 0.122±0.011,respectively,in 500,1000,2000 sub-groups and control group(P < 0.05.The mitochondrial transmembrane potential of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by intense picosecond PEF,and the fluorescence intensity in 2000 sub-group(76.66±13.38 was much lower than that in control group(155.81±2.33,P < 0.05.Conclusion Intense picosecond PEF may significantly inhibit the growth of HeLa cells,and induce cell apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway.

  4. Senescent mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer cells growth via galectin-3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanju; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihua; Liu, Guangjin; Li, Yanqi; Wu, Xiaobing; Jing, Yongguang; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is linked to aging and tumorigenesis. The senescence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may influence the tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis by secreting a variety of cytokines and growth factors. The conditioned media of adipose derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) stimulated the proliferation of human LoVo colorectal-cancer cells, and the replicative senescent MSCs had the more obvious effects in comparison to that of premature AD-MSCs. Analysis of the factors secreted in the MSCs culture media determined that senescent MSCs expressed and secreted high levels of galectin-3. Galectin-3 expression correlated with the stimulatory effect of senescent AD-MSCs on LoVo cells proliferation, as knockdown of galectin-3 in senescent AD-MSCs significantly reversed the effect of MSCs-mediated growth stimulation of LoVo cells. Furthermore, the simultaneous addition of recombinant galectin-3 to the co-culture systems partially restored the tumor-promoting effect of the senescent AD-MSCs. Analysis of the mechanisms of senescent MSCs and galectin-3 on LoVo cells signal transduction determined that senescent MSCs and exogenous galectin-3 promoted cell growth by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]1/2) pathway. Senescent MSCs may alter the tissue microenvironment and affect nearby malignant cells via cytokine secretion, and galectin-3 is an important mediator of senescent AD-MSC-mediated stimulation of colon cancer cell growth. Therefore, thorough assessment of AD-MSCs prior to their implementation in clinical practice is warranted.

  5. Influence of Cell-Cell Interactions on the Population Growth Rate in a Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong

    2017-12-01

    The understanding of the macroscopic phenomenological models of the population growth at a microscopic level is important to predict the population behaviors emerged from the interactions between the individuals. In this work, we consider the influence of the population growth rate R on the cell-cell interaction in a tumor system and show that, in most cases especially small proliferative probabilities, the regulative role of the interaction will be strengthened with the decline of the intrinsic proliferative probabilities. For the high replication rates of an individual and the cooperative interactions, the proliferative probability almost has no effect. We compute the dependences of R on the interactions between the cells under the approximation of the nearest neighbor in the rim of an avascular tumor. Our results are helpful to qualitatively understand the influence of the interactions between the individuals on the growth rate in population systems. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11675008 and 21434001

  6. Glycolysis Is Governed by Growth Regime and Simple Enzyme Regulation in Adherent MDCK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Markus; Ritter, Joachim B.; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Due to its vital importance in the supply of cellular pathways with energy and precursors, glycolysis has been studied for several decades regarding its capacity and regulation. For a systems-level understanding of the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell metabolism, we couple a segregated cell growth model published earlier with a structured model of glycolysis, which is based on relatively simple kinetics for enzymatic reactions of glycolysis, to explain the pathway dynamics under various cultivation conditions. The structured model takes into account in vitro enzyme activities, and links glycolysis with pentose phosphate pathway and glycogenesis. Using a single parameterization, metabolite pool dynamics during cell cultivation, glucose limitation and glucose pulse experiments can be consistently reproduced by considering the cultivation history of the cells. Growth phase-dependent glucose uptake together with cell-specific volume changes generate high intracellular metabolite pools and flux rates to satisfy the cellular demand during growth. Under glucose limitation, the coordinated control of glycolytic enzymes re-adjusts the glycolytic flux to prevent the depletion of glycolytic intermediates. Finally, the model's predictive power supports the design of more efficient bioprocesses. PMID:25329309

  7. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...... implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain....

  8. Growth of primary embryo cells in a microculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Max; Pope, Sara; Conover, Joanne; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2010-04-01

    We present optimal perfusion conditions for the growth of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) using a microfluidic perfusion culture system. In an effort to balance nutrient renewal while ensuring the presence of cell secreted factors, we found that the optimal perfusion rate for culturing primary embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) in our experimental setting is 10 nL/min with an average flow velocity 0.55 microm/s in the microchannel. Primary mEFs may have a greater dependence on cell secreted factors when compared to their immortalized counterpart 3T3 fibroblasts cultured under similar conditions. Both the seeding density and the perfusion rate are critical for the proliferation of primary cells. A week long cultivation of mEFs and mESCs using the microculture system exhibited similar morphology and viability to those grown in a petri dish. Both mEFs and mESCs were analyzed using fluorescence immunoassays to determine their proliferative status and protein expression. Our results demonstrate that a perfusion-based microculture environment is capable of supporting the highly proliferative status of pluripotent embryonic stem cells.

  9. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-06

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli.

  10. Modification of MCF-10A Cells with Pioglitazone and Serum-Rich Growth Medium Increases Soluble Factors in the Conditioned Medium, Likely Reducing BT-474 Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo, Boon Yin; Miswan, Noorizan; Balaram, Prabha; Nadarajan, Kalpanah; Elstner, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to preincubate MCF-10A cells with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media and to determine adhesive and non-adhesive interactions of the preincubated MCF-10A cells with BT-474 cells. For this purpose, the MCF-10A cells were preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media, at appropriate concentrations, for 1 week. The MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media were then co-cultured adhesively and non-adhesively ...

  11. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  12. Adaptive temperature profile control of a multizone crystal growth furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batur, C.; Sharpless, R. B.; Duval, W. M. B.; Rosenthal, B. N.

    1991-01-01

    An intelligent measurement system is described which is used to assess the shape of a crystal while it is growing inside a multizone transparent furnace. A color video imaging system observes the crystal in real time, and determines the position and the shape of the interface. This information is used to evaluate the crystal growth rate, and to analyze the effects of translational velocity and temperature profiles on the shape of the interface. Creation of this knowledge base is the first step to incorporate image processing into furnace control.

  13. Bioinspired seeding of biomaterials using three dimensional microtissues induces chondrogenic stem cell differentiation and cartilage formation under growth factor free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; Bolander, J.; Ji, W.; Vanspauwen, B.; Lammertyn, J.; Schrooten, J.; Luyten, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Cell laden biomaterials are archetypically seeded with individual cells and steered into the desired behavior using exogenous stimuli to control growth and differentiation. In contrast, direct cell-cell contact is instructive and even essential for natural tissue formation. Namely, microaggregation

  14. Modification of MCF-10A Cells with Pioglitazone and Serum-Rich Growth Medium Increases Soluble Factors in the Conditioned Medium, Likely Reducing BT-474 Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpanah Nadarajan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to preincubate MCF-10A cells with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media and to determine adhesive and non-adhesive interactions of the preincubated MCF-10A cells with BT-474 cells. For this purpose, the MCF-10A cells were preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media, at appropriate concentrations, for 1 week. The MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media were then co-cultured adhesively and non-adhesively with BT-474 cells for another week. Co-culture of BT-474 cells with the preincubated MCF-10A cells, both adhesively and non-adhesively, reduced the growth of the cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of the preincubated MCF-10A cells against the growth of BT-474 cells was likely produced by increasing levels of soluble factors secreted by the preincubated MCF-10A cells into the conditioned medium, as immunoassayed by ELISA. However, only an elevated level of a soluble factor distinguished the conditioned medium collected from the MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and serum-rich growth medium than that with pioglitazone alone. This finding was further confirmed by the induction of the soluble factor transcript expression in the preincubated MCF-10A cells, as determined using real-time PCR, for the above phenomenon. Furthermore, modification of the MCF-10A cells through preincubation did not change the morphology of the cells, indicating that the preincubated cells may potentially be injected into mammary fat pads to reduce cancer growth in patients or to be used for others cell-mediated therapy.

  15. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Daichi; Oishi, Isao; Makino, Ryuichi; Kurumisawa, Nozomi; Nakaya, Ryuma; Ono, Tamao; Kagami, Hiroshi; Tagami, Takahiro

    2016-04-22

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2.

  16. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data...... lung cancer cell lines express the EGF receptor....... of EGF receptor mRNA in all 10 cell lines that were found to be EGF receptor-positive and in one cell line that was found to be EGF receptor-negative in the radioreceptor assay and affinity labeling. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of small cell...

  17. Single-cell analysis of S. cerevisiae growth recovery after a sublethal heat-stress applied during an alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibayrenc, Pierre; Preziosi-Belloy, Laurence; Ghommidh, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Interest in bioethanol production has experienced a resurgence in the last few years. Poor temperature control in industrial fermentation tanks exposes the yeast cells used for this production to intermittent heat stress which impairs fermentation efficiency. Therefore, there is a need for yeast strains with improved tolerance, able to recover from such temperature variations. Accordingly, this paper reports the development of methods for the characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth recovery after a sublethal heat stress. Single-cell measurements were carried out in order to detect cell-to-cell variability. Alcoholic batch fermentations were performed on a defined medium in a 2 l instrumented bioreactor. A rapid temperature shift from 33 to 43 °C was applied when ethanol concentration reached 50 g l⁻¹. Samples were collected at different times after the temperature shift. Single cell growth capability, lag-time and initial growth rate were determined by monitoring the growth of a statistically significant number of cells after agar medium plating. The rapid temperature shift resulted in an immediate arrest of growth and triggered a progressive loss of cultivability from 100 to 0.0001% within 8 h. Heat-injured cells were able to recover their growth capability on agar medium after a lag phase. Lag-time was longer and more widely distributed as the time of heat exposure increased. Thus, lag-time distribution gives an insight into strain sensitivity to heat-stress, and could be helpful for the selection of yeast strains of technological interest.

  18. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC) suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage-Sleiman, Rouba; Herveau, Stéphanie; Matera, Eva-Laure; Laurier, Jean-Fabien; Dumontet, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC), a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents both in vitro and in xenografts. These

  19. SOCS3 in retinal neurons and glial cells suppresses VEGF signaling to prevent pathological neovascular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Ju, Meihua; Lin, Zhiqiang; Fredrick, Thomas W; Evans, Lucy P; Tian, Katherine T; Saba, Nicholas J; Morss, Peyton C; Pu, William T; Chen, Jing; Stahl, Andreas; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Smith, Lois E H

    2015-09-22

    Neurons and glial cells in the retina contribute to neovascularization, or the formation of abnormal new blood vessels, in proliferative retinopathy, a condition that can lead to vision loss or blindness. We identified a mechanism by which suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in neurons and glial cells prevents neovascularization. We found that Socs3 expression was increased in the retinal ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers after oxygen-induced retinopathy. Mice with Socs3 deficiency in neuronal and glial cells had substantially reduced vaso-obliterated retinal areas and increased pathological retinal neovascularization in response to oxygen-induced retinopathy, suggesting that loss of neuronal/glial SOCS3 increased both retinal vascular regrowth and pathological neovascularization. Furthermore, retinal expression of Vegfa (which encodes vascular endothelial growth factor A) was higher in these mice than in Socs3 flox/flox controls, indicating that neuronal and glial SOCS3 suppressed Vegfa expression during pathological conditions. Lack of neuronal and glial SOCS3 resulted in greater phosphorylation and activation of STAT3, which led to increased expression of its gene target Vegfa, and increased endothelial cell proliferation. In summary, SOCS3 in neurons and glial cells inhibited the STAT3-mediated secretion of VEGF from these cells, which suppresses endothelial cell activation, resulting in decreased endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. These results suggest that neuronal and glial cell SOCS3 limits pathological retinal angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF signaling. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Evaluation of yeast single cell protein (SCP) diets on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was carried out on the possibility of replacing fishmeal with graded levels of yeast single cell protein (SCP; 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%) in ... that the 50% yeast SCP fed fish had the highest percentage of body protein (55.35%), but with a lower amount of fat at the end of the feeding trial compared to the control.

  1. Evaluation of yeast single cell protein (SCP) diets on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    An investigation was carried out on the possibility of replacing fishmeal with graded levels of yeast single cell protein (SCP; 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%) in isonitrogenous feed formulations (30% protein) in the diet of Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings for a period of 12 weeks. The control diet had fishmeal as the primary protein ...

  2. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  3. Cell lineage branching as a strategy for proliferative control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzi, Gentian; Lander, Arthur D; Khammash, Mustafa

    2015-02-19

    How tissue and organ sizes are specified is one of the great unsolved mysteries in biology. Experiments and mathematical modeling implicate feedback control of cell lineage progression, but a broad understanding of what lineage feedback accomplishes is lacking. By exploring the possible effects of various biologically relevant disturbances on the dynamic and steady state behaviors of stem cell lineages, we find that the simplest and most frequently studied form of lineage feedback - which we term renewal control - suffers from several serious drawbacks. These reflect fundamental performance limits dictated by universal conservation-type laws, and are independent of parameter choice. Here we show that introducing lineage branches can circumvent all such limitations, permitting effective attenuation of a wide range of perturbations. The type of feedback that achieves such performance - which we term fate control - involves promotion of lineage branching at the expense of both renewal and (primary) differentiation. We discuss the evidence that feedback of just this type occurs in vivo, and plays a role in tissue growth control. Regulated lineage branching is an effective strategy for dealing with disturbances in stem cell systems. The existence of this strategy provides a dynamics-based justification for feedback control of cell fate in vivo.

  4. Acceleration of wound healing with stem cell-derived growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamari, Masayuki; Nishino, Yudai; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Ueda, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it has been revealed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) accelerate the healing of skin wounds. Although the proliferative capacity of MSCs decreases with age, MSCs secrete many growth factors. The present study examined the effect of mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) on wound healing. The wound-healing process was observed macroscopically and histologically using an excisional wound-splinting mouse model, and the expression level of hyaluronic acid related to the wound healing process was observed to evaluate the wound-healing effects of MSC, MSC-CM, and control (phosphate-buffered saline). The MSC and MSC-CM treatments accelerated wound healing versus the control group. At 7 days after administration, epithelialization was accelerated, thick connective tissue had formed in the skin defect area, and the wound area was reduced in the MSC and MSC-CM groups versus the control group. At 14 days, infiltration of inflammatory cells was decreased versus 7 days, and the wounds were closed in the MSC and MSC-CM groups, while a portion of epithelium was observed in the control group. At 7 and 14 days, the MSC and MSC-CM groups expressed significantly higher levels of hyaluronic acid versus the control group (P wound healing versus the control group to a similar degree. Accordingly, it is suggested that the MSC-CM contains growth factor derived from stem cells, is able to accelerate wound healing as well as stem cell transplantation, and may become a new therapeutic method for wound healing in the future.

  5. Effect of anolyte on growth and division of Chinese hamster cancerous cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeed Mohammadzadeh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, cancer can be controlled by chemotherapy, but unfortunately, this method has strong side effects and scientist try to reduce them using different substances. 2 kinds of activated water called anolyte and catholyte have electrochemical property and antibacterial and oxidative properties respectively. The aim of this research is to study the effect of anolyte on growth and division of cancerous cells. Materials and Methods: In this research, different concentration of anolyte, 1 . 7, 2, 5,8.3 and 10 percent of anolyte and control with 2 and 5 percent of serum physiologic were added on converted cell of Chinese hamster (line b11dii-FAF28 clone 237 in 12 plastic and 15 glass flasks. After adding, converted cell was counted with the help of hoemocytometer and microscope. Data of experiment analyzed and results compared by t test, as well as using Excell software their diagrams were drawn. Results: The results indicated that anolyte had significant effect on cancer cells. In concentration of 1.7% cell division was decreased but in concentration of 8.3 %, division of cancerous cells was blocked and cells were fixed. Conclusion: Considering the low amount of sodium chloride in anolyte, it seems that, this solution (Anolyte hasn’t side effects and advers effect on the cells body.

  6. Controlled regular locomotion of algae cell microrobots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuangxi; Jiao, Niandong; Tung, Steve; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    Algae cells can be considered as microrobots from the perspective of engineering. These organisms not only have a strong reproductive ability but can also sense the environment, harvest energy from the surroundings, and swim very efficiently, accommodating all these functions in a body of size on the order of dozens of micrometers. An interesting topic with respect to random swimming motions of algae cells in a liquid is how to precisely control them as microrobots such that they swim according to manually set routes. This study developed an ingenious method to steer swimming cells based on the phototaxis. The method used a varying light signal to direct the motion of the cells. The swimming trajectory, speed, and force of algae cells were analyzed in detail. Then the algae cell could be controlled to swim back and forth, and traverse a crossroad as a microrobot obeying specific traffic rules. Furthermore, their motions along arbitrarily set trajectories such as zigzag, and triangle were realized successfully under optical control. Robotize algae cells can be used to precisely transport and deliver cargo such as drug particles in microfluidic chip for biomedical treatment and pharmacodynamic analysis. The study findings are expected to bring significant breakthrough in biological drives and new biomedical applications.

  7. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi, E-mail: hashizume@plasma.engg.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) from 1.3 × 10{sup 16} to 2.3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} to 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}; cells were inactivated by O({sup 3}P{sub j}) doses exceeding 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O({sup 3}P{sub j})

  8. Investigating the roles of jasmonic acid and cytokinin in maize leaf growth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth is the accumulation of biomass attributed to cell division and cell expansion. In the maize leaf, growth is spatially separated into three distinct growth zones: the division zone, elongation zone, and the maturation zone. This spatial separation makes the maize leaf a useful model for ...

  9. Topical Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor for Oral Mucositis Induced by Intensive Chemotherapy with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Final Analysis of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2 Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Won Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF oral spray for oral mucositis (OM induced by intensive chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this phase 2 study, patients were randomized to either rhEGF (50 microg/mL or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. The primary endpoint was incidence of National Cancer Institute (NCI grade ≥2 OM. A total of 138 patients were enrolled in this study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, rhEGF did not reduce the incidence of NCI grade ≥2 OM (p = 0.717 nor reduce its duration (p = 0.725. Secondary endpoints including the day of onset and duration of NCI grade ≥2 OM, the incidence of NCI grade ≥3 OM and its duration, and patient-reported quality of life were also similar between the two groups. In the per-protocol analysis, however, the duration of opioid analgesic use was shorter in the rhEGF group (p = 0.036, and recipients in the rhEGF group required a lower cumulative dose of opioid analgesics than those in the placebo group (p = 0.046, among patients with NCI grade ≥2 OM. Adverse events were mild and transient. This study found no evidence to suggest that rhEGF oral spray reduces the incidence of OM. However, further studies are needed to investigate the effect of rhEGF on OM-induced pain reduction after intensive chemotherapy.

  10. Modulation of cultured porcine granulosa cell responsiveness to follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Ovarian follicular development is dependent upon the coordinated growth and differentiation of the granulosa cells which line the follicle. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) induces granulosa cell differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates granulosa cell proliferation in vitro. The interaction of these two effectors upon selected parameters of growth and differentiation was examined in monolayer cultures of porcine granulose cells. Analysis of the EGF receptor by 125 I-EGF binding revealed that the receptor was of high affinity with an apparent dissociation constant of 4-6 x 10 -10 M. The average number of receptors per cell varied with the state of differentiation both in vivo and in vitro; highly differentiated cells bound two-fold less 125 I-EGF and this effect was at least partially induced by FSH in vitro. EGF receptor function was examined by assessing EGF effects on cell number and 3 H-thymidine incorporation. EGF stimulated thymidine incorporation in both serum-free and serum-supplemented culture, but only in serum-supplemented conditions was cell number increased. EGF receptor function was inversely related to the state of differentiation and was attenuated by FSH. The FSH receptor was examined by 125 I-FSH binding. EGF increased FSH receptor number, and lowered the affinity of the receptor. The function of these receptors was assessed by 125 I-hCG binding and progesterone radioimmunoassay. If EGF was present continuously in the cultures. FSH receptor function was attenuated regardless of FSH receptor number. A preliminary effort to examine the mechanism of this interaction was performed by analyzing hormonally controlled protein synthesis with 35 S-methionine labeling, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. FSH promoted the expression of a 27,000 dalton protein. This effect was attenuated by EGF

  11. Control of bacterial adhesion and growth on honeycomb-like patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Ding, Yonghui; Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang

    2015-11-01

    It is a great challenge to construct a persistent bacteria-resistant surface even though it has been demonstrated that several surface features might be used to control bacterial behavior, including surface topography. In this study, we develop micro-scale honeycomb-like patterns of different sizes (0.5-10 μm) as well as a flat area as the control on a single platform to evaluate the bacterial adhesion and growth. Bacteria strains, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with two distinct shapes (rod and sphere) are cultured on the platforms, with the patterned surface-up and surface-down in the culture medium. The results demonstrate that the 1 μm patterns remarkably reduce bacterial adhesion and growth while suppressing bacterial colonization when compared to the flat surface. The selective adhesion of the bacterial cells on the patterns reveals that the bacterial adhesion is cooperatively mediated by maximizing the cell-substrate contact area and minimizing the cell deformation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Moreover, study of bacterial behaviors on the surface-up vs. surface-down samples shows that gravity does not apparently affect the spatial distribution of the adherent cells although it indeed facilitates bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the experimental results suggest that two major factors, i.e. the availability of energetically favorable adhesion sites and the physical confinements, contribute to the anti-bacterial nature of the honeycomb-like patterns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutriomes and personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention, telomere integrity maintenance and cancer growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage at the base sequence and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability, including telomere integrity and functionality and DNA repair. Using nutrient array systems with high-content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth, it is possible to define, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control. This knowledge can also be used to improve culture systems for cells used in therapeutics such as stem cells to ensure that they are not genetically aberrant when returned to the body. Furthermore, this information could be used to design dietary patterns that deliver the micronutrient combinations and concentrations required for preventing DNA damage by micronutrient deficiency or excess. Using this approach, new knowledge could be obtained to identify the dietary restrictions and/or supplementations required to control specific cancers, which is particularly important given that reliable validated advice is not yet available for those diagnosed with cancer.

  13. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient

  14. CP-31398 prevents the growth of p53-mutated colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xingxing; Kong, Xinjuan; Yan, Junwei; Yan, Jingjun; Zhang, Yunan; Wu, Qian; Chang, Ying; Shang, Haitao; Dou, Qian; Song, Yuhu; Liu, Fang

    2015-03-01

    Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Small molecule CP-31398 was shown to restore mutant p53 tumor suppressor functions in cancer cells. Here, we determined the effects of CP-31398 on the growth of p53-mutated colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro and in vivo. CRC cells which carry p53 mutation in codon 273 were treated with CP-31398 and the control, and the effects of CP-31398 on cell cycle, cell apoptosis, and proliferation were determined. The expression of p53-responsive downstream genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. CP-31398 was administrated into xenograft tumors created by the inoculation of HT-29 cells, and then the effect of CP-31398 on the growth of xenograft tumors was examined. CP-31398 induced p53 downstream target molecules in cultured HT-29 cells, which resulted in the inhibition of CRC cell growth assessed by the determination of cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In xenograft tumors, CP-31398 modulated the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase 3, cyclin D, and Mdm2 and then blocked the growth of xenograft tumors. CP-31398 would be developed as a therapeutic candidate for p53-mutated CRC due to the restoration of mutant p53 tumor suppressor functions.

  15. Effect of microgravity environment on cell wall regeneration, cell divisions, growth, and differentiation of plants from protoplasts (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to investigate if microgravity has any influence on growth and differentiation of protoplasts. Formation of new cell walls on rapeseed protoplasts takes place within the first 24 hours after isolation. Cell division can be observed after 2-4 days and formation of cell aggregates after 5-7 days. Therefore, it is possible during the 7 day IML-1 Mission to investigate if cell wall formation, cell division, and cell differentiation are influenced by microgravity. Protoplasts of rapeseeds and carrot will be prepared shortly before launch and injected into 0.6 ml polyethylene bags. Eight bags are placed in an aluminum block inside the ESA Type 1 container. The containers are placed at 4 C in PTCU's and transferred to orbiter mid-deck. At 4 C all cell processes are slowed down, including cell wall formation. Latest access to the shuttle will be 12 hours before launch. In orbit the containers will be transferred from the PTC box to the 22 C Biorack incubator. The installation of a 1 g centrifuge in Biorack will make it possible to distinguish between effects of near weightlessness and effects caused by cosmic radiation and other space flight factors including vibrations. Parallel control experiments will be carried out on the ground. Other aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  16. Glucose Signaling-Mediated Coordination of Cell Growth and Cell Cycle in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Busti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides being the favorite carbon and energy source for the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, glucose can act as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple aspects of yeast physiology. Yeast cells have evolved several mechanisms for monitoring the level of glucose in their habitat and respond quickly to frequent changes in the sugar availability in the environment: the cAMP/PKA pathways (with its two branches comprising Ras and the Gpr1/Gpa2 module, the Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway and the main repression pathway involving the kinase Snf1. The cAMP/PKA pathway plays the prominent role in responding to changes in glucose availability and initiating the signaling processes that promote cell growth and division. Snf1 (the yeast homologous to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is primarily required for the adaptation of yeast cell to glucose limitation and for growth on alternative carbon source, but it is also involved in the cellular response to various environmental stresses. The Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway regulates the expression of genes required for glucose uptake. Many interconnections exist between the diverse glucose sensing systems, which enables yeast cells to fine tune cell growth, cell cycle and their coordination in response to nutritional changes.

  17. Controlled shutdown of a fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Keskula, Donald H.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for the shutdown of a fuel cell system to relieve system overpressure while maintaining air compressor operation, and corresponding vent valving and control arrangement. The method and venting arrangement are employed in a fuel cell system, for instance a vehicle propulsion system, comprising, in fluid communication, an air compressor having an outlet for providing air to the system, a combustor operative to provide combustor exhaust to the fuel processor.

  18. Sulindac Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Scheper

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac has antineoplastic effects on various cancer cell lines; consequently, we assessed sulindac's effects on laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, SCC (HEP-2 cells treated with various cyclooxygenase inhibitors or transfected with constitutively active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 or survivin vectors were analyzed using Western blot analysis, annexin V assay, and cell proliferation assay. In parallel, nude mice injected subcutaneously with HEP-2 cells were either treated intraperitoneally with sulindac or left untreated, and analyzed for tumor weight, survivin expression, and tyrosine-phosphorylated Stat3 expression. In vitro studies confirmed the selective antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of sulindac, which also downregulated Stat3 and survivin protein expression. Stat3 or survivin forced expression partially rescued the antiproliferative effects of sulindac. In vivo studies showed significant repression of HEP-2 xenograft growth in sulindactreated mice versus controls, with near-complete resolution at 10 days. Additionally, tumor specimens treated with sulindac showed downregulation of phosphorylated tyrosine-705 Stat3 and survivin expression. Taken together, our data suggest, for the first time, a specific inhibitory effect of sulindac on tumor growth and survivin expression in laryngeal cancer, both in vitro and in vivo, in a Stat3-dependent manner, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach to head and neck cancer.

  19. Direct growth of self-crystallized graphene and graphite nanoballs with Ni vapor-assisted growth: From controllable growth to material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Wen-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ze; Yeh, Chao-Hui; He, Jr-Hau; Chiu, Po-Wen; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-01-01

    A directly self-crystallized graphene layer with transfer-free process on arbitrary insulator by Ni vapor-assisted growth at growth temperatures between 950 to 1100°C via conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was developed and demonstrated. Domain sizes of graphene were confirmed by Raman spectra from ~12 nm at growth temperature of 1000°C to ~32 nm at growth temperature of 1100°C, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the graphene is controllable, depending on deposition time and growth temperature. By increasing growth pressure, the growth of graphite nano-balls was preferred rather than graphene growth. The detailed formation mechanisms of graphene and graphite nanoballs were proposed and investigated in detail. Optical and electrical properties of graphene layer were measured. The direct growth of the carbon-based materials with free of the transfer process provides a promising application at nanoelectronics. PMID:24810224

  20. UVB-irradiated apoptotic cells induce accelerated growth of co-implanted viable tumor cells in immune competent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurio, Ricardo; Janko, Christina; Schorn, Christine; Maueröder, Christian; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Gaipl, Udo; Schett, Georg; Berens, Christian; Frey, Benjamin; Munoz, Luis E

    2013-08-01

    The presence of a solid tumor is the result of a complex balance between rejection, tolerance and regeneration in which the interactions of tumor cells with cells of the host immune system contribute strongly to the final outcome. Here we report on a model where lethally UVB-irradiated cells cause accelerated growth of viable tumor cells in vitro and in allogeneic immune competent mice. UVB-irradiated tumor cells alone did not form tumors and failed to induce tolerance for a second challenge with the same allogeneic tumor. Our data show an important role for dying cells in promoting accelerated tumor cell growth of a small number of viable tumor cells in a large inoculum of UVB-irradiated tumor cells. This occurs when viable and dying/dead tumor cells are in close proximity, suggesting that mobile factors contribute to growth promotion. The anti-inflammatory and growth promoting properties of apoptotic cells are based on several independent effects. UVB-irradiated apoptotic cells directly release a growth promoting activity and clearance by macrophages of apoptotic cells is accompanied by the secretion of IL10, TGFß, and PGE2. Growth promotion is even observed with dying heterologous cells implying a conserved mechanism. Future experiments should focus on the effects of dying tumor cells generated in vivo on the outgrowth of surviving tumor cells which is prone to have implications for cancer therapy.

  1. The effects of a reduced environmental deuterium concentration on growth of culture normal and neoplastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bild, Walther; Haulica, Ion; Nastasa, V.

    2002-01-01

    In connection with studies on the effects of deuterium depleted water on radioprotection and immunostimulation, research was conducted to find out effects of environmental depleted deuterium upon culture cells growth. The reduction of deuterium concentration in cellular medium was achieved by forming the culture medium for RMPI 1640, Gibco BRL cells with under-deuterated water (produced at ICSI) with different deuterium concentration (30, 60, 90, 120 ppm), as compared with control batches in the same medium constituted from normal distilled water (145-150 ppm D/(D+H). A significant stimulation in the cellular growth due to deuterium depletion in the culture media was observed. Also, variations in growth rates and the profile of proliferation curves in neoplastic cells as compared with normal cells were observed, the same trend being observed in all cultures. Paradoxically, quantitative effects were observed, peaking at 90 ppm deuterium concentration rather than at a minimal concentration, as expected. The MTT test confirmed the stimulating effects of deuterium depletion. To put into evidence the immunity stimulation, the explant rat splenocytes from laboratory animals were grown, stimulated with Concanavaline A or bacterial Lipopolysaccharides of increasing concentration. Similar effects were observed

  2. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  3. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  4. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 regulates endothelial cell function and vessel growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Katharina M; You, Xintian; Manavski, Yosif; Doddaballapur, Anuradha; Zörnig, Martin; Braun, Thomas; John, David; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Chen, Wei; Uchida, Shizuka; Boon, Reinier A; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2014-04-25

    The human genome harbors a large number of sequences encoding for RNAs that are not translated but control cellular functions by distinct mechanisms. The expression and function of the longer transcripts namely the long noncoding RNAs in the vasculature are largely unknown. Here, we characterized the expression of long noncoding RNAs in human endothelial cells and elucidated the function of the highly expressed metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1). Endothelial cells of different origin express relative high levels of the conserved long noncoding RNAs MALAT1, taurine upregulated gene 1 (TUG1), maternally expressed 3 (MEG3), linc00657, and linc00493. MALAT1 was significantly increased by hypoxia and controls a phenotypic switch in endothelial cells. Silencing of MALAT1 by small interfering RNAs or GapmeRs induced a promigratory response and increased basal sprouting and migration, whereas proliferation of endothelial cells was inhibited. When angiogenesis was further stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor, MALAT1 small interfering RNAs induced discontinuous sprouts indicative of defective proliferation of stalk cells. In vivo studies confirmed that genetic ablation of MALAT1 inhibited proliferation of endothelial cells and reduced neonatal retina vascularization. Pharmacological inhibition of MALAT1 by GapmeRs reduced blood flow recovery and capillary density after hindlimb ischemia. Gene expression profiling followed by confirmatory quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that silencing of MALAT1 impaired the expression of various cell cycle regulators. Silencing of MALAT1 tips the balance from a proliferative to a migratory endothelial cell phenotype in vitro, and its genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition reduces vascular growth in vivo.

  5. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is a critical regulator for the survival and growth of oral squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K; Sakaguchi, M; Iioka, H; Matsui, M; Nakanishi, H; Huh, N H; Kondo, E

    2014-03-06

    Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is essential for adenovirus infection to target cells, and its constitutive expression in various cancerous and normal tissues has been reported. Recently, the biological role of CAR in human cancers of several different origins has been investigated with respect to tumor progression, metastasis and tumorigenesis. However, its biological function in tumor cells remains controversial. Here we report the critical role of CAR in growth regulation of oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in vitro and in vivo via the specific interaction with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Loss of endogenous CAR expression by knockdown using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) against CAR facilitates growth suppression of SCC cells due to cell dissociation, followed by apoptosis. The consequent morphological reaction was reminiscent of anoikis, rather than epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and the dissociation of oral SCC cells was triggered not by lack of contact with extracellular matrix, but by loss of cell-to-cell contact caused by abnormal translocation of E-cadherin from surface membrane to cytoplasm. Immunoprecipitation assays of the CAR-transfected oral SCC cell line, HSC-2, with or without ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) revealed that CAR directly associates with ROCKI and ROCKII, which results in inhibition of ROCK activity and contributes to maintenance of cell-to-cell adhesion for their growth and survival. Based on these findings, in vivo behavior of CAR-downregulated HSC-2 cells from siRNA knockdown was compared with that of normally CAR-expressing cells in intraperitoneally xenografted mouse models. The mice engrafted with CAR siRNA-pretreated HSC-2 cells showed poor formation of metastatic foci in contrast to those implanted with the control siRNA-pretreated cells. Thus, CAR substantially has an impact on growth and survival of oral SCC cells as a negative regulator of ROCK in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Feeder Cell Type Affects the Growth of In Vitro Cultured Bovine Trophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam M. Saadeldin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trophectoderm cells are the foremost embryonic cells to differentiate with prospective stem-cell properties. In the current study, we aimed at improving the current approach for trophoblast culture by using granulosa cells as feeders. Porcine granulosa cells (PGCs compared to the conventional mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were used to grow trophectoderm cells from hatched bovine blastocysts. Isolated trophectoderm cells were monitored and displayed characteristic epithelial/cuboidal morphology. The isolated trophectoderm cells expressed mRNA of homeobox protein (CDX2, cytokeratin-8 (KRT8, and interferon tau (IFNT. The expression level was higher on PGCs compared to MEFs throughout the study. In addition, primary trophectoderm cell colonies grew faster on PGCs, with a doubling time of approximately 48 hrs, compared to MEFs. PGCs feeders produced a fair amount of 17β-estradiol and progesterone. We speculated that the supplementation of sex steroids and still-unknown factors during the trophoblasts coculture on PGCs have helped to have better trophectoderm cell’s growth than on MEFs. This is the first time to use PGCs as feeders to culture trophectoderm cells and it proved superior to MEFs. We propose PGCs as alternative feeders for long-term culture of bovine trophectoderm cells. This model will potentially benefit studies on the early trophoblast and embryonic development in bovines.

  7. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Senno, Laura del [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Aguiari, Gianluca, E-mail: dsn@unife.it [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  8. Converging Light, Energy and Hormonal Signaling Control Meristem Activity, Leaf Initiation, and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Binish; Bilooei, Sara Farahi; Dóczi, Róbert; Grove, Elliot; Railo, Saana; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet; Bögre, László; López-Juez, Enrique

    2018-02-01

    The development of leaf primordia is subject to light control of meristematic activity. Light regulates the expression of thousands of genes with roles in cell proliferation, organ development, and differentiation of photosynthetic cells. Previous work has highlighted roles for hormone homeostasis and the energy-dependent Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase in meristematic activity, yet a picture of how these two regulatory mechanisms depend on light perception and interact with each other has yet to emerge. Their relevance beyond leaf initiation also is unclear. Here, we report the discovery that the dark-arrested meristematic region of Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) experiences a local energy deprivation state and confirm previous findings that the PIN1 auxin transporter is diffusely localized in the dark. Light triggers a rapid removal of the starvation state and the establishment of PIN1 polar membrane localization consistent with auxin export, both preceding the induction of cell cycle- and cytoplasmic growth-associated genes. We demonstrate that shoot meristematic activity can occur in the dark through the manipulation of auxin and cytokinin activity as well as through the activation of energy signaling, both targets of photomorphogenesis action, but the organ developmental outcomes differ: while TOR-dependent energy signals alone stimulate cell proliferation, the development of a normal leaf lamina requires photomorphogenesis-like hormonal responses. We further show that energy signaling adjusts the extent of cell cycle activity and growth of young leaves non-cellautonomously to available photosynthates and leads to organs constituted of a greater number of cells developing under higher irradiance. This makes energy signaling perhaps the most important biomass growth determinant under natural, unstressed conditions. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Converging Light, Energy and Hormonal Signaling Control Meristem Activity, Leaf Initiation, and Growth1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Binish; Bilooei, Sara Farahi; Grove, Elliot; Railo, Saana; Palme, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The development of leaf primordia is subject to light control of meristematic activity. Light regulates the expression of thousands of genes with roles in cell proliferation, organ development, and differentiation of photosynthetic cells. Previous work has highlighted roles for hormone homeostasis and the energy-dependent Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase in meristematic activity, yet a picture of how these two regulatory mechanisms depend on light perception and interact with each other has yet to emerge. Their relevance beyond leaf initiation also is unclear. Here, we report the discovery that the dark-arrested meristematic region of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) experiences a local energy deprivation state and confirm previous findings that the PIN1 auxin transporter is diffusely localized in the dark. Light triggers a rapid removal of the starvation state and the establishment of PIN1 polar membrane localization consistent with auxin export, both preceding the induction of cell cycle- and cytoplasmic growth-associated genes. We demonstrate that shoot meristematic activity can occur in the dark through the manipulation of auxin and cytokinin activity as well as through the activation of energy signaling, both targets of photomorphogenesis action, but the organ developmental outcomes differ: while TOR-dependent energy signals alone stimulate cell proliferation, the development of a normal leaf lamina requires photomorphogenesis-like hormonal responses. We further show that energy signaling adjusts the extent of cell cycle activity and growth of young leaves non-cellautonomously to available photosynthates and leads to organs constituted of a greater number of cells developing under higher irradiance. This makes energy signaling perhaps the most important biomass growth determinant under natural, unstressed conditions. PMID:29284741

  10. Understanding pollen tube growth: the hydrodynamic model versus the cell wall model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonia, L.; Munnik, T.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific progress stimulates the evolution of models used to understand and conceptualize biological behaviors. The widely accepted cell wall model of pollen tube growth explains stochastic growth of the apical pectin wall, but fails to explain the mechanism driving oscillations in growth and cell

  11. Interleukin 4: signalling mechanisms and control of T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, W E

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic type I cytokine that controls both growth and differentiation among haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. Its receptor is a heterodimer. One chain, the IL-4R alpha chain, binds IL-4 with high affinity and determines the nature of the biochemical signals that are induced. The second chain, gamma c, is required for the induction of such signals. IL-4-mediated growth depends upon activation events that involve phosphorylation of Y497 of IL-4R alpha, leading to the binding and phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 in haemopoietic cells and of IRS-1 in non-haemopoietic cells. By contrast, IL-4-mediated differentiation events depend upon more distal regions of the IL-4R alpha chain that include a series of STAT-6 binding sites. The distinctive roles of these receptor domains was verified by receptor-reconstruction experiments. The 'growth' and 'differentiation' domains of the IL-4R alpha chain, independently expressed as chimeric structures with a truncated version of the IL-2R beta chain, were shown to convey their functions to the hybrid receptor. The critical role of STAT-6 in IL-4-mediated gene activation and differentiation was made clear by the finding that lymphocytes from STAT-6 knockout mice are strikingly deficient in these functions but have retained the capacity to grow, at least partially, in response to IL-4. IL-4 plays a central role in determining the phenotype of naive CD4+ T cells. In the presence of IL-4, newly primed naive T cells develop into IL-4 producers while in its absence they preferentially become gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) producers. Recently, a specialized subpopulation of T cells, CD4+/NK1.1+ cells, has been shown to produce large amounts of IL-4 upon stimulation. Two examples of mice with deficiencies in these cells are described--beta 2-microglobulin knockout mice and SJL mice. Both show defects in the development of IL-4-producing cells and in the increase in serum IgE in response to stimulation with the

  12. Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy II. Cell-internal factors for conditional growth in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephanie A; Gromeier, Matthias

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of virus-host interactions have fueled new studies in the field of oncolytic viruses. The first part of this review explained how cell-external factors, such as cellular receptors, influence tumor tropism and specificity of oncolytic virus candidates. In the second part of this review, we focus on cellinternal factors that mediate tumor-specific virus growth. An oncolytic virus must be able to replicate within cancerous cells and kill them without collateral damage to healthy surrounding cells. This desirable property is inherent to some proposed oncolytic viral agents or has been achieved by genetic manipulation in others.

  13. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase (ASNS) suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. ASNS is deemed as a promising therapeutic target and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance in several human cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis has not been investigated. In this study, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transiently knockdown ASNS in two gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN-45, followed by growth rate assay and colony formation assay. Dose response curve analysis was performed in AGS and MKN-45 cells with stable ASNS knockdown to assess sensitivity to cisplatin. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo synergistic effects of ASNS depletion and cisplatin on tumor growth. Expression level of ASNS was evaluated in human patient samples using quantitative PCR. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was performed to evaluate association between ASNS expression and patient survival. Transient knockdown of ASNS inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in AGS and MKN-45 cells. Stable knockdown of ASNS conferred sensitivity to cisplatin in these cells. Depletion of ASNS and cisplatin treatment exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth in AGS xenografts. Moreover, ASNS was found to be up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Low expression of ASNS was significantly associated with better survival in gastric cancer patients. ASNS may contribute to gastric cancer tumorigenesis and may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of gastric cancer.

  14. Spatially controlled simultaneous patterning of multiple growth factors in three-dimensional hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ryan G.; Ahsan, Shoeb; Aizawa, Yukie; Maxwell, Karen L.; Morshead, Cindi M.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) protein-patterned scaffolds provide a more biomimetic environment for cell culture than traditional two-dimensional surfaces, but simultaneous 3D protein patterning has proved difficult. We developed a method to spatially control the immobilization of different growth factors in distinct volumes in 3D hydrogels, and to specifically guide differentiation of stem/progenitor cells therein. Stem-cell differentiation factors sonic hedgehog (SHH) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were simultaneously immobilized using orthogonal physical binding pairs, barnase-barstar and streptavidin-biotin, respectively. Barnase and streptavidin were sequentially immobilized using two-photon chemistry for subsequent concurrent complexation with fusion proteins barstar-SHH and biotin-CNTF, resulting in bioactive 3D patterned hydrogels. The technique should be broadly applicable to the patterning of a wide range of proteins.

  15. The Drosophila sterile-20 kinase slik controls cell proliferation and apoptosis during imaginal disc development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Hipfner

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation and programmed cell death are closely controlled during animal development. Proliferative stimuli generally also induce apoptosis, and anti-apoptotic factors are required to allow net cell proliferation. Genetic studies in Drosophila have led to identification of a number of genes that control both processes, providing new insights into the mechanisms that coordinate cell growth, proliferation, and death during development and that fail to do so in diseases of cell proliferation. We present evidence that the Drosophila Sterile-20 kinase Slik promotes cell proliferation and controls cell survival. At normal levels, Slik provides survival cues that prevent apoptosis. Cells deprived of Slik activity can grow, divide, and differentiate, but have an intrinsic survival defect and undergo apoptosis even under conditions in which they are not competing with normal cells for survival cues. Like some oncogenes, excess Slik activity stimulates cell proliferation, but this is compensated for by increased cell death. Tumor-like tissue overgrowth results when apoptosis is prevented. We present evidence that Slik acts via Raf, but not via the canonical ERK pathway. Activation of Raf can compensate for the lack of Slik and support cell survival, but activation of ERK cannot. We suggest that Slik mediates growth and survival cues to promote cell proliferation and control cell survival during Drosophila development.

  16. What processes control collisional growth in marine stratocumulus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, P. Y.; Hu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Collisional growth in marine stratocumulus is the key process in the formation of drizzle, and thus in controlling the moisture and energy budgets, and radiative properties of such clouds. However, there exists substantial variability in microphysical properties of drizzle on length scales as small as a tens of meters. The goal of this study is to better identify the processes that lead to collisional growth at cloud top, which is responsible for triggering drizzle and causing its variability. To achieve this goal, aircraft measurements at cloud top in marine stratocumulus from the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Aerosol Land Study) are analyzed to examine the relationship between collisionally-formed drops and dynamic (updraft velocity, turbulence), thermodynamic (temperature, moist static energy), and microphysical (liquid water content, properties of the drop size distribution) properties at cloud top. Our first finding is that collisionally-formed drops correlate well with air parcels that have resided at or near cloud top for longer times. A second finding is that such drops are not preferentially found in clusters (in contrast with cumulus clouds). Lastly, the length scale at which any meaningful relationships emerge is at most a few meters; at larger length scales correlations disappear. This length scale is considerably smaller than that used in most large-eddy simulations of stratocumulus. These results form a picture where in these clouds, collisional growth is governed by a subset of small air parcels (a few cubic meters in volume) that randomly persist at or near cloud top for durations many times longer than average such that drops within this volume can experience more collisions.

  17. Cannabidiol rather than Cannabis sativa extracts inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Sindiswa T; Motadi, Lesetja R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer remains a global health related issue among females of Sub-Saharan Africa, with over half a million new cases reported each year. Different therapeutic regimens have been suggested in various regions of Africa, however, over a quarter of a million women die of cervical cancer, annually. This makes it the most lethal cancer amongst black women and calls for urgent therapeutic strategies. In this study we compare the anti-proliferative effects of crude extract of Cannabis sativa and its main compound cannabidiol on different cervical cancer cell lines. To achieve our aim, phytochemical screening, MTT assay, cell growth analysis, flow cytometry, morphology analysis, Western blot, caspase 3/7 assay, and ATP measurement assay were conducted. Results obtained indicate that both cannabidiol and Cannabis sativa extracts were able to halt cell proliferation in all cell lines at varying concentrations. They further revealed that apoptosis was induced by cannabidiol as shown by increased subG0/G1 and apoptosis through annexin V. Apoptosis was confirmed by overexpression of p53, caspase 3 and bax. Apoptosis induction was further confirmed by morphological changes, an increase in Caspase 3/7 and a decrease in the ATP levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that cannabidiol rather than Cannabis sativa crude extracts prevent cell growth and induce cell death in cervical cancer cell lines.

  18. Stromal Cells Derived from Visceral and Obese Adipose Tissue Promote Growth of Ovarian Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Obesity, and in particular visceral obesity, has been associated with an increased risk of developing cancers as well as higher rates of mortality following diagnosis. The impact of obesity on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC, which contribute to the formation of tumor stroma, is unknown. Here we hypothesized that visceral source and diet-induced obesity (DIO changes the ASC phenotype, contributing to the tumor promoting effects of obesity. We found that ASC isolated from subcutaneous (SC-ASC and visceral (V-ASC white adipose tissue(WAT of lean(Le and obese(Ob mice exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers expression, and had comparable effects on ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration. Obese and visceral derived ASC proliferated slower and exhibited impaired differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro as compared to ASC derived from subcutaneous WAT of lean mice. Intraperitoneal co-injection of ovarian cancer cells with obese or visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased growth of intraperitoneal ID8 tumors as compared to controls. Obese and V-ASC increased stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells, including CD3+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages. Obese and visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased expression of chemotactic factors IL-6, MIP-2, and MCP-1 when cultured with tumor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that obese and V-ASC have a unique phenotype, with more limited proliferation and differentiation capacity but enhanced expression of chemotactic factors in response to malignant cells which support infiltration of inflammatory cells and support tumor growth and dissemination.

  19. Controlling Molecular Growth between Fractals and Crystals on Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Na; Gu, Gao-Chen; Wang, Hao; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł; He, Yang; Wang, Yu; Xie, Chao; Shen, Zi-Yong; Lü, Jing-Tao; Tang, Hao; Peng, Lian-Mao; Hou, Shi-Min; Wu, Kai; Wang, Yong-Feng

    2015-12-22

    Recent studies demonstrate that simple functional molecules, which usually form two-dimensional (2D) crystal structures when adsorbed on solid substrates, are also able to self-assemble into ordered openwork fractal aggregates. To direct and control the growth of such fractal supramolecules, it is necessary to explore the conditions under which both fractal and crystalline patterns develop and coexist. In this contribution, we study the coexistence of Sierpiński triangle (ST) fractals and 2D molecular crystals that were formed by 4,4″-dihydroxy-1,1':3',1″-terphenyl molecules on Au(111) in ultrahigh vacuum. Growth competition between the STs and 2D crystals was realized by tuning substrate and molecular surface coverage and changing the functional groups of the molecular building block. Density functional theory calculations and Monte Carlo simulations are used to characterize the process. Both experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the possibility of steering the surface self-assembly to generate fractal and nonfractal structures made up of the same molecular building block.

  20. Tension required for pectate chemistry to control growth in Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proseus, Timothy E; Boyer, John S

    2007-01-01

    Recent work showed that polygalacturonate (pectate) chemistry controlled the growth rate of the large-celled alga Chara corallina when turgor pressure (P) was normal (about 0.5 MPa). The mechanism involved calcium withdrawal from the wall by newly supplied pectate acting as a chelator. But P itself can affect growth rate. Therefore, pectate chemistry was investigated at various P. A pressure probe varied P in isolated walls, varying the tension on the calcium pectate cross-links bearing the load of P. When soluble pectate was newly supplied, the wall grew irreversibly but the pectate was inactive below a P of 0.2 MPa, indicating that tension was required in the existing wall before new pectate acted. It was suggested that the tension distorted some of the wall pectate (the dominant pectin), weakening its calcium cross-links and causing the calcium to be preferentially lost to the new pectate, which was not distorted. The preferential loss provided a molecular mechanism for loosening the wall structure, resulting in faster growth. However, the resulting relaxation of the vacated wall pectate would cause calcium to be exchanged with load-bearing calcium pectate nearby, auto-propagating throughout the wall for long periods. There is evidence for this effect in isolated walls. In live cells, there is also evidence that auto-propagation is controlled by binding the newly supplied pectate (now calcium pectate) to the wall and/or by additional Ca(2+) entering the wall structure. A tension-dependent cycle of pectate chemistry thus appeared to control growth while new wall was deposited as a consequence.

  1. Noisy-threshold control of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilar Jose MG

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular responses to death-promoting stimuli typically proceed through a differentiated multistage process, involving a lag phase, extensive death, and potential adaptation. Deregulation of this chain of events is at the root of many diseases. Improper adaptation is particularly important because it allows cell sub-populations to survive even in the continuous presence of death conditions, which results, among others, in the eventual failure of many targeted anticancer therapies. Results Here, I show that these typical responses arise naturally from the interplay of intracellular variability with a threshold-based control mechanism that detects cellular changes in addition to just the cellular state itself. Implementation of this mechanism in a quantitative model for T-cell apoptosis, a prototypical example of programmed cell death, captures with exceptional accuracy experimental observations for different expression levels of the oncogene Bcl-xL and directly links adaptation with noise in an ATP threshold below which cells die. Conclusions These results indicate that oncogenes like Bcl-xL, besides regulating absolute death values, can have a novel role as active controllers of cell-cell variability and the extent of adaptation.

  2. Bioactive phytochemical proanthocyanidins inhibit growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by targeting multiple signaling molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Prasad

    Full Text Available Despite advances in surgical and medical therapies, approximate 50% survival rate of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC has had marginal improvement in the last 30 years. Therefore, alternative strategies are required for the management of HNSCC. Here, we report the chemotherapeutic effect of proanthocyanidins on HNSCC cells using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of human HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites, such as oral cavity (SCC1, larynx (SCC5, tongue (OSC19 and pharynx (FaDu, with grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs reduced their cell viability and induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. GSPs induced inhibition of cell viability was associated with: (i G1-phase arrest, (ii inhibition of expressions of cyclins (cyclin D1 and Cyclin D2 and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk, (iii increased expression of the Cdk inhibitory proteins (Cip1/p21, Kip1/p27, enhanced binding of Cdk inhibitors to Cdks, and downregulation of E2F transcription factor. GSPs significantly (P<0.05-0.001 increased apoptosis of SCC1 and OSC19 cells with induction of Bax, reduced expression of Bcl-2, and activation of caspase-3. GSPs also reduced the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and treatment of SCC1 cells with erlotinib, an EGFR-targeting small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, significantly (P<0.05-0.001 reduced cell viability and increased cell death. Dietary administration of GSPs (0.5%, w/w in supplementation with AIN76A control diet inhibited the growth of SCC1 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice, which was associated with: (i inhibition of cell proliferation, (ii induction of apoptosis of tumor xenograft cells, (iii decreased expression of cyclins and Cdks, (iv decreased expression of EGFR, and (v increased expression of Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 proteins and their increased binding to Cdks in tumor xenograft samples. Together, these results suggest that GSPs may be a promising candidate for head and neck

  3. Depletion of cutaneous macrophages and dendritic cells promotes growth of basal cell carcinoma in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone König

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC belongs to the group of non-melanoma skin tumors and is the most common tumor in the western world. BCC arises due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene Patched1 (Ptch. Analysis of the conditional Ptch knockout mouse model for BCC reveals that macrophages and dendritic cells (DC of the skin play an important role in BCC growth restraining processes. This is based on the observation that a clodronate-liposome mediated depletion of these cells in the tumor-bearing skin results in significant BCC enlargement. The depletion of these cells does not modulate Ki67 or K10 expression, but is accompanied by a decrease in collagen-producing cells in the tumor stroma. Together, the data suggest that cutaneous macrophages and DC in the tumor microenvironment exert an antitumor effect on BCC.

  4. Identification of ubiquitin in bovine milk and its growth inhibitory effects on human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburghaus, C; Welinder, C; Tjörnstad, U; Lindmark-Månsson, H; Paulsson, M; Oredsson, S

    2010-08-01

    Bovine milk is associated with improved health and reduced risk of several diseases, among them cancer. Milk is a complex mixture of known and unknown components. The components and the mechanisms that contribute to the cancer-preventive effects are largely unknown. We set out to find new peptides in milk and identified ubiquitin (Ub) using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and Western blot. Using quantitative Western blot, we estimated the Ub concentration to be about 0.003 micromol/L in milk. We then decided to investigate the effect of treating human colon cancer CaCo-2 cells with Ub, using higher concentrations than in milk. CaCo-2 cells treated with 0.02 to 2.0 micromol/L Ub showed significantly decreased proliferation compared with untreated control cells. A higher growth inhibitory effect than in CaCo-2 cells was found in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y treated with 0.02 to 0.2 micromol/L Ub. A bromodeoxyuridine DNA flow cytometric method was used to study cell cycle kinetics in Ub-treated CaCo-2 cells. The data point toward a prolongation of the G(1) phase. The levels of several cell cycle regulatory proteins were affected. Our data point to Ub possibly being one of the components in milk reducing the risk of cancer. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of 5-bromodeoxyuridine on the growth and morphology of transformed rat liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdalovic, N; Weibel, J; Diamond, L

    1980-07-01

    The effects of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) on the growth, morphology, and tumorigenicity of the spontaneously transformed rat liver cell line R72/3 were studied. These cells grow either in suspension or in a monolayer and are tumorigenic. In monolayer cultures, cells treated with low concentrations (2.5 micrograms/ml) of BrdUrd were larger, more spread out, and more firmly attached to the substratum than were untreated controls. Treated cells failed to grow in suspension or on confluent monolayers of 3T3 cells and did not form colonies in soft agar. Scanning electron microscopy revealed extensive flattening of treated cells and a dramatic reduction in the number of microvilli on the cell surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed an increase in polyribosomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum, as well as an enlargement of endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and a complete absence of the bundles of intermediate size filaments that were conspicuous in untreated cells. The persistence of these changes required the continuous presence of BrdUrd in the medium. The effects of BrdUrd were readily reversed by withdrawal of BrdUrd and were not expressed in the presence of excess thymidine.

  6. Prions in control of cell glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounsell, Elizabeth F

    2004-06-01

    Prion proteins that are normal cellular components or involved in pathology can vary little or not at all in primary amino acid sequence, but their glycosylation is different, e.g. in scrapie versus normal forms; in mouse strain-specific isolates; and in BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) and variant CJD (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) versus classical CJD. The results of Nielsen et al. published in this issue of the Biochemical Journal show that changes in glycosylation are not restricted to the prion. The paper comprehensively characterizes a decrease in the glycosylation of the insulin receptor in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells, but no change in glycosylation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor. Thus the scrapie prion can influence glycosylation, not only of itself, but also of other selected cell glycoproteins.

  7. Epidermal growth factor enhances osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Angel-Mosqueda, Casiano; Gutiérrez-Puente, Yolanda; López-Lozano, Ada Pricila; Romero-Zavaleta, Ricardo Emmanuel; Mendiola-Jiménez, Andrés; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos Eduardo; Márquez-M, Marcela; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angélica

    2015-09-03

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) play an important role in extracellular matrix mineralization, a complex process required for proper bone regeneration, one of the biggest challenges in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic potential of EGF and bFGF on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Human DPSCs were isolated using CD105 magnetic microbeads and characterized by flow cytometry. To induce osteoblast differentiation, the cells were cultured in osteogenic medium supplemented with EGF or bFGF at a low concentration. Cell morphology and expression of CD146 and CD10 surface markers were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy. To measure mineralization, an alizarin red S assay was performed and typical markers of osteoblastic phenotype were evaluated by RT-PCR. EGF treatment induced morphological changes and suppression of CD146 and CD10 markers. Additionally, the cells were capable of producing calcium deposits and increasing the mRNA expression to alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) in relation to control groups (p stem cell-based therapy for bone tissue engineering applications in periodontics and oral implantology.

  8. Uptake of apoptotic cells drives the growth of a pathogenic trypanosome in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Nascimento, Danielle O.; Soares, Milena B. P.; Bozza, Patricia T.; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; de Mello, Fernando G.; Dosreis, George A.; Lopes, Marcela F.

    2000-01-01

    After apoptosis, phagocytes prevent inflammation and tissue damage by the uptake and removal of dead cells. In addition, apoptotic cells evoke an anti-inflammatory response through macrophages. We have previously shown that there is intense lymphocyte apoptosis in an experimental model of Chagas' disease, a debilitating cardiac illness caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we show that the interaction of apoptotic, but not necrotic T lymphocytes with macrophages infected with T. cruzi fuels parasite growth in a manner dependent on prostaglandins, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and polyamine biosynthesis. We show that the vitronectin receptor is critical, in both apoptotic-cell cytoadherence and the induction of prostaglandin E2/TGF-β release and ornithine decarboxylase activity in macrophages. A single injection of apoptotic cells in infected mice increases parasitaemia, whereas treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors almost completely ablates it in vivo. These results suggest that continual lymphocyte apoptosis and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages have a role in parasite persistence in the host, and that cyclooxygenase inhibitors have potential therapeutic application in the control of parasite replication and spread in Chagas' disease.

  9. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 Cip1 , which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21 Cip1 mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21 Cip1 mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21 Cip1

  10. Use of Phytone Peptone to Optimize Growth and Cell Density of Lactobacillus reuteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olabiyi A. Atilola

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the use of phytone peptone to optimize the growth and cell density of Lactobacillus reuteri. Four strains of L. reuteri (DSM 20016, SD 2112, CF 2-7F, and MF 2-3, were used in this study. An overnight culture of individual strains was inoculated into fresh basal media with various protein sources (peptone, tryptone, proteose peptone #3, phytone peptone, tryptic soy broth, yeast extract, and beef extract. Samples were then mixed well and incubated at 37 °C for 15 h. Bacterial growth was monitored by measuring turbidity (optical density 610 nm at different time intervals during the incubation period. At the end of incubation, samples were plated on de-Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS agar to determine the bacterial population. Our results showed that phytone peptone promoted the growth of L. reuteri (p < 0.05 by 1.4 log CFU/mL on average compared to the control samples. Therefore, phytone peptone could be included in laboratory media to enhance growth and increase the cell density of L. reuteri.

  11. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  12. Cell binding and growth inhibition by hexachlorophene of decanoate and their reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, B C; Freese, E

    1978-01-01

    More than 80% of the hexachlorophene added to a Bacillus subtilis culture binds to the cells. Complete growth inhibition requires 6 x 10(5) molecules bound per cell. In contrast, more than 99% decanoate remains in solution and 3.8 x 10(7) molecules bound per cell are needed to inhibit growth. Centrifugation and resuspension of cells in growth medium removes only decanoate, whereas the addition of 1% bovine serum albumin to the growth medium removes both inhibitors from their binding sites on the cells. The addition of untreated cells to a hexachlorophene-treated culture enables the hexachlorophene molecules to redistribute among all the cells with the result that the inhibited cells can resume growth.

  13. Hypoxia simultaneously alters satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis and hepatocyte growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flann, K L; Rathbone, C R; Cole, L C; Liu, X; Allen, R E; Rhoads, R P

    2014-05-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is a multifaceted process requiring the spatial and temporal coordination of myogenesis as well as angiogenesis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) plays a pivotal role in myogenesis by activating satellite cells (SC) in regenerating muscle and likely plays a role as a contributor to revascularization. Moreover, repair of a functional blood supply is critical to ameliorate tissue ischemia and restore skeletal muscle function, however effects of hypoxia on satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis remain unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the role of HGF and effect of hypoxia on the capacity of satellite cells to promote angiogenesis. To characterize the role of HGF, a microvascular fragment (MVF) culture model coupled with satellite cell conditioned media (CM) was employed. The activity of HGF was specifically blocked in SC CM reducing sprout length compared to control CM. In contrast, MVF sprout number did not differ between control or HGF-deficient SC CM media. Next, we cultured MVF in the presence of CM from satellite cells exposed to normoxic (20% O2 ) or hypoxic (1% O2 ) conditions. Hypoxic CM recapitulated a MVF angiogenic response identical to HGF deficient satellite cell CM. Hypoxic conditions increased satellite cell HIF-1α protein abundance and VEGF mRNA abundance but decreased HGF mRNA abundance compared to normoxic satellite cells. Consistent with reduced HGF gene expression, HGF promoter activity decreased during hypoxia. Taken together, this data indicates that hypoxic modulation of satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis involves a reduction in satellite cell HGF expression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Breviscapine suppresses the growth of non-small cell lung cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Breviscapine (BVP) has previously been shown to inhibit the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.However, little is known about the effects of BVP on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth. Here, we aimedto study the effects of BVP on human NSCLC growth. We employed A549, NCL-H460 and A549 cells ...

  15. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton : lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes.

  16. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-12-08

    Dec 8, 2012 ... Collectively, our findings indicate that human SFMBT2 may regulate cell growth via epigenetic regulation of HOXB13 gene expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. [Lee K, Na W , Maeng J-H, Wu H and Ju B-G 2013 Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with four mbt domains 2. J.

  17. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  18. [Effects of RAGE on Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-da; Hu, Wei-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) on cell proliferation and tumor growth in nude mice with pancreatic cancer. PANC-1 cells were transfected with shRNA RAGE -1, -2, -3 to down-regulate the expression of RAGE. Cholecystokinin octopeptide-8 (CCK-8), real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to test the impact of shRNA RAGE on the expressions of mRNAs and proteins of RAGE, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Tumor growth and microvessel density in the nude mice implanted with shRNA RAGE transfected PANC-1 cells were observed using immunohistochemistry. The shRNA RAGE -1, -2, -3 transfected cells had lower absorbance values than the controls 24 h after transfection, and the absorbance value reached the lowest at 48 h. The specific shRNA sequences significantly inhibited the expressions of mRNA and protein of RAGE. The mice implanted with shRNA RAGE -2 had lower tumor volume and microvessel density than shRNA RAGE -1, -3. The expressions of mRNAs and proteins of RAGE, MMP-2, NF-κB, MMP-9 and VEGF were lower in the cells transfected with shRNA RAGE -2 compared with shRNA RAGE -1, -3. RAGE is involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo . The RAGE expression could influence the process of tumor angiogenesis.

  19. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  20. The strawberry gene FaGAST affects plant growth through inhibition of cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, José I; Amaya, Iraida; Castillejo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Quesada, Miguel A; Botella, Miguel A; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2006-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) FaGAST gene encodes a small protein with 12 cysteine residues conserved in the C-terminal region similar to a group of proteins identified in other species with diverse assigned functions such as cell division, elongation, or elongation arrest. This gene is expressed in the fruit receptacle, with two peaks during ripening at the white and the red-ripe stages, both coincident with an arrest in the growth pattern. Expression is also high in the roots but confined to the cells at the end of the elongation zone. Exogenous application of gibberellin increased the transcript level of the FaGAST gene in strawberry fruits. Ectopic expression of FaGAST in transgenic Fragaria vesca under the control of the CaMV-35S promoter caused both delayed growth of the plant and fruits with reduced size. The same growth defect was observed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing FaGAST. In addition, the transgenic plants exhibited late flowering and low sensitivity to exogenous gibberellin. Taken together, the expression pattern, the regulation by gibberellin, and the transgenic phenotypes point to a role for FaGAST in arresting cell elongation during strawberry fruit ripening.