WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell growth animal

  1. Growth and death of animal cells in bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Animal-cell cultivation is becoming increasingly important especially for the area of hunian- health products. The products range from vaccines to therapeutic proteins and the cells themselves. The therapeutic application of proteins puts high demands upon their quality with respect to purity and st

  2. Functional analysis of tumor cell growth and clearance in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.; Mailaender, V.; Tucker, Amanda A.; Olomu, A. B.; Zhang, Weisheng; Negrin, Robert S.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of antineoplastic therapies would be enhanced by sensitive methods that noninvasively asses both tumor location and neoplastic growth kinetics in living animals. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, it was possible to externally monitor growth and regression of luciferase labeled murine tumor cells engrafted into immunodeficient mice. External quantification of tumor burden revealed the biological impact of the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide on the kinetics of tumor growth in living animals. Therapeutic activity was apparent but this drug did not eliminate the NIH 3T3 cell signal over the 28 d time course. This novel, noninvasive system allowed sensitive, real time spatiotemporal analyses of neoplastic cell growth and may facilitate rapid optimization of effective therapeutic treatment regimes.

  3. New animal model to study epigenetic mechanisms mediating altered gravity effects upon cell growth and morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Radugina, Elena A.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Almeida, Eduardo

    The gravitational field and its variations act as a major environmental factor that can impact morphogenesis developing through epigenetic molecular mechanisms. The mechanisms can be thoroughly investigated by using adequate animal models that reveal changes in the morpho-genesis of a growing organ as a function of gravitational effects. Two cooperative US/Russian experiments on Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) were the first to demonstrate differences in the shape of regenerating tails of space-flown and ground control newts. The space-flown and aquarium (simulated microgravity) animals developed lancet-shaped tails whereas 1 g con-trols (kept in space-type habitats) showed hook-like regenerates. These visual observations were supported by computer-aided processing of the images and statistical analysis of the results. Morphological examinations and cell proliferation measurements using BrdU demon-strated dorsal-ventral asymmetry as well as enhanced epithelial growth on the dorsal area of regenerating tails in 1 g newts. These findings were reproduced in laboratory tests on newts kept at 1 g and in large water tanks at cut g. The 1 g animals showed statistically significant deviations of the lancet-like tail shape typically seen in aquarium animals. Such modifications were found as early as regeneration stages III-IV and proved irreversible. The authors believe that the above phenomenon detected in newts used in many space experiments can serve as an adequate model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying gravitational effects upon animal morphogenesis.

  4. Cluster-cluster aggregation with particle replication and chemotaxy: a simple model for the growth of animal cells in culture

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, S. G.; M. L. Martins

    2010-01-01

    Aggregation of animal cells in culture comprises a series of motility, collision and adhesion processes of basic relevance for tissue engineering, bioseparations, oncology research and \\textit{in vitro} drug testing. In the present paper, a cluster-cluster aggregation model with stochastic particle replication and chemotactically driven motility is investigated as a model for the growth of animal cells in culture. The focus is on the scaling laws governing the aggregation kinetics. Our simula...

  5. Replacement of animal serum proteins by human albumin for growth and interferon production by Namalva cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, A. K.; Scattergood, E M; Hopke, C J; Tytell, A. A.; Hilleman, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Growth and interferon production by human lymphoblastoid cells (Namalva) have been achieved by using medium with a complete substitution of human albumin for fetal bovine serum. Medium containing 0.3% human albumin supported exponential cell growth (minimum doubling time, 20 h) in Bilthoven 10-liter fermentors. Interferon induction with Sendai virus resulted in interferon yields of 0.5 x 10(4) to 1.0 x 10(4) interferon units per 10(6) Namalva cells per ml in RPMI 1640 medium containing 0.15 t...

  6. Cluster–cluster aggregation with particle replication and chemotaxy: a simple model for the growth of animal cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggregation of animal cells in culture comprises a series of motility, collision and adhesion processes of basic relevance for tissue engineering, bioseparations, oncology research and in vitro drug testing. In the present paper, a cluster–cluster aggregation model with stochastic particle replication and chemotactically driven motility is investigated as a model for the growth of animal cells in culture. The focus is on the scaling laws governing the aggregation kinetics. Our simulations reveal that in the absence of chemotaxy the mean cluster size and the total number of clusters scale in time as stretched exponentials dependent on the particle replication rate. Also, the dynamical cluster size distribution functions are represented by a scaling relation in which the scaling function involves a stretched exponential of the time. The introduction of chemoattraction among the particles leads to distribution functions decaying as power laws with exponents that decrease in time. The fractal dimensions and size distributions of the simulated clusters are qualitatively discussed in terms of those determined experimentally for several normal and tumoral cell lines growing in culture. It is shown that particle replication and chemotaxy account for the simplest cluster size distributions of cellular aggregates observed in culture

  7. Optimization of the cell seeding density and modeling of cell growth and metabolism using the modified Gompertz model for microencapsulated animal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-tao, Qi; Ying, Zhang; Juan, Ma; Xin, Guo; Yu-bing, Xie; Wei, Wang; Xiaojun, Ma

    2006-04-01

    Cell microencapsulation is one of the promising strategies for the in vitro production of proteins or in vivo delivery of therapeutic products. In order to design and fabricate the optimized microencapsulated cell system, the Gompertz model was applied and modified to describe the growth and metabolism of microencapsulated cell, including substrate consumption and product formation. The Gompertz model successfully described the cell growth kinetics and the modified Gompertz models fitted the substrate consumption and product formation well. It was demonstrated that the optimal initial cell seeding density was about 4-5 x 10(6) cells/mL of microcapsule, in terms of the maximum specific growth rate, the glucose consumption potential and the product formation potential calculated by the Gompertz and modified Gompertz models. Modeling of cell growth and metabolism in microcapsules provides a guideline for optimizing the culture of microencapsulated cells.

  8. Monitoring cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, W

    2001-05-01

    This appendix provides two protocols for monitoring cell growth. Counting cells using a hemacytometer is tedious but it allows one to effectively distinguish live cells from dead cells (using Trypan Blue exclusion). In addition, this procedure is less subject to errors due to cell clumping or heterogeneity of cell size. The use of an electronic cell counter is quicker and easier than counting cells using a hemacytometer. However, an electronic cell counter as currently constructed does not distinguish live from dead cells in a reliable fashion and is subject to error due to the presence of cell clumps. Overall, the electronic cell counter is best reserved for repetitive and rapid counting of fresh peripheral blood cells and should be used with caution when counting cell populations derived from tissues. PMID:18432653

  9. Sparging-shear sensitivity of animal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Pol, van der, P.

    1998-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly produced by modern biotechnological techniques. The in-vitro culture of animal cells in stirred tanks is one of the feasible systems, especially for proteins that require specific post-tanslational modifications to evoke a desired respons in patients. Animal cell are usually capable to perform these modifications in contrast to bacteria and yeast. Another advantage of animal cells is that they secrete their product into the culture medium, which is greatly ...

  10. Sparging-shear sensitivity of animal cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly produced by modern biotechnological techniques. The in-vitro culture of animal cells in stirred tanks is one of the feasible systems, especially for proteins that require specific post-tanslational modifications to evoke a desired respons in patients. Animal cell

  11. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fanny; Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells secrete a range of proteins in a constitutive or regulated manner through the conventional or canonical exocytic/secretory pathway characterized by vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum, through the Golgi apparatus, and towards the plasma membrane. However, a number of proteins are secreted in an unconventional manner, which are insensitive to inhibitors of conventional exocytosis and use a route that bypasses the Golgi apparatus. These include cytosolic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and membrane proteins that are known to also traverse to the plasma membrane by a conventional process of exocytosis, such as α integrin and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor (CFTR). Mechanisms underlying unconventional protein secretion (UPS) are actively being analyzed and deciphered, and these range from an unusual form of plasma membrane translocation to vesicular processes involving the generation of exosomes and other extracellular microvesicles. In this chapter, we provide an overview on what is currently known about UPS in animal cells. PMID:27665549

  12. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Growth and Development Symposium titled “Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, LA, July 10 to 14, 2011. T...

  13. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  14. Time-series animation techniques for visualizing urban growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, W.; Masuoka, P.

    1997-01-01

    Time-series animation is a visually intuitive way to display urban growth. Animations of landuse change for the Baltimore-Washington region were generated by showing a series of images one after the other in sequential order. Before creating an animation, various issues which will affect the appearance of the animation should be considered, including the number of original data frames to use, the optimal animation display speed, the number of intermediate frames to create between the known frames, and the output media on which the animations will be displayed. To create new frames between the known years of data, the change in each theme (i.e. urban development, water bodies, transportation routes) must be characterized and an algorithm developed to create the in-between frames. Example time-series animations were created using a temporal GIS database of the Baltimore-Washington area. Creating the animations involved generating raster images of the urban development, water bodies, and principal transportation routes; overlaying the raster images on a background image; and importing the frames to a movie file. Three-dimensional perspective animations were created by draping each image over digital elevation data prior to importing the frames to a movie file. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Study on the growth promoting capacity of calf and fetal bovine serum for animal cells "in vitro" II: electrophoretic study and survey on the antiproteolytic activity of pools of calf and fetal bovine serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edda de Rizzo

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available Calf serum and fetal bovine serum present great variability as to its growth promoting efficiency (GPE. As supplement of culture media to cultivate cells of animal origin they stimulate the "in vitro" multiplication and maintain cell viability. When fourteen lots of calf sera of variable GPE had the total protein contents as well as the percentages of serum fractions determined, no significant differences that could possibly explain the variability of the GPE were observed. Evaluation of the antiproteolytic activity of nineteen lots of calf serum and eighteen serum lots of younger calves showed that the former exhibited lower antiproteolytic titers (1:40 to 1:80 than the latter (1:80 to 1:160. Twelve lots of fetal bovine serum studied in parallel, showed the highest concentration of antiproteolytic factors, with titers equal to 1:320. Sera of bovine origin, but not fetal sera, are usually heat-inactivated, what was demonstrated to be responsible for the decrease of the antiproteolytic activity of 75% of the lots tested. This could explain the inability of certain heat-inactivated sera in promoting multiplication of some cells "in vitro", as verified with primary monkey kidney cells. The results obtained in this study indicated the convenience of submiting each lot of serum to be introduced in cell culture to previous determination of its characteristics, such as growth promoting efficiency, antiproteolytic activity and also toxicity, absence of extraneous agents, etc., in order to minimize the possibility of using serum lots of questionable quality, thus preventing not only the loss of cell lines, but also undesirable and sometimes expensive delays.

  16. Large animal models for stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, John; Roberts, R. Michael; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for nov...

  17. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  18. The cell's view of animal body-plan evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Deirdre C; Martindale, Mark Q; Srivastava, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    An adult animal's form is shaped by the collective behavior of cells during embryonic development. To understand the forces that drove the divergence of animal body-plans, evolutionary developmental biology has focused largely on studying genetic networks operating during development. However, it is less well understood how these networks modulate characteristics at the cellular level, such as the shape, polarity, or migration of cells. We organized the "Cell's view of animal body plan evolution" symposium for the 2014 The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting with the explicit goal of bringing together researchers studying the cell biology of embryonic development in diverse animal taxa. Using a broad range of established and emerging technologies, including live imaging, single-cell analysis, and mathematical modeling, symposium participants revealed mechanisms underlying cells' behavior, a few of which we highlight here. Shape, adhesion, and movements of cells can be modulated over the course of evolution to alter adult body-plans and a major theme explored during the symposium was the role of actomyosin in coordinating diverse behaviors of cells underlying morphogenesis in a myriad of contexts. Uncovering whether conserved or divergent genetic mechanisms guide the contractility of actomyosin in these systems will be crucial to understanding the evolution of the body-plans of animals from a cellular perspective. Many speakers presented research describing developmental phenomena in which cell division and tissue growth can control the form of the adult, and other presenters shared work on studying cell-fate specification, an important source of novelty in animal body-plans. Participants also presented studies of regeneration in annelids, flatworms, acoels, and cnidarians, and provided a unifying view of the regulation of cellular behavior during different life-history stages. Additionally, several presentations highlighted technological

  19. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  20. Optimal chemotaxis in animal cell intermittent migration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving, and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing a persistent random walk during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time, and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells from Animals I. Basic Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Michael V. Dodson, Gary J. Hausman, LeLuo Guan, Min Du, Theodore P. Rasmussen, Sylvia P. Poulos, Priya Mir, Werner G. Bergen, Melinda E. Fernyhough, Douglas C. McFarland, Robert P. Rhoads, Beatrice Soret, James M. Reecy, Sandra G. Velleman, Zhihua Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals are of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding of muscle stem cell biology and function is essential for developing technologies and strategies to augment the metabolic efficiency and muscle hypertrophy of growing animals potentially leading to grea...

  2. [Antibiotic growth promoters for the view of animal nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphues, J

    1999-01-01

    From 01. 07./09. 1999 on six further antibiotic growth promoters have been banned--with only four substances remaining in this group of feed additives. Therefore, the discussion on a possible induction of bacterial resistance by antibiotic growth promoters, especially in potentially pathogenic bacteria, will sooner or later come to an end which is not least in the interest of the reputation of animal husbandry and food of animal origin. Unfortunately, no short-term solution for health problems by legislation--especially in the gastrointestinal tract--during rearing and the beginning of the fattening period is possible as experiences in Sweden have distinctively shown. Anyway, growth promoting feed additives were not a cure-all of rearing problems, in spite of their use considerable amounts of antibiotics were prescribed during this period. But growth promoters (especially chinoxalines) were most suitable for the prophylaxis of a microbial imbalance in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, after the ban of these effective representatives of feed additives the amount of prescribed antimicrobial drugs for metaphylaxis and therapy should be critically observed. The questions of practicable alternatives will be primarily addressed to the fields of animal nutrition, veterinary medicine and feed industry. To answer these questions and to evolve new solutions (as well as to check their suitability in practice) is considerably more intricate than simply to ban these substances which is more attractive for the media, however. It is no progressive solution to give up antimicrobial growth promoters as feed additives and to use the same substances (for example olaquindox) as therapeutics now (prescribed by veterinarians) or to switch to zincoxide or copper (in a dosage high above all nutrient requirements) in order to prevent postweaning problems due to E. coli. But one has to take into consideration the reasons for the use of antibiotics (growth promoters and therapeutics) or

  3. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  4. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  5. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. ► ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. ► ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. ► ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  6. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  7. Effects of lectin ingestion on animal growth and internal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, A

    1998-01-01

    Lectins are essential and omnipresent plant constituents. As many foods are of plant origin, the daily ingestion of lectins by both humans and animals is appreciable. For example, in an ad hoc survey, 53 edible plants were shown to contain lectins and approx 30% of fresh and processed food regularly consumed by humans had significant hemagglutinating activity (1). The situation is potentially even more acute in animal nutrition because animal diet is less diverse than that of humans, and in most instances foodstuffs are not thoroughly heat-treated. This is particularly significant in the light of our finding a correlation between lectin activity and antinutritional effects (2). As in evolution, the mammalian gut has been regularly exposed to lectins, they must have played an important part in the development of the digestive system. Although based on experience, most overtly toxic plants have been eliminated from the diet, many plants with appreciable lectin content are still consumed because it has not been easy to relate growth retardation and antinutritional, mild allergic or other subclinical symptoms to the food consumed or a particular component of it. As some lectins are at least partially heat stable and most survive the passage through the gut in functionally and immunologically intact form, their interaction with the gut surface epithelium (3) can damage the gut at high dietary intakes and this may lead to digestive disorders/diseases in some instances. However, it is not generally appreciated that not all lectins are antinutrients and indeed some may have beneficial effects and be of potential value in nutritional practice. Accordingly, it is of considerable importance to establish whether a lectin has deleterious or potentially beneficial effects for mammals. Unfortunately at present there are no adequate in vitro methods to do this reliably and it is usually necessary to carry out in vivo animal feeding studies, despite their relatively cumbersome

  8. Animated Cell Biology: A Quick and Easy Method for Making Effective, High-Quality Teaching Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H.

    2006-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that animations aid learning of dynamic concepts in cell biology. However, existing animation packages are expensive and difficult to learn, and the subsequent production of even short animations can take weeks to months. Here I outline the principles and sequence of steps for producing high-quality PowerPoint…

  9. Curvas de crescimento na produção animal Growth curves in animal production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Ribeiro de Freitas

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram discutidas as propriedades de sete modelos não-lineares, considerando-se o ajuste de curvas de crescimento na produção animal. Os modelos utilizados: Brody, Richards, Von Bertalanffy e duas alternativas de Gompertz e de Logístico foram ajustados, pelo método de Gauss Newton por meio do procedimento NLIN do SAS, a dados peso-idade de oito espécies: camarão-d'água-doce, rã-pimenta, coelho, frango, ovino, caprino, suíno e bovino. Considerando-se os critérios como: convergência ou não, coeficiente de determinação e interpretabilidade biológica dos parâmetros, concluiu-se que: a o modelo Logístico y= A/(1 + e-ktm estimou o peso em todas as espécies animais, enquanto o de Von Bertalanffy apenas não foi adequado para camarão; b os dois modelos Gompertz foram adequados para camarão, rã, frango, suíno e bovino; c em cada espécie, pelo menos dois dos sete modelos mostraram-se adequados para estimar o crescimento corporal das espécies animais estudadas, pois os coeficientes de determinação foram superiores a 92,0%.The properties of seven nonlinear models were discussed concerning its applications in the fitting of growth curves in animal production. The models used: Brody, Richards, Von Bertalanffy and two alternatives of Gompertz and Logistic models, were fitted by Gauss Newton method to weight-age data from eight animal species: freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergi, pepper frog, rabbit, poultry, sheep, goat, swine and cattle. Considering results of the fitted models such as convergence or not, coefficient of determination and biological interpretation of parameters, it was concluded that: a the Logisticmethod y = A/(1 + e-ktm estimated body weight in all species, while the Von Bertalanffy model was not adequate only for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergi; b both Gompertz models were adequate for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergi, pepper frog, poultry, swine and cattle; c for each specie, at least two

  10. Approaches to Optimizing Animal Cell Culture Process: Substrate Metabolism Regulation and Protein Expression Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanxing

    Some high value proteins and vaccines for medical and veterinary applications by animal cell culture have an increasing market in China. In order to meet the demands of large-scale productions of proteins and vaccines, animal cell culture technology has been widely developed. In general, an animal cell culture process can be divided into two stages in a batch culture. In cell growth stage a high specific growth rate is expected to achieve a high cell density. In production stage a high specific production rate is stressed for the expression and secretion of qualified protein or replication of virus. It is always critical to maintain high cell viability in fed-batch and perfusion cultures. More concern has been focused on two points by the researchers in China. First, the cell metabolism of substrates is analyzed and the accumulation of toxic by-products is decreased through regulating cell metabolism in the culture process. Second, some important factors effecting protein expression are understood at the molecular level and the production ability of protein is improved. In pace with the rapid development of large-scale cell culture for the production of vaccines, antibodies and other recombinant proteins in China, the medium design and process optimization based on cell metabolism regulation and protein expression improvement will play an important role. The chapter outlines the main advances in metabolic regulation of cell and expression improvement of protein in animal cell culture in recent years.

  11. Non-invasive optical imaging of tumor growth in intact animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinling; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2003-12-01

    We describe here a system for rapidly visualizing tumor growth in intact rodent mice that is simple, rapid, and eminently accessible and repeatable. We have established new rodent tumor cell line -- SP2/0-GFP cells that stably express high level of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by transfected with a plasmid that encoded GFP using electroporation and selected with G418 for 3 weeks. 1 x 104 - 1x107 SP2/0-GFP mouse melanoma cells were injected s.c. in the ears and legs of 6- to 7-week-old syngeneic male BALB/c mice, and optical images visualized real-time the engrafted tumor growth. The tumor burden was monitored over time by cryogenically cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera focused through a stereo microscope. The results show that the fluorescence intensity of GFP-expressing tumor is comparably with the tumor growth and/or depress. This in vivo optical imaging based on GFP is sensitive, external, and noninvasive. It affords continuous visual monitoring of malignant growth within intact animals, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies.

  12. Plant and animal stem cells: similar yet different

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, R.; Sabatini, S.

    2014-01-01

    The astonishingly long lives of plants and their regeneration capacity depend on the activity of plant stem cells. As in animals, stem cells reside in stem cell niches, which produce signals that regulate the balance between self-renewal and the generation of daughter cells that differentiate into n

  13. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization.

  14. Animal Models of Cardiac Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Lailiang; Li, Wenzhong; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yue(Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125, U.S.A.); Jie, Shen; Kong, Deling; Steinhoff, Gustav; Ma, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Animal models that mimic cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for understanding the mechanisms underlying the diseases at the cellular and molecular level. This review focuses on various methods in preclinical research to create small animal models of cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, heart failure, myocarditis and cardiac hypertrophy, and the related stem cell treatment for these diseases.

  15. Preclinical safety testing for cell-based products using animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBlane, James W

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of preclinical testing include to show why there might be therapeutic benefit in patients and to provide information on the product's toxicity. For cell-based products, given even once, there may be long term exposure and this could imply, unlike for conventional drugs, that all preclinical studies may be needed prior to first human use. The duration of exposure to cells should be studied in animals to guide toxicity assessments. Distribution of cells after administration by a route resembling that intended in humans should be studied to understand potential risks. Risk of tumour formation with the product may also need to be characterised. To the extent that this information can be generated by in vitro testing, studies in animals may not be needed and limitations on the capability of preclinical data to predict human toxicity are recognised: species-specificity make some cell products act only in humans and a human cell-product might be expected to be rejected by immunocompetent animals. Does this suggest testing in immunosuppressed animals or of development of an animal-cell product supposedly similar to the human cell product? No single answer seems to fit every situation.

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: Trial on different animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS. - Highlights: • BNCT with the use of L-BPA was applied for three human clear cell sarcoma (CCS) cell lines. • BNCT trial was performed on a newly established intramuscularly CCS-bearing animal model. • A significant decrease of the tumor-volume was seen by single BNCT with the use of L-BPA. • A multiple BNCT application would be required for controlling the growth of any residual tumors

  17. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. PMID:26945003

  18. Spermatogonial stem cells from domestic animals: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Yaqing; Qu, Rongfeng; He, Ying; Tian, Xiue; Zeng, Wenxian

    2014-03-01

    Spermatogenesis, an elaborate and male-specific process in adult testes by which a number of spermatozoa are produced constantly for male fertility, relies on spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). As a sub-population of undifferentiated spermatogonia, SSCs are capable of both self-renewal (to maintain sufficient quantities) and differentiation into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are able to convert to pluripotent stem cells during in vitro culture, thus they could function as substitutes for human embryonic stem cells without ethical issues. In addition, this process does not require exogenous transcription factors necessary to produce induced-pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells. Moreover, combining genetic engineering with germ cell transplantation would greatly facilitate the generation of transgenic animals. Since germ cell transplantation into infertile recipient testes was first established in 1994, in vivo and in vitro study and manipulation of SSCs in rodent testes have been progressing at a staggering rate. By contrast, their counterparts in domestic animals, despite the failure to reach a comparable level, still burgeoned and showed striking advances. This review outlines the recent progressions of characterization, isolation, in vitro propagation, and transplantation of spermatogonia/SSCs from domestic animals, thereby shedding light on future exploration of these cells with high value, as well as contributing to the development of reproductive technology for large animals.

  19. A dynamic model of tomato fruit growth integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanwoua, J.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Heuvelink, E.; Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a model of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit growth integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication. The fruit was considered as a population of cells grouped in cell classes differing in their initial cell age and cell mass. The model describes fruit gr

  20. Growth of fodder crop (Sorghum bicolor L. as animal feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman M. Nour,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted at experimental farm of Faculty of Agriculture (U of K in 2007 July to October to study the effect of three different Khartoum State soil obtained from river Nile (G, shambat area (SH and El- Fetehab area (F on the growth of sorghum (Abu-sabeen. The experiment was done in plastic pots in glass house. Complete randomized block deign (CRD were used. Plant height was recorded throughout the plant growth which showed significant difference. G Soil gave higher range followed by SH and F respectively.

  1. On size and growth of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaoud, A

    2002-01-01

    Understanding how growth induces form is a longstanding biological question. Many studies concentrated on the shapes of plant cells, fungi or bacteria. Some others have shown the importance of the mechanical properties of bacterial walls and plant tissues in pattern formation. Here I sketch a simple physical picture of cell growth. The study is focussed on isolated cells that have walls. They are modeled as thin elastic shells containing a liquid, which pressure drives the growth as generally admitted for bacteria or plant cells. Requiring mechanical equilibrium leads to estimations of typical cell sizes, in quantitative agreement with compiled data including bacteria, cochlear outer hair, fungi, yeast, root hair and giant alga cells.

  2. Concise Review: Stem Cell Trials Using Companion Animal Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Andrew M; Dow, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    Studies to evaluate the therapeutic potential of stem cells in humans would benefit from more realistic animal models. In veterinary medicine, companion animals naturally develop many diseases that resemble human conditions, therefore, representing a novel source of preclinical models. To understand how companion animal disease models are being studied for this purpose, we reviewed the literature between 2008 and 2015 for reports on stem cell therapies in dogs and cats, excluding laboratory animals, induced disease models, cancer, and case reports. Disease models included osteoarthritis, intervertebral disc degeneration, dilated cardiomyopathy, inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's fistulas, meningoencephalomyelitis (multiple sclerosis-like), keratoconjunctivitis sicca (Sjogren's syndrome-like), atopic dermatitis, and chronic (end-stage) kidney disease. Stem cells evaluated in these studies included mesenchymal stem-stromal cells (MSC, 17/19 trials), olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC, 1 trial), or neural lineage cells derived from bone marrow MSC (1 trial), and 16/19 studies were performed in dogs. The MSC studies (13/17) used adipose tissue-derived MSC from either allogeneic (8/13) or autologous (5/13) sources. The majority of studies were open label, uncontrolled studies. Endpoints and protocols were feasible, and the stem cell therapies were reportedly safe and elicited beneficial patient responses in all but two of the trials. In conclusion, companion animals with naturally occurring diseases analogous to human conditions can be recruited into clinical trials and provide realistic insight into feasibility, safety, and biologic activity of novel stem cell therapies. However, improvements in the rigor of manufacturing, study design, and regulatory compliance will be needed to better utilize these models. Stem Cells 2016;34:1709-1729. PMID:27066769

  3. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  4. Thermodynamics of irreversible plant cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Pietruszka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The time-irreversible cell enlargement of plant cells at a constant temperature results from two independent physical processes, e.g. water absorption and cell wall yielding. In such a model cell growth starts with reduction in wall stress because of irreversible extension of the wall. The water absorption and physical expansion are spontaneous consequences of this initial modification of the cell wall (the juvenile cell vacuolate, takes up water and expands. In this model the irreversible aspect of growth arises from the extension of the cell wall. Such theory expressed quantitatively by time-dependent growth equation was elaborated by Lockhart in the 60's.The growth equation omit however a very important factor, namely the environmental temperature at which the plant cells grow. In this paper we put forward a simple phenomenological model which introduces into the growth equation the notion of temperature. Moreover, we introduce into the modified growth equation the possible influence of external growth stimulator or inhibitor (phytohormones or abiotic factors. In the presence of such external perturbations two possible theoretical solutions have been found: the linear reaction to the application of growth hormones/abiotic factors and the non-linear one. Both solutions reflect and predict two different experimental conditions, respectively (growth at constant or increasing concentration of stimulator/inhibitor. The non-linear solution reflects a common situation interesting from an environmental pollution point of view e.g. the influence of increasing (with time concentration of toxins on plant growth. Having obtained temperature modified growth equations we can draw further qualitative and, especially, quantitative conclusions about the mechanical properties of the cell wall itself. This also concerns a new and interesting result obtained in our model: We have calculated the magnitude of the cell wall yielding coefficient (T [m3 J-1•s-1] in

  5. DNA profiling and characterization of animal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Glyn N; Byrne, Ed; Hawkins, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    The history of the culture of animal cell lines is littered with published and much unpublished experience with cell lines that have become switched, mislabelled, or cross-contaminated during laboratory handling. To deliver valid and good quality research and to avoid waste of time and resources on such rogue lines, it is vital to perform some kind of qualification for the provenance of cell lines used in research and particularly in the development of biomedical products. DNA profiling provides a valuable tool to compare different sources of the same cells and, where original material or tissue is available, to confirm the correct identity of a cell line. This chapter provides a review of some of the most useful techniques to test the identity of cells in the cell culture laboratory and gives methods which have been used in the authentication of cell lines. PMID:24297409

  6. Expression of Bacterial β-Galactosidase in Animal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    An, Gynheung; Hidaka, Katsuhiko; Siminovitch, Louis

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing the gene for bacterial β-galactosidase, situated close to the simian virus 40 early promoter, has been constructed. Transfection of CHO, L, and COS-1 cells with this plasmid led to the expression and appearance of the enzyme. Using this system, we have developed a series of promoter cloning vehicles capable of accepting promoter signals for animal genes.

  7. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  8. Endocrine manipulation of growth in animals: Future prospects especially in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful use of a number of anabolic steroid preparations in numerous countries has demonstrated that manipulation of an animal's endocrine status can lead to a substantially enhanced growth rate. Despite evidence that, used correctly, these materials present no health hazard to the consumer of treated meat, their use is not permitted in several countries. This prohibition influences the extent of world trade in meat. Modern biotechnology offers other methods of enhancing growth, e.g. the use of peptide hormones or growth factors produced by recombinant DNA technologies. Potentially, the immune response can also be exploited to increase growth and in the longer term transgenic animals may also prove a satisfactory alternative. Animals with enhanced growth potential will however require an enhanced food supply. In many parts of the world what is required is a method to lower the nutrient demands of animals during periods of feed shortage. This approach requires a substantially different philosophy and of course separate financial resources for its development. In developing countries, despite the excitement associated with new technologies, there appears to be much more to be gained, at least in the immediate future, by improving the nutrition and the health of animals. (author). 28 refs, 6 tabs

  9. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Microcystin Toxicity in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Campos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MC are potent hepatotoxins produced by the cyanobacteria of the genera Planktothrix, Microcystis, Aphanizomenon, Nostoc and Anabaena. These cyclic heptapeptides have strong affinity to serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs thereby acting as an inhibitor of this group of enzymes. Through this interaction a cascade of events responsible for the MC cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in animal cells may take place. Moreover MC induces oxidative stress in animal cells and together with the inhibition of PPs, this pathway is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of MC toxicity. In recent years new insights on the key enzymes involved in the signal-transduction and toxicity have been reported demonstrating the complexity of the interaction of these toxins with animal cells. Key proteins involved in MC up-take, biotransformation and excretion have been identified, demonstrating the ability of aquatic animals to metabolize and excrete the toxin. MC have shown to interact with the mitochondria. The consequences are the dysfunction of the organelle, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell apoptosis. MC activity leads to the differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and protein kinases involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation and tumor promotion activity. This activity may result from the direct inhibition of the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. This review aims to summarize the increasing data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MC toxicity in animal systems, reporting for direct MC interacting proteins and key enzymes in the process of toxicity biotransformation/excretion of these cyclic peptides.

  11. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  12. Image-based red cell counting for wild animals blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Claudio R M; Schneider, Fabio K; Dos Santos, Leonilda Correia

    2010-01-01

    An image-based red blood cell (RBC) automatic counting system is presented for wild animals blood analysis. Images with 2048×1536-pixel resolution acquired on an optical microscope using Neubauer chambers are used to evaluate RBC counting for three animal species (Leopardus pardalis, Cebus apella and Nasua nasua) and the error found using the proposed method is similar to that obtained for inter observer visual counting method, i.e., around 10%. Smaller errors (e.g., 3%) can be obtained in regions with less grid artifacts. These promising results allow the use of the proposed method either as a complete automatic counting tool in laboratories for wild animal's blood analysis or as a first counting stage in a semi-automatic counting tool. PMID:21096766

  13. Growth regulation of cultured human nevus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancianti, M L; Györfi, T; Shih, I M; Valyi-Nagy, I; Levengood, G; Menssen, H D; Halpern, A C; Elder, D E; Herlyn, M

    1993-03-01

    Cells isolated from congenital melanocytic nevi and cultured in vitro have growth characteristics that resemble their premalignant stage in situ. A serum-free, chemically defined medium has been developed that allows continuous growth of established nevus cultures for up to several months. Like primary melanoma cells, nevus cells in high-calcium-containing W489 medium require insulin for growth. In contrast to melanoma cells, nevus cells in serum-free medium require the presence of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which enhanced intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. In contrast to the requirements of normal human melanocytes from newborn foreskin, congenital nevus cells grow with less dependency on basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nevus cultures contain bFGF-like activity, and they express bFGF mRNA. Nevic cells of compound nevi also express bFGF mRNA in situ but only in the junctional areas. These results indicate that bFGF plays an important growth regulatory role for nevus cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8440904

  14. Thiolactosides: Scaffolds for the Synthesis of Glycolipids in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Mori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various glycolipids were synthesized using thiolactosides as scaffolds for glycosylation in animal cells. The basic building blocks, n-dodecyl β-D-thiolactoside (β-LacSC12 and n-dodecyl α-D-thiolactoside (α-LacSC12, were chemically synthesized in 2 steps: glycosylation followed by deacylation. The thiolactosides were administered to animal cells in culture and served as substrates for cellular enzyme-catalyzed glycosylation. Incubation of mouse melanoma B16 cells in the presence of β-LacSC12 or α-LacSC12 resulted in sialylation of the terminal galactose residue and gave a GM3-type ganglioside. Administration of β-Lac SC12 in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells likewise gave a GM3-type ganglioside. On the other hand, introduction of β-LacSC12 in African green monkey kidney (Vero cells gave Gb3- and Gb4-type glycolipids aside from GM3-type ganglioside. In the course of the study, significant changes in B16 cell morphology and elevated secretion of melanin were also observed.

  15. Evaluation of single cell protein for nutrition of farm animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oslage, H.J.; Schulz, E.

    1981-08-01

    For the production of microorganisms with high content of protein technologies on the basis of carbon rich substrates have been developed during the past years. Thus, signification of Single Cell Protein (SCP) for nutrition of farm animals has changed. While, in former times, yeasts were added only in small portions (1-2%) as vitamin supplementation today it is the aim to use microbial biomass as a protein component. The use of SCP as a feedstuff requires a careful physiological and toxicological evaluation as well as extensive investigations of possible use and frontiers of those products for farm animals. Topic of this work were bacteria, bred on methanol as well as yeasts, grown on alcanes and on whey/lactic acid respectively. SCP is preferently used as a feedstuff for poultry, pigs, calves and fishes. Digestibility and utilisation of protein is good till very good, for the a.m. animals, digestibility being between 75-93% and net protein utilisation (NPU) being between 60-76%. In rations of young animals (chicken, piglets and calves) contents of 5-10% SCP have been proved to be without any negative effect on acceptance, body gain, feed utilisation and mortality. For older animals SCP can be used as the only protein source beside the basic feedstuffs.

  16. Tomato fruit growth : integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication by experimentation and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanwoua, J.

    2012-01-01

    Keywords: cell division, cell growth, cell endoreduplication, fruit growth, genotype, G×E interaction, model, tomato. Fruit size is a major component of fruit yield and quality of many crops. Variations in fruit size can be tremendous due to genotypic and environmental factors. The mechanisms

  17. EFFECTIVE COMPOUNDS OF POMEGRANATE AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANIMAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara Packová; Nora Maruniaková; Marek Halenár; Ángel A. Carbonell-Barrachina; Adriana Kolesárová

    2014-01-01

    This review describes possible effects of antioxidant compounds of pomegranate on animal cells. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits are widely consumed. Pomegranate is one of the oldest known edible fruit. Spain is main producer in the Europe. Pomegranate contains bioactive polyphenols - punicalagin with molecular weight 1084. Part of punicalagin's molecule is ellagic acid. The both substances generate total antioxidant capacity of pomegranate. Punicalagin compounds present high antioxida...

  18. Shape of growth cells in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocheau, A; Georgelin, M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize experimentally the whole shape of the growth cells displayed in directional solidification and its evolution with respect to control parameters. A library of cells is first built up from observation of directional solidification of a succinonitrile alloy in a large range of pulling velocity, cell spacing, and thermal gradient. Cell boundaries are then extracted from these images and fitted by trial functions on their whole profile, from cell tip to cell grooves. A coherent evolution of the fit parameters with the control parameters is evidenced. It enables us to characterize the whole cell shape by a single function involving only two parameters which vary smoothly in the control parameter space. This, in particular, evidences a continuous evolution of the cell geometry at the cell to dendrite transition which denies the existence of a change of branch of solutions at the occurrence of sidebranching. More generally, this global determination of cell shape complemented with a previous determination of the position of cells in the thermal field (the cell tip undercooling) provides a complete characterization of growth solutions and of their evolutions in this system. It thus brings about a relevant framework for testing and improving theoretical and numerical understanding of cell shapes and cell stability in directional solidification.

  19. Growth hormone secretion during space flight and evaluation of the physiological responses of animals held in the research animal holding facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Thomas N.; Grindeland, Richard; Mehler, William; Oyama, Jiro

    1987-01-01

    The spaceflight of the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) on the Space Laboratory 3 (SL 3) provided the opportunity to evaluate the suitability of the RAHF for housing and maintaining experimental animals during spaceflight, and to determine changes in the secretion of growth hormone during spaceflight. Using ground-based studies the following were investigated: the optimum conditions for creating gravitational force on space flight animals; neural pathways that may play a role in the space flight syndrome; and the time course of muscle atrophy due to hypodynamia and hypokenesia in hindlimb-suspended animals and the role of growth hormone in these processes.

  20. Animal experiments and clinical application of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Liu; Wei Liu; Baiyu Zhou; Jing Wang; Bing Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The olfactory epithelium can still generate new neurons after arresting its growth and development in the human body. Axons can still be generated and pass through peripheral tissue to reach the olfactory bulb. Thus, olfactory cells have been widely used in the repair of spinal cord injury.OBJECTIVE: Using animal experiments in conjunction with a clinical study of olfactory ensheathing cells, this paper was designed to clarify the function and application prospects of olfactory ensheathing cells, as well as the existing problems with their application. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the terms "olfactory ensheathing cells, spinal cord injury", we retrieved manuscripts published from January 1990 to June 2007. The languages were limited to English and Chinese. Inclusion criteria: studies addressing the characteristics, basic study, clinical application and prospects of olfactory ensheathing cells; studies that were recently published or were published in high-impact journals. Exclusion criteria: repetitive studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The included 29 manuscripts were primarily clinical or basic experimental studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: Following spinal cord injury, spinal neurons die, neurotrophic factors are lacking, and the existing glial scar and cavities hinder axonal growth. One method to repair spinal cord injury is to interfere with the above-mentioned factors based on animal experiments. Myelination and axonal regeneration are the keys to spinal cord injury therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells can secrete several neurotrophic factors, inhibit horizontal cell reactions, have noticeable neuroprotective effects, and possess a very strong reproductive activity, so they have many advantages in the fields of cell transplantation and gene therapy. However, there still exist many questions and uncertainties, such as the best time window and dose, as well as complications of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation; precise mechanism of action after olfactory

  1. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette;

    1999-01-01

    Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...... cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved...... increase in the beta cell number seems to occur. In pregnancy, however, a marked hyperplasia of the beta cells is observed both in rodents and man. Increased mitotic activity has been seen both in vivo and in vitro in islets exposed to placental lactogen (PL), prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH...

  2. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  3. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Caen (France); Marteau, Lena [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Bernaudin, Jean-Francois [Service d' Histologie-Biologie Tumorale, ER2UPMC, Universite Paris 6, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Roussel, Simon [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CHU de Caen (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Petit, Edwige, E-mail: epetit@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France)

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  4. Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2000-01-01

    The largest animal ever to live on the earth is the blue whale(蓝鲸)It weighs about 80 tons--more than 24 elephants. It is more than 30 metres long. A newborn baby whale weighs as much as a big elephant.

  5. Interlab Cell Line Collection: Bioresource of Established Human and Animal Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Parodi, Barbara; Aresu, Ottavia; Visconti, Paola; Manniello, Maria Assunta; Strada, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The Interlab Cell Line Collection (ICLC) was established in 1994 as a core facility of the National Institute of Cancer Research. It supplies: human and animal cell lines; Short Tandem Repeat (STR) profiling of human cell lines; quality control service; mycoplasma detection and eradication service; safe deposit service and patent deposit service of cell lines and hybridomas. The catalogue of services is on-line, and the cell lines are distributed all over the world. 

  6. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  7. PARKINSON’S DISEASE: ANIMAL MODELS AND DOPAMINERGIC CELL VULNERABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Blesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects about 1.5% of the global population over 65 years of age. A hallmark feature of PD is the degeneration of the dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and the consequent striatal DA deficiency. Yet, the pathogenesis of PD remains unclear. Despite tremendous growth in recent years in our knowledge of the molecular basis of PD and the molecular pathways of cell death, important questions remain, such ...

  8. ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mammals(哺乳动物)Mammals are the world's most dominant(最占优势的)animal.They are extremely(非常)diverse(多种多样的)creatures(生物,动物)that include(包括)the biggest ever animal (the blue whale鲸,which eats up to 6 tons every day),the smallest(leaf-nosed bat小蹄蝠) and the laziest(sloth树獭,who spends 80% of their time sleeping).There are over 4,600 kinds of mammals and they live in very different environments(环境)—oceans(海洋),rivers,the jungle(丛林),deserts,and plains(平原).

  9. Controlling the switches: Rho GTPase regulation during animal cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    Animal cell division is a fundamental process that requires complex changes in cytoskeletal organization and function. Aberrant cell division often has disastrous consequences for the cell and can lead to cell senescence, neoplastic transformation or death. As important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases play major roles in regulating many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. These include centrosome duplication and separation, generation of cortical rigidity, microtubule-kinetochore stabilization, cleavage furrow formation, contractile ring formation and constriction, and abscission. The ability of Rho proteins to function as regulators of cell division depends on their ability to cycle between their active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound states. However, Rho proteins are inherently inefficient at fulfilling this cycle and require the actions of regulatory proteins that enhance GTP binding (RhoGEFs), stimulate GTPase activity (RhoGAPs), and sequester inactive Rho proteins in the cytosol (RhoGDIs). The roles of these regulatory proteins in controlling cell division are an area of active investigation. In this review we will delineate the current state of knowledge of how specific RhoGEFs, RhoGAPs and RhoGDIs control mitosis and cytokinesis, and highlight the mechanisms by which their functions are controlled.

  10. The influence of feeding GMO-peas on growth of animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Mares

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of genetically modified (GM food or feed into the commercial sale represents a very complicated process. One of the most important steps in approval process is the evaluation of all risks on the health status of people and animal models. Within our project the genetically modified peas was breeded that showed significant resistance against Pea seed-borne mosaic virus and Pea enation mosaic virus. Preclinical studies have been conducted to found out the effect of GMO peas on animals - rats of outbreeding line Wistar. In a total, 24 male, specific pathogen free Wistar rats were used in the experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, the animals were 28 days old. The three experimental groups with 8 individuals were created. The first group of rats was fed with GMO peas, the second group of rats consumed mix of pea cultivar Raman and the third group was control without pea addition (wheat and soya were used instead of pea. In the present study we focused our attention on health, growth and utility features of rats fed with GM pea. All characteristic were observed during the experiment lasting 35 days. Consumed feed was weighted daily and the weight of the animals was measured every seven days. The average values were compared within the groups. The aim of the experiment was to verify if resistant lines of pea influence the weight growth of animal models. The results of our experiment showed that even a high concentration (30% of GM pea did not influence growth rate of rats to compare with both rats fed with pea of Raman cultivar and control group. We did not observe any health problems of animal models during the experiment.

  11. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Junfeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST.

  12. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  13. Recovery of fibroblast-like cells from refrigerated goat skin up to 41 d of animal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Charles; Singh, Mahipal

    2015-05-01

    Successful cloning of animals using somatic cell nuclear transfer requires undamaged nuclear DNA from desired donor cell types. In vitro culture of cells is one way of ensuring nuclear integrity. The goal of this study was to evaluate the limits of postmortem cell survival/culture in refrigerated goat ear skin tissues which could be used for long-term storage and cloning of animals in future. To achieve this, 60 explants from 6 different goats were cultured after 0, 3, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27, 30, 33, 37, and 41 d postmortem and observed under inverted microscope for outgrowth of fibroblast-like cells, after 10-12 d of culture. Explants from all time points including 19% from 41-dpm tissues exhibited outgrowth. However, the percentage of outgrowth positive explants, as well as culture confluence, reduced with increasing postmortem time interval. Cell cultures established from primary outgrowth of 41-dpm tissues when compared for their growth profile with similarly obtained 0-dpm cultures revealed similar growth curve and cell morphology. Cytogenetic analysis of 41-dpm tissue-derived cell populations revealed a normal female karyotype with 60 XX homologous chromosomes indicating genetic stability of the cell population. In conclusion, these results show that refrigerated skin tissue remains alive for more than a month and that the cells derived from such tissues are normal and can be cryopreserved for long-term storage and future cloning of animals with desired genetics.

  14. Enhanced animal growth via ligand-regulated GHRH myogenic-injectable vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Malone, P. Brandon; Hill, Leigh Anne; Ellis, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Robert J.; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Regulated animal growth occurred following a single electroporated injection of a mixture of two plasmids (10 microg of DNA), one expressing the GeneSwitch regulator protein, the other an inducible growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) gene, into the tibialis anterior muscles of adult SCID mice. Administration of the ligand mifepristone (MFP) up-regulated GHRH expression, as shown by elevations of IGF-I levels, and when MFP dosing was withdrawn, IGF-I returned to baseline levels. Five cycles of IGF-I induction were observed during a five-month period. Chronic MFP dosing for 25 days increased lean body mass, weight gain, and bone mineral density significantly compared with non-MFP treated controls. In summary, long-term drug-regulated GHRH expression was achieved following plasmid-based gene therapy, and chronic induction of GHRH expression in adult animals led to improvements in weight gain and body composition.

  15. Monitoring the growth of the neural representations of new animal concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Andrew James; Just, Marcel Adam

    2015-08-01

    Although enormous progress has recently been made in identifying the neural representations of individual object concepts, relatively little is known about the growth of a neural knowledge representation as a novel object concept is being learned. In this fMRI study, the growth of the neural representations of eight individual extinct animal concepts was monitored as participants learned two features of each animal, namely its habitat (i.e., a natural dwelling or scene) and its diet or eating habits. Dwelling/scene information and diet/eating-related information have each been shown to activate their own characteristic brain regions. Several converging methods were used here to capture the emergence of the neural representation of a new animal feature within these characteristic, a priori-specified brain regions. These methods include statistically reliable identification (classification) of the eight newly acquired multivoxel patterns, analysis of the neural representational similarity among the newly learned animal concepts, and conventional GLM assessments of the activation in the critical regions. Moreover, the representation of a recently learned feature showed some durability, remaining intact after another feature had been learned. This study provides a foundation for brain research to trace how a new concept makes its way from the words and graphics used to teach it, to a neural representation of that concept in a learner's brain. PMID:26032608

  16. The multiple roles of epidermal growth factor repeat O-glycans in animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltom, Amanda R; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed

    2015-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeat is a common, evolutionarily conserved motif found in secreted proteins and the extracellular domain of transmembrane proteins. EGF repeats harbor six cysteine residues which form three disulfide bonds and help generate the three-dimensional structure of the EGF repeat. A subset of EGF repeats harbor consensus sequences for the addition of one or more specific O-glycans, which are initiated by O-glucose, O-fucose or O-N-acetylglucosamine. These glycans are relatively rare compared to mucin-type O-glycans. However, genetic experiments in model organisms and cell-based assays indicate that at least some of the glycosyltransferases involved in the addition of O-glycans to EGF repeats play important roles in animal development. These studies, combined with state-of-the-art biochemical and structural biology experiments have started to provide an in-depth picture of how these glycans regulate the function of the proteins to which they are linked. In this review, we will discuss the biological roles assigned to EGF repeat O-glycans and the corresponding glycosyltransferases. Since Notch receptors are the best studied proteins with biologically-relevant O-glycans on EGF repeats, a significant part of this review is devoted to the role of these glycans in the regulation of the Notch signaling pathway. We also discuss recently identified proteins other than Notch which depend on EGF repeat glycans to function properly. Several glycosyltransferases involved in the addition or elongation of O-glycans on EGF repeats are mutated in human diseases. Therefore, mechanistic understanding of the functional roles of these carbohydrate modifications is of interest from both basic science and translational perspectives. PMID:26175457

  17. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  18. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  19. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  20. Cells Lines vs. Animals Studies for Developing New Therapeutic Strategies in Human Pancreatic Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past, most of the knowledge gained regarding the physiology and the pathology of the pancreas has been evaluated in experimental studies on animals especially on rats/mice. This approach has been criticized in recent years because most of the data obtained from animals cannot be fully applied to humans [1]. A new approach to the physiology and pathology of the pancreas comes from studying its molecular biology, and the results obtained seem to be more reliable than those obtained in animals. An example of this assumption comes from studies on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: this cancer seems to result from a progressive accumulation of mutations in genes such as K-ras, CDKN2A, p53, BRCA2, p164ink, and SMAD4 [2]; in particular, the SMAD4 mutations which result in the constitutive activation of transforming growth factor b1 signalling, are generally considered to be responsible for the desmoplastic response, which includes upregulated expression of the extracellular matrix, and type I collagen [3, 4, 5, 6]. Grzesiak et al. [7, 8] have also shown that a2b1 integrin-mediated adhesion on type I collagen promotes a malignant phenotype in FG pancreatic cells, as defined by increased proliferation and haptokinetic cell migration, downregulated expression and localization of E-cadherin and b-catenin in cell-cell contacts, increased phosphorylation of GSK3b and PKB/Akt, and downregulated expression of PTHrP, IL-6, and IL-8 as compared to fibronectin, type IV collagen, laminin, or vitronectin. These results are in agreement with previous studies demonstrating that type I collagen downregulates E-cadherin expression in Panc-1, BxPC-3, and PaTu8988s pancreatic cancer cells, resulting in increased proliferation and migration compared to fibronectin.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  2. Animal protein intake, serum insulin-like growth factor I, and growth in healthy 2.5-y-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Udam, Tina Rovenna; Lauritzen, Lotte;

    2004-01-01

    Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear....

  3. Antibiotic growth promoters enhance animal production by targeting intestinal bile salt hydrolase and its producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eLin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growth-promoting effect of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs was correlated with the decreased activity of bile salt hydrolase (BSH, an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization. Consistent with this finding, independent chicken studies have demonstrated that AGP usage significantly reduced population of Lactobacillus species, the major BSH-producers in the intestine. Recent finding also demonstrated that some AGPs, such as tetracycline and roxarsone, display direct inhibitory effect on BSH activity. Therefore, BSH is a promising microbiome target for developing novel alternatives to AGPs. Specifically, dietary supplementation of BSH inhibitor may promote host lipid metabolism and energy harvest, consequently enhancing feed efficiency and body weight gain in food animals.

  4. Animal protein intake, serum insulin-like growth factor I, and growth in healthy 2.5-y-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Udam, Tina Rovenna; Lauritzen, Lotte;

    2004-01-01

    Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear.......Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear....

  5. [The dynamics of Phanerozoic marine animal diversity agrees with the hyperbolic growth model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, A V; Korotaev, A V

    2007-01-01

    Generic diversity dynamics of the Phanerozoic marine animals is far better described by the hyperbolic model, widely used in demography and macrosociology, than by the exponential and logistic models from population dynamics traditionally employed for this purpose. Exponential and logistic models imply zero influence of interactions between taxa on the dynamics of diversity, with the exception of competing for unoccupied ecological space, whereas the hyperbolic model implies non-linear second-order positive feedback in the development of the biota. The hyperbolic human population growth is caused by positive feedback between population size and the rate of technological and cultural development (the more individuals, the more inventors, the more rapid progress, the more rapid growth of the Earth's bearing capacity; the smaller death-rate, the more accelerated growth-rate of the population). Probably there is also non-linear second-order positive feedback between diversity and community structure (the more genera, the higher alpha-diversity, which is defined as average number of genera per community, the more complicated and stable, "buffered" communities, the greater "taxonomic capacity of the environment" and average duration of the existence of genera; extinction rate dencreases, biodiversity growth-rate increases). The simplest mathematical model of biodiversity dynamics based on this assumption is confirmed by empirical data on alpha-diversity dynamics. Progressive complexification of marine communities during the Phanerozoic is also confirmed by the growing evennes of generic abundance distribution in paleocommunities. PMID:17338263

  6. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... that transferrin is the only obligatory factor whereas growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and TRH had modulating effects. A heat-labile heparin binding serum factor which stimulated thymidine incorporation but not cell proliferation was demonstrated in human serum. Measurements...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  7. In vivo models for cancer stem cell research: a practical guide for frequently used animal models and available biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidan, I; Steiniger, S C J

    2014-04-01

    The identification of a rare population of cancer stem cells whose presence in tumors is believed to determine their growth and metastatic activity, has provided a novel approach for targeted anti-cancer therapy. At the in vivo stage of the development of new therapeutic approaches for killing cancer stem cells, the most significant issues are the appropriate choice of rational animal models that offer the option to select animal species, strains and substrains, essential techniques for the inoculation of tumors, and methods of tumor detection in animals. The identification and validation of various types of cancer stem cell markers, which could serve as potential marker(s) of therapeutic efficacy of applied drugs, is a considerable challenge. The aim of this review is to provide a guide for the in vivo study of novel therapeutics that target cancer stem cells. This review describes frequently used mouse solid tumor models and evaluates their usefulness for cancer stem cell research. The classification of existing compounds that are used in today's experimental anti-cancer stem cell therapy and examples of exploratory first-in-human studies using these compounds for selective elimination of cancer stem cells will also be discussed. Finally, this review will examine the current status of available cancer stem cell markers, and highlight several important cancer stem cell properties that are still not well understood, but could influence the anti-cancer drug development process. PMID:24781726

  8. Analytical strategies for residue analysis of veterinary drugs and growth-promoting agents in food-producing animals - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    2005-01-01

    After a brief introduction into the field of veterinary drugs and growth-promoting agents, the most important EU regulations and directives for the inspection of food-producing animals and animal products regarding the residue control of these substances are presented and discussed. Main attention i

  9. Etabolism in compensatory growth . III. The urea, glucose and C02 entry rates in animal undergoing compensatory growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pram Mahyudin

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucose (GER, Urea (UER and C02 (C02 ER entry rates were studied at four points in the growth curve viz: before feed restriction (PI after 8 weeks of feed restriction (P2, after 3 weeks (P3 and 15 weeks (P4 following resumption ofad libitum feeding. Sixteen Merino wethers were used and offerred pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa ad libitum for 3 weeks; then they were divided into 2 groups of eight. Group I continued to be fed ad libitum and Group 11 was fed pelleted lucerne at half maintenance level for 8 weeks and then fed ad libitum until the end of experiment. During feed restriction (P2, UER, urinary urea and urea transferred from the blood to the gut were 74% lower in group II than those in group I due to the reduction of N intake . At P2 GER and C02ER were also lower (53% and 56%, respectively because of the reduction of available glucose precursor and metabolic rate. Similarly AV concentration difference of glucose, glucose taken up by the hind-limb muscle and the percentage of glucose taken up by muscle that was oxidised were reduced by 52%, 86% and 48%, respectively . When animals resumed ad libitum feeding, the components of urea entry rate (except plasma urea concentration, GER and C02ER were markedly increased indicating A switch to the anabolic mode, followed by increased glucose taken up and oxidised by the hind-limb muscle . The significance of glucose in muscle metabolism during compensatory growth was shown in the dramatic increase in the actual rate of glucose oxidation per unit muscle weight . It appears that the priority of usage of glucose taken up by muscle during compensatory growth is for oxidation to both C02 and lactate.

  10. Lectins as markers of endothelial cells: comparative study between human and animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, F; Dalion, J

    1988-04-01

    Vascular endothelial cells were labelled with 10 vegetal lectins and 3 more monoclonal antibodies antiblood group ABO substances, in major organs of 14 common laboratory animals. After fixation in PLPa and paraffin embedding, cells were examined to determine their likeness to human cells. The most interesting reactive used was EEA, whose positivity defines upper mammalians. Blood B substance positivity and CSA negativity defines primates among which man is unique and defined by UEA I positivity and variability in ABO substance. CSA positivity defines non-primate upper mammalians. Rodents and birds were negative with all reactives tested. From the histochemical point of view, the animals closest to humans are monkeys, followed by swine and oxen, then by cat and dog and lastly by sheep. Rodents appear unrelated to humans in this system.

  11. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  12. Chlorhexidine Digluconate Effects on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Some Field Isolates of Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Khoshnood, Sheida; Khubani, Shahin; Dokht Faraj, Mahdi; Hakimi Alni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study chlorhexidine digluconate disinfectant effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some bacterial field isolates from animals. Objectives: The current study investigated chlorhexidine digluconate effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some field isolates of veterinary bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus. aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates for ea...

  13. GSK-3: functional insights from cell biology and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana eKaidanovich-Beilin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 is a widely expressed and highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase encoded in mammals by two genes that generate two related proteins: GSK-3α and GSK-3β. GSK-3 is active in cells under resting conditions and is primarily regulated through inhibition or diversion of its activity. While GSK-3 is one of the few protein kinases that can be inactivated by phosphorylation, the mechanisms of GSK-3 regulation are more varied and not fully understood. Precise control appears to be achieved by a combination of phosphorylation, localization, and sequestration by a number of GSK-3-binding proteins. GSK-3 lies downstream of several major signaling pathways including the phosphatidylinositol 3’ kinase pathway, the Wnt pathway, Hedgehog signaling and Notch. Specific pools of GSK-3, which differ in intracellular localization, binding partner affinity and relative amount are differentially sensitized to several distinct signaling pathways and these sequestration mechanisms contribute to pathway insulation and signal specificity. Dysregulation of signaling pathways involving GSK-3 is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders and there are data suggesting GSK-3 isoform-selective roles in several of these. Here, we review the current knowledge of GSK-3 regulation and targets and discuss the various animal models that have been employed to dissect the functions of GSK-3 in brain development and function through the use of conventional or conditional knock-out mice as well as transgenic mice. These studies have revealed fundamental roles for these protein kinases in memory, behavior and neuronal fate determination and provide insights into possible therapeutic interventions.

  14. Sex-specific lung diseases: effect of oestrogen on cultured cells and in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosung Shim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex prevalence in lung disease suggests that sex-specific hormones may contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of at least some lung diseases, such as lung adenocarcinoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM and benign metastasising leiomyoma (BML. Oestrogen is an important hormone in normal lung development and in the pathogenesis of female predominant pulmonary diseases. In vivo and in vitro studies have facilitated our understanding of disease pathogenesis and discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Oestrogen promoted disease progression in cell and animal models of lung adenocarcinoma, LAM and BML. Specifically, oestrogen enhanced tumour growth and metastasis in animal models of these diseases. Furthermore, 17β-estradiol (E2, the most abundant form of oestrogen in humans, increased the size and proliferation of cultured cells of lung adenocarcinoma and LAM. Coupled with the known mechanisms of oestrogen metabolism and signalling, these model systems may provide insights into the diverse effects of oestrogen and other hormones on lung diseases. Anti-oestrogen treatments that target key events of oestrogen synthesis or signalling, such as aromatase activity, oestrogen receptors and signalling pathways, may offer additional opportunities for clinical trials.

  15. Pluripotent cells in farm animals: state of the art and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Imialek, Monika; Niemann, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, embryonic germ cells and embryonic carcinoma cells are a unique type of cell because they remain undifferentiated indefinitely in in vitro culture, show self-renewal and possess the ability to differentiate into derivatives of the three germ layers. These capabilities make them a unique in vitro model for studying development, differentiation and for targeted modification of the genome. True pluripotent ESCs have only been described in the laboratory mouse and rat. However, rodent physiology and anatomy differ substantially from that of humans, detracting from the value of the rodent model for studies of human diseases and the development of cellular therapies in regenerative medicine. Recently, progress in the isolation of pluripotent cells in farm animals has been made and new technologies for reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state have been developed. Prior to clinical application of therapeutic cells differentiated from pluripotent stem cells in human patients, their survival and the absence of tumourigenic potential must be assessed in suitable preclinical large animal models. The establishment of pluripotent cell lines in farm animals may provide new opportunities for the production of transgenic animals, would facilitate development and validation of large animal models for evaluating ESC-based therapies and would thus contribute to the improvement of human and animal health. This review summarises the recent progress in the derivation of pluripotent and reprogrammed cells from farm animals. We refer to our recent review on this area, to which this article is complementary.

  16. Radioimmunoassay studies on repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA in cultured animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV (ultraviolet) damaged DNA and its repair of various cultured animal cells were observed by radioimmunoassay using anti-serum against the UV irradiation induced heat-degenerated DNA. There is some difference among the cells of used animals according to their DNA repairabilities. The cells were divided into four groups according to the existence or strength of their repairabilities. 1) excision repair type: cells of men and chimpanzees. 2) photoreactivation type: cells derived from Tachydromus tachydromoides and chicks. 3) photoreactivation with excision repair: cells of rats, kangaroos and mosquitos. 4) non-excision repair type: cells of mice, Meriones and rats. Animal cells have plural types of repair. Main types of repair will differ according to the kind of animals. (Ichikawa, K.)

  17. Development of a Xeno-Free Substrate for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Hailin Zhu; Jinliang Yang; Yuquan Wei; Harry Huimin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are cultured on inactivated live feeder cells. For clinical application using hESCs, there is a requirement to minimize the risk of contamination with animal components. Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from feeder cells is the most natural way to provide xeno-free substrates for hESC growth. In this study, we optimized the step-by-step procedure for ECM processing to develop a xeno-free ECM that supports the growth of undifferentiated hESCs...

  18. Effect of eye NGF administration on two animal models of retinal ganglion cells degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Colafrancesco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF administration on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in experimentally induced glaucoma (GL and diabetic retinopathy (DR. GL was induced in adult rats by injection of hypertonic saline into the episcleral vein of the eye and diabetes (DT was induced by administration of streptozoticin. Control and experimental rats were treated daily with either ocular application of NGF or vehicle solution. We found that both animal models present a progressive degeneration of RGCs and changing NGF and VEGF levels in the retina and optic nerve. We then proved that NGF eye drop administration exerts a protective effect on these models of retinal degeneration. In brief, our findings indicate that NGF can play a protective role against RGC degeneration occurring in GL and DR and suggest that ocular NGF administration might be an effective pharmacological approach.

  19. Induction and analysis of antigen-specific T cell responses in melanoma patients and animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bins, Adriaan Dirk

    2007-01-01

    This thesis introduces a novel T cell vaccination method that uses a tattoo machine to inject DNA in the skin of the vaccinee. In comparison to other experimental vaccination methods DNA tattooing is very strong: besides small laboratory animals also large animals mount strong T cell responses upon

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells with rhBMP-2 inhibits the growth of canine osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassi Rici Rose

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs belong to a unique group of proteins that includes the growth factor TGF-β. BMPs play important roles in cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and inhibition of cell growth. They also participate in the maturation of several cell types, depending on the microenvironment and interactions with other regulatory factors. Depending on their concentration gradient, the BMPs can attract various types of cells and act as chemotactic, mitogenic, or differentiation agents. BMPs can interfere with cell proliferation and the formation of cartilage and bone. In addition, BMPs can induce the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into various cell types, including chondroblasts and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of treatment with rhBMP-2 on the proliferation of canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs and the tumor suppression properties of rhBMP-2 in canine osteocarcoma (OST cells. Osteosarcoma cell lines were isolated from biopsies and excisions of animals with osteosarcoma and were characterized by the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Butantan Institute. The mesenchymal stem cells were derived from the bone marrow of canine fetuses (cMSCs and belong to the University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine (FMVZ-USP stem cell bank. After expansion, the cells were cultured in a 12-well Transwell system; cells were treated with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells associated with rhBMP2. Expression of the intracytoplasmic and nuclear markers such as Caspase-3, Bax, Bad, Bcl-2, Ki-67, p53, Oct3/4, Nanog, Stro-1 were performed by flow citometry. Results We evaluated the regenerative potential of in vitro treatment with rhBMP-2 and found that both osteogenic induction and tumor regression occur in stem cells from canine bone marrow. rhBMP-2 inhibits the proliferation capacity of OST cells by mechanisms of apoptosis and tumor suppression mediated by p

  1. A Comparison of Imaging Techniques to Monitor Tumor Growth and Cancer Progression in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Puaux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose. Monitoring solid tumor growth and metastasis in small animals is important for cancer research. Noninvasive techniques make longitudinal studies possible, require fewer animals, and have greater statistical power. Such techniques include FDG positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and optical imaging, comprising bioluminescence imaging (BLI and fluorescence imaging (FLI. This study compared the performance and usability of these methods in the context of mouse tumor studies. Methods. B16 tumor-bearing mice (n=4 for each study were used to compare practicality, performance for small tumor detection and tumor burden measurement. Using RETAAD mice, which develop spontaneous melanomas, we examined the performance of MRI (n=6 mice and FDG-PET (n=10 mice for tumor identification. Results. Overall, BLI and FLI were the most practical techniques tested. Both BLI and FDG-PET identified small nonpalpable tumors, whereas MRI and FLI only detected macroscopic, clinically evident tumors. FDG-PET and MRI performed well in the identification of tumors in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value. Conclusion. Each of the four methods has different strengths that must be understood before selecting them for use.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  3. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Senno, Laura del [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Aguiari, Gianluca, E-mail: dsn@unife.it [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  4. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  5. Translating stem cell therapies: the role of companion animals in regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Volk, Susan W.; Theoret, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians and veterinary medicine have been integral to the development of stem cell therapies. The contributions of large animal experimental models to the development and refinement of modern hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were noted nearly five decades ago. More recent advances in adult stem cell/regenerative cell therapies continue to expand knowledge of the basic biology and clinical applications of stem cells. A relatively liberal legal and ethical regulation of stem cell r...

  6. Twenty years of embryonic stem cell research in farm animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notable distinctions between an embryonic stem cell (ESC) and somatic cell are that the ESC can maintain an undifferentiated state indefinitely, self renew, and is pluripotent, meaning that the ESC can potentially generate cells representing all the three primordial germ layers and contribute to the...

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Emeli M., E-mail: Emeli.Nilsson@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Brokken, Leon J.S., E-mail: Leon.Brokken@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Haerkoenen, Pirkko L., E-mail: Pirkko.Harkonen@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  8. Cell growth characterization using multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell growth characterization during culturing is an important issue in a variety of biomedical applications. In this study an electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy-based multi-electrode culture monitoring system was developed to characterize cell growth. A PC12 cell line was cultured for the cell growth study. The bioimpedance variations for PC12 cell growth within the initial 12 h were measured over a range between 1 kHz and 4 MHz at three different medium concentrations. Within this frequency range, the largest bioimpedance value was 1.9 times the smallest bioimpedance value. The phase angle decreased over the range from 1 to 10 kHz when cells were growing. Then, the phase angle approached a constant over the frequency range between 10 kHz and 2 MHz. Thereafter, the phase angle increased rapidly from 20 to 52 degrees during cell culturing between 8 and 12 h at 4 MHz. The maximum cell number after culturing for 12 h increased by 25.8% for the control sites with poly-D-lysine (PDL) pastes. For the normal growth factor, the cell number increased up to 4.78 times from 8 to 12 h, but only 0.96 and 1.60 times for the other two medium growth factors. The correlation coefficients between impedance and cell number were 0.868 (coating with PDL), and 0.836 (without PDL) for the normal concentration medium. Thus, impedance may be used as an index for cell growth characterization. (paper)

  9. Cell growth characterization using multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Yu; Huang, Ji-Jer; Huang, Yu-Jie; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Cell growth characterization during culturing is an important issue in a variety of biomedical applications. In this study an electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy-based multi-electrode culture monitoring system was developed to characterize cell growth. A PC12 cell line was cultured for the cell growth study. The bioimpedance variations for PC12 cell growth within the initial 12 h were measured over a range between 1 kHz and 4 MHz at three different medium concentrations. Within this frequency range, the largest bioimpedance value was 1.9 times the smallest bioimpedance value. The phase angle decreased over the range from 1 to 10 kHz when cells were growing. Then, the phase angle approached a constant over the frequency range between 10 kHz and 2 MHz. Thereafter, the phase angle increased rapidly from 20 to 52 degrees during cell culturing between 8 and 12 h at 4 MHz. The maximum cell number after culturing for 12 h increased by 25.8% for the control sites with poly-D-lysine (PDL) pastes. For the normal growth factor, the cell number increased up to 4.78 times from 8 to 12 h, but only 0.96 and 1.60 times for the other two medium growth factors. The correlation coefficients between impedance and cell number were 0.868 (coating with PDL), and 0.836 (without PDL) for the normal concentration medium. Thus, impedance may be used as an index for cell growth characterization.

  10. Activity and growth of microbial populations in pressurized deep-sea sediment and animal gut samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, P S; Deming, J W; Ohwada, K; Colwell, R R

    1982-08-01

    Benthic animals and sediment samples were collected at deep-sea stations in the northwest (3,600-m depth) and southeast (4,300- and 5200-m depths) Atlantic Ocean. Utilization rates of [14C]glutamate (0.67 to 0.74 nmol) in sediment suspensions incubated at in situ temperatures and pressures (3 to 5 degrees C and 360, 430, or 520 atmospheres) were relatively slow, ranging from 0.09 to 0.39 nmol g-1 day-1, whereas rates for pressurized samples of gut suspensions varied widely, ranging from no detectable activity to a rapid rate of 986 nmol g-1 day-1. Gut flora from a holothurian specimen and a fish demonstrated rapid, barophilic substrate utilization, based on relative rates calculated for pressurized samples and samples held at 1 atm (101.325 kPa). Substrate utilization by microbial populations in several sediment samples was not inhibited by in situ pressure. Deep-sea pressures did not restrict growth, measured as doubling time, of culturable bacteria present in a northwest Atlantic sediment sample and in a gut suspension prepared from an abyssal scavenging amphipod. From the results of this study, it was concluded that microbial populations in benthic environments can demonstrate significant metabolic activity under deep-ocean conditions of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, rates of microbial activity in the guts of benthic macrofauna are potentially more rapid than in surrounding deep-sea sediments. PMID:6127054

  11. Hematological and hepatic effects of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) used to stimulate hair growth in an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Gnann, Laís Angelo; Castro, Rafael Ferreira; Azzalis, Ligia Ajaime; Feder, David; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira; Pereira, Edimar Cristiano; Rosa, Paulo César Pires; Junqueira, Virginia Berlanga Campos; Rocha, Katya Cristina; Machado, Carlos D’ Aparecida; Paschoal, Francisco Camargo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso

    2013-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata is the hair loss usually reversible, in sharply defined areas. The treatment of alopecia using growth factors shows interesting activity in promoting hair growth. In this concept, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) is a marker of angiogenesis, stimulating hair growth by facilitating the supply of nutrients to the hair follicle, increasing follicular diameter. The aim of this study was the evaluation of a topical gel enriched with VEGF liposomes on the hair gr...

  12. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  13. Use of antimicrobial growth promoters in food animals and Enterococcus faecium resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø;

    1999-01-01

    , clear evidence of a health risk was not available. Accumulating evidence now indicates that the use of the glycopeptide avoparcin as a growth promoter has created in food animals a major reservoir of Enterococcus faecium, which contains the high level glycopeptide resistance determinant vanA, located...

  14. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  15. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2015-07-14

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  16. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  17. Large animal induced pluripotent stem cells as pre-clinical models for studying human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan R Plews; Gu, Mingxia; Longaker, Michael T.; Joseph C. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The derivation of human embryonic stem cells and subsequently human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has energized regenerative medicine research and enabled seemingly limitless applications. Although small animal models, such as mouse models, have played an important role in the progression of the field, typically, they are poor representations of the human disease phenotype. As an alternative, large animal models should be explored as a potentially better approach for clinica...

  18. Explaining tomato fruit growth by a multi-scale model on regulation of cell division, cell growth and carbohydrate dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de P.H.B.; Kromdijk, W.; Okello, R.C.; Fanwoua, J.; Struik, P.C.; Yin, X.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    A multi-scale approach to model tomato fruit growth is proposed, in order to account for the interaction between gene functioning and growth conditions, and, ultimately, to explain the fruit phenotype of various genotypes in diverse growth environments. There is particular focus on: (I) cell divisio

  19. Regulatory B cells and tolerance in transplantation: from animal models to human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eChesneau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the role of B cells in transplantation was thought to be restricted to producing antibodies that have been clearly shown to be deleterious in the long term, but, in fact, B cells are also able to produce cytokine and to present antigen. Their role as regulatory cells in various pathological situations has also been highlighted, and their role in transplantation is beginning to emerge in animal, and also in human, models. This review summarizes the different studies in animals and humans that suggest a B-cell regulatory role in the transplant tolerance mechanisms.

  20. Growth kinetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in bioelectrochemical cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏煦; 王淀佐; 邱冠周; 胡岳华

    2004-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans might be the most important bacteria used in biometallurgy. The foundation way of its growth process is oxidizing ferrous in order to obtain energy needed for metabolism, but the variation of ferrous concentration and mixed potential of the culture media would have crucial effect on the bacteria growth.Based on the characteristics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans growth and redox potential of ferric and ferrous, an electrochemical cell was designed conventionally to study growth rule and the relationship between redox potential and bacteria growth was built up, and some growth kinetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were elucidated. It demonstrates that the variation of open potential of electrochemical cell △E shows the growth tendency of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, at the initial growth stage, the value of △E increases slowly, when at logistic growth stage, it increases drastically, and the growth rate of bacteria is linear with the oxidation rate of ferrous. The bacteria growth kinetics model is proposed using Monod and Michealis-Menten equation, and the kinetics parameters are got. The consistence of the measured and the calculated results proves that it is proper to use the proposed kinetics model and the electrochemical cell method to describe the growth rule of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

  1. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell......-like) as well as T cells producing both cytokines (THO-like) responded to class II mAb. The costimulatory effect was not restricted to IL-2-driven T cell growth, since TCR/CD3-induced T cell activation was also enhanced by HLA-DR mAb. Moreover, class II costimulation potentiated CD28-mAb-induced T cell...

  2. Sunitinib Does Not Accelerate Tumor Growth in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krastan B. Blagoev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have suggested that sunitinib accelerates metastases in animals, ascribing this to inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor or the tumor’s adaptation. To address whether sunitinib accelerates tumors in humans, we analyzed data from the pivotal randomized phase III trial comparing sunitinib and interferon alfa in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The evidence clearly shows that sunitinib was not harmful, did not accelerate tumor growth, and did not shorten survival. Specifically, neither longer sunitinib treatment nor a greater effect of sunitinib on tumors reduced survival. Sunitinib did reduce the tumor’s growth rate while administered, thereby improving survival, without appearing to alter tumor biology after discontinuation. Concerns arising from animal models do not apply to patients receiving sunitinib and likely will not apply to similar agents.

  3. A C⋅As lyase for degradation of environmental organoarsenical herbicides and animal husbandry growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-05-27

    Arsenic is the most widespread environmental toxin. Substantial amounts of pentavalent organoarsenicals have been used as herbicides, such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA), and as growth enhancers for animal husbandry, such as roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylarsonic acid) [Rox(V)]. These undergo environmental degradation to more toxic inorganic arsenite [As(III)]. We previously demonstrated a two-step pathway of degradation of MSMA to As(III) by microbial communities involving sequential reduction to methylarsonous acid [MAs(III)] by one bacterial species and demethylation from MAs(III) to As(III) by another. In this study, the gene responsible for MAs(III) demethylation was identified from an environmental MAs(III)-demethylating isolate, Bacillus sp. MD1. This gene, termed arsenic inducible gene (arsI), is in an arsenic resistance (ars) operon and encodes a nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenase with C ⋅ As lyase activity. Heterologous expression of ArsI conferred MAs(III)-demethylating activity and MAs(III) resistance to an arsenic-hypersensitive strain of Escherichia coli, demonstrating that MAs(III) demethylation is a detoxification process. Purified ArsI catalyzes Fe(2+)-dependent MAs(III) demethylation. In addition, ArsI cleaves the C ⋅ As bond in trivalent roxarsone and other aromatic arsenicals. ArsI homologs are widely distributed in prokaryotes, and we propose that ArsI-catalyzed organoarsenical degradation has a significant impact on the arsenic biogeocycle. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a molecular mechanism for organoarsenic degradation by a C ⋅ As lyase.

  4. Roles for microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons in animal cell cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhongcai; CAI Shang; JIANG Qing; ZHANG Chuanmao; TANG Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    Microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons play key roles in the whole process of cytokinesis. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of cytokinesis by microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons, many reports are conflicting. In our study, combining the cytoskeletons drug treatments with the time-lapse video technology, we retested the key roles of microtubule and actin filament in cytokinesis. The results showed that depolymerization of microtubules by Nocodazole after the initiation of furrowing would not inhibit the furrow ingression, but obviously decrease the stiffness of daughter cells. Depolymerizing actin filaments by Cytochalasin B before metaphase would inhibit the initiation of furrowing but not chromosome segregation, resulting in the formation of binucleate cells; however, depolymerizing actin filaments during anaphase would prevent furrowing and lead to the regress of established furrow, also resulting in the formation of binucleate cells. Further, depolymerizing microtubules and actin filaments simultaneously after metaphase would cause the quick regress of the furrow and the formation of binucleate cells. From these results we propose that a successful cytokinesis requires functions and coordination of both the microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons. Microtubule cytoskeleton may function in the positioning and initiation of cleavage furrow, and the actin filament cytoskeleton may play key roles in the initiation and ingression of the furrow.

  5. Recent Advances in Application of Male Germ Cell Transplantation in Farm Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Honaramooz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of isolated germ cells from a fertile donor male into the seminiferous tubules of infertile recipients can result in donor-derived sperm production. Therefore, this system represents a major development in the study of spermatogenesis and a unique functional assay to determine the developmental potential and relative abundance of spermatogonial stem cells in a given population of testis cells. The application of this method in farm animals has been the subject of an increasing number of studies, mostly because of its potential as an alternative strategy in producing transgenic livestock with higher efficiency and less time and capital requirement than the current methods. This paper highlights the salient recent research on germ cell transplantation in farm animals. The emphasis is placed on the current status of the technique and examination of ways to increase its efficiency through improved preparation of the recipient animals as well as isolation, purification, preservation, and transgenesis of the donor germ cells.

  6. Growth of children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.J. van den Hoek (A. C J); A. Karstens (A.); R.M. Egeler (Maarten); K. Hählen (Karel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractConclusion: GH deficiency is not a common manifestation of LCH in childhood and GH provocation tests are only indicated when there is a poor or decelerating growth rate. In our patients the number of organs involved and/or the treatment modality did not influence the growth in all but on

  7. Dihydroartemisinin is an inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang JIAO; Chun-min GE; Qing-hui MENG; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anticancer activity of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a deriva-tive of antimalaria drug artemisinin in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods: Cell growth was determined by the MTT viability assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle progression were evaluated by a DNA fragmentation gel electro-phoresis, flow cytometry assay, and TUNEL assay; protein and mRNA expression were analyzed by Western blotting and RT-PCR assay. Results: Artemisinin and its derivatives, including artesunate, arteether, artemether, arteannuin, and DHA, exhibit anticancer growth activities in human ovarian cancer cells. Among them, DHA is the most effective in inhibiting cell growth. Ovarian cancer cell lines are more sensitive (5-10-fold) to DHA treatment compared to normal ovarian cell lines. DHA at micromolar dose levels exhibits a dose- and time-dependent cyto-toxicity in ovarian cancer cell lines. Furthermore, DHA induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest, accompanied by a decrease of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 and an increase of Bax and Bad. Conclusion: The promising results show for the first time that DHA inhibits the growth of human ovarian cancer cells. The selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth, apoptosis induction, and G2 arrest provide in vitro evidence for further studies of DHA as a possible anticancer drug in the clinical treatment of ovarian cancer.

  8. Deoxynivalenol induces cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in animal primary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Banerjee, Subham; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Borthakur, Sashin Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum, is widely found as a contaminant of food. DON is responsible for a wide range of toxic activities, including gastro-intestinal, lymphoid, bone-marrow and cardiotoxicity. But, the complete explorations of toxicity in terms of hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as well have not been documented well. Again, the mechanisms through which DON damages the DNA and promotes cellular toxicity are not well established. Considering the above fact, this research article is focused on the effects of DON-induced toxicities on experimental animal model as well as its effects on cellular level via various toxicological investigations. DON treatment showed cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Further, flow cytometric analysis of hepatocytes showed cellular apoptosis, suggesting that DON-induced hepatotoxicity is, may be partly, mediated by apoptosis. Moreover, significant differences were found in each haematology and clinical chemistry value, either (p > 0.05). No abnormality of any organ was found during histopathological examination. Hence, it can be concluded that DON induces oxidative DNA damage and increases the formation of centromere positive micronuclei due to aneugenic activity. PMID:25578892

  9. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  10. Picosecond ultrasonics in single cells: Interface step motion for thin animal cells and Brillouin scattering for thick vegetal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducousso, M.; Dehoux, T.; Audoin, B.; Zouani, O.; Chollet, C.; Durrieu, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the mechanical properties of single biological cells using a picosecond laser-ultrasonic method is proposed. A pump-probe set-up based on ultrafast laser (100 fs pulses) is used to generate and detect acoustic frequencies in the GHz range in a cell on a metallic substrate. The time resolution is about 1 ps and the laser focusing allows a 1 μm lateral resolution. We carry out experiments in both animal and vegetal cells. A semi-analytical simulation model of the physical phenomena involved in experiments is presented. The coupled heat and stress equations are solved including a thermal boundary resistance at the cell/substrate interface and strong acoustic absorption. The optical detection resulting from the interaction between the acoustic wave and the laser light is also modelled. Simulations allow the analysis of experimental signals in both vegetal and animal cells. The results support the potentialities of the non-invasive technique for bioengineering and medical applications.

  11. β-catenin-driven binary cell fate decisions in animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays key roles during animal development. In several species, β-catenin is used in a reiterative manner to regulate cell fate diversification between daughter cells following division. This binary cell fate specification mechanism has been observed in animals that belong to very diverse phyla: the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the annelid Platynereis, and the ascidian Ciona. It may also play a role in the regulation of several stem cell lineages in vertebrates. While the molecular mechanism behind this binary cell fate switch is not fully understood, it appears that both secreted Wnt ligands and asymmetric cortical factors contribute to the generation of the difference in nuclear β-catenin levels between daughter cells. β-Catenin then cooperates with lineage specific transcription factors to induce the expression of novel sets of transcription factors at each round of divisions, thereby diversifying cell fate. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26952169

  12. Growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Masayuki; Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-08-01

    Earlier studies have shown that resveratrol could induce death in several human cancer cell lines in culture. Here we report our observation that resveratrol can also promote the growth of certain human cancer cells when they are grown either in culture or in athymic nude mice as xenografts. At relatively low concentrations (cells, but this effect was not observed in several other human cell lines tested. Analysis of cell signaling molecules showed that resveratrol induced the activation of JNK, p38, Akt, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in these cells. Further analysis using pharmacological inhibitors showed that only the NF-kappaB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) abrogated the growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in cultured cells. In athymic nude mice, resveratrol at 16.5 mg/kg body weight enhanced the growth of MDA-MB-435s xenografts compared to the control group, while resveratrol at the 33 mg/kg body weight dose did not have a similar effect. Additional analyses confirmed that resveratrol stimulated cancer cell growth in vivo through activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Taken together, these observations suggest that resveratrol at low concentrations could stimulate the growth of certain types of human cancer cells in vivo. This cell type-specific mitogenic effect of resveratrol may also partly contribute to the procarcinogenic effect of alcohol consumption (rich in resveratrol) in the development of certain human cancers.

  13. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells

  14. Discussion of Animal Stem Cells in the Classroom: Engaging Students through the Lens of Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Niess, Daniel; Hutchinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning about stem cells within the context of treating pet illness or injury is an additional way for teachers to discuss the integration of science, technology, and veterinary medicine. We explain how practitioners in veterinary medicine harvest animal stem cells from adipose (fat) tissue in treating pet illness or injury. Further, we narrate…

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of inflammatoryand autoimmune diseases in experimental animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew W Klinker; Cheng-Hong Wei

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells [also known asmesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)] are currently beingstudied as a cell-based treatment for inflammatorydisorders. Experimental animal models of humanimmune-mediated diseases have been instrumental inestablishing their immunosuppressive properties. Inthis review, we summarize recent studies examiningthe effectiveness of MSCs as immunotherapy in severalwidely-studied animal models, including type 1 diabetes,experimental autoimmune arthritis, experimentalautoimmune encephalomyelitis, inflammatory boweldisease, graft-vs -host disease, and systemic lupuserythematosus. In addition, we discuss mechanismsidentified by which MSCs mediate immune suppressionin specific disease models, and potential sources offunctional variability of MSCs between studies.

  16. Dissolution of rock phosphate in animal manure soil amendment and lettuce growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Agyarko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted in pots on the field to assess the effect of different quantities of poultry manure (PM, cattle manure (CM and pig manure (PG on the release of available phosphorus from Togo rock phosphate (RP and lettuce growth. There were eleven (11 treatments which were: Control (soil only; 2.5g RP; 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 5gCM; 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 5gPM; 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 5gPG, applied per kg soil, using the Completely Randomized Design (CRD with three replications. Available phosphorus and other parameters were assessed using standard methods. Results were statistically analyzed using the the GenStat (11th Edition statistical software package. The amount and type of animal manure in the amendment affected the amount of the available P released. The addition of 2.5g manure to 2.5g RP in a kg of soil significantly (P<0.05 increased available P by 4 to 7 times over the sole 2.5g RP/kg soil treatment. Doubling the amount of manure in the amendment (5g manure + 2.5g RP almost doubled the amount of P released, with the poultry manure combinations being more significant. The amount of available P in the soil positively related to the plant height (R2=63, leaf area (R2=0.55, dry weight (R2=0.73 and the percentage P in the leaf (R2=0.88 of lettuce. The PM at 2.5gRP + 5gPM recorded the highest significant (P<0.05 values. The study has provided further basis for manure selection and quantities to be used in enhancing the release of P from rock phosphate. However, investigations need to be continued using nuclear techniques.

  17. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  18. Catalase regulates cell growth in HL60 human promyelocytic cells: evidence for growth regulation by H(2)O(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Misao; Akashi, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are generated constitutively in mammalian cells. Because of its relatively long life and high permeability across membranes, H(2)O(2) is thought to be an important second messenger. Generation of H(2)O(2) is increased in response to external insults, including radiation. Catalase is located at the peroxisome and scavenges H(2)O(2). In this study, we investigated the role of catalase in cell growth using the H(2)O(2)-resistant variant HP100-1 of human promyelocytic HL60 cells. HP100-1 cells had an almost 10-fold higher activity of catalase than HL60 cells without differences in levels of glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc SOD (CuZnSOD). HP100-1 cells had higher proliferative activity than HL60 cells. Treatment with catalase or the introduction of catalase cDNA into HL60 cells stimulated cell growth. Exposure of HP100-1 cells to a catalase inhibitor resulted in suppression of cell growth with concomitant increased levels of intracellular H(2)O(2). Moreover, exogenously added H(2)O(2) or depletion of glutathione suppressed cell growth in HL60 cells. Extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) was constitutively phosphorylated in HP100-1 cells but not in HL60 cells. Inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway suppressed the growth of HP100-1 cells, but inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) did not affect growth. Moreover, inhibition of catalase blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 but not of p38MAPK in HP100-1 cells. Thus our results suggest that catalase activates the growth of HL60 cells through dismutation of H(2)O(2), leading to activation of the ERK1/2 pathway; H(2)O(2) is an important regulator of growth in HL60 cells.

  19. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  20. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  1. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amrita DOSANJH

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a cysteine-rich protein that promotes extracellular matrix deposition. CTGF is selectively induced by transforming growth factor β and des-Arg kallidin in lung fibroblasts and increases steady-state mRNA levels of α type I collagen, 5α-integrin and fibronectin in fibroblasts. Bronchial epithelial cells have been proposed to functionally interact with lung fibroblasts. We therefore investigated if bronchial epithelial cells are able to synthesize CTGF. Human bronchial epithelial cells were grown to subconfluence in standard growth media. Proliferating cells grown in small airway growth media were harvested following starvation for up to 24 h. Expression of CTGF transcripts was measured by PCR. Immunocytochemistry was also completed using a commercially available antibody.The cells expressed readily detectable CTGF transcripts. Starvation of these cells resulted in a quantitative decline of CTGF transcripts. Direct sequencing of the PCR product identified human CTGF. Immunocytochemistry confirmed intracellular CTGF in the cells and none in negative control cells. We conclude that bronchial epithelial cells could be a novel source of CTGF. Bronchial epithelial cell-derived CTGF could thus directly influence the deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic lung diseases.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 influences pancreatic cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah K Johnson; Randy S Haun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) overexpression in pancreatic cancer (PaC).METHODS: The effects of IGFBP-5 on cell growth were assessed by stable transfection of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cell lines and measuring cell number and DNA synthesis. Alterations in the cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses.Changes in cell survival and signal transduction were evaluated after mitogen activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment.RESULTS: After serum depr ivat ion, IGFBP-5 expression increased both cell number and DNA synthesis in BxPC-3 cells, but reduced cell number in PANC-1 cells. Consistent with this observation, cell cycle analysis of IGFBP-5-expressing cells revealed accelerated cell cycle progression in BxPC-3 and G2/M arrest of PANC-1 cells. Signal transduction analysis revealed that Akt activation was increased in BxPC-3, but reduced in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) activation in BxPC-3, but enhanced ERK1/2 activation in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. When MEK1/2 was blocked, Akt activation remained elevated in IGFBP-5 expressing PaC cells; however, inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 abrogated IGFBP-5-mediated cell survival.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IGFBP-5 expression affects the cell cycle and survival signal pathways and thus it may be an important mediator of PaC cell growth.

  3. TOR and paradigm change: cell growth is controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael N

    2016-09-15

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of target of rapamycin (TOR), a highly conserved kinase and central controller of cell growth. In this Retrospective, I briefly describe the discovery of TOR and the subsequent elucidation of its cellular role. I place particular emphasis on an article by Barbet et al. from 1996, the first suggesting that TOR controls cell growth in response to nutrients.

  4. TOR and paradigm change: cell growth is controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael N

    2016-09-15

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of target of rapamycin (TOR), a highly conserved kinase and central controller of cell growth. In this Retrospective, I briefly describe the discovery of TOR and the subsequent elucidation of its cellular role. I place particular emphasis on an article by Barbet et al. from 1996, the first suggesting that TOR controls cell growth in response to nutrients. PMID:27634743

  5. The influence of feeding GMO-peas on growth of animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Mares; Tunde Jurikova Pokorna; Jiri Sochor; Ladislav Zeman; Mojmir Baron; Jiri Mlcek; Stefan Balla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of genetically modified (GM) food or feed into the commercial sale represents a very complicated process. One of the most important steps in approval process is the evaluation of all risks on the health status of people and animal models. Within our project the genetically modified peas was breeded that showed significant resistance against Pea seed-borne mosaic virus and Pea enation mosaic virus. Preclinical studies have been conducted to found out the effect of GMO peas on anim...

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting at the initiator of hTERT arrests growth of hepatoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Xia Liu; Wen-Sheng Sun; Ying-Lin Cao; Chun-Hong Ma; Li-Hui Han; Li-Ning Zhang; Zhen-Guang Wang; Fa-Liang Zhu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effect of antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide (asON) complementary to the initiator of human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT)on the growth of hepatoma cells.METHODS: The as-hTERT was synthesized by using a DNA synthesizer. HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with ashTERT at the concentration of 10 μmol/L. After 72 h, these cells were obtained for detecting growth inhibition,telomerase activity using the methods of MTT, TRAP-PCR-ELISA, respectively. BALB/c(nu/nu) mice were injected HepG2.2.15 cells and a human-nude mice model was obtained. There were three groups for anti-tumor activity study. Once tumors were established, these animals in the first group were administered as-hTERT and saline.Apoptosis of tumor cells was detected by FCM. In the 2nd group, the animals were injected HepG2.2.15 cells together with as-hTERT. In the third group, the animals were given as-hTERT 24 hours postinjection of HepG2.2.15 cells. The anti-HBV effects were assayed with ELISA ih vitro and in vivo.RESULTS: Growth inhibition was observed in cells treated with as-hTERT ih vitro. A significant different in the value of A570-A630 was found between cells treated with as-hTERT and control (P<0.01) by MTT method. The telomerase activity of tumor cells treated with as-hTERT was reduced,the value of A450 nm was 0.42 compared to control (1,49)with TRAP-PCR-ELISA. The peak of apoptosis in tumor cells given as-hTERT was 21. 12%, but not seen in saline-treated control. A prolonged period of carcinogenesis was observed in the second and third group animals. There was inhibitory effect on the expression of HBsAg and HBeAg ih vivo and in vitro.CONCLUSION: As-hTERT has an anti-tumor activity, which may be useful for gene therapy of tumors.

  7. A lack of commitment for over 500 million years: conserved animal stem cell pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboobaker, A Aziz; Kao, Damian

    2012-06-13

    Stem cells, both adult and germline, are the key cells underpinning animal evolution. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the evolution of their shared key feature: pluripotency. Now using genome-wide expression profiling of pluripotent planarian adult stem cells (pASCs), Önal et al (2012) present evidence for deep molecular conservation of pluripotency. They characterise the expression profile of pASCs and identify conserved expression profiles and functions for genes required for mammalian pluripotency. Their analyses suggest that molecular pluripotency mechanisms may be conserved, and tantalisingly that pluripotency in germ stem cells (GSCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs) may have had shared common evolutionary origins.

  8. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  9. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  10. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase coordinates cell growth and fat storage through phosphatidylinositol metabolism and the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During development, animals usually undergo a rapid growth phase followed by a homeostatic stage when growth has ceased. The increase in cell size and number during the growth phase requires a large amount of lipids; while in the static state, excess lipids are usually stored in adipose tissues in preparation for nutrient-limited conditions. How cells coordinate growth and fat storage is not fully understood. Through a genetic screen we identified Drosophila melanogaster CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS/CdsA, which diverts phosphatidic acid from triacylglycerol synthesis to phosphatidylinositol (PI synthesis and coordinates cell growth and fat storage. Loss of CdsA function causes significant accumulation of neutral lipids in many tissues along with reduced cell/organ size. These phenotypes can be traced back to reduced PI levels and, subsequently, low insulin pathway activity. Overexpressing CdsA rescues the fat storage and cell growth phenotypes of insulin pathway mutants, suggesting that CdsA coordinates cell/tissue growth and lipid storage through the insulin pathway. We also revealed that a DAG-to-PE route mediated by the choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase Bbc may contribute to the growth of fat cells in CdsA RNAi.

  11. Molecular mobility of scaffolds' biopolymers influences cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlipec, Rok; Gorgieva, Selestina; Jurašin, Darija; Urbančič, Iztok; Kokol, Vanja; Strancar, Janez

    2014-09-24

    Understanding biocompatibility of materials and scaffolds is one of the main challenges in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration. The complex nature of cell-biomaterial interaction requires extensive preclinical functionality testing by studying specific cell responses to different biomaterial properties, from morphology and mechanics to surface characteristics at the molecular level. Despite constant improvements, a more general picture of biocompatibility is still lacking and tailormade scaffolds are not yet available. The scope of our study was thus the investigation of the correlation of fibroblast cell growth on different gelatin scaffolds with their morphological, mechanical as well as surface molecular properties. The latter were thoroughly investigated via polymer molecular mobility studied by site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) for the first time. Anisotropy of the rotational motion of the gelatin side chain mobility was identified as the most correlated quantity with cell growth in the first days after adhesion, while weaker correlations were found with scaffold viscoelasticity and no correlations with scaffold morphology. Namely, the scaffolds with highly mobile or unrestricted polymers identified with the cell growth being five times less efficient (N(cells) = 60 ± 25 mm(-2)) as compared to cell growth on the scaffolds with considerable part of polymers with the restricted rotational motion (N(cells) = 290 ± 25 mm(-2)). This suggests that molecular mobility of scaffold components could play an important role in cell response to medical devices, reflecting a new aspect of the biocompatibility concept.

  12. The control of cell growth and body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Simon

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important ways in which animal species vary is in their size. Individuals of the largest animal ever thought to have lived, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus), can reach a weight of 190 t and a length of over 30 m. At the other extreme, among the smallest multicellular animals are males of the parasitic wasp, Dicopomorpha echmepterygis, which even as adults are just 140 μm in length. In terms of volume, these species differ by more than 14 orders of magnitude. Since size has such profound effects on an organism's ecology, anatomy and physiology, an important task for evolutionary biology and ecology is to account for why organisms grow to their characteristic sizes. Equally, a full description of an organism's development must include an explanation of how its growth and body size are regulated. Here I review research on how these processes are controlled in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Analyses of small and long mutants have revealed that in the worm, DBL-1, a ligand in the TGFβ superfamily family, promotes growth in a dose-dependent manner. DBL-1 signaling affects body size by stimulating the growth of syncytial hypodermal cells rather than controlling cell division. Signals from chemosensory neurons and from the gonad also modulate body size, in part, independently of DBL-1-mediated signaling. Organismal size and morphology is heavily influenced by the cuticle, which acts as the exoskeleton. Finally, I summarize research on several genes that appear to regulate body size by cell autonomously regulating cell growth throughout the worm. PMID:24262077

  13. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  14. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor).

    OpenAIRE

    Winkles, J A; Friesel, R; Burgess, W H; Howk, R; Mehlman, T; Weinstein, R.; T. MACIAG

    1987-01-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells, exp...

  15. In vitro effects of recombinant human growth hormone on growth of human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Yong Chen; Dao-Ming Liang; Ping Gan; Yi Zhang; Jie Lin

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth of human gastric cancer cell line in vitro.METHODS: Experiment was divided into control group,rhGH group, oxaliplatin (L-OHP) group and rhGH+L-OHP group. Cell inhibitory rate, cell cycle, cell proliferation index (PI) and DNA inhibitory rate of human gastric cancer line BGC823, at different concentrations of rhGH treatment were studied by cell culture, MTT assay and flow cytometry.RESULTS: The distinctly accelerated effects of rhGH on multiplication of BGC823 cell line were not found in vitro.There was no statistical significance between rhGH group and control group, or between rhGH+L-OHP group and LOHP group (P>0.05). The cell growth curve did not rise.Cell inhibitory rate and cells arrested in G0-G1 phase were obviously increased. Meanwhile, cells in S phase and PI were distinctly decreased and DNA inhibitory rate was obviously increased in rhGH+L-OHP group in comparison with control group and rhGH group, respectively (P<0.01).Cell inhibitory rate showed an increasing trend and PI showed a decreasing trend in rhGH+L-OHP group compared with L-OHP group.CONCLUSION: In vitro rhGH does not accelerate the multiplication of human gastric cancer cells. It may increase the therapeutic efficacy when it is used in combination with anticancer drugs.

  16. Prenatal immune activation alters hippocampal place cell firing characteristics in adult animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Amy R; Bilkey, David K

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Adults with these disorders display alterations in memory function that may result from changes in the structure and function of the hippocampus. In the present study we use an animal model to investigate the effect that a transient prenatal maternal immune activation episode has on the spatially-modulated firing activity of hippocampal neurons in adult animals. MIA was induced in pregnant rat dams with a single injection of the synthetic cytokine inducer polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day 15. Control dams were given a saline equivalent. Firing activity and local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the CA1 region of the adult male offspring of these dams as they moved freely in an open arena. Most neurons displayed characteristic spatially-modulated 'place cell' firing activity and while there was no between-group difference in mean firing rate between groups, place cells had smaller place fields in MIA-exposed animals when compared to control-group cells. Cells recorded in MIA-group animals also displayed an altered firing-phase synchrony relationship to simultaneously recorded LFPs. When the floor of the arena was rotated, the place fields of MIA-group cells were more likely to shift in the same direction as the floor rotation, suggesting that local cues may have been more salient for these animals. In contrast, place fields in control group cells were more likely to shift firing position to novel spatial locations suggesting an altered response to contextual cues. These findings show that a single MIA intervention is sufficient to change several important characteristics of hippocampal place cell activity in adult offspring. These changes could contribute to the memory dysfunction that is associated with MIA, by altering the encoding of spatial context and by

  17. Virtual microstructural leaf tissue generation based on cell growth modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abera, M.K.; Retta, M.A.; Verboven, P.; Nicolai, B.M.; Berghuijs, H.; Struik, P.

    2016-01-01

    A cell growth algorithm for virtual leaf tissue generation is presented based on the biomechanics of plant cells in tissues. The algorithm can account for typical differences in epidermal layers, palisade mesophyll layer and spongy mesophyll layer which have characteristic differences in the shap

  18. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75NTR, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75NTR. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75NTR. This latter signaling through p75NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  19. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neety Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins.

  20. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Neety; Pal, Shilpa; Sapru, Sunaina; Kundu, Joydip; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Singh, N Ibotambi; Yao, Juming; Kundu, Subhas C

    2016-01-01

    Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins. PMID:27517047

  1. Deficiency in the 15 kDa Selenoprotein Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, and is thought to provide protection against some forms of cancer. These protective effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, through selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Recent studies in a mouse colon cancer cell line have shown that the 15 kDa selenoprotein (Sep15 may also play a role in promoting colon cancer. The current study investigated whether the effects of reversing the cancer phenotype observed when Sep15 was removed in mouse colon cancer cells, were recapitulated in HCT116 and HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Targeted down-regulation of Sep15 using RNAi technology in these human colon cancer cell lines resulted in similarly decreased growth under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions. However, the magnitude of reduction in cell growth was much less than in the mouse colon cancer cell line investigated previously. Furthermore, changes in cell cycle distribution were observed, indicating a delayed release of Sep15 deficient cells from the G0/G1 phase after synchronization. The potential mechanism by which human colon cancer cells lacking Sep15 revert their cancer phenotype will need to be explored further.

  2. The potential of hydrodynamic damage to animal cells of industrial relevance: current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiwei; Berdugo, Claudia; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2011-10-01

    Suspension animal cell culture is now routinely scaled up to bioreactors on the order of 10,000 L, and greater, to meet commercial demand. However, the concern of the 'shear sensitivity' of animal cells still remains, not only within the bioreactor, but also in the downstream processing. As the productivities continue to increase, titer of ~10 g/L are now reported with cell densities greater than 2 × 10(7) cells/mL. Such high, and potentially higher cell densities will inevitably translate to increased demand in mass transfer and mixing. In addition, achieving productivity gains in both the upstream stage and downstream processes can subject the cells to aggressive environments such as those involving hydrodynamic stresses. The perception of 'shear sensitivity' has historically put an arbitrary upper limit on agitation and aeration in bioreactor operation; however, as cell densities and productivities continue to increase, mass transfer requirements can exceed those imposed by these arbitrary low limits. Therefore, a better understanding of how animal cells, used to produce therapeutic products, respond to hydrodynamic forces in both qualitative and quantitative ways will allow an experimentally based, higher, "upper limit" to be created to guide the design and operation of future commercial, large scale bioreactors. With respect to downstream hydrodynamic conditions, situations have already been achieved in which practical limits with respect to hydrodynamic forces have been experienced. This review mainly focuses on publications from both the academy and industry regarding the effect of hydrodynamic forces on industrially relevant animal cells, and not on the actual scale-up of bioreactors. A summary of implications and remaining challenges will also be presented. PMID:21785843

  3. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate.

  4. Effect of transforming growth factor-β1 on human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsuya Shimizu; Takashi Tajiri; Shigeki Yokomuro; Yoshiaki Mizuguchi; Yutaka Kawahigashi; Yasuo Arima; Nobuhiko Taniai; Yasuhiro Mamada; Hiroshi Yoshida; Koho Akimaru

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the biological effects of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC).METHODS: We investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on human ICC cell lines (HuCCT1, MEC, and HuH-28) by monitoring the influence of TGF-β1 on tumor growth and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in ICC cells.RESULTS: All three human ICC cell lines produced TGF-β1 and demonstrated accelerated growth in the presence of TGF-β1 with no apoptotic effect. Studies on HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced stimulation of the expression of TGF-β1, as well as a decrease in TGF-β1 mRNA expression induced by neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. These results indicate that TGF-β1 stimulates the production and function of TGF-β1 in an autocrine fashion. Further, IL-6 secretion was observed in all three cell lines and exhibited an inhibitory response to neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. Experiments using HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced acceleration of IL-6 protein expression and mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate a functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6. All three cell lines proliferated in the presence of IL-6. In contrast, TGF-β1 induced no growth effect in HuCCT1 in the presence of small interfering RNA against a specific cell surface receptor of IL-6 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3.CONCLUSION: ICC cells produce TGF-β1 and confer a TGF-β1-induced growth effect in an autocrine fashion.TGF-β1 activates IL-6 production, and the functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6 contributes to ICC cell growth by TGF-β1.

  5. Animal Rights and Human Growth: Intellectual Courage and Extending the Moral Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Bradley D.

    2009-01-01

    While the ethical dimension of human-animal relationships has become a legitimate, rich subject for contemporary moral philosophers, scholars of moral education, and to a large extent, philosophers of education, have remained surprisingly silent on this subject. The primary purpose of this essay is to illustrate the relationship between the moral…

  6. Preparing T Cell Growth Factor from Rat Splenocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Beeton, Christine; Chandy, K. George

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance of antigen-specific T cell lines or clones in culture requires rounds of antigen-induced activation separated by phases of cell expansion 1,2. Addition of interleukin 2 to the culture media during the expansion phase is necessary to prevent cell death and sufficient to maintain short-term T cell lines but has been shown to increase Th1 polarization 3. Replacement of interleukin 2 by T cell growth factor (TCGF) which contains a mix of cytokines is more effective than interleukin 2...

  7. Different Roles of Mast Cells in Obesity and Diabetes: Lessons from Experimental Animals and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Michael A.; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in allergic hyperresponsiveness and in defending microorganism infections. Recent studies of experimental animals and humans have suggested that MCs participate in obesity and diabetes. MC distribution and activities in adipose tissues may vary, depending on the locations of different adipose tissues. In addition to releasing inflammatory mediators to affect adipose tissue extracellular matrix remodeling and to promote inflammatory cell recruitment and ...

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  11. Stem cell therapy for joint problems using the horse as a clinically relevant animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Betts, Dean H.

    2007-01-01

    of experimentally induced lesions. The horse lends itself as a good animal model of spontaneous joint disorders that are clinically relevant to similar human disorders. Equine stem cell and tissue engineering studies may be financially feasible to principal investigators and small biotechnology companies...

  12. Software sensors as a tool for optimization of animal-cell cultures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis software sensors are introduced that predict the biomass activity and the concentrations of glucose, glutamine, lactic acid, and ammonium on line, The software sensors for biomass activity, glucose and lactic acid can be applied for any type of animal cell that is grown in a bioreacto

  13. Pancreatic acinar cells: molecular insight from studies of signal-transduction using transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, David I

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are classical exocrine gland cells. The apical regions of clusters of coupled acinar cells collectively form a lumen which constitutes the blind end of a tube created by ductal cells - a structure reminiscent of a "bunch of grapes". When activated by neural or hormonal secretagogues, pancreatic acinar cells are stimulated to secrete a variety of proteins. These proteins are predominately inactive digestive enzyme precursors called "zymogens". Acinar cell secretion is absolutely dependent on secretagogue-induced increases in intracellular free Ca(2+). The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) has precise temporal and spatial characteristics as a result of the exquisite regulation of the proteins responsible for Ca(2+) release, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) clearance in the acinar cell. This brief review discusses recent studies in which transgenic animal models have been utilized to define in molecular detail the components of the Ca(2+) signaling machinery which contribute to these characteristics.

  14. Meloxicam inhibits the growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A P; Williams, C S; Sheng, H; Lamps, L W; Williams, V P; Pairet, M; Morrow, J D; DuBois, R N

    1998-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 has been reported to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The effects of meloxicam (a COX-2 inhibitor) on the growth of two colon cancer cell lines that express COX-2 (HCA-7 and Moser-S) and a COX-2 negative cell line (HCT-116) were evaluated. The growth rate of these cells was measured following treatment with meloxicam. HCA-7 and Moser-S colony size were significantly reduced following treatment with meloxicam; however, there was no significant change in HCT-116 colony size with treatment. In vivo studies were performed to evaluate the effect of meloxicam on the growth of HCA-7 cells when xenografted into nude mice. We observed a 51% reduction in tumor size after 4 weeks of treatment. Analysis of COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels in HCA-7 tumor lysates revealed a slight decrease in COX-2 expression levels in tumors taken from mice treated with meloxicam and no detectable COX-1 expression. Here we report that meloxicam significantly inhibited HCA-7 colony and tumor growth but had no effect on the growth of the COX-2 negative HCT-116 cells. PMID:9886578

  15. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  16. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  17. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  18. Evidence and implications of higher-order scaling in the environmental variation of animal population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jake M; Ponciano, José M

    2015-03-01

    Environmental stochasticity is an important concept in population dynamics, providing a quantitative model of the extrinsic fluctuations driving population abundances. It is typically formulated as a stochastic perturbation to the maximum reproductive rate, leading to a population variance that scales quadratically with abundance. However, environmental fluctuations may also drive changes in the strength of density dependence. Very few studies have examined the consequences of this alternative model formulation while even fewer have tested which model better describes fluctuations in animal populations. Here we use data from the Global Population Dynamics Database to determine the statistical support for this alternative environmental variance model in 165 animal populations and test whether these models can capture known population-environment interactions in two well-studied ungulates. Our results suggest that variation in the density dependence is common and leads to a higher-order scaling of the population variance. This scaling will often stabilize populations although dynamics may also be destabilized under certain conditions. We conclude that higher-order environmental variation is a potentially ubiquitous and consequential property of animal populations. Our results suggest that extinction risk estimates may often be overestimated when not properly taking into account how environmental fluctuations affect population parameters. PMID:25730852

  19. Growth and Development Symposium: promoting healthier humans through healthier livestock: animal agriculture enters the metagenomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D N

    2011-03-01

    The priorities of public health and agricultural sciences intersect through a shared objective to foster better human health. Enhancements in food quality and reductions in the environmental effects of modern agriculture represent 2 distinct paths through which animal sciences can contribute to the cause of public health. Recent developments in the study of human-associated microbial communities (microbiotas), notably in association with disease, indicate that better understanding of the microbial ecology of livestock can contribute to achieving the goals of better foods and a cleaner environment. Culture-independent microbiological technologies now permit comprehensive study of complex microbial communities in their natural environments. Microbiotas associated with both humans and animals provide myriad beneficial services to their hosts that, if lost or diminished, could compromise host health. Dysfunctional microbial communities have been noted in several human conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Examination of the mechanisms by which the human microbiota influences health and disease susceptibility can inform similar studies of host-microbe function in the animal sciences. Insights gained from human studies indicate strategies to raise not only healthier livestock, through selective manipulation of microbial communities, but also healthier humans.

  20. An integrated optical platform for micromanipulation of cells and tissue in live animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Raphael

    The hematopoietic stem cell niche is a specialized bone marrow (BM) microenvironment where blood-forming cells reside. Interactions between these rare cells and their niche need to be studied at the single-cell level. While live animal cell tracking with optical microscopy has proven useful for this purpose, a more thorough characterization requires novel approaches. This can be accomplished by using an integrated optical platform for cell and tissue manipulations (cell transplantation and extraction) in the skull bone of live mice. The platform integrates a non-damaging laser ablation microbeam for bone removal and tissue cutting, optical tweezers for single cell trapping, and a video-rate scanning microscope. For single cell delivery, a narrow channel is ablated through bone under imaging guidance. Cells are then transferred from a micropipette into an optical trap, which brings cells into the BM through the channel. The survival and proliferation of implanted cells can be tracked in vivo by imaging. For cell extraction after laser bone thinning, different approaches can be implemented and three of them are presented.

  1. Preclinical Studies with Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Different Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Zucconi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have been widely investigated for cell-based therapy studies as an alternative source to bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of MSCs with potential to derivate at least muscle, cartilage, fat, and bone cells in vitro. The possibility to replace the defective muscle cells using cell therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of progressive muscular dystrophies (PMDs, independently of the specific gene mutation. Therefore, preclinical studies in different models of muscular dystrophies are of utmost importance. The main objective of the present study is to evaluate if umbilical cord MSCs have the potential to reach and differentiate into muscle cells in vivo in two animal models of PMDs. In order to address this question we injected (1 human umbilical cord tissue (hUCT MSCs into the caudal vein of SJL mice; (2 hUCT and canine umbilical cord vein (cUCV MSCs intra-arterially in GRMD dogs. Our results here reported support the safety of the procedure and indicate that the injected cells could engraft in the host muscle in both animal models but could not differentiate into muscle cells. These observations may provide important information aiming future therapy for muscular dystrophies.

  2. Preclinical Studies with Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Different Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Eder; Vieira, Natassia Moreira; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Secco, Mariane; Jazedje, Tatiana; Costa Valadares, Marcos; Fussae Suzuki, Miriam; Bartolini, Paolo; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been widely investigated for cell-based therapy studies as an alternative source to bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of MSCs with potential to derivate at least muscle, cartilage, fat, and bone cells in vitro. The possibility to replace the defective muscle cells using cell therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of progressive muscular dystrophies (PMDs), independently of the specific gene mutation. Therefore, preclinical studies in different models of muscular dystrophies are of utmost importance. The main objective of the present study is to evaluate if umbilical cord MSCs have the potential to reach and differentiate into muscle cells in vivo in two animal models of PMDs. In order to address this question we injected (1) human umbilical cord tissue (hUCT) MSCs into the caudal vein of SJL mice; (2) hUCT and canine umbilical cord vein (cUCV) MSCs intra-arterially in GRMD dogs. Our results here reported support the safety of the procedure and indicate that the injected cells could engraft in the host muscle in both animal models but could not differentiate into muscle cells. These observations may provide important information aiming future therapy for muscular dystrophies. PMID:21785565

  3. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  4. Effect of number of animals per pen on growth performance and meat quality of veal calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cozzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been carried out on the effect of the group housing system in comparison with the traditional individual crate on growth performance, carcass traits and behavior of veal calves (Andrighetto et al. 1999, Cozzi et al. 2000, Verga et al. 2000.

  5. Effect of number of animals per pen on growth performance and meat quality of veal calves

    OpenAIRE

    Cozzi, G.; Dorigo, M.; F. Gottardo

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out on the effect of the group housing system in comparison with the traditional individual crate on growth performance, carcass traits and behavior of veal calves (Andrighetto et al. 1999, Cozzi et al. 2000, Verga et al. 2000).

  6. Chinese Experts Successfully Produced Transgenic Animals from Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Individual animals produced by haploid stem cells are ideal models for studying recessive genes. Hap- loid stem cells not only can maintain haploidy, but also are capable of replicating themselves infinitely. Modified genes can be passed on to future generations through genetic engineering of haploid embryonic stem cells, which thus avoids the germlinechimerism caused by other transgenic methods and greatly im- proves the analysis efficiency of the function of gene modification. However, natural haploids are only re- stricted to germline cells in mammals. Currently in mammals, only the embryonic stem cells in rats and mice can be used as the carrier of gene modification, but the embryonic stem cells of other mammals, in- eluding primates, cannot guarantee germline transmission, which has seriously hindered the establishment of disease models by using these species.

  7. The role of stem cells in midgut growth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, R S; Baldwin, K M; Loeb, M

    2001-06-01

    The Manduca sexta (L.) [Lepidoptera: Sphingidae] and Heliothis virescens (F.) [Lepidoptera: Noctuidae] midguts consist of a pseudostratified epithelium surrounded by striated muscle and tracheae. This epithelium contains goblet, columnar, and basal stem cells. The stem cells are critically important in that they are capable of massive proliferation and differentiation. This growth results in a fourfold enlargement of the midgut at each larval molt. The stem cells are also responsible for limited cell replacement during repair. While the characteristics of the stem cell population vary over the course of an instar, stem cells collected early in an instar and those collected late can start in vitro cultures. Cultures of larval stem, goblet, and columnar cells survive in vitro for several mo through proliferation and differentiation of the stem cells. One of the two polypeptide differentiation factors which have been identified and characterized from the culture medium has now been shown to be present in midgut in vivo. Thus the ability to examine lepidopteran midgut stem cell growth in vitro and in vivo is proving to be effective in determining the basic features of stem cell action and regulation. PMID:11515964

  8. Research progress in animal models and stem cell therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabin Han,1,2 Wei Wang1, Chao Chen1 1Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, 2Department of Neurology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital/The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes degeneration of brain neurons and leads to memory loss and cognitive impairment. Since current therapeutic strategies cannot cure the disease, stem cell therapy represents a powerful tool for the treatment of AD. We first review the advances in molecular pathogenesis and animal models of AD and then discuss recent clinical studies using small molecules and immunoglobulins to target amyloid-beta plaques for AD therapy. Finally, we discuss stem cell therapy for AD using neural stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, embryonic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cell from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood. In particular, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells are proposed as a future treatment for AD. Keywords: amyloid-beta plaque, neurofibrillary tangle, neural stem cell, olfactory ensheathing cell, mesenchymal stem cell, induced pluripotent stem cell

  9. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  10. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Datura innoxia Mill, were successfully grown on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium with 2,4–D, NAA or BAP as growth substances, provided the micronutrient levels were reduced to 1/10. Normal amounts of micronutrients were toxic. Attempts to identify the toxic elements did...... malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities above 500...

  11. Genomic interplay in bacterial communities: implications for growth promoting practices in animal husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; McKinnon, Jessica; Wyrsch, Ethan; Hammond, Jeffrey M; Charles, Ian G; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics heralded the start of a "Golden Age" in the history of medicine. Over the years, the use of antibiotics extended beyond medical practice into animal husbandry, aquaculture and agriculture. Now, however, we face the worldwide threat of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to all existing major classes of antibiotic, reflecting the possibility of an end to the antibiotic era. The seriousness of the threat is underscored by the severely limited production of new classes of antibiotics. Evolution of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics results from the inherent genetic capability that bacteria have to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Consequently, under antibiotic selection pressures, bacteria have acquired resistance to all classes of antibiotics, sometimes very shortly after their introduction. Arguably, the evolution and rapid dissemination of multiple drug resistant genes en-masse across microbial pathogens is one of the most serious threats to human health. In this context, effective surveillance strategies to track the development of resistance to multiple antibiotics are vital to managing global infection control. These surveillance strategies are necessary for not only human health but also for animal health, aquaculture and plant production. Shortfalls in the present surveillance strategies need to be identified. Raising awareness of the genetic events that promote co-selection of resistance to multiple antimicrobials is an important prerequisite to the design and implementation of molecular surveillance strategies. In this review we will discuss how lateral gene transfer (LGT), driven by the use of low-dose antibiotics in animal husbandry, has likely played a significant role in the evolution of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative bacteria and has complicated molecular surveillance strategies adopted for predicting imminent resistance threats.

  12. Genomic interplay in bacterial communities: implications for growth promoting practices in animal husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piklu eRoy Chowdhury

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of antibiotics heralded the start of a ‘Golden Age’ in the history of medicine. Over the years, the use of antibiotics extended beyond medical practice into animal husbandry, aquaculture and agriculture. While the ‘Golden Age’ featured the rapid discovery of a series of new classes of antibiotics, the current discovery/development pipeline has been less productive. We are now faced with the threat of diseases mediated by pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to all major classes of antibiotic. Evolution of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics results from the inherent genetic capability that bacteria have to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Consequently, under antibiotic selection pressures, bacteria have acquired resistance to all classes of antibiotics, sometimes very shortly after their introduction. Multiple drug resistant (MDR bacteria are found worldwide and are possibly signalling the end of the antibiotic era. Arguably, the evolution and rapid dissemination of MDR genes en-masse across microbial pathogens is one of the most serious threats to human health. In this context, effective surveillance strategies to track the development of resistance to multiple antibiotics are vital to managing global infection control. These surveillance strategies are necessary for not only human health but also for animal health and plant production. Shortfalls in the present surveillance strategies need to be identified. Raising awareness of the genetic events that promote co-selection of resistance to multiple antimicrobials is an important prerequisite to the design and implementation of molecular surveillance strategies. In this review we will discuss how surveillance strategies are important for our understanding of the possible relationship between the use of low-dose antibiotics in animal husbandry and evolution of MDR in Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...

  14. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  15. Straw blood cell count, growth, inhibition and comparison to apoptotic bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomkins Jeffrey P

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian cells transform into individual tubular straw cells naturally in tissues and in response to desiccation related stress in vitro. The transformation event is characterized by a dramatic cellular deformation process which includes: condensation of certain cellular materials into a much smaller tubular structure, synthesis of a tubular wall and growth of filamentous extensions. This study continues the characterization of straw cells in blood, as well as the mechanisms of tubular transformation in response to stress; with specific emphasis placed on investigating whether tubular transformation shares the same signaling pathway as apoptosis. Results There are approximately 100 billion, unconventional, tubular straw cells in human blood at any given time. The straw blood cell count (SBC is 45 million/ml, which accounts for 6.9% of the bloods dry weight. Straw cells originating from the lungs, liver and lymphocytes have varying nodules, hairiness and dimensions. Lipid profiling reveals severe disruption of the plasma membrane in CACO cells during transformation. The growth rates for the elongation of filaments and enlargement of rabbit straw cells is 0.6~1.1 (μm/hr and 3.8 (μm3/hr, respectively. Studies using apoptosis inhibitors and a tubular transformation inhibitor in CACO2 cells and in mice suggested apoptosis produced apoptotic bodies are mediated differently than tubular transformation produced straw cells. A single dose of 0.01 mg/kg/day of p38 MAPK inhibitor in wild type mice results in a 30% reduction in the SBC. In 9 domestic animals SBC appears to correlate inversely with an animal's average lifespan (R2 = 0.7. Conclusion Straw cells are observed residing in the mammalian blood with large quantities. Production of SBC appears to be constant for a given animal and may involve a stress-inducible protein kinase (P38 MAPK. Tubular transformation is a programmed cell survival process that diverges from apoptosis

  16. β‐catenin‐driven binary cell fate decisions in animal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β‐catenin pathway plays key roles during animal development. In several species, β‐catenin is used in a reiterative manner to regulate cell fate diversification between daughter cells following division. This binary cell fate specification mechanism has been observed in animals that belong to very diverse phyla: the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the annelid Platynereis, and the ascidian Ciona. It may also play a role in the regulation of several stem cell lineages in vertebrates. While the molecular mechanism behind this binary cell fate switch is not fully understood, it appears that both secreted Wnt ligands and asymmetric cortical factors contribute to the generation of the difference in nuclear β‐catenin levels between daughter cells. β‐Catenin then cooperates with lineage specific transcription factors to induce the expression of novel sets of transcription factors at each round of divisions, thereby diversifying cell fate. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:377–388. doi: 10.1002/wdev.228 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26952169

  17. Cell-mediated transgenesis in rabbits: chimeric and nuclear transfer animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartchenko, V; Flisikowska, T; Li, S; Richter, T; Wieland, H; Durkovic, M; Rottmann, O; Kessler, B; Gungor, T; Brem, G; Kind, A; Wolf, E; Schnieke, A

    2011-02-01

    The ability to perform precise genetic engineering such as gene targeting in rabbits would benefit biomedical research by enabling, for example, the generation of genetically defined rabbit models of human diseases. This has so far not been possible because of the lack of functional rabbit embryonic stem cells and the high fetal and perinatal mortality associated with rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer. We examined cultured pluripotent and multipotent cells for their ability to support the production of viable animals. Rabbit putative embryonic stem (ES) cells were derived and shown capable of in vitro and in vivo pluripotent differentiation. We report the first live born ES-derived rabbit chimera. Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were derived from bone marrow, and multipotent differentiation was demonstrated in vitro. Nuclear transfer was carried out with both cell types, and embryo development was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Rabbit MSCs were markedly more successful than ES cells as nuclear donors. MSCs were transfected with fluorescent reporter gene constructs and assessed for nuclear transfer competence. Transfected MSCs supported development with similar efficiency as normal MSCs and resulted in the first live cloned rabbits from genetically manipulated MSCs. Reactivation of fluorescence reporter gene expression in reconstructed embryos was investigated as a means of identifying viable embryos in vitro but was not a reliable predictor. We also examined serial nuclear transfer as a means of rescuing dead animals.

  18. Two-dimension tissue growth model based on circular granular cells for cells with small overlap

    CERN Document Server

    Viridi, Sparisoma; Aprianti, Devi; Haris, Luman; Haryanto, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    Tissue growth can be modeled in two dimension by only using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce child. Linear spring-dashpot model is used to bind the cells with a cut-off interaction range of 1.1 times sum of radii of interacted cells. Simulation steps must be divided into explicit and implicit ones due to cell growing stage and cell position rearrangement. This division is aimed to avoid simulation problem. Only in the explicit steps time changes is performed. Large cells overlap is chosen as termination condition of tissue growth. Only some cells configuration can growth to infinite time without encountering the large cells overlap. These configurations, and the other also, are presented in this work.

  19. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bretlau, P

    1993-01-01

    Forty oral squamous cell carcinomas have been investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The same cases were recently characterized for the expression of EGF-receptors. TGF-alpha was detected...... with a monoclonal mouse antibody and EGF with polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Thirty-five of the tumours were positive for TGF-alpha and 26 of the tumours for EGF. None of the poorly differentiated tumours was positive for EGF, but they all were for TGF-alpha. In sections including normal differentiated oral mucosa......, the cells above the basal cell layer were positive for both TGF-alpha and EGF. The same staining pattern was observed in oral mucosa obtained from healthy persons. In moderately to well differentiated carcinomas, the immunoreactivity was mainly confined to the cytologically more differentiated cells, thus...

  20. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Haiwei Zhang; Kaiming Zhang; Xinyu Wang; Shipu Li; Yixia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Sc hwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more signiifcantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not signiifcantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy.

  1. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  2. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  3. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance of broilers fed with animal fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Murali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance, nutrient utilization and nitrogen balance in broilers fed with animal fat. Materials and Methods: 80 day-old Cobb commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned into two dietary treatment groups with four replicates of ten chicks each. The diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. The birds in both the control (T1 and treatment group (T2 were fed with a diet having 5% animal fat, while the treatment group (T2 was supplemented with 900 mg of L-carnitine. The birds were fed with standard broiler starter ration up to 4 weeks of age and finisher ration up to 6 weeks of age. Results: The average body weight (g, cumulative feed intake (g and cumulative feed conversion ratio belonging to groups T1 and T2 at 6th week of age were 2091.25 and 2151.11, 3976.49 and 4171.68, 1.97 and 1.96 respectively. The percentage availability of the nutrients of two experimental rations T1 and T2 was 68.23 and 68.00 for dry matter, 58.72 and 55.98 for crude protein, 73.85 and 71.35 for ether extract, 34.19 and 33.86 for crude fiber, 79.18 and 79.59 for nitrogen free extract, 70.24 and 70.03 for energy efficiency and nitrogen balance (g/day were 2.35 and 2.39, respectively. Conclusion: This study suggests that the supplementation of 900 mg L-carnitine in diet with added animal fat had no effect on growth performance, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance of broilers.

  4. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Telomerase Activity in Osteosarcoma Cells by DN-hTERT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; RAO Yaojian; ZHU Wentao; GUO Fengjin

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the effects of dominant negative human telomerase reverse transcriptase (DN-hTERT) on cell growth and telomerase activity in osteosarcoma cell line MG63, MG63 cells were transfected with DN-hTERT-IRES2-EGFP9 (DN) or IRES2-EGF (I, blank vector) with lipofectamine 2000. The stably transfected cells were selected with G-418. Cell growth properties were examined under a fluorescence microscope. The hTERT mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Telomerase activities were measured by TRAP-ELISE. The tumorigenicity was studied with tumor xenografts by subcutaneous injection of cancer cells into nude mice. The results showed that cell growth was suppressed in MG63 cells transfected with DN-hTERT. The hTERT mRNA was increased in N-hTERT transfected-MG63 cells (MG63/DN). The telomerase activity was 2.45±0.11 in MG63/DN cells, while 3.40±0.12 in the cells transfected with blank vector (MG63/I), (P<0.05); DN-hTERT-expressing clones did not form tumors in 2 weeks, but the ratio of tumorigenesis was 30 % in nude mice bearing MG63/I (P<0.01). It was concluded that DN-hTERT could specifically inhibit the cell growth and telomerase activity in MG63 cells.

  5. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  6. Follicular Helper CD4+ T Cells in Human Neuroautoimmune Diseases and Their Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular helper CD4+ T (TFH cells play a fundamental role in humoral immunity deriving from their ability to provide help for germinal center (GC formation, B cell differentiation into plasma cells and memory cells, and antibody production in secondary lymphoid tissues. TFH cells can be identified by a combination of markers, including the chemokine receptor CXCR5, costimulatory molecules ICOS and PD-1, transcription repressor Bcl-6, and cytokine IL-21. It is difficult and impossible to get access to secondary lymphoid tissues in humans, so studies are usually performed with human peripheral blood samples as circulating counterparts of tissue TFH cells. A balance of TFH cell generation and function is critical for protective antibody response, whereas overactivation of TFH cells or overexpression of TFH-associated molecules may result in autoimmune diseases. Emerging data have shown that TFH cells and TFH-associated molecules may be involved in the pathogenesis of neuroautoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optica (NMO/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD, and myasthenia gravis (MG. This review summarizes the features of TFH cells, including their development, function, and roles as well as TFH-associated molecules in neuroautoimmune diseases and their animal models.

  7. Regulated growth of diatom cells on self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Koichi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We succeeded in regulating the growth of diatom cells on chemically modified glass surfaces. Glass surfaces were functionalized with -CF3, -CH3, -COOH, and -NH2 groups using the technique of self-assembled monolayers (SAM, and diatom cells were subsequently cultured on these surfaces. When the samples were rinsed after the adhesion of the diatom cells on the modified surfaces, the diatoms formed two dimensional arrays; this was not possible without the rinsing treatment. Furthermore, we examined the number of cells that grew and their motility by time-lapse imaging in order to clarify the interaction between the cells and SAMs. We hope that our results will be a basis for developing biodevices using living photosynthetic diatom cells.

  8. Systems-biology dissection of eukaryotic cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews Justen; Przytycka Teresa M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent article in BMC Biology illustrates the use of a systems-biology approach to integrate data across the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of budding yeast in order to dissect the relationship between nutrient conditions and cell growth. See research article http://jbiol.com/content/6/2/4 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/68

  9. Actin-dependent vacuolar occupancy of the cell determines auxin-induced growth repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, David; Löfke, Christian; Krüger, Falco; Kittelmann, Maike; Eisa, Ahmed; Hughes, Louise; Smith, Richard S.; Hawes, Chris; Schumacher, Karin; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is an early attribute of cellular life, and its main components are composed of conserved proteins. The actin cytoskeleton has a direct impact on the control of cell size in animal cells, but its mechanistic contribution to cellular growth in plants remains largely elusive. Here, we reveal a role of actin in regulating cell size in plants. The actin cytoskeleton shows proximity to vacuoles, and the phytohormone auxin not only controls the organization of actin filaments but also impacts vacuolar morphogenesis in an actin-dependent manner. Pharmacological and genetic interference with the actin–myosin system abolishes the effect of auxin on vacuoles and thus disrupts its negative influence on cellular growth. SEM-based 3D nanometer-resolution imaging of the vacuoles revealed that auxin controls the constriction and luminal size of the vacuole. We show that this actin-dependent mechanism controls the relative vacuolar occupancy of the cell, thus suggesting an unanticipated mechanism for cytosol homeostasis during cellular growth. PMID:26715743

  10. Combination radiofrequency (RF) ablation and IV liposomal heat shock protein suppression: Reduced tumor growth and increased animal endpoint survival in a small animal tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Ahmed, Muneeb; Tasawwar, Beenish; Levchenko, Tatynana; Sawant, Rupa R.; Torchilin, Vladimir; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of IV liposomal quercetin (a known down-regulator of heat shock proteins) alone and with liposomal doxorubicin on tumor growth and end-point survival when combined with radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation in a rat tumor model. Methods Solitary subcutaneous R3230 mammary adenocarcinoma tumors (1.3–1.5 cm) were implanted in 48 female Fischer rats. Initially, 32 tumors (n=8, each group) were randomized into four experimental groups: (a) conventional monopolar RF alone (70°C for 5 min), (b) IV liposomal quercetin alone (1 mg/kg), (c) IV liposomal quercetin followed 24hr later with RF, and (d) no treatment. Next, 16 additional tumors were randomized into two groups (n=8, each) that received a combined RF and liposomal doxorubicin (15 min post-RF, 8 mg/kg) either with or without liposomal quercetin. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed using a tumor diameter of 3.0 cm as the defined survival endpoint. Results Differences in endpoint survival and tumor doubling time among the groups were highly significant (P<0.001). Endpoint survivals were 12.5±2.2 days for the control group, 16.6±2.9 days for tumors treated with RF alone, 15.5±2.1days for tumors treated with liposomal quercetin alone, and 22.0±3.9 days with combined RF and quercetin. Additionally, combination quercetin/RF/doxorubicin therapy resulted in the longest survival (48.3±20.4 days), followed by RF/doxorubicin (29.9±3.8 days). Conclusions IV liposomal quercetin in combination with RF ablation reduces tumor growth rates and improves animal endpoint survival. Further increases in endpoint survival can be seen by adding an additional anti-tumor adjuvant agent liposomal doxorubicin. This suggests that targeting several post-ablation processes with multi-drug nanotherapies can increase overall ablation efficacy. PMID:22230341

  11. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  12. SIMPLE SINGLE CELL MODEL OF ANIMAL CELLS%动物细胞的简单单细胞模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高红亮; 丛威; 吕秀菊; 欧阳藩

    2001-01-01

    An individual cell is a chemical reactor with thousands ofreactions operated under a highly sophisticated control system,and it is a self-regulated reactor that can alter its biosynthetic machinery to meet its demands in a changing environment.A simple mathematical model for the growth of a single cell of hybridoma is presented in this work in which the cell is divided into structural and genetic compartments.This model can describe the changes in cell component,cell shape,cell size,substrate uptake,byproduct release and other temporal events during the cell division cycle.Some model parameters were regressed with experimental gross data of hybridoma in continuous culture,and specific uptake rate of glucose and glutamine of hybridoma in continuous culture were predicted.The predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data.The average relative deviation is 13.8%.

  13. BIOFLAVONOID QUERCETIN-FOOD SOURCES, BIOAVAILABILITY, ABSORBTION AND EFFECT ON ANIMAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Baková

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioflavonoid quercetin is found in the edible portion of the majority of dietary plants. The absorption and metabolism of quercetin is still poorly understood. It is known that aglycone form of quercetin, which is absorbed better than quercetin administered in nonglucosidic forms Absorbed quercetin is probably extensively modified before being excreted by kidneys. It has a broad range of activities within animal cells and occurs to be able to prevent or reduce the development of different type of diseases.

  14. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs

  15. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Growth factors and feeder cells promote differentiation of human embryonic stem cell into dopaminergic neurons: a novel role of fibroblast growth factor-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofia Correia

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are a potential source of dopaminergic neurons for treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Dopaminergic neurons can be derived from hESCs and display a characteristic midbrain phenotype. Once transplanted, they can induce partial behavioral recovery in animal models of PD. The potential research field faces several challenges that need to be overcome before clinical application of hESCs in a transplantation therapy in PD can be considered. These include low survival of the hESC-derived, grafted dopaminergic neurons after transplantation; unclear functional integration of the grafted neurons in the host brain; and, the risk of teratoma/tumor formation from the transplanted cells. This review is focused on our recent efforts to improve the survival of hESC-dervied dopaminergic neurons. We have examined the effect of fibroblast growth factor (FGF-20 in the differentiation of hESCs into dopaminergic neurons. We supplemented cultures of hESCs with FGF-20 during differentiation on PA6 mouse stromal cells for three weeks. When we added FGF-20 the yield of neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase increased. We demonstrated that at least part of the effect is contributed by enhanced cell differentiation towards the dopaminergic phenotype as well as reduced cell death. We compare our results with those obtained in other published protocols using different sets of growth factors. Our data indicate that FGF-20 has potent effects to generate large number of dopaminergic neurons derived from hESCs, which may be useful for cell therapy in PD.

  17. Cell lineages, growth and repair of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescroart, Fabienne; Meilhac, Sigolène M

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the heart involves diversification of lineages which differentiate into distinct cardiac cell types or contribute to different regions such as the four cardiac chambers. The heart is the first organ to form in the embryo. However, in parallel with the growth of the organism, before or after birth, the heart has to adapt its size to maintain pumping efficiency. The adult heart has only a mild regeneration potential; thus, strategies to repair the heart after injury are based on the mobilisation of resident cardiac stem cells or the transplantation of external sources of stem cells. We discuss current knowledge on these aspects and raise questions for future research.

  18. Suppressing The Growth Of Dendrites In Secondary Li Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Evan D.; Perrone, David E.; Shen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed technique for suppressing growth of lithium dendrites in rechargeable lithium electrochemical power cells involves periodic interruption of steady charging current with short, high-current discharge pulses. Technique applicable to lithium cells of several different types, including Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/Vo(x), and Li/MnO(2). Cells candidates for use in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high-energy-density rechargeable batteries needed.

  19. Slit2 Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Fibrosarcoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyung Kim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Slits are a group of secreted glycoproteins that play a role in the regulation of cell migration. Previous studies suggested that Slit2 might be a tumor-suppressor gene. However, it remained to be determined whether Slit2 suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in animal models. We showed that Slit2 expression was decreased or abolished in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs compared to normal tissues by in situ hybridization. Stable transfection of human SCC A431 and fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells with Slit2 gene suppressed tumor growth in athymic nude mice. Apoptosis in Slit2-transfected tumors was increased, whereas proliferating cells were decreased, suggesting a mechanism for Slit2-mediated tumor suppression. This was supported by further analysis indicating that antiapoptotic molecules Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl and cell cycle molecules Cdk6 and Cyclin D1 were down-regulated in Slit2-transfected tumors. Furthermore, wound healing and Matrigel invasion assays showed that the transfection with Slit2 inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion. Slit2-transfected tumors showed a high level of keratin 8/18 and a low level of N-cadherin expression compared to empty vector-transfected tumors. More importantly, Slit2 transfection suppressed the metastasis of HT1080 tumor cells in lungs after intravenous inoculation. Collectively, our study has demonstrated that Slit2 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis of fibrosarcoma and SCC and that its effect on cell cycle and apoptosis signal pathways is an important mechanism for Slit2-mediated tumor suppression.

  20. Slit2 inhibits growth and metastasis of fibrosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Zhang, Hong; Li, Hui; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Swisher, Stephen; He, Donggou; Wu, Lizhi; Xu, Jianmin; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Xu, Xìao-chun; Xu, Hui

    2008-12-01

    Slits are a group of secreted glycoproteins that play a role in the regulation of cell migration. Previous studies suggested that Slit2 might be a tumor-suppressor gene. However, it remained to be determined whether Slit2 suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in animal models. We showed that Slit2 expression was decreased or abolished in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) compared to normal tissues by in situ hybridization. Stable transfection of human SCC A431 and fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells with Slit2 gene suppressed tumor growth in athymic nude mice. Apoptosis in Slit2-transfected tumors was increased, whereas proliferating cells were decreased, suggesting a mechanism for Slit2-mediated tumor suppression. This was supported by further analysis indicating that antiapoptotic molecules Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl and cell cycle molecules Cdk6 and Cyclin D1 were down-regulated in Slit2-transfected tumors. Furthermore, wound healing and Matrigel invasion assays showed that the transfection with Slit2 inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion. Slit2-transfected tumors showed a high level of keratin 8/18 and a low level of N-cadherin expression compared to empty vector-transfected tumors. More importantly, Slit2 transfection suppressed the metastasis of HT1080 tumor cells in lungs after intravenous inoculation. Collectively, our study has demonstrated that Slit2 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis of fibrosarcoma and SCC and that its effect on cell cycle and apoptosis signal pathways is an important mechanism for Slit2-mediated tumor suppression.

  1. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  2. Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella eAdami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialised world is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient.In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success.This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation and between the human disease model and the animal disease model.

  3. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Edouard A.; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected.

  4. Ureteral growth in animal models with increased renal excretion of urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1999-01-01

    -operated control rats; and (5) control rats. The 24-hour urinary volume was measured on days 7, 14 and 21. Growth of the kidney, ureter and bladder was investigated and the histological appearance of the ureter was further evaluated. Diabetic and sucrose-fed rats had comparable polyuria with a seven-fold increase......The influence of increased functional load on the macroscopical and histological appearance of the ureter was investigated. Sixty rats were divided into five groups: (1) sucrose-fed rats with non-osmotic polyuria; (2) diabetic rats with osmotic polyuria; (3) uninephrectomized rats; (4) sham...... in urinary output. The urinary volume for the remaining kidney was doubled in uninephrectomized rats. After 3 weeks, diabetic rats had increased weight of the kidney, ureter and bladder, sucrose-fed rats had increased weight of the bladder, whereas uninephrectomized rats had increased weight of the kidney...

  5. Hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy reduces ventricular arrhythmia in animal models of myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumoto,Akihisa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    It was recently reported that gene therapy using hepatocyte growth factor (HGF has the potential to preserve cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. We speculated that this HGF gene therapy could also prevent ventricular arrhythmia. To investigate this possibility, we examined the antiarrhythmic effect of HGF gene therapy in rat acute and old myocardial infarction models. Myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left descending coronary artery. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ-coated liposome containing HGF genes were injected directly into the myocardium fourteen days before programmed pacing. Ventricular fibrillation (VFwas induced by programmed pacing. The VF duration was reduced and the VF threshold increased after HGF gene therapy ( p< 0.01. Histological analyses revealed that the number of vessels in the ischemic border zone was greatly increased after HGF gene injection. These findings revealed that HGF gene therapy has an anti-arrhythmic effect after myocardial ischemia.

  6. Dissolution of rock phosphate in animal manure soil amendment and lettuce growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kofi Agyarko; Akwasi Adutwum Abunyewa; Emmanuel Kwasi Asiedu; Emmanuel Heva

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted in pots on the field to assess the effect of different quantities of poultry manure (PM), cattle manure (CM) and pig manure (PG) on the release of available phosphorus from Togo rock phosphate (RP) and lettuce growth. There were eleven (11) treatments which were: Control (soil only); 2.5g RP; 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 5gCM; 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 5gPM; 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 5gPG, applied per kg soil, using the Completely Randomized Design...

  7. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  8. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  9. Rainfed areas and animal agriculture in Asia: the wanting agenda for transforming productivity growth and rural poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra, C

    2012-01-01

    The importance of rainfed areas and animal agriculture on productivity enhancement and food security for economic rural growth in Asia is discussed in the context of opportunities for increasing potential contribution from them. The extent of the rainfed area of about 223 million hectares and the biophysical attributes are described. They have been variously referred to inter alia as fragile, marginal, dry, waste, problem, threatened, range, less favoured, low potential lands, forests and woodlands, including lowlands and uplands. Of these, the terms less favoured areas (LFAs), and low or high potential are quite widely used. The LFAs are characterised by four key features: i) very variable biophysical elements, notably poor soil quality, rainfall, length of growing season and dry periods, ii) extreme poverty and very poor people who continuously face hunger and vulnerability, iii) presence of large populations of ruminant animals (buffaloes, cattle, goats and sheep), and iv) have had minimum development attention and an unfinished wanting agenda. The rainfed humid/sub-humid areas found mainly in South East Asia (99 million ha), and arid/semi-arid tropical systems found in South Asia (116 million ha) are priority agro-ecological zones (AEZs). In India for example, the ecosystem occupies 68% of the total cultivated area and supports 40% of the human and 65% of the livestock populations. The area also produces 4% of food requirements. The biophysical and typical household characteristics, agricultural diversification, patterns of mixed farming and cropping systems are also described. Concerning animals, their role and economic importance, relevance of ownership, nomadic movements, and more importantly their potential value as the entry point for the development of LFAs is discussed. Two examples of demonstrated success concern increasing buffalo production for milk and their expanded use in semi-arid AEZs in India, and the integration of cattle and goats with oil

  10. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R;

    1983-01-01

    an undetectable or sharply reduced number of EGF receptors. The EGF receptor number and receptor affinity of epidermal basal cells freshly isolated from rats of increasing age has also been determined. We find that receptor affinity remains unchanged (3.3 nM) but that basal cell surface receptor number decreases...... markedly with age. This decrease in receptor number is similar in trend to the known drop in basal cell [3H]thymidine labelling index which occurs over the same time period. The data suggest that the distribution of EGF receptors and EGF cell surface receptor number in skin are important in the spatial...... receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry either...

  11. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  12. Optimization of growth and bacteriocin activity of the food bioprotective Carnobacterium divergens V41 in an animal origin protein free medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne BRILLET-VIEL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of Carnobacterium divergens V41 growth and bacteriocin activity in a culture medium deprived of animal protein, needs for food bioprotection, was performed by using a statistical approach. In a screening experiment, twelve factors (pH, temperature, carbohydrates, NaCl, yeast extract, soy peptone, sodium acetate, ammonium citrate, magnesium sulphate, manganese sulphate, ascorbic acid and thiamine were tested for their influence on the maximal growth and bacteriocin activity using a two-level incomplete factorial design with 192 experiments performed in microtiter plate wells. Based on results, a basic medium was developed and three variables (pH, temperature and carbohydrates concentration were selected for a scale-up study in bioreactor. A 23 complete factorial design was performed, allowing the estimation of linear effects of factors and all the first order interactions. The best conditions for the cell production were obtained with a temperature of 15°C and a carbohydrates concentration of 20 g/l whatever the pH (in the range 6.5-8, and the best conditions for bacteriocin activity were obtained at 15°C and pH 6.5 whatever the carbohydrates concentration (in the range 2-20 g/l. The predicted final count of C. divergens V41 and the bacteriocin activity under the optimized conditions (15°C, pH 6.5, 20 g/l carbohydrates were 2.4 x 1010 CFU/ml and 819200 AU/ml respectively. C. divergens V41 cells cultivated in the optimized conditions were able to grow in cold-smoked salmon and totally inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (< 50 CFU g-1 during five weeks of vacuum storage at 4° and 8°C.

  13. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  14. miR-526a regulates apoptotic cell growth in human carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoli; Wang, Cui; Xu, Changzhi; Yan, Zhifeng; Wei, Congwen; Guan, Kai; Ma, Shengli; Cao, Ye; Liu, Liping; Zou, Deyong; He, Xiang; Zhang, Buchang; Ma, Qingjun; Zheng, Zirui

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in the regulation of cell cycle, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Our previous studies showed that miR-526a positively regulated innate immune response by suppressing CYLD expression, however, the functional relevance of miR-526a expression and cell growth remains to be evaluated. In this study, miR-526a overexpression was found to promote cancer cell proliferation, migration, and anchor-independent colony formation. The molecular mechanism(s) of miR-526a-mediated growth stimulation is associated with rapid cell cycle progression and inhibition of cell apoptosis by targeting CYLD. Taken together, these results provide evidence to show the stimulatory role of miR-526a in tumor migration and invasion through modulation of the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26002288

  15. Over-expressed and truncated midkines promote proliferation of BGC823 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Ling Wang; Hui Wang; Shu-Li Zhao; Ya-Hong Huang; Ya-Yi Hou

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether midkine (MK) and its truncated form (tMK) contribute to gastric tumorigenesis using in vitro and in vivo models.METHODS: Human MK and tMK plasmids were constructed and expressed in BGC823 (a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line) to investigate the effect of over-expressed MK or tMK on cell growth and turmorigenesis in nude mice.RESULTS: The growth of MK-transfected or tMK-transfected cells was significantly increased compared with that of the control cells, and tMK-transfected cells grew more rapidly than MK-transfected cells. The number of colony formation of the cells transfected with MK or tMK gene was larger than the control cells. In nude mice injected with MK-transfected or tMK-transfected cells, visible tumor was observed earlier and the tumor tissues were larger in size and weight than in control animals that were injected with cells without the transfection of either genes.CONCLUSION: Over-expressed MK or tMK can promote human gastric cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, and tMK has greater effect than MK. tMK may be a more promising gene therapeutic target compared with MK for treatment of malignant tumors.

  16. 42% 500X Bi-Facial Growth Concentrator Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczuk, S.; Chiu, P.; Zhang, X.; Pulver, D.; Harris, C.; Siskavich, B.

    2011-12-01

    Data are presented from three-junction concentrator photovoltaic cells using a new cell architecture (1.9 eV InGaP top cell lattice-matched to a 1.42 eV GaAs middle cells on one side of a infrared-transparent GaAs wafer with a lattice-mismatched 0.95 eV InGaAs bottom cell grown isolated on the wafer backside). The cell uses a new epitaxial bifacial growth (BFG) technique. The impetus is to replace the 0.67 eV Ge bottom cell in the standard three junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandems with a higher bandgap 0.95 eV InGaAs cell that boosts the bottom cell voltage by about 40% while maintaining a simple high-yield cell process without use of complex large area epitaxial liftoff or wafer bonding steps used to make similar cell stacks. Efficiency was independently-verified by NREL for a 1 cm×1 cm cell (42.3% at 406 suns, with Voc 3.452V, 87.1% FF and 1xJsc of 14.07 mA/cm2, at 25 °C AM1.5D, 100 mW/cm2), which was the world record at the time of the CPV-7 conference. No degradation was seen during concentrated solar operation after a 2000 hr 165C burn-in and PbSn solder tests. Average efficiency of 1 cm2 cells designed for 500 suns at 1018 suns was 40.5% (Spire test, 25 °C, spectrally corrected flash simulator). Measured efficiency temperature coefficient for gen2 cells is -0.06%/°C, similar to InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandems.

  17. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  18. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK

  19. Effect of flupirtine on the growth and viability of U373 malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flupirtine is a non-opioid analgesic without antipyretic or antiphlogistic properties but with favorable tolerability in humans. This analgesic also exhibits neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, flupirtine antagonizes glutamate- and NMDA-induced intracellular levels of Ca2+ and counteracts the effects of focal cerebral ischemia. Although flupirtine has been used to relieve pain caused by different diseases and clinical procedures, information on the safety and efficacy of flupirtine is limited. The present study was conducted to investigate the neuroprotective effects of flupirtine on U373 malignant glioma (MG) cell lines. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis was performed by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Variations in the growth of U373 MG cells in 5 mM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), 1 mM flupirtine, and combined treatment indicated the antagonistic effects of NMDA and flupirtine on MG cell lines. The variation in the percentage of gated cell population in different cell cycle phases showed significant variations after 48 h of treatment. Flupirtine has neuroprotective effect of on U373 MG cells, which limits its use in the pain management of brain tumors. This property warrants further studies using animal models and large-scale clinical trials

  20. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  1. Effects of animal source food and micronutrient fortification in complementary food products on body composition, iron status, and linear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Jutta Kloppenborg Heick; Touch, Bunthang; Chhoun, Chamnan;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor nutritional quality of complementary foods often limits growth. Animal source foods, such as milk or meat, are often unaffordable. Local affordable alternatives are needed. Objective: We evaluate the efficacy of 2 newly developed, rice-based complementary food products: WinFood (WF......) with small fish and edible spiders and WinFood-Lite (WF-L) fortified with small fish, against 2 existing fortified corn-soy blend products, CSB+ (purely plant based) and CSB++ (8% dried skimmed milk). Design: In total, 419 infants aged 6 mo were enrolled in this randomized, single-blinded study for 9 mo......, designed primarily to assess increments in fat-free mass by a deuterium dilution technique and change in plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. Secondary endpoints were changes in anthropometric variables, including knee-heel length. Data were analyzed by the intention-to-treat approach. Results...

  2. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  3. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  4. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Chien-Chih [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, Chun-Li [Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kwun-Min [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, Kang, E-mail: kangfang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  5. Linking pseudouridine synthases to growth, development and cell competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortoriello, Giuseppe; de Celis, José F; Furia, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases direct RNA pseudouridylation and bind H/ACA small nucleolar RNA (snoRNAs), which, in turn, may act as precursors of microRNA-like molecules. In humans, loss of pseudouridine synthase activity causes dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a complex systemic disorder characterized by cancer susceptibility, failures in ribosome biogenesis and telomere stability, and defects in stem cell formation. Considering the significant interest in deciphering the various molecular consequences of pseudouridine synthase failure, we performed a loss of function analysis of minifly (mfl), the pseudouridine synthase gene of Drosophila, in the wing disc, an advantageous model system for studies of cell growth and differentiation. In this organ, depletion of the mfl-encoded pseudouridine synthase causes a severe reduction in size by decreasing both the number and the size of wing cells. Reduction of cell number was mainly attributable to cell death rather than reduced proliferation, establishing that apoptosis plays a key role in the development of the loss of function mutant phenotype. Depletion of Mfl also causes a proliferative disadvantage in mosaic tissues that leads to the elimination of mutant cells by cell competition. Intriguingly, mfl silencing also triggered unexpected effects on wing patterning and cell differentiation, including deviations from normal lineage boundaries, mingling of cells of different compartments, and defects in the formation of the wing margin that closely mimic the phenotype of reduced Notch activity. These results suggest that a component of the pseudouridine synthase loss of function phenotype is caused by defects in Notch signalling.

  6. Controlled Cell Growth and Cell Migration in Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica/Alginate Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda Kehr, Nermin; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-21

    Nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with different periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) concentrations and a NC hydrogel bilayer with various PMO concentrations inside the layers of the hydrogel matrix are prepared. The effect of the PMO concentration on cell growth and migration of cells is reported. The cells migrate in the bilayer NC hydrogel towards higher PMO concentrations and from cell culture plates to NC hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26648333

  7. Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) in laboratory animals: offering an insight into stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Liu, Hua-Hsing; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chen, Pin-Ru; Liu, Ming-Chao; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chang, Ko-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a pathological process secondary to underlying bone marrow (BM) insufficiency in adults. It is characterized by the emergence of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors scattered around the affected tissue, most likely in the spleen, liver, and lymph node, etc. EMH in patients frequently receives less medical attention and is neglected unless a compressive or obstructive hematopoietic mass appears to endanger the patient's life. However, on a biological basis, EMH reflects the alteration of relationships among hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and their original and new microenvironments. The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to mobilize from the bone marrow and to accommodate and function in extramedullary tissues is rather complicated and far from our current understanding. Fortunately, many reports from the studies of drugs and genetics using animals have incidentally found EMH to be involved. Thereby, the molecular basis of EMH could further be elucidated from those animals after cross-comparison. A deeper understanding of the extramedullary hematopoietic niche could help expand stem cells in vitro and establish a better treatment in patients for stem cell transplantation. PMID:25646951

  8. Methyl Jasmonate Represses Growth and Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Cultured Taxus Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Rohan A.; Lenka, Sangram K.; Normanly, Jennifer; Walker, Elsbeth L.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation is an effective strategy to induce and enhance synthesis of the anticancer agent paclitaxel (Taxol®) in Taxus cell suspension cultures; however, concurrent decreases in growth are often observed, which is problematic for large scale bioprocessing. Here, increased accumulation of paclitaxel in Taxus cuspidata suspension cultures with MeJA elicitation was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in cell growth, evident within the first three days post-elicitatio...

  9. Temporal changes in the response of SVZ neural stem cells to intraventricular administration of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Takashi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Ito, Akihiro; Imai, Hideaki; Okabe, Shigeo; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-04-01

    In vivo growth factor (GF) treatment is a promising approach to enhance the regenerative capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) for brain repair. However, how exogenous GFs affect endogenous NSCs is not well understood. This study investigated the impact of intraventricular administration of fibroblast growth factor 2 and epidermal growth factor on NSCs in the subventricular zone of intact adult mice. GFs were administered for various periods (3, 7, 10, and 14 days), and the proliferation and neuronal production of NSCs were assessed during and after GF treatment. We found that proliferation of NSCs and their progeny is markedly augmented during the first 7 days after the initiation of GF treatment. GF treatment for longer periods, however, did not lead to further increases in the NSC pool, but rather attenuated such proliferation and inhibited neurogenesis. As a result, the production of new olfactory bulb neurons was increased in animals treated with GFs for 7 days but decreased in animals treated for 14 days. These results show time-dependent changes in the response of NSCs to exogenous GFs and demonstrate that precise control of the duration of GF treatment is important for significant enhancement of neuronal production by NSCs in vivo for brain repair. PMID:26845459

  10. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas;

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation...... a markedly reduced capability of GH internalization. In contrast to cells transfected with GH-R1-638, none of the cell lines expressing truncated GH receptors exhibited any increase of the GH-stimulated insulin production. We conclude that domains within the COOH-terminal half of the cytoplasmic part...... of the GH receptor are required for transduction of the signal for GH-stimulated insulin synthesis, whereas cytoplasmic domains proximal to the transmembrane region are involved in receptor-mediated GH internalization....

  11. Establishment of an Immortalized Skin Keratinocyte Cell Line Derived from the Animal Model Mastomys coucha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasche, Daniel; Stephan, Sonja; Savelyeva, Larissa; Westermann, Frank; Rösl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In the present report we describe the establishment of a spontaneous immortalized skin keratinocyte cell line derived from the skin of the multimammate rodent Mastomys coucha. These animals are used in preclinical studies for a variety of human diseases such as infections with nematodes, bacteria and papillomaviruses, especially regarding cutaneous manifestations such as non-melanoma skin cancer. Here we characterize the cells in terms of their origin and cytogenetic features. Searching for genomic signatures, a spontaneous mutation in the splicing donor sequence of Trp53 (G to A transition at the first position of intron 7) could be detected. This point mutation leads to alternative splicing and to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated and, in turn, undetectable form of p53, probably contributing to the process of immortalization. Mastomys coucha-derived skin keratinocytes can be used as an in vitro system to investigate molecular and immunological aspects of infectious agent interactions with their host cells. PMID:27533138

  12. Measurement of oxidative damage to DNA in nanomaterial exposed cells and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest;

    2015-01-01

    -reactivity with other molecules in cells. This review provides an overview of efforts to reliably detect oxidatively damaged DNA and a critical assessment of the published studies on DNA damage levels. Animal studies with high baseline levels of oxidatively damaged DNA are more likely to show positive associations...... of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung tissue. Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black, TiO2 , carbon nanotubes and ZnO is associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in tissues. These observations are supported by cell culture studies showing concentration-dependent associations between ENM exposure...... and oxidatively damaged DNA measured by the comet assay. Cell culture studies show relatively high variation in the ability of ENMs to oxidatively damage DNA; hence, it is currently impossible to group ENMs according to their DNA damaging potential. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  13. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  14. Cell transfection as a tool to study growth hormone action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norstedt, G; Enberg, B; Francis, S;

    1994-01-01

    The isolation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) cDNA clones has made possible the transfection of GHRs into cultured cells. Our aim in this minireview is to show how the application of such approaches have benefited GHR research. GH stimulation of cells expressing GHR cDNAs can cause an alteration...... of cellular function that mimic those of the endogenous GHR. GHR cDNA transfected cells also offer a system where the mechanism of GH action can be studied. Such a system has been used to demonstrate that the GHR itself becomes tyrosine phosphorylated and that further phosphorylation of downstream proteins...... is important in GH action. The GH signals are transmitted to the nucleus and GH regulated genes have now begun to be characterized. The ability to use cell transfection for mechanistic studies of GH action will be instrumental to define domains within the receptor that are of functional importance...

  15. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P; Tornøe, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device......, capable of local delivery of NGF. The clinical device, named NsG0202, houses an NGF-secreting cell line (NGC-0295), which is derived from a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, stably genetically modified to secrete NGF. Bioactivity and correct processing of NGF was confirmed in vitro. Ns...

  16. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Bao-Quan; WANG Xian-Ju; LIU Guo-Tao; LIU Liang-Gang

    2003-01-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise.Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution functionand its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the populationof the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction.Noise in the system can induce the phase transition.

  17. Disrupting the oncogenic synergism between nucleolin and Ras results in cell growth inhibition and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Schokoroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin are major contributors to malignant transformation. The pleiotropic protein nucleolin can bind to both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. Previously, we have demonstrated a crosstalk between Ras, nucleolin and the ErbB1 receptor. Activated Ras facilitates nucleolin interaction with ErbB1 and stabilizes ErbB1 levels. The three oncogenes synergistically facilitate anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used several cancer cell lines. The effect of Ras and nucleolin inhibition was determined using cell growth, cell death and cell motility assays. Protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. We found that inhibition of Ras and nucleolin reduces tumor cell growth, enhances cell death and inhibits anchorage independent growth. Our results reveal that the combined treatment affects Ras and nucleolin levels and localization. Our study also indicates that Salirasib (FTS, Ras inhibitor reduces cell motility, which is not affected by the nucleolin inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional avenue for inhibiting cancers driven by these oncogenes.

  18. Photoresist Derived Carbon for Growth and Differentiation of Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Zou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or necrosis of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS is thehallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Theinability to regenerate in CNS offers little hope for naturally repairing the damagedneurons. However, with the rapid development of new technologies, regenerative medicineoffers great promises to patients with these disorders. Among many events for furtheradvancement of regenerative medicine, extracellular matrix (ECM plays a critical role forcellular migration and differentiation. To develop a biocompatible and electricallyconductive substrate that can be potentially used to promote growth and regeneration ofneurons and to record intracellular and multisite signals from brain as a probe, a polymericprecursor – SPR 220.7 was fabricated by pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 700 oC.Human Neuroblastoma cells - SK-N-MC, SY5Y, mouse teratocarcinoma cells P-19 and ratPC12 cells were found to attach and proliferate on photoresist derived carbon film.Significantly, neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells induced by NGF was demonstrated byobserving cell shape and size, and measuring the length of neurites under SEM. Our resultsindicated that fabricated carbon could potentially be explored in regenerative medicine forpromoting neuronal growth and differentiation in CNS with neurodegeneration.

  19. Polyamines in relation to growth in carrot cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, K M; Phillips, R

    1988-09-01

    Changes in polyamine metabolism were investigated in relation to growth of cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota, cv Chantenay). Changes in levels of the major amines putrescine and spermidine throughout the culture period correlated poorly with changes in fresh weight, but a closer correlation with the minor component spermine was observed. The arginine decarboxylase (ADC) inhibitor difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) strongly and specifically inhibited ADC activity in the supernatant, reduced the major amine (putrescine) by 95% and the total amine content by 80%. It had no effect on cell number and stimulated fresh weight by over 25% through increased cell expansion. Spermine content, in contrast, increased with DFMA concentration in parallel with fresh weight increases. Difluoromethylornithine strongly inhibited ornithine decarboxylase activity in the pellet, but had little effect on either polyamine levels or culture growth. It was concluded that little evidence for a correlation between free polyamines and cell number in carrot cultures could be detected, but that a possible correlation between spermine content and cell expansion was observed.

  20. Polyamines in Relation to Growth in Carrot Cell Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Kevin M.; Phillips, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Changes in polyamine metabolism were investigated in relation to growth of cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota, cv Chantenay). Changes in levels of the major amines putrescine and spermidine throughout the culture period correlated poorly with changes in fresh weight, but a closer correlation with the minor component spermine was observed. The arginine decarboxylase (ADC) inhibitor difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) strongly and specifically inhibited ADC activity in the supernatant, reduced the major amine (putrescine) by 95% and the total amine content by 80%. It had no effect on cell number and stimulated fresh weight by over 25% through increased cell expansion. Spermine content, in contrast, increased with DFMA concentration in parallel with fresh weight increases. Difluoromethylornithine strongly inhibited ornithine decarboxylase activity in the pellet, but had little effect on either polyamine levels or culture growth. It was concluded that little evidence for a correlation between free polyamines and cell number in carrot cultures could be detected, but that a possible correlation between spermine content and cell expansion was observed. PMID:16666271

  1. Growth inhibition by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Joyce E; O'Toole, Kieran; Gonzalez, David; Lunec, John

    2009-06-01

    Clinical outcome following chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma is poor and improvements are needed. This preclinical study investigates the effect of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors (PTK787, ZD6474, ZD1839, SU6668 and SU11248) on the growth of three mesothelioma cell lines (NCI H226, NCI H28 and MSTO 211H), the presence of growth factor receptors and inhibition of their downstream signalling pathways. GI50 values were determined: ZD6474 and SU11248, mainly VEGFR2 inhibitors, gave the lowest GI50 across all cell lines (3.5-6.9 microM) whereas ZD1839 gave a GI50 in this range only in H28 cells. All cell lines were positive for EGFR, but only H226 cells were positive for VEGFR2 by Western blotting. ZD6474 and ZD1839 inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK, whereas VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was completely inhibited with 0.1 microM SU11248. VEGFR2 was detected in tumour samples by immunohistochemistry. VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation in mesothelioma. PMID:19318229

  2. Derivation of neural stem cells from an animal model of psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, A; Walton, N M; Shin, R; Chen, Q; Miyake, S; Tajinda, K; Gross, A K; Kogan, J H; Heusner, C L; Tamura, K; Matsumoto, M

    2013-01-01

    Several psychiatric and neurological diseases are associated with altered hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting differing neural stem cell (NSC) function may play a critical role in these diseases. To investigate the role of resident NSCs in a murine model of psychiatric disease, we sought to isolate and characterize NSCs from alpha-calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II heterozygous knockout (CaMK2α-hKO) mice, a model of schizophrenia/bipolar disorder. These mice display altered neurogenesis, impaired neuronal development and are part of a larger family possessing phenotypic and behavioral correlates of schizophrenia/bipolar disorder and a shared pathology referred to as the immature dentate gyrus (iDG). The extent to which NSCs contribute to iDG pathophysiology remains unclear. To address this, we established heterogeneous cultures of NSCs isolated from the hippocampal neuropoietic niche. When induced to differentiate, CaMK2α-hKO-derived NSCs recapitulate organotypic hippocampal neurogenesis, but generate larger numbers of immature neurons than wild-type (WT) littermates. Furthermore, mutant neurons fail to assume mature phenotypes (including morphology and MAP2/calbindin expression) at the same rate observed in WT counterparts. The increased production of immature neurons which fail to mature indicates that this reductionist model retains key animal- and iDG-specific maturational deficits observed in animal models and human patients. This is doubly significant, as these stem cells lack several developmental inputs present in vivo. Interestingly, NSCs were isolated from animals prior to the emergence of overt iDG pathophysiology, suggesting mutant NSCs may possess lasting intrinsic alterations and that altered NSC function may contribute to iDG pathophysiology in adult animals. PMID:24193728

  3. Systems-biology dissection of eukaryotic cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Justen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent article in BMC Biology illustrates the use of a systems-biology approach to integrate data across the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of budding yeast in order to dissect the relationship between nutrient conditions and cell growth. See research article http://jbiol.com/content/6/2/4 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/68

  4. Imatinib alters cell viability but not growth factors levels in TM4 Sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Atari-Hajipirloo, Somayeh; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Valizadeh, Nasim; Mahabadi, Sonya; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anticancer agent imatinib (IM) is a small molecular analog of ATP that inhibits tyrosine kinase activity of platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and stem cell factor (SCF) receptor in cancer cells. However these factors have a key role in regulating growth and development of normal Sertoli, Leydig and germ cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine cell viability, PDGF and SCF levels in mouse normal Sertoli cells exposed to IM. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM IM for 2, 4 or 6 days. The cell viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, One-Way ANOVA was performed. Results: IM showed significant decrease in Sertoli cell viability compared to control group (p=0.001). However, IM increased PDGF and SCF level insignificantly (p>0.05). Conclusion: Results suggested that IM treatment induced a dose dependent reduction of cell viability in Sertoli cells. It seems that treatment with this anticancer drug is involved in the fertility process. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of PDGF and SCF in this cell. PMID:27738659

  5. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  6. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies. PMID:27575162

  7. NucleoCounter-An efficient technique for the determination of cell number and viability in animal cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dimpalkumar; Naciri, Mariam; Clee, Paul; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2006-05-01

    The NucleoCounter is a novel, portable cell counting device based on the principle of fluorescence microscopy. The present work establishes its use with animal cells and checks its reliability, consistency and accuracy in comparison with other cytometric techniques. The main advantages of this technique are its ability to handle a large number of samples with a high degree of precision and its simplicity and specificity in detecting viable cells quantitatively in a heterogeneous culture. The work addresses and overcomes the problems of subjectivity, and some of the inherent sampling errors associated with using the traditional haemocytometer and Trypan Blue exclusion method. NucleoCounter offers reduced intra- and inter-observer variation as well as consistency in repetitive analysis that establishes it as an efficient and highly potential device for at-line monitoring of animal cell processes. Furthermore, since the only manual steps required are sample aspiration and mixing with two reagents, it is feasible that the whole method could be automated and brought on-line for process monitoring and control. PMID:19002893

  8. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) study of rotating cylindrical filters for animal cell perfusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo-Cardero, Alvio; Chico, Ernesto; Castilho, Leda; de Andrade Medronho, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the main fluid flow features inside a rotating cylindrical filtration (RCF) system used as external cell retention device for animal cell perfusion processes were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The motivation behind this work was to provide experimental fluid dynamic data for such turbulent flow using a high-permeability filter, given the lack of information about this system in the literature. The results shown herein gave evidence that, at the boundary between the filter mesh and the fluid, a slip velocity condition in the tangential direction does exist, which had not been reported in the literature so far. In the RCF system tested, this accounted for a fluid velocity 10% lower than that of the filter tip, which could be important for the cake formation kinetics during filtration. Evidence confirming the existence of Taylor vortices under conditions of turbulent flow and high permeability, typical of animal cell perfusion RCF systems, was obtained. Second-order turbulence statistics were successfully calculated. The radial behavior of the second-order turbulent moments revealed that turbulence in this system is highly anisotropic, which is relevant for performing numerical simulations of this system.

  9. Suppression of cell growth and invasion by miR-205 in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailong Wu; Shoumin Zhu; Yin-Yuan Mo

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, small, non-coding RNAs, which are capable of silencing gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, we report that miR-205 is significantly underexpressed in breast tumor compared to the matched normal breast tissue. Similarly, breast cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, express a lower level miR-205 than the non-malignant MCF-10A cells. Of interest, ectopic expression of miR-205 significantly inhibits cell proliferation and anchorage independent growth, as well as cell invasion. Furthermore, miR-205 was shown to suppress lung metastasis in an animal model. Finally, western blot combined with the luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that ErbB3 and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are direct targets for miR-205, and this miR-205-mediated suppression is likely through the direct interaction with the putative miR-205 binding site in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of ErbB3 and VEGF-A. Together, these results suggest that miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer.

  10. Effect of arginase II on L-arginine depletion and cell growth in murine cell lines of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson John R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arginine is the common substrate for the two isoforms of arginase. Arginase I, highly expressed in the liver and arginase II mainly expressed in the kidney. Arginase I-producing myeloid derived suppressor cells have been shown to inhibit T-cell function by the depletion of L-arginine. On the other hand, arginase II has been detected in patients with cancer and is thought to metabolize L-arginine to L-ornithine needed to sustain rapid tumor growth; however its role in L-arginine depletion is unclear. Thus, in tumor biology, L-arginine metabolism may play a dual role in tumor growth and in the induction of T cell dysfunction. Therefore, we studied in murine renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines, the effect of arginase II on tumor cell proliferation and L-arginine depletion. The effect of arginase inhibitors on cell proliferation was also tested. Methods Three murine renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cell lines were tested for the presence of arginase. nor-NOHA, an arginase inhibitor was used to substantiate the effect of arginase on cell growth and L-arginine depletion. Amino acid levels were tested by HPLC. Results Our results show that mRCC cell lines express only arginase II and were able to deplete L-arginine from the medium. Cell growth was independent of the amount of arginase activity expressed by the cells. nor-NOHA significantly (P = 0.01 reduced arginase II activity and suppressed cell growth in cells exhibiting high arginase activity. The depletion of L-arginine by mRCC induced the decrease expression of CD3ζ a key element for T-cell function. Conclusion The results of this study show for the first time that arginase II produced by RCC cell lines depletes L-arginine resulting in decreased expression of CD3ζ. These results indicate that RCC cell lines expressing arginase II can modulate the L-arginine metabolic pathway to regulate both cell growth and T-cell function. Blocking arginase may lead to a decrease in RCC cell

  11. Ginger inhibits cell growth and modulates angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jennifer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc is a natural dietary component with antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. The ginger component [6]-gingerol has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects through mediation of NF-κB. NF-κB can be constitutively activated in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and may contribute towards increased transcription and translation of angiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ginger on tumor cell growth and modulation of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Methods The effect of ginger and the major ginger components on cell growth was determined in a panel of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. Activation of NF-κB and and production of VEGF and IL-8 was determined in the presence or absence of ginger. Results Ginger treatment of cultured ovarian cancer cells induced profound growth inhibition in all cell lines tested. We found that in vitro, 6-shogaol is the most active of the individual ginger components tested. Ginger treatment resulted in inhibition of NF-kB activation as well as diminished secretion of VEGF and IL-8. Conclusion Ginger inhibits growth and modulates secretion of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells. The use of dietary agents such as ginger may have potential in the treatment and prevention of ovarian cancer.

  12. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    2001-01-01

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2 DNA-sy

  13. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  14. Oocyte-granulosa cell interactions during mouse follicular development: regulation of kit ligand expression and its role in oocyte growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderhyden Barbara C

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian folliculogenesis is regulated by both endocrine and intraovarian mechanisms that coordinate the processes of oocyte growth and somatic cell proliferation and differentiation. Within the follicle, paracrine interactions between the oocyte and surrounding granulosa cells are critical for normal cell development and function. This review focuses on the role of paracrine interactions during early oocyte and follicular development that ensure proper coordination of oocyte and somatic cell function. Particular emphasis is given to granulosa cell-derived Kit Ligand (KitL, whose functional importance for oocyte growth has been demonstrated by a wide range of in vivo and in vitro studies. Reported interactions between KitL and oocyte-derived growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF9 and bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP15 suggest the molecular basis of oocyte-granulosa cell interactions, but also hint at the complexity of these communications. These paracrine interactions and the structure of the oocyte-granulosa cell interface are follicle stage-specific and regulated by FSH. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that promote the development of healthy oocytes with good developmental competence has potential applications for improving fertility and for in vitro growth systems for oocytes from domestic animals and humans.

  15. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  16. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  17. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico, E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro [Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  18. Regulation of IGFBP secretion and modulation of cell growth in MDBK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohick, W S; Clemmons, D R

    1993-03-01

    The ability of IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) to modulate cell growth and IGF-I responsiveness of epithelial cells was examined using the Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. The predominant IGFBP present in conditioned media (CM) of untreated cells was found to be IGFBP-2. Following exposure to forskolin, the abundance of IGFBP-2 in CM was decreased, while IGFBP-3 and -4 were induced. These changes corresponded with alterations in mRNA abundance. Growth of MDBK cells in serum-free media was stimulated by addition of 2.5 to 50 ng/ml of IGF-I in a dose responsive manner. Coincubation with equimolar amounts of IGF-I and exogenous bovine IGFBP-3 potentiated the growth response observed with IGF-I alone. In order to alter endogenous IGFBP-3 secretion, cells were exposed to transfection with an expression vector containing sense IGFBP-3 cDNA. Following selection and amplification with methotrexate, cells underwent a permanent alteration in cell morphology, exhibiting characteristics of transporting epithelia. This was associated with secretion of IGFBP-3 under basal conditions. Secretion of IGFBP-3 was due to expression of endogenous IGFBP-3 and not to expression of the transgene. Cells expressing IGFBP-3 under basal conditions grew slower in serum, but were more responsive to 100 ng/ml of IGF-1 in serum-free media compared to wild-type MDBK cells. The role of IGFBP-3 in mediating these responses requires further study.

  19. The role of large animal studies in cardiac regenerative therapy concise review of translational stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sung Uk; Yeung, Alan C; Ikeno, Fumiaki

    2013-08-01

    Animal models have long been developed for cardiovascular research. These animal models have been helpful in understanding disease, discovering potential therapeutics, and predicting efficacy. Despite many efforts, however, translational study has been underestimated. Recently, investigations have identified stem cell treatment as a potentially promising cell therapy for regenerative medicine, largely because of the stem cell's ability to differentiate into many functional cell types. Stem cells promise a new era of cell-based therapy for salvaging the heart. However, stem cells have the potential risk of tumor formation. These properties of stem cells are considered a major concern over the efficacy of cell therapy. The translational/preclinical study of stem cells is essential but only at the beginning stages. What types of heart disease are indicated for stem cell therapy, what type of stem cell, what type of animal model, how do we deliver stem cells, and how do we improve heart function? These may be the key issues that the settlement of which would facilitate the transition of stem cell research from bench to bedside. In this review article, we discuss state-of-the-art technology in stem cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Stimulation of circus movement by activin, bFGF and TGF-beta 2 in isolated animal cap cells of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoura, I; Nakamura, H; Tashiro, K; Shiokawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Lobopodium is a hyaline cytoplasmic protrusion which rotates circumferencially around a cell. This movement is called circus movement, which is seen in dissociated cells of amphibian embryos. Relative abundance of the lobopodia-forming cells changes temporally and spatially within Xenopus embryos, reflecting stage-dependent difference of morphogenetic movements. The lobopodia-forming activity of dissociated animal cap cells was stimulated strongly by activin and bFGF, and weakly by TGF-beta 2. In addition, activin A was found to stimulate cellular attachment to the substratum when the cultivation lasted long. Thus, mesoderm-inducing growth factors stimulate lobopodia formation and cellular movements which may be necessary for gastrulation and neurulation in Xenopus early embryos.

  1. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  2. Role of CaECM25 in cell morphogenesis, cell growth and virulence in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prominent opportunistic fungal pathogen in humans. Multiple factors are associated with the virulence of C. albicans, including morphogenesis, cell wall organization and growth rate. Here, we describe the identification and functional characterization of CaECM25, a gene that has not been reported before. We constructed Caecm25?/? mutants and investigated the role of the gene in morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence. CaECM25 deletion resulted in defects in cell separation, a slower growth rate, reduced filamentous growth and attenuated adherence to plastic surfaces. The Caecm25?/? mutant was also significantly less virulent than wild type when tested for systemic infection in mice. Therefore, CaECM25 plays important roles in morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence.

  3. Role of CaECM25 in cell morphogenesis, cell growth and virulence in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TingTing; LI WanJie; LI Di; WANG Yue; SANG JianLi

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prominent opportunistic fungal pathogen in humans. Multiple factors are associated with the virulence of C. albicans, including morphogenesis, cell wall organization and growth rate. Here, we describe the identification and functional characterization of CaECM25, a gene that has not been reported before. We constructed Caecm25△/△ mutants and investigated the role of the gene In morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence. CaECM25 deletion resulted in defects in cell separation, a slower growth rate, reduced filamentous growth and attenuated adherence to plastic surfaces. The Caecm25△/△ mutant was also significantly less virulent than wild type when tested for systemic infection in mice. Therefore, CaECM25 plays important roles in morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence.

  4. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  5. Adrenomedullin as a Growth and Cell Fate Regulatory Factor for Adult Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Martínez-Herrero; Ignacio M Larráyoz; Laura Ochoa-Callejero; Josune García-Sanmartín; Alfredo Martínez

    2012-01-01

    The use of stem cells as a strategy for tissue repair and regeneration is one of the biomedical research areas that has attracted more interest in the past few years. Despite the classic belief that the central nervous system (CNS) was immutable, now it is well known that cell turnover occurs in the mature CNS. Postnatal neurogenesis is subjected to tight regulation by many growth factors, cell signals, and transcription factors. An emerging molecule involved in this process is adrenomedullin...

  6. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and sup...

  7. Loss of hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-1alpha impacts on adult mouse intestinal epithelial cell growth and cell lineages differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine R Lussier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although Hnf1alpha is crucial for pancreas and liver functions, it is believed to play a limited functional role for intestinal epithelial functions. The aim of this study was to assess the consequences of abrogating Hnf1alpha on the maintenance of adult small intestinal epithelial functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An Hnf1alpha knockout mouse model was used. Assessment of histological abnormalities, crypt epithelial cell proliferation, epithelial barrier, glucose transport and signalling pathways were measured in these animals. Changes in global gene expression were also analyzed. Mice lacking Hnf1alpha displayed increased crypt proliferation and intestinalomegaly as well as a disturbance of intestinal epithelial cell lineages production during adult life. This phenotype was associated with a decrease of the mucosal barrier function and lumen-to-blood glucose delivery. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signalling pathway was found to be overly activated in the small intestine of adult Hnf1alpha mutant mice. The intestinal epithelium of Hnf1alpha null mice displayed a reduction of the enteroendocrine cell population. An impact was also observed on proper Paneth cell differentiation with abnormalities in the granule exocytosis pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these results unravel a functional role for Hnf1alpha in regulating adult intestinal growth and sustaining the functions of intestinal epithelial cell lineages.

  8. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the ef...

  9. In Vivo Measurements of Tumor Metabolism and Growth after Administration of Enzastaurin Using Small Animal FDG Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Pollok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG may help to establish the antitumor activity of enzastaurin, a novel protein kinase C-beta II (PKC-II inhibitor, in mouse xenografts. Methods. The hematologic cell line RAJI and the solid tumor cell line U87MG were each implanted in NOD/SCID mice. Standard tumor growth measurements and [18F]FDG PET imaging were performed weekly for up to three weeks after tumor implantation and growth. Results. Concomitant with caliper measurements, [18F]FDG PET imaging was performed to monitor glucose metabolism. Heterogeneity of glucose uptake in various areas of the tumors was observed after vehicle or enzastaurin treatment. This heterogeneity may limit the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging to measure enzastaurin-associated changes in xenograft tumors. Conclusion. [18F]FDG PET imaging technique does not correlate with standard caliper assessments in xenografts to assess the antitumor activity of enzastaurin. Future studies are needed to determine the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging in preclinical models.

  10. Cheiradone: a vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nessar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is associated with physiological (for example wound healing and pathological conditions (tumour development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are the major angiogenic regulators. We have identified a natural product (cheiradone isolated from a Euphorbia species which inhibited in vivo and in vitro VEGF- stimulated angiogenesis but had no effect on FGF-2 or EGF activity. Two primary cultures, bovine aortic and human dermal endothelial cells were used in in vitro (proliferation, wound healing, invasion in Matrigel and tube formation and in vivo (the chick chorioallantoic membrane models of angiogenesis in the presence of growth factors and cheiradone. In all cases, the concentration of cheiradone which caused 50% inhibition (IC50 was determined. The effect of cheiradone on the binding of growth factors to their receptors was also investigated. Results Cheiradone inhibited all stages of VEGF-induced angiogenesis with IC50 values in the range 5.20–7.50 μM but did not inhibit FGF-2 or EGF-induced angiogenesis. It also inhibited VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-1 and 2 with IC50 values of 2.9 and 0.61 μM respectively. Conclusion Cheiradone inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis by binding to VEGF receptors -1 and -2 and may be a useful investigative tool to study the specific contribution of VEGF to angiogenesis and may have therapeutic potential.

  11. Entrainability of cell cycle oscillator models with exponential growth of cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Enkhkhudulmur, Tsog-Erdene; Katayama, Norihiro; Karashima, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Among various aspects of cell cycle, understanding synchronization mechanism of cell cycle is important because of the following reasons. (1)Cycles of cell assembly should synchronize to form an organ. (2) Synchronizing cell cycles are required to experimental analysis of regulatory mechanisms of cell cycles. (3) Cell cycle has a distinct phase relationship with the other biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm. However, forced as well as mutual entrainment mechanisms are not clearly known. In this study, we investigated entrainability of cell cycle models of yeast cell under the periodic forcing to both of the cell mass and molecular dynamics. Dynamics of models under study involve the cell mass growing exponentially. In our result, they are shown to allow only a limited frequency range for being entrained by the periodic forcing. In contrast, models with linear growth are shown to be entrained in a wider frequency range. It is concluded that if the cell mass is included in the cell cycle regulation, its entrainability is sensitive to a shape of growth curve assumed in the model. PMID:25571564

  12. Vaccination Method Affects Immune Response and Bacterial Growth but Not Protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium Animal Model of Typhoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, Clare L; Strugnell, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the murine model for typhoid, where animals are infected with S. Typhimurium. Mice were vaccinated either intravenously or orally with the same live attenuated S. Typhimurium strain and data were collected on vaccine strain growth, shedding and stimulation of antibodies and cytokines. Following vaccination, mice were challenged with a virulent strain of S. Typhimurium and the protection conferred by the different vaccination routes was measured in terms of challenge suppression and animal survival. The main difference in immune stimulation found in this study was the development of a secretory IgA response in orally-vaccinated mice, which was absent in IV vaccinated mice. While both strains showed similar protection in terms of challenge suppression in systemic organs (spleen and liver) as well as survival, they differed in terms of challenge suppression of virulent pathogens in gut-associated organs. This difference in gut colonisation presents important questions around the ability of vaccines to prevent shedding and transmission. These findings demonstrate that while protection conferred by two vaccines can appear to be the same, the mechanisms controlling the protection can differ and have important implications for infection dynamics within a population.

  13. Vaccination Method Affects Immune Response and Bacterial Growth but Not Protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium Animal Model of Typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare L Kinnear

    Full Text Available Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the murine model for typhoid, where animals are infected with S. Typhimurium. Mice were vaccinated either intravenously or orally with the same live attenuated S. Typhimurium strain and data were collected on vaccine strain growth, shedding and stimulation of antibodies and cytokines. Following vaccination, mice were challenged with a virulent strain of S. Typhimurium and the protection conferred by the different vaccination routes was measured in terms of challenge suppression and animal survival. The main difference in immune stimulation found in this study was the development of a secretory IgA response in orally-vaccinated mice, which was absent in IV vaccinated mice. While both strains showed similar protection in terms of challenge suppression in systemic organs (spleen and liver as well as survival, they differed in terms of challenge suppression of virulent pathogens in gut-associated organs. This difference in gut colonisation presents important questions around the ability of vaccines to prevent shedding and transmission. These findings demonstrate that while protection conferred by two vaccines can appear to be the same, the mechanisms controlling the protection can differ and have important implications for infection dynamics within a population.

  14. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  15. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  16. An investigation of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the growth-inhibitory effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers in cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Áine

    2002-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid produced by ruminant animals. Despite animal studies showing that CLA is an effective agent in preventing mammary and colon tumour development there is a need to determine isomeric-specific effects of CLA and identify molecular targets in tumour tissues. Mammary (MCF-7) and colon (SW480) tumour cell lines were used in this study as in vitro models to investigate effects of CLA on growth and membra...

  17. Phosphorylation-dependent Trafficking of Plasma Membrane Proteins in Animal and Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Remko Offringa; and Fang Huang

    2013-01-01

    In both unicellular and multicellular organisms, transmembrane (TM) proteins are sorted to and retained at specific membrane domains by endomembrane trafficking mechanisms that recognize sorting signals in the these proteins. The trafficking and distribution of plasma membrane (PM)-localized TM proteins (PM proteins), especially of those PM proteins that show an asymmetric distribution over the PM, has received much attention, as their proper PM localization is crucial for elementary signaling and transport processes, and defects in their localization often lead to severe disease symptoms or developmental defects. The subcellular localization of PM proteins is dynamically regulated by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These modificaitons mostly occur on sorting signals that are located in the larger cytosolic domains of the cargo proteins. Here we review the effects of phosphorylation of PM proteins on their trafficking, and present the key examples from the animal field that have been subject to studies for already several decades, such as that of aquaporin 2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Our knowledge on cargo trafficking in plants is largely based on studies of the family of PIN FORMED (PIN) carriers that mediate the efflux of the plant hormone auxin. We will review what is known on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of PIN proteins, with a focus on how this is modulated by phosphorylation, and identify and discuss analogies and differences in trafficking with the well-studied animal examples.

  18. Interaction of benzo[c]phenanthridine and protoberberine alkaloids with animal and yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaninová, I; Táborská, E; Bochoráková, H; Slanina, J

    2001-01-01

    We compared the effects of four quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids--chelerythrine, chelilutine, sanguinarine, and sanguilutine--and two quaternary protoberberine alkaloids-berberine and coptisine--on the human cell line HeLa (cervix carcinoma cells) and the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces japonicus var. versatilis. The ability of alkaloids to display primary fluorescence, allowed us to record their dynamics and localization in cells. Cytotoxic, anti-microtubular, and anti-actin effects in living cells were studied. In the yeasts, neither microtubules nor cell growth was seriously affected even at the alkaloid concentration of 100 microg/ml. The HeLa cells, however, responded to the toxic effect of alkaloids at concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 microg/ml. IC50 values for individual alkaloids were: sanguinarine IC50 = 0.8 microg/ml, sanguilutine IC50 = 8.3 microg/ml, chelerythrine IC50 = 6.2 microg/ml, chelilutine IC50 = 5.2 microg/ml, coptisine IC50 = 2.6 microg/ml and berberine IC50 > 10.0 microg/ml. In living cells, sanguinarine produced a decrease in microtubule numbers, particularly at the cell periphery, at a concentration of 0.1 microg/ml. The other alkaloids showed a similar effect but at higher concentrations (5-50 microg/ml). The strongest effects of sanguinarine were explained as a consequence of its easy penetration through the cell membrane owing to nonpolar pseudobase formation and to a high degree of molecular planarity.

  19. Dickkopf3 overexpression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Mei Gu; Yi-Hui Ma; Wu-Gan Zhao; Jie Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the role of dickkopf3 (Dkk3) in human pancreatic cancer cell growth.METHODS: Dkk3 mRNA and protein expression in human pancreatic cancer cell lines were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Methylation of the Dkk3 promoter sequence was examined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and Dkk3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) treatment. The effects of Dkk3 on cancer cell proliferation and in vitro sensitivity to gemcitabine were investigated by CellTiter 96. AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (MTS) after transfecting the Dkk3 expression plasmid into human pancreatic cancer cells. The expression of β-catenin, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) was also examined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting after upregulating Dkk3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells.RESULTS: The results show that the expression levels of both Dkk3 mRNA and protein were low in all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. The Dkk3 promoter sequence was methylated in the MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cell lines, which showed reduced Dkk3 expression. These two cell lines, which initially had a methylated Dkk3 promoter, showed increased Dkk3 mRNA expression that was dependent upon the dosage and timing of the DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-dC, treatment (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). When Dkk3 expression was upregulated following the transfection of a Dkk3 expression plasmid into MIA PaCa-2 cells, the ability of cells to proliferate decreased (P < 0.01), and the expression of β-catenin and pERK was downregulated (P < 0.01). Sensitivity to gemcitabine was enhanced in Dkk3 expression plasmid-transfected cells.CONCLUSION: Our findings, for the first time, implicate Dkk3 as a tumor suppressor in human pancreatic cancer

  20. Cloning adult farm animals: a review of the possibilities and problems associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J L; Schrick, F N; McCracken, M D; van Amstel, S R; Hopkins, F M; Welborn, M G; Davies, C J

    2003-08-01

    In 1997, Wilmut et al. announced the birth of Dolly, the first ever clone of an adult animal. To date, adult sheep, goats, cattle, mice, pigs, cats and rabbits have been cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer. The ultimate challenge of cloning procedures is to reprogram the somatic cell nucleus for development of the early embryo. The cell type of choice for reprogramming the somatic nucleus is an enucleated oocyte. Given that somatic cells are easily obtained from adult animals, cultured in the laboratory and then genetically modified, cloning procedures are ideal for introducing specific genetic modifications in farm animals. Genetic modification of farm animals provides a means of studying genes involved in a variety of biological systems and disease processes. Moreover, genetically modified farm animals have created a new form of 'pharming' whereby farm animals serve as bioreactors for production of pharmaceuticals or organ donors. A major limitation of cloning procedures is the extreme inefficiency for producing live offspring. Dolly was the only live offspring produced after 277 attempts. Similar inefficiencies for cloning adult animals of other species have been described by others. Many factors related to cloning procedures and culture environment contribute to the death of clones, both in the embryonic and fetal periods as well as during neonatal life. Extreme inefficiencies of this magnitude, along with the fact that death of the surrogate may occur, continue to raise great concerns with cloning humans. PMID:12846674

  1. Cloning adult farm animals: a review of the possibilities and problems associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J L; Schrick, F N; McCracken, M D; van Amstel, S R; Hopkins, F M; Welborn, M G; Davies, C J

    2003-08-01

    In 1997, Wilmut et al. announced the birth of Dolly, the first ever clone of an adult animal. To date, adult sheep, goats, cattle, mice, pigs, cats and rabbits have been cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer. The ultimate challenge of cloning procedures is to reprogram the somatic cell nucleus for development of the early embryo. The cell type of choice for reprogramming the somatic nucleus is an enucleated oocyte. Given that somatic cells are easily obtained from adult animals, cultured in the laboratory and then genetically modified, cloning procedures are ideal for introducing specific genetic modifications in farm animals. Genetic modification of farm animals provides a means of studying genes involved in a variety of biological systems and disease processes. Moreover, genetically modified farm animals have created a new form of 'pharming' whereby farm animals serve as bioreactors for production of pharmaceuticals or organ donors. A major limitation of cloning procedures is the extreme inefficiency for producing live offspring. Dolly was the only live offspring produced after 277 attempts. Similar inefficiencies for cloning adult animals of other species have been described by others. Many factors related to cloning procedures and culture environment contribute to the death of clones, both in the embryonic and fetal periods as well as during neonatal life. Extreme inefficiencies of this magnitude, along with the fact that death of the surrogate may occur, continue to raise great concerns with cloning humans.

  2. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  3. Cloning and analysis of genes regulating plant cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this work are to identify, clone and analyze genes involved in the regulation of plant cell growth. To do this, we have induced tumors on Arabidopsis thaliana by exposing seed or germinating seedlings to ionizing radiation. The tumors which developed on the plants derived from these seed were excised and established in culture. Unlike normal tissue explants, the tumors are able to grow on hormone-free medium suggesting changes in growth control (either hormonal or other) induced by the radiation exposure. This progress report describes work aimed at characterizing these tumors at the physiological and cellular levels and at determining the molecular basis of the changes leading to the tumorous phenotype

  4. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  5. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  6. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Grigoriadou, Christina; Pytel, Dariusz; Zhang, Fang; Ye, Jiangbin; Koumenis, Constantinos; Cavener, Douglas; Diehl, J. Alan

    2010-01-01

    In order to proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential anti-neoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase PERK have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have utilized animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate PERK contribution in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is utilized during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis and thereby facilitates tumor growth. PMID:20453876

  7. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, E; Grigoriadou, C; Pytel, D; Zhang, F; Ye, J; Koumenis, C; Cavener, D; Diehl, J A

    2010-07-01

    To proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential antineoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase, RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have used animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate the contribution of PERK in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle because of the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is used during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis, thereby facilitating tumor growth.

  8. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2016-03-01

    different treatment groups: vehicle, vatalanib (oral treatment 50 mg/kg/d, HET0016 (intraperitoneal treatment 10 mg/kg/d, and combined (vatalanib and HET0016. Following scheduled treatments, all animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging on day 22, followed by euthanasia. Brain specimens were equally divided for immunohistochemistry and protein array analysis.Results: Our results demonstrated a trend that HET0016, alone or in combination with vatalanib, is capable of controlling the tumor growth compared with that of vatalanib alone, indicating attenuation of the unwanted effect of vatalanib. When both vatalanib and HET0016 were administered together on the day of the tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment, tumor volume, tumor blood volume, permeability, extravascular and extracellular space volume, tumor cell proliferation, and cell migration were decreased compared with that of the vehicle-treated group. Conclusion: HET0016 is capable of controlling tumor growth and migration, but these effects are dependent on the timing of drug administration. The addition of HET0016 to vatalanib may attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib.Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, glioblastoma, antiangiogenic treatments, HET0016, vascular parameters, protein array

  9. Growth and radiosensitivity of irradiated human glioma cell progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Li; Li Li; Changshao Xu; Juying Zhou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progenitors of the immortalized human glioma cell line, SHG-44, are significantly less sensitive to irradiation. Two hypotheses regarding the mechanism of this effect exist: several studies have suggested that there is a subgroup with different radiosensitivities in identical cell group, and the progenitors of irradiate is a adaptive response subgroup, so its radiosensitivity is descend. A second hypothesis suggests that irradiated glioma progeny have a stronger ability to repair DNA damage. This would suggest that when progeny are continuously irradiated, resistance to irradiation-induced DNA increases, and radiosensitivity decreases.OBJECTIVE: To investigate radiosensitivity and growth features after irradiation to progeny of the human glioma cell line SHG-44.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled experiment, which was performed at the Department of Radiology Laboratory, the First Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, between September 2004 and January 2006.MATERIALS: The glioma cell line SHG-44 was provided by the Institute of Neuroscience, First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University. Propidium iodide reagent was provided by Coulter Corporation. A linear accelerator, KD-2 type, was provided by Siemens, Germany. The flow cytometer EPICS-XL was provided by Coulter Corporation.METHODS: Brain glioma SHG-44 cells were divided into four groups: SHG-44, SHG-44-2, SHG-44-6, and SHG-44-10. The SHG-44-2, SHG-44-6, and SHG-44-10 cells were vertically irradiated with varying doses of 2,6 and 10 Gy by a linear accelerator (6 MVX). The cells were passaged for 15 generations and cultured in RPMI-1640 culture media.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Community re-double time, mean lethal dose (D0), extrapolation number (N), fraction surviving fraction irradiated by 2 Gy dose (SF2), quasi-threshold dose (Dq), and cell cycle.RESULTS: The Population doubling time (PDT) of SHG-44-2, SHG-44-6, and SHG-44-10 cell groups was not significant (P=0.052). Compared to

  10. Therapeutic Potential of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in IBD: From Animal Models to Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cabezón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosa undergoes continuous antigenic exposure from food antigens, commensal flora derived ligands, and pathogens. This constant stimulation results in controlled inflammatory responses that are effectively suppressed by multiple factors. This tight regulation, necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis, is affected during inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD resulting in altered immune responses to harmless microorganisms. Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of immunity, located in peripheral and lymphoid tissues, which are essential for homeostasis of T cell-dependent immune responses. The expression of a particular set of pathogen recognition receptors allows DCs to initiate immune responses. However, in the absence of danger signals, different DC subsets can induce active tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg, inhibiting inflammatory T helper cell responses, or both. Interestingly, several protocols to generate clinical grade tolerogenic DC (tol-DCs in vitro have been described, opening the possibility to restore the intestinal homeostasis to bacterial flora by cellular therapy. In this review, we discuss different DC subsets and their role in IBD. Additionally, we will review preclinical studies performed in animal models while describing recent characterization of tol-DCs from Crohn’s disease patients for clinical application.

  11. Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Micera, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) research has shown that this factor acts not only outside its classical domain of the peripheral and central nervous system, but also on non-neuronal and cancer cells. This latter observation has led to divergent hypothesis about the role of NGF, its specific distribution pattern within the tissues and its implication in induction as well as progression of carcinogenesis. Moreover, other recent studies have shown that NGF has direct clinical relevance in certain human brain neuron degeneration and a number of human ocular disorders. These studies, by suggesting that NGF is involved in a plethora of physiological function in health and disease, warrant further investigation regarding the true role of NGF in carcinogenesis. Based on our long-lasting experience in the physiopathology of NGF, we aimed to review previous and recent in vivo and in vitro NGF studies on tumor cell induction, progression and arrest. Overall, these studies indicate that the only presence of NGF is unable to generate cell carcinogenesis, both in normal neuronal and non-neuronal cells/tissues. However, it cannot be excluded the possibility that the co-expression of NGF and pro-carcinogenic molecules might open to different consequence. Whether NGF plays a direct or an indirect role in cell proliferation during carcinogenesis remains to demonstrate. PMID:27439311

  12. Physical growth of children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Malay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometric measurements were used to study the physical growth of 58 sickle cell disease(SS children with severe clinical manifestations and compared with 86 normal(AA children from Nagpur district of Maharashtra. Both sickle cell disease male and female children were shown to have statistically significant lower weights, heights, sitting heights, mid arm circumferences, skin fold thickness and body mass indexes but not upper/ lower segment ratio as compared to normal children with comparable sex and ages. No significant differences were observed between the male and female children with sickle cell disease or normal for any of the anthropometric measurements. A significant lower values of all the measurements except U/L ratio was observed in the age group of 11-14 years than the earlier age among the sickle cell disease children as compared to the normal children of the same age and sex groups. Thus, these results indicate that as a group, children with sickle cell disease weigh less, are shorter and undernourished as compared to normal children.

  13. The biochemical control of the cell cycle by growth regulators in higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGWei; LatoyaHarris; RonaldJ.Newton

    2004-01-01

    The cell cycle is an important research field in cell biology and it is genetically and developmentally regulated in animals and plants. The aim of this study was to review knowledge about the biochemical regulation of the cell cycle by plant growth regulators through molecular checkpoints that regulate the transition from G0-G1-S-phase and G2-M in higher plants.Recent research has shown that zeatin treatment led to the up-regulation of CycD3 in Arabidopsis. Benzyladenine treatment can also shorten the duration of S-phase through recruitment of latent origins of DNA replication. Kinetin is involved in the phosphoregulation of the G2-M checkpoint; the major cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) at this checkpoint has recently shown to be dephosphorylated as a result of cytokinin treatment, an effect that can also be mimicked by the fission yeast Cdc25 phosphatase. Gibberellic acid (GA) treatment induces internode elongation in deepwater rice, this response is mediated by a GA-induced up-regulation of a cyclin-Cdk at the G2-M checkpoint. Recent evidence has also linked abscisic acid to a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. A new D-type cyclin, recently discovered in Arabidopsis may have a key role in this process. A brief review on plant growth regulator-cell cycle interfacing during development and a cytokinin-induced continuum of cell cycle activation through the up-regulation of a plant D-type cyclin at the G1 checkpoint and the phosphoregulation of the Cdk at the G2/M checkpoint had been concluded. This review could be valuable to research on cell and developmental biology in plants.

  14. The intraportal injection model: A practical animal model for hepatic metastases and tumor cell dissemination in human colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of metastasized colorectal carcinoma requires biologically relevant and adequate animal models that generate both reproducible metastasis and the dissemination of tumor cells in the form of so-called minimal residual disease (MRD), an expression of the systemic character of neoplastic disease. We injected immunoincompetent nude mice intraportally with different numbers (1 × 105, 1 × 106 and 5 × 106 cells) of the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and SW-620 and investigated by histological studies and CK-20 RT-PCR the occurrence of hematogenous metastases and the dissemination of human tumor cells in bone marrow. Only the injection of 1 × 106 cells of each colon carcinoma cell line produced acceptable perioperative mortality with reproducible induction of hepatic metastases in up to 89% of all animals. The injection of 1 × 106 cells also generated tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow in up to 63% of animals with hepatic metastases. The present intraportal injection model in immunoincompetent nude mice represents a biologically relevant and adequate animal model for the induction of both reproducible hepatic metastasis and tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow as a sign of MRD

  15. Functionalized silica nanoparticles: a platform for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kemin; He, Xiaoxiao; Yang, XiaoHai; Shi, Hui

    2013-07-16

    Going in vivo, including living cells and the whole body, is very important for gaining a better understanding of the mystery of life and requires specialized imaging techniques. The diversity, composition, and temporal-spatial variation of life activities from cells to the whole body require the analysis techniques to be fast-response, noninvasive, highly sensitive, and stable, in situ and in real-time. Functionalized nanoparticle-based fluorescence imaging techniques have the potential to meet such needs through real-time and noninvasive visualization of biological events in vivo. Functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) doped with fluorescent dyes appear to be an ideal and flexible platform for developing fluorescence imaging techniques used in living cells and the whole body. We can select and incorporate different dyes inside the silica matrix either noncovalently or covalently. These form the functionalized hybrid SiNPs, which support multiplex labeling and ratiometric sensing in living systems. Since the silica matrix protects dyes from outside quenching and degrading factors, this enhances the photostability and biocompatibility of the SiNP-based probes. This makes them ideal for real-time and long-time tracking. One nanoparticle can encapsulate large numbers of dye molecules, which amplifies their optical signal and temporal-spatial resolution response. Integrating fluorescent dye-doped SiNPs with targeting ligands using various surface modification techniques can greatly improve selective recognition. Along with the endocytosis, functionalized SiNPs can be efficiently internalized into cells for noninvasive localization, assessment, and monitoring. These unique characteristics of functionalized SiNPs substantially support their applications in fluorescence imaging in vivo. In this Account, we summarize our efforts to develop functionalized dye-doped SiNPs for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels. We first discuss how to design and

  16. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AIBao-Quan; WANGXian-Ju; LIUGuo-Tao; LIULiang-Gang

    2003-01-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise.Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor ceils from going into extinction.Noise in the system can induce the phase transition.

  17. Centriole Age Underlies Asynchronous Primary Cilium Growth in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Charles T; Stearns, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that are present in most mammalian tissues and play important roles in development and disease [1]. They are required for the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) [2-4] and PDGF [5] signalling pathways. Primary cilia grow from the older of the two centrioles of the centrosome, referred to as the mother centriole. In cycling cells the cilium typically grows in G1 and is lost before mitosis, but the regulation of its growth is poorly understood. Centriole ...

  18. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-03-31

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  19. Effect of epidermal growth factor on the migration of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faliang Duan; Guoping Yang; Junwu Wei; Jinglei Wu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recently,researches on neural stem cells(NSCs)are focus on differentiation and migration of stem cells.How to regulate and control differentiation and migration of NSCs based on human wills is still a hot topic.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effct of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the migration and proliferation of NSCs and analyze duration of the effect.DESIGN:Contrast study based on cells.SETFING:Department of Neurological Surgery,the First Hospital of Wuhan.MATERIALS:Healthy SD rats aged 13-14 embryonic days.EGF(Sigma Company).METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratory of Experimental Center Affiliated to the First Hospital of Wuhan from October 2004 to July 2006.NSCs selected from embryonic striatum of rats with 13-14 embryonic days were cultured;7 days later,suspended neural sphere was used to make simple cell suspension and cultured once more.Then,DMEM-F12+20 μg/L EGF was added into culture medium;14 days latar.the rats were divided into experimental group and control group.Rats in the experimental group were cultured with the same medium mentioned above;however, rats in the control group were cultured with only DMEM-F12.Migration of cells was observed under microscope every day.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:NSCs migration in both experimental group and control group.RESULTS:Cell spheres in primary culture were NSCs.In addition,14 days later,proliferation of stem cells were observed remarkably in EGF culture.and size of cell sphere was about that of 100 cells.In exparimental group.proliferation of cell sphere was slow down on the 14th culture day,and apophysis was erupted to neighbor cell sphere.Moreover,NSCs migrated from big cell sphere to small cell sphere during 14-17 culture days.and then,cell migration was disappeared at 17 days after culture.In control group.cell migration was not observed.CONCLUSION:EGF can induce proliferation and migration of NSCs during a special time(14-17 days).However,NSCs do not immigrate over the

  20. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 μm) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering

  3. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Deng, Tianzheng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Yongjie [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Feng Feng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Yan [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)], E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 {mu}m) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering.

  4. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Daichi; Oishi, Isao; Makino, Ryuichi; Kurumisawa, Nozomi; Nakaya, Ryuma; Ono, Tamao; Kagami, Hiroshi; Tagami, Takahiro

    2016-04-22

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  5. Banned antibacterial growth promoters in animal feed: Collaborative trial on the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method developed in the feedstuffs-radius project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poucke, C.V.; Dumoulin, F.; Yakkundi, S.; Situ, C.; Elliott, C.T.; Grutters, E.M.; Verheijen, R.; Schilt, R.; Eriksson, S.; Peteghem, C.V.

    2006-01-01

    A chemical confirmation method for the identification and quantification of five banned antibacterial growth promoters (AGPs) in animal feed was developed and in-house validated as part of the European Feedstuffs-RADIUS project [1]. To complete the validation process a collaborative trial was perfor

  6. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  7. Analysis of integrated animal-fish production system under subtropical hill agro ecosystem in India: growth performance of animals, total biomass production and monetary benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, A; Pathak, K A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Vinod, K

    2009-03-01

    The present study assessed the benefits of integration of animals with fish production in optimizing the bio mass production from unit land in subtropical hill agro ecosystem. Hampshire pigs and Khaki Campbell ducks were integrated with composite fish culture. The pig and duck excreta were directly allowed into the pond and no supplementary feed was given to fish during the period of study. The average levels of N, P and K in dried pig and duck manure were 0.9, 0.7 and 0.6 per cent and 1.3, 0.6 and 0.5 per cent, respectively. The average body weight of pig and duck at 11 months age was 90 and 1.74 kg with an average daily weight gain of 333.33 and 6.44 g, respectively. The fish production in pig-fish and duck-fish systems were 2209 and 2964 kg/ha, respectively while the fish productivity in control pond was only 820 kg/ha. The total biomass (animal and fish) production was higher (p<0.05) in commercial feeding system compared to the traditional system, however the input/output ratio was 1:1.2 and 1:1.55 for commercial and traditional systems, respectively. It was inferred that the total biomass production per unit land was high (p<0.05) when animal and fish were integrated together.

  8. Three Dimensional Simulation Method in Early Process of Division and Growth for Tumour Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-qiu; ZHAO Ting-ting

    2014-01-01

    The process of division, growth and death for tumour cell mass in the early is simulated. An integrated GUI is provided for users to set the value of each parameters, which are cell growth rates, cell mass division rates, cell mass death rates, simulate type, maximum running time, polarity and cell colour. It can display the growth process of each cell on result GUI. Also, it can display the values of each parameters for observing and analysing in current life cycle on result GUI, which are cell mass division times, cell mass death rate, cell mass division rate and cell mass growth rate. In the process of simulation, The cell growth rate is described by the approach to combine the exponential model with the linear model. In addition, a linked list data structure to store the tumour cells is used by the cellular automata for a reference to determine the position of each cell. It sets up two linked list to store the cells, one of them save the new small division cells and the other one save the big cell. That can make the painting process of cells on result GUI clearer and more organized. At last, the polarity of tumour growth is described for determining the growth direction of cells.

  9. Combination of α-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Huang

    Full Text Available α-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or α-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of α-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the α-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-κB activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with α-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with α-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of α-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that α-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor I and II in 14 animal species and man as determined by three radioligand assays and two bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor I and II (IGF I and II) were determined by five different assays in human serum, in the sera of ten mammalian species and in chicken, turtle, and frog serum. Sera of all tested mammals contain two different IGFs corresponding to human immunoreactive IGF I and receptor reactive IGF II. Receptor reactive IGF II of most animal species does not show significant cross-reactivity in the RIA for human IGF II. IGF activity was also detected in sera of non-mammals, such as chicken and turtles, but not in frog serum. The IGF values obtained with the different assay system corresponded rather well: there is a good correlation between the values obtained in the protein binding and the fat cell assay, and between the results of the latter assays and the sum of immunoreactive IGF I and receptor reative IGF II. The results suggest that those regions in the IGF I and II molecules which are responsible for reactivity with the type I IGF and the insulin receptor have not essentially changed during evolution. Similarly, the C-region, which mainly determines the immunological properties of IGFs, appears to have remained relatively constant in the IGF I, but not in the IGF II molecule. (author)

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Modulate Proliferation of Cultured Rabbit Corneal Endothelial Cells and Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF.MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did.Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  12. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica R P Elmore

    Full Text Available Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg or phosphate buffered saline (PBS was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function

  13. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Monica R P; Lee, Rafael J; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R)/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS) resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function similarly to the

  14. A description of the semiotic metaphor in biology teaching: assertions about the animal cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Dantas Trevisan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this survey is describing signly the metaphor learning resource, with focus on biology education. Our teorical reference is the peircean semiotics, because it means solid heritage to code surveys implicated at science education, it led us to do an explanation about the main lines about that reference, addressed to researchers and lecturers interested in those reasonings. In the description yearned, another objectives appear: demonstrate diferences between metaphor/analogy and pragmatic analogy; to list metaphors, from cell representation analysis, and argue about principals diferences and probable cognitive consequences between the metaphor event in the visual representation and speech sentences. Therefore we analysed the animal cell of a high school first grade studying book – biology – cell biology – used by São Paulo and another state students. The findings demonstrate the undeniable importance of the metaphor as a learning tool in the biology education, and new findings about that, such as its limits in the concept elaboration, gnosiologic consequences for receptioning, the search needs for propositions– pictures between concept relations – in the science speech construction, and other results.

  15. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarockyte, Greta; Daugelaite, Egle; Stasys, Marius; Statkute, Urte; Poderys, Vilius; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2016-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) nanoparticles (SPIONs) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT) was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3-24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining. PMID:27548152

  16. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted...... for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies.......Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...

  17. Pyramidal cell development: postnatal spinogenesis, dendritic growth, axon growth, and electrophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eElston

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we review recent findings related to postnatal spinogenesis, dendritic and axon growth, pruning and electrophysiology of neocortical pyramidal cells in the developing primate brain. Pyramidal cells in sensory, association and executive cortex grow dendrites, spines and axons at different rates, and vary in the degree of pruning. Of particular note is the fact that pyramidal cells in primary visual area (V1 prune more spines than they grow during postnatal development, whereas those in inferotemporal (TEO and TE and granular prefrontal cortex (gPFC; Brodmann’s area 12 grow more than they prune. Moreover, pyramidal cells in TEO, TE and the gPFC continue to grow larger dendritic territories from birth into adulthood, replete with spines, whereas those in V1 become smaller during this time. The developmental profile of intrinsic axons also varies between cortical areas: those in V1, for example, undergo an early proliferation followed by pruning and local consolidation into adulthood, whereas those in area TE tend to establish their territory and consolidate it into adulthood with little pruning. We correlate the anatomical findings with the electrophysiological properties of cells in the different cortical areas, including membrane time constant, depolarizing sag, duration of individual action potentials, and spike-frequency adaptation. All of the electrophysiological variables ramped up before 7 months of age in V1, but continued to ramp up over a protracted period of time in area TE. These data suggest that the anatomical and electrophysiological profiles of pyramidal cells vary among cortical areas at birth, and continue to diverge into adulthood. Moreover, the data reveal that the use it or lose it notion of synaptic reinforcement may speak to only part of the story, use it but you still might lose it may be just as prevalent in the cerebral cortex.

  18. Why Cells Grow and Divide? General Growth Mechanism and How it Defines Cells’ Growth, Reproduction and Metabolic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K.

    2015-02-01

    We consider a general growth mechanism, which acts at cellular level and above (organs, systems and whole organisms). Using its mathematical representation, the growth equation, we study the growth and division mechanisms of amoeba and fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show how this mechanism, together with biomolecular machinery, governs growth and reproduction of cells, and these organisms in particular. This mechanism provides revealing answers to fundamental questions of biology, like why cells grow and divide, why and when cells’ growth stops. It also sheds light on questions like why and how life originated and developed. Solving the growth equation, we obtain analytical expression for the growth curve of fission yeast as a function of geometrical characteristics and nutrient influxes for RNA and protein synthesis, and compare the computed growth curves with 85 experiments. Statistical evaluation shows that these growth curves correspond to experimental data significantly better than all previous approximations. Also, using the general growth mechanism, we show how metabolic characteristics of cells, their size and evolutionary traits relate, considering fission yeast. In particular, we found that fission yeast S. pombe consumes about 16-18 times more nutrients for maintenance needs than for biomass synthesis.

  19. Effects of different Helicobacter pylori culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Guo Yan; Gang Zhao; Jin-Ping Ma; Shi-Rong Cai; Wen-Hua Zhan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of different Helicobacter pylori (H py/orl) culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: Broth culture filtrates of H pylori were prepared. Gastric epithelial cells were treated with the filtrates, and cell growth was determined by growth curve and flow cytometry. DNA damage of gastric epithelial cells was measured by single-cell microgel electrophoresis.RESULTS: Gastric epithelial cells proliferated actively when treated by CagA-gene-positive broth culture filtrates, and colony formation reached 40%. The number of cells in S phase increased compared to controls. Comet assay showed 41.2% comet cells in GES-1 cells treated with CagA-positive filtrates (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: CagA-positive filtrates enhance the changes in morphology and growth characteristics of human gastric epithelial tumor cells. DNA damage maybe one of the mechanisms involved in the growth changes.

  20. Inhibitory Effect of Melatonin on the Growth of H22 Hepatocarcinoma Cells by Inducing Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    泰莉; 王西明; 段秋红; 陈蓓蓓; 何善述

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Whether melatonin not only inhibits the growth of H22 hepatocarcinoma cells but also induces apoptosis in vitro was assessed. The anti-proliferative effects of melatonin on tumor cells was observed by MTT assay and tumor cells growth curve assay. And the apoptosis of the cells was studied by acridine orange fluorescence assay and flow cytometry. The cell cycle of the tumor cells was also observed by flow cytometry. It was found that melatonin could significantly inhibit the growth of H22 hepatocarcinoma cells. Incubated with melatonin, chromatin condensation of the tumor cells was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Compared with control, the percentage of apoptotic cells was increased, and the proportion of G0/S increased but that of G2/M decreased. It was suggested that melatonin could directly inhibit the growth of H22 hepatocarcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis and extending the length of cell cycle of the tumor cells.

  1. The targeted inhibitory effects of human amniotic fluid stem cells carrying CXCR4 promoter and DAL-1 on non-small cell lung carcinoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Li, S; Cai, T; Wang, H; Xie, X; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y

    2016-02-01

    The differentially expressed in adenocarcinoma of the lung-1 (DAL-1) protein has been demonstrated to be suppressive to various types of tumors including lung cancer. This study aimed to determine the targeted effects of human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFS cells) carrying CXCR4 promoter driven conditionally replicable adenovirus vector overexpressing DAL-1 (Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1) on non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) growth. The apoptotic effects of virus vectors were assessed using flow cytometry, and the cytotoxicity analyzed by CCK-8 assay. In vivo imaging system was used to determine the homing capability of hAFS cells. A549 cell xenograft mouse model was created to assess the in vivo effect of DAL-1 overexpression on NSCLC growth. We found that infection of Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 increased the apoptosis of A549 NSCLC cells but not 16HBE normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 administered via intratumoral injection led to significant reduced growth and greater necrosis of A549 xenograft tumors comparing to null vector treated animals. When infused via tail vein, hAFS cells carrying Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 homed to lung cancer xenografts, caused virus replication and DAL-1 overexpression, and led to significant lower growth and greater necrosis of A549 cell xenografts comparing to non-treatment control. In conclusion, hAFS cells are capable of carrying Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 vectors, specifically targeting to lung cancer, and causing oncolytic effects when administered in vivo.

  2. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 regulates multiple myeloma cell growth and bortezomib-induced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colpo Anna

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3 α and β are two serine-threonine kinases controlling insulin, Wnt/β-catenin, NF-κB signaling and other cancer-associated transduction pathways. Recent evidence suggests that GSK-3 could function as growth-promoting kinases, especially in malignant cells. In this study, we have investigated GSK-3α and GSK-3β function in multiple myeloma (MM. Methods GSK-3 α and β expression and cellular localization were investigated by Western blot (WB and immunofluorescence analysis in a panel of MM cell lines and in freshly isolated plasma cells from patients. MM cell growth, viability and sensitivity to bortezomib was assessed upon treatment with GSK-3 specific inhibitors or transfection with siRNAs against GSK-3 α and β isoforms. Survival signaling pathways were studied with WB analysis. Results GSK-3α and GSK-3β were differently expressed and phosphorylated in MM cells. Inhibition of GSK-3 with the ATP-competitive, small chemical compounds SB216763 and SB415286 caused MM cell growth arrest and apoptosis through the activation of the intrinsic pathway. Importantly, the two inhibitors augmented the bortezomib-induced MM cell cytotoxicity. RNA interference experiments showed that the two GSK-3 isoforms have distinct roles: GSK-3β knock down decreased MM cell viability, while GSK-3α knock down was associated with a higher rate of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity. GSK-3 inhibition caused accumulation of β-catenin and nuclear phospho-ERK1, 2. Moreover, GSK-3 inhibition and GSK-3α knockdown enhanced bortezomib-induced AKT and MCL-1 protein degradation. Interestingly, bortezomib caused a reduction of GSK-3 serine phosphorylation and its nuclear accumulation with a mechanism that resulted partly dependent on GSK-3 itself. Conclusions These data suggest that in MM cells GSK-3α and β i play distinct roles in cell survival and ii modulate the sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors.

  3. Silencing NOTCH signaling causes growth arrest in both breast cancer stem cells and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, S; Das, T P; Damodaran, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are characterized by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity and are refractory to current treatment modalities, show a higher risk for metastasis, and influence the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to a shorter time to recurrence and death. In this study, we focused on examination of the mechanism of action of a small herbal molecule, psoralidin (Pso) that has been shown to effectively suppress the growth of BSCSs and breast cancer cells (BCCs), in breast cancer (BC) models. Methods: ALDH− and ALDH+ BCCs were isolated from MDA-MB-231 cells, and the anticancer effects of Pso were measured using cell viability, apoptosis, colony formation, invasion, migration, mammosphere formation, immunofluorescence, and western blot analysis. Results: Psoralidin significantly downregulated NOTCH1 signaling, and this downregulation resulted in growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Molecularly, Pso inhibited NOTCH1 signaling, which facilitated inhibition of EMT markers (β-catenin and vimentin) and upregulated E-cadherin expression, resulting in reduced migration and invasion of both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Conclusion: Together, our results suggest that inhibition of NOTCH1 by Pso resulted in growth arrest and inhibition of EMT in BCSCs and BCCs. Psoralidin appears to be a novel agent that targets both BCSCs and BCCs. PMID:24129237

  4. Glucose Signaling-Mediated Coordination of Cell Growth and Cell Cycle in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Busti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides being the favorite carbon and energy source for the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, glucose can act as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple aspects of yeast physiology. Yeast cells have evolved several mechanisms for monitoring the level of glucose in their habitat and respond quickly to frequent changes in the sugar availability in the environment: the cAMP/PKA pathways (with its two branches comprising Ras and the Gpr1/Gpa2 module, the Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway and the main repression pathway involving the kinase Snf1. The cAMP/PKA pathway plays the prominent role in responding to changes in glucose availability and initiating the signaling processes that promote cell growth and division. Snf1 (the yeast homologous to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is primarily required for the adaptation of yeast cell to glucose limitation and for growth on alternative carbon source, but it is also involved in the cellular response to various environmental stresses. The Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway regulates the expression of genes required for glucose uptake. Many interconnections exist between the diverse glucose sensing systems, which enables yeast cells to fine tune cell growth, cell cycle and their coordination in response to nutritional changes.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor-9 Activates c-Kit Progenitor Cells and Enhances Angiogenesis in the Infarcted Diabetic Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinender Singla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that fibroblast growth factor-9 (FGF-9 would enhance angiogenesis via activating c-kit positive stem cells in the infarcted nondiabetic and diabetic heart. In brief, animals were divided into three groups: Sham, MI, and MI+FGF-9. Two weeks following MI or sham surgery, our data suggest that treatment with FGF-9 significantly diminished vascular apoptosis compared to the MI group in both C57BL/6 and db/db mice (p<0.05. Additionally, the number of c-kit+ve/SM α-actin+ve cells and c-kit+ve/CD31+ve cells were greatly enhanced in the MI+FGF-9 groups relative to the MI suggesting FGF-9 enhances c-Kit cell activation and their differentiation into vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, respectively (p<0.05. Histology shows that the total number of vessels were quantified for all groups and our data suggest that the FGF-9 treated groups had significantly more vessels than their MI counterparts (p<0.05. Finally, echocardiographic data suggests a significant improvement in left ventricular output, as indicated by fractional shortening and ejection fraction in both nondiabetic and diabetic animals treated with FGF-9 (p<0.05. Overall, our data suggests FGF-9 has the potential to attenuate vascular cell apoptosis, activate c-Kit progenitor cells, and enhance angiogenesis and neovascularization in C57BL/6 and db/db mice leading to improved cardiac function.

  6. RASSF1A expression inhibits cell growth and enhances cell chemosensitivity to mitomycin in BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hong-geng; XUE Wan-jiang; QIAN Hai-xin; ZHOU Xiao-jun; QIN Lei; LAN Jing

    2009-01-01

    Background The antitumor role of Ras association domain family 1A (RASSFIA) gene and its potential molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this study was to observe the antitumor ability of RASSFIA in hepatoceliular carcinoma, and study the mechanisms of cell apoptosis induced by RASSFIA.Methods After stably transfecting a RASSF1A (wild-type or mutant) expression vector into the BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, RT-PCR and Westem blotting was used to detect the RASSF1A expression levels in recombinant cells. The effects of wild-type RASSF1A on cell growth were observed in vitro by analyzing cell proliferation rate, cell colony formation, and in vivo by analyzing tumorigenesis in nude mice. In addition, the effect of RASSF1A gene expression on the chemosensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to antitumor drugs was examined by inhibition of cell proliferation and the percentage of apoptotic cells.Results Wild-type RASSF1A, not the mutant, suppressed cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of wild-type RASSF1A could enhance the inhibition of cell proliferation and the percentage of apoptotic cells following cell treatment with mitomycin, but had no significant effect when combined with adriamycin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatJn treatment.Conclusion Wild-type RASSF1A inhibits cell growth and enhances cell chemosensitivity to mitomycin in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that RASSF1A may serve as a new target for gene therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

  7. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and pr...

  8. NK4, an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), inhibits growth of multiple myeloma cells: molecular targeting of angiogenic growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenlin; Hattori, Yutaka; Yamada, Taketo; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Sagawa, Morihiko; Otsuki, Takemi; Niikura, Takako; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2007-04-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes cell growth and motility and also increases neovascularization. Multiple myeloma (MM) cells produce HGF, and the plasma concentration of HGF is significantly elevated in patients with clinically active MM, suggesting that HGF might play a role in the pathogenesis of MM. NK4, an antagonist of HGF, is structurally homologous to angiostatin, and our previous report showed that NK4 inhibited the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells induced by HGF stimulation. The purposes of this study were to elucidate the contribution of HGF to the growth of MM cells as well as to investigate the possibility of the therapeutic use of NK4. In vitro study showed that NK4 protein stabilized the growth of MM cell lines and regulated the activation of c-MET, ERK1/2, STAT3, and AKT-1. Recombinant adenovirus containing NK4 cDNA (AdCMV.NK4) was injected intramuscularly into Icr/scid mice bearing tumors derived from HGF-producing MM cells. AdCMV.NK4 significantly inhibited the growth of these tumors in vivo. Histologic examination revealed that AdCMV.NK4 induced apoptosis of MM cells, accompanied by a reduction in neovascularization in the tumors. Thus, NK4 inhibited the growth of MM cells via antiangiogenic as well as direct antitumor mechanisms. The molecular targeting of HGF by NK4 could be applied as a novel therapeutic approach to MM. PMID:17179234

  9. Influence of different ammonium, lactate and glutamine concentrations on CCO cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Slivac, Igor; Blajić, Višnja; Radošević, Kristina; Kniewald, Zlatko; Gaurina Srček, Višnja

    2010-01-01

    In this study the effects of ammonium and lactate on a culture of channel catfish ovary (CCO) cells were examined. We also made investigation on the influence of glutamine, since our previous research revealed that this amino acid stimulated CCO cell growth more than glucose in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ammonium in cell culture included the considerable decrease in cell growth rate with eventual growth arrest as well as the retardation of glucose consumption. At ammonium...

  10. Effects on cell growth processes (mitosis, synthesis of nucleic acids and of proteins). Chapter 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of reports of the interference of -SH radioprotective agents with cell division and with the processes of nucleic acid and protein synthesis which are a prerequisite for mitosis. Mitotic activity is inhibited to the same extent in mammalian tissues as in cultures of animal and plant cells and bacteria. With cultured cells, the toxicity and the antimitotic activity have been found to be at their highest level for intermediate concentrations of the compound and to decrease for higher and lower concentrations. Inhibition of the synthesis of nucleic acids by -SH radioprotective substances has been observed with cultures of cells and bacteria and in mammalian tissues. In vitro interactions with the structures of free DNA and nucleoprotein have also been studied. The extent to which such complexes between the protective agent and DNA or nucleoprotein occur in vivo is not known. A depression of protein synthesis has been observed, and participates in the more general inhibition of growth processes. Possible mechanisms of these effects are discussed. (U.K.)

  11. Amperometric cell for subcutaneous detection of hydrogen sulfide in anesthetized experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a toxic gas. It has been recognized that H2S evolving in biochemical reactions in living organisms has an important role in different physiologic processes. Nowadays, H2S is known as an endogenous messenger molecule. Natural sulfurous spring water has been proved beneficial in the therapy of diseases of the skin and other organs (Boros et al 2013). In vivo real-time detection of local H2S concentration is an important but challenging task. We developed a two-electrode amperometric cell for selective subcutaneous detection of H2S in anesthetized mice. The cell is a small size implantable gas sensor containing a platinum disc anode and a silver cathode. The selectivity is provided by a membrane permeable only by gases. There is a buffered reversible electrochemical mediator solution in an oxidized form inside the cell. As gaseous H2S penetrates into the cell the mediator is reduced, and +0.4 V versus the reference is employed on the platinum working electrode. The reduced mediator is oxidized on the anode surface. The current provides an analytical signal representing the concentration of H2S. Appropriate shape, size and membrane material were selected, and optimal working parameters—such as mediator concentration, pH and cell voltage—were determined in vitro. The lower limit of detection in the stirred sample solution at pH = 5.5 was as small as 9.4  ×  10−7 M and a dynamic concentration range of 0–6  ×  10–4 M could be achieved. The detecting surfaces of the cell were covered with freshly dissected mouse skin to test dermal H2S permeability. In other experiments, the cell was implanted subcutaneously in an anesthetized mouse and the animal was submerged in a buffer solution containing different concentrations of H2S so that the skin surface over the sensor was covered by the solution. Measurements of subcutaneous H2S concentration were taken. The experiments clearly proved that H2S diffuses through the skin

  12. Sensitivity of the Erythrocyte Micronucleus Assay: Dependence on Number of Cells Scored and Inter-animal Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Kissling, Grace E.; Dertinger, Stephen; Hayashi, Makoto; MacGregor, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, the in vivo erythrocyte micronucleus assay has been scored using microscopy. Because the frequency of micronucleated cells is typically low, cell counts are subject to substantial binomial counting error. Counting error, along with inter-animal variability, limit the sensitivity of this assay. Recently, flow cytometric methods have been developed for scoring micronucleated erythrocytes and these methods enable many more cells to be evaluated than is possible with microscopic s...

  13. Soy Biodiesel and Petrodiesel Emissions Differ in Size, Chemical Composition and Stimulation of Inflammatory Responses in Cells and Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Fukagawa, Naomi K.; Li, Muyao; Poynter, Matthew E; Palmer, Brian C.; Parker, Erin; Kasumba, John; Holmén, Britt A.

    2013-01-01

    Debate about the biological effects of biodiesel exhaust emissions exists due to variation in methods of exhaust generation and biological models used to assess responses. Because studies in cells do not necessarily reflect the integrated response of a whole animal, experiments were conducted in two human cell lines representing bronchial epithelial cells and macrophages and female mice using identical particle suspensions of raw exhaust generated by a Volkswagen light-duty diesel engine usin...

  14. Establishment of animal model for the analysis of cancer cell metastasis during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Γ-Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is one of major therapeutic tools in cancer treatment. Nevertheless, γ-IR therapy failed due to occurrence of metastasis, which constitutes a significant obstacle in cancer treatment. The main aim of this investigation was to construct animal model which present metastasis during radiotherapy in a mouse system in vivo and establishes the molecular mechanisms involved. The C6L transfectant cell line expressing firefly luciferase (fLuc) was treated with γ-IR, followed by immunoblotting, zymography and invasion assay in vitro. We additionally employed the C6L transfectant cell line to construct xenografts in nude mice, which were irradiated with γ-IR. Irradiated xenograft-containing mice were analyzed via survival curves, measurement of tumor size, and bioluminescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo. Metastatic lesions in organs of mice were further assessed using RT-PCR, H & E staining and immunohistochemistry. γ-IR treatment of C6L cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased cell invasion. In irradiated xenograft-containing mice, tumor sizes were decreased dramatically and survival rates extended. Almost all non-irradiated xenograft-containing control mice had died within 4 weeks. However, we also observed luminescence signals in about 22.5% of γ-IR-treated mice. Intestines or lungs of mice displaying luminescence signals contained several lesions, which expressed the fLuc gene and presented histological features of cancer tissues as well as expression of EMT markers. These findings collectively indicate that occurrences of metastases during γ-IR treatment accompanied induction of EMT markers, including increased MMP activity. Establishment of a murine metastasis model during γ-IR treatment should aid in drug development against cancer metastasis and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process

  15. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M;

    2009-01-01

    RNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted s.c. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by positron emission tomography imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia...

  16. Analysis of Vero cell growth behavior on microcarrier by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵曼君; 姜蕾; 丛威; 欧阳藩

    2002-01-01

    By using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes of Vero cells attached to and grown on the microcarrier Cytodex-3 were observed, and their behavior of adhesion, spreading and proliferation was analyzed. The effect of exogenous fibronectin/ laminin on adhesion and spreading of MCC/Vero cell was studied. The images of ESEM showed that expansion of cell growth was directed toward vacancy space. The growth curve and cell concentration change during the whole culture process were obtained from the statistical counting method based on ESEM images and the crystal violet method. The growth rate of Vero cells increases with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation, that is, the specific growth rate increases quickly with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation. When serum concentration in medium #199 ranged from 5% to 10%, experimental results indicated that serum concentration is one of the important factors influencing cell growth, particularly in the cell adhesion and spreading stage.

  17. Analysis of Vero cell growth behavior on microcarrier by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Manjun; Jiang, Lei; Cong, Wei; Ouyang, Fan

    2002-04-01

    By using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes of Vero cells attached to and grown on the microcarrier Cytodex-3 were observed, and their behavior of adhesion, spreading and proliferation was analyzed. The effect of exogenous fibronectin/ laminin on adhesion and spreading of MCC/Vero cell was studied. The images of ESEM showed that expansion of cell growth was directed toward vacancy space. The growth curve and cell concentration change during the whole culture process were obtained from the statistical counting method based on ESEM images and the crystal violet method. The growth rate of Vero cells increases with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation, that is, the specific growth rate increases quickly with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation. When serum concentration in medium #199 ranged from 5% to 10%, experimental results indicated that serum concentration is one of the important factors influencing cell growth, particularly in the cell adhesion and spreading stage. PMID:18763074

  18. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  19. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  20. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  1. Growth hormone promotes skeletal muscle cell fusion independent of insulin-like growth factor 1 up-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiropoulos, Athanassia; Ohanna, Mickaël; Kedzia, Cécile; Menon, Ram K.; Kopchick, John J.; Kelly, Paul A; Pende, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) participates in the postnatal regulation of skeletal muscle growth, although the mechanism of action is unclear. Here we show that the mass of skeletal muscles lacking GH receptors is reduced because of a decrease in myofiber size with normal myofiber number. GH signaling controls the size of the differentiated myotubes in a cell-autonomous manner while having no effect on size, proliferation, and differentiation of the myoblast precursor cells. The GH hypertrophic action ...

  2. NFkB signaling is important for growth of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Emdal, Kristina Bennet; Guerra, Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    resistant cell growth and a potential target for re-sensitizing resistant cells to endocrine therapy. We used an MCF-7-derived cell model for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer to investigate dependence on NF¿B signaling for antiestrogen resistant cell growth. We found that targeting NF¿B preferentially...... inhibited resistant cell growth. Antiestrogen resistant cells expressed increased p50 and RelB, and displayed increased phosphorylation of p65 at Ser529 and Ser536. Moreover, transcriptional activity of NF¿B after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor a was enhanced in antiestrogen resistant cell lines...... resistant cells increased sensitivity to tamoxifen treatment. Our data provide evidence that NF¿B signaling is enhanced in antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells and plays an important role for antiestrogen resistant cell growth and for sensitivity to tamoxifen treatment in resistant cells. Our results...

  3. Novel Radiopaque UHMWPE Sublaminar Wires in a Growth-Guidance System for the Treatment of Early Onset Scoliosis: Feasibility in a Large Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogie, R; Roth, Ak; Faber, S; de Jong, Jja; Welting, Tjm; Willems, Pc; Arts, Jj; van Rhijn, Lw

    2014-09-29

    Study Design. In vivo analysis in an ovine model.Objective. To evaluate the feasibility of radiopaque UHMWPE sublaminar wires in a growth-guidance spinal system by assessing stability, biocompatibility and growth potential.Summary of Background Data. Several growth-guidance systems have been developed for the treatment of early onset scoliosis (EOS). The use of gliding pedicle screws and metal sublaminar wires during these procedures can cause metal-on-metal debris formation and neurological deficits. Novel radiopaque UHMWPE wires are introduced to safely facilitate longitudinal growth and provide stability in a growth-guidance system for EOS.Methods. Twelve immature sheep received posterior segmental spinal instrumentation; pedicle screws were inserted at L5 and radiopaque UHWMPE (bismuth trioxide) wires were passed sublaminarly at each level between L3 and T11 and fixed to dual cobalt-chromiun rods. Four age-matched, unoperated animals were evaluated to serve as a control group. Radiographs were taken to measure growth of the instrumented segment. After 24 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the spines were harvested for histological evaluation and high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) analysis.Results. No neurological deficits occurred and all instrumentation remained stable. One animal died from an unknown cause. Substantial growth occurred in the instrumented segments (L5-T11) in the intervention group (27± 2 mm), which was not significantly different to the control group, (30 ± 4mm, p = 0.42). HR-pQCT analysis clearly showed safe routing and fixation of the UHMWPE wires and instrumentation. Despite the noted growth, ectopic bone formation with the formation of bony bridges was observed in all animals. Histology revealed no evidence of chronic inflammation or wear debris.Conclusions. This study shows the first results of radiopaque UHMWPE sublaminar wires as part of a growth guidance spinal system. UHMWPE sublaminar wires

  4. Metformin Induced AMPK Activation, G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest and the Inhibition of Growth of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xianbin; Hu, Xi; Tan, Xiaojun; Cheng, Weijie; Wang, Qinjia; Chen, Xiaofeng; Guan, Yinghong; Chen, Chong; Jing, Xubin

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) have become a severe threat to health and the current treatments for ESCC are frequently not effective. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the anti-hyperglycemic agent metformin may reduce the risk of developing cancer, including ESCC, among diabetic patients. However, the antitumor effects of metformin on ESCC and the mechanisms underlying its cell cycle regulation remain elusive. The findings reported herein show that the anti-proliferative action of metformin on ESCC cell lines is partially mediated by AMPK. Moreover, we observed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest accompanied by the up-regulation of p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. In vivo experiments further showed that metformin inhibited tumor growth in a ESCC xenograft model. Most importantly, the up-regulation of AMPK, p53, p21CIP1, p27KIP1 and the down-regulation of cyclinD1 are involved in the anti-tumor action of metformin in vivo. In conclusion, metformin inhibits the growth of ESCC cells both in cell cultures and in an animal model. AMPK, p53, p21CIP1, p27KIP1 and cyclinD1 are involved in the inhibition of tumor growth that is induced by metformin and cell cycle arrest in ESCC. These findings indicate that metformin has the potential for use in the treatment of ESCC.

  5. Downregulation of Akt1 Inhibits Anchorage-Independent Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Liu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The serine/threonine kinases, Akti/PKBα, Akt2/PKBβ, and Akt3/PKBγ, play a critical role in preventing cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. However, the function of individual Akt isoforms in the tumorigenicity of cancer cells is still not well defined. In the current study, we used an AM antisense oligonucleotide (AS to specifically downregulate Akti protein in both cancer and normal cells. Our data indicate that AM AS treatment inhibits the ability of MiaPaCa-2, H460, HCT-15, and HT1080 cells to grow in soft agar. The treatment also induces apoptosis in these cancer cells as demonstrated by FRCS analysis and a caspase activity assay. Conversely, Akti AS treatment has little effect on the cell growth and survival of normal human cells including normal human fibroblast (NHF, fibroblast from muscle (FBM, and mammary gland epithelial 184135 cells. In addition, AM AS specifically sensitizes cancer cells to typical chemotherapeutic agents. Thus, Akti is indispensable for maintaining the tumorigenicity of cancer cells. Inhibition of AM may provide a powerful sensitization agent for chemotherapy specifically in cancer cells.

  6. Squalamine and cisplatin block angiogenesis and growth of human ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Williams, Jon I; Pietras, Richard J

    2002-04-25

    Angiogenesis is important for growth and progression of ovarian cancers. Squalamine is a natural antiangiogenic sterol, and its potential role in treatment of ovarian cancers with or without standard cisplatin chemotherapy was assessed. Since HER-2 gene overexpression is associated with cisplatin resistance in vitro and promotion of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, the response of ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression to squalamine and cisplatin was evaluated both in tumor xenograft models and in tissue culture. Ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 overexpression were grown as subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. Animals were treated by intraperitoneal injection with control vehicle, cisplatin, squalamine or cisplatin combined with squalamine. At the end of the experiment, tumors were assessed for tumor growth inhibition and for changes in microvessel density and apoptosis. Additional in vitro studies evaluated effects of squalamine on tumor and endothelial cell growth and on signaling pathways in human endothelial cells. Profound growth inhibition was elicited by squalamine alone and by combined treatment with squalamine and cisplatin for both parental and HER-2-overexpressing ovarian tumor xenografts. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tumors revealed decreased microvessel density and increased apoptosis. Although HER-2-overexpressing tumors had more angiogenic and less apoptotic activity than parental cancers, growth of both tumor types was similarly suppressed by treatment with squalamine combined with cisplatin. In in vitro studies, we found that squalamine does not directly affect proliferation of ovarian cells. However, squalamine significantly blocked VEGF-induced activation of MAP kinase and cell proliferation in human vascular endothelial cells. The results suggest that squalamine is anti-angiogenic for ovarian cancer xenografts and appears to enhance cytotoxic effects of cisplatin chemotherapy independent of HER-2 tumor status

  7. Growth delay of human bladder cancer cells by Prostate Stem Cell Antigen downregulation is associated with activation of immune signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein expressed not only in prostate but also in pancreas and bladder cancer as shown by immunohistochemistry and mRNA analysis. It has been targeted by monoclonal antibodies in preclinical animal models and more recently in a clinical trial in prostate cancer patients. The biological role played in tumor growth is presently unknown. In this report we have characterized the contribution of PSCA expression to tumor growth. A bladder cell line was engineered to express a doxycycline (dox) regulated shRNA against PSCA. To shed light on the PSCA biological role in tumor growth, microarray analysis was carried out as a function of PSCA expression. Expression of gene set of interest was further analyzed by qPCR Down regulation of the PSCA expression was associated with reduced cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors showed a reduced tumor growth upon treatment with dox, which effectively induced shRNA against PSCA as revealed by GFP expression. Pathway analysis of deregulated genes suggests a statistical significant association between PSCA downregulation and activation of genes downstream of the IFNα/β receptor. These experiments established for the first time a correlation between the level of PSCA expression and tumor growth and suggest a role of PSCA in counteracting the natural immune response

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells directly interact with breast cancer cells and promote tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Katharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Schambach, Axel; Glage, Silke; Otte, Anna; Hass, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    Cellular interactions were investigated between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human breast cancer cells. Co-culture of the two cell populations was associated with an MSC-mediated growth stimulation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A continuous expansion of tumor cell colonies was progressively surrounded by MSC(GFP) displaying elongated cell bodies. Moreover, some MSC(GFP) and MDA-MB-231(cherry) cells spontaneously generated hybrid/chimeric cell populations, demonstrating a dual (green fluorescent protein+cherry) fluorescence. During a co-culture of 5-6 days, MSC also induced expression of the GPI-anchored CD90 molecule in breast cancer cells, which could not be observed in a transwell assay, suggesting the requirement of direct cellular interactions. Indeed, MSC-mediated CD90 induction in the breast cancer cells could be partially blocked by a gap junction inhibitor and by inhibition of the notch signaling pathway, respectively. Similar findings were observed in vivo by which a subcutaneous injection of a co-culture of primary MSC with MDA-MB-231(GFP) cells into NOD/scid mice exhibited an about 10-fold increased tumor size and enhanced metastatic capacity as compared with the MDA-MB-231(GFP) mono-culture. Flow cytometric evaluation of the co-culture tumors revealed more than 90% of breast cancer cells with about 3% of CD90-positive cells, also suggesting an MSC-mediated in vivo induction of CD90 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an elevated neovascularization and viability in the MSC/MDA-MB-231(GFP)-derived tumors. Together, these data suggested an MSC-mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by which the altered MSC morphology and the appearance of hybrid/chimeric cells and breast cancer-expressing CD90(+) cells indicate mutual cellular alterations.

  9. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems

  10. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-15

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems.

  11. Physical modeling of animal cell damage by hydrodynamic forces in suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G Z; Gray, M R; Thompson, B G

    1992-12-01

    Physical damage of animal cells in suspension culture, due to stirring and sparging, is coupled with complex metabolic responses. Nylon microcapsules, therefore, were used as a physical model to study the mechanisms of damage in a stirred bioreactor and in a bubble column. Microcapsule breaskage folowed first-order kinetices in all experiments Entrainment of bubbles into the liquid phase in the stirred bioreactor gave more microcapsule breakage. In the bubble column, the bubble bursting zone at gas-liquid interface was primarily responsible for microcapsule breakage. The forces on the microcapsules were equivalent to an external pressure of approximately 4 x 10(4) N. m(-2), based on the critical microcapsule diameter for survival of 190 microm. A stable foam layer, however, was found to be effective in protecting microcapsules from damage. The microcapsule transport to the gas-liquid interface and entrainment into the foam phase was consistent with flotation by air bubbles. This result implies that additives and operation of bioreactors should be selected to minimize flotation of cells. PMID:18601080

  12. Gene delivery process in a single animal cell after femtosecond laser microinjection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microinjection of extracellular molecules into a single animal cell was performed by an amplified femtosecond laser irradiation. When a single-shot laser pulse was focused on the plasma membrane of a single fibroblast from the mouse cell line NIH3T3 with a high-numerical aperture objective lens, a transient hole with a diameter of 1 μm was formed. The delivery process of extracellular molecules immediately after the hole formation was monitored by a fluorescence staining with fluoresceinisothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran). Then the gene expression was confirmed using a DNA plasmid of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The gene expression was observed when the laser pulse was focused first on the cellular membrane and then on the nuclear membrane, while the gene was not expressed when the laser was focused only on the cellular membrane. On the basis of these results, the efficiency of gene delivery by the femtosecond laser microinjection and the subsequent gene expression were clarified.

  13. 32. Study the aneugenic effect of benzene on germ cell of animal and workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the aneupoidy effect of benzene on germ cells of animal and humans. Method: The NIH adult female mice were treated with varies doses of benzene (942, 1881 and 3762mg/kg respectively) by single gavage and (706, 1922 and 4864mg/m3 respectively) by inhalation (2h/d, 15d), the ovulated oocytes were collected for conventional cytogenetic analyses, and the frequencies of aneuploidy were detected. The frequencies of aneuploidy in sperm of benzene exposed workers were detected by two color fluorescence in situ hybridization with digoxingenin labeled 9 chromosome probe(D9Z1) and biotin labeled 18 chromosome probe (D18Z1). Result: The frequencies of aneuploidy in MII oocytes were significantly increased over the control in three groups treated by inhalation (7.06%,7.50% and 7.76% respectively control 1.30%, P<0.05 ), a dose-dependent response was present, But in gavage groups only the high dose group was increased over that of control. P<0.05. The timeweight average air concentration (TWA) of benzene in the workplace was 86.49mg/m3, it was two fold higher than the national maximum allowable concentration. The concentration of urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (ttMA) in exposed group was significantly higher than that of control group. A total of 136 401 sperm nuclei in 14 exposed workers and 156 955 sperm nuclei in 16 control workers were counted. The results showed that the frequencies of disomic sperm for chromosome 9 and 18, and diploidy sperm in exposed-workers (0.168%, 0.055%, 0.073%, respectively) were statistically increased over that (0.050%、 0. 033% and 0.040%, respectively) of controls. P<0.05. The frequencies of nullisomic sperm for chromosome 9,18 in the exposed group (0.206%,0.068%) were statistically increased also over that (0.067%,0.048% respectively) of control. The frequency of overall numerical chromosome aberrations (0.570%) in tbe exposed group was increased over that of control(0.218%)P<0.05.Conclusion:An increased aneuploidy

  14. Growth hormone and retinal ganglion cell function: QNR/D cells as an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos; Andres, Alexis; Giterman, Daniel; Karpinski, Edward; Harvey, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have been shown to be sites of growth hormone (GH) production and GH action in the embryonic (embryo day 7, ED7) chick neural retina. Primary RGC cell cultures were previously used to determine autocrine or paracrine actions of GH in the retina, but the antibody used in their immunopanning (anti-Thy-1) is no longer available. We have therefore characterized an immortalized neural retina (QNR/D) cell line derived from ED7 embryonic quail as a replacement experimental model. These cells express the GH gene and have GH receptor (GHR)-immunoreactivity. They are also immunoreactive for RGC markers (islet-1, calretinin, RA4) and neural fibers (neurofilament, GAP 43, vimentin) and they express the genes for Thy-1, neurotrophin 3 (NTF3), neuritin 1 (NRN1) and brn3 (POU4F). These cells are also electrically active and therefore resemble the RGCs in the neural retina. They are also similarly responsive to exogenous GH, which induces overexpression of the neurotrophin 3 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 genes and stimulates cell survival, as in the chick embryo neural retina. QNR/D cells are therefore a useful experimental model to assess the actions of GH in retinal function. PMID:24239556

  15. Synergistic Induction of Cyclooxygenase-2 by Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Epidermal Growth Factor Inhibits Apoptosis in Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Saha

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression has been observed in several human tumor types and in selected animal and cell culture models of carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. Increased expression of COX-2 and production of prostaglandins appear to provide a survival advantage to transformed cells through the inhibition of apoptosis, increased attachment to extracellular matrix, increased invasiveness, the stimulation of angiogenesis. In the present studies, we found that transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF synergistically induced the expression of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production in mink lung epithelial (Mvi Lu cells. EGF, but not PDGF or IGF-1, was able to inhibit TGF-β1-induced apoptosis in Mvi Lu cells and this effect was blocked by NS-398, a selective inhibitor of COX-2 activity, suggesting a possible role for COX-2 in the anti-apoptosic effect of EGF receptor ligands. The combination of TGF-β1 and EGF also significantly induced COX-2 expression in rat intestinal epithelial (RIE-1 cells and completely prevented sodium butyrate (NaBu-induced apoptosis. The synergistic induction of COX-2 by TGF-β1 and EGF was not observed in R1B-L17 cells, a line derived from Mvi Lu cells that lacks the TGF-β type-I receptor. AG1478, a selective inhibitor of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity, completely suppressed the induction of COX-2 expression by either EGF or TGF-β1+EGF. Also, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK/ERK pathway, SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK activity, significantly inhibited the induction of COX-2 in response to combined EGF and TGF-β1. These results suggest an important collaborative interaction of TGF-β1 and EGF signaling in the induction of COX-2 and prostaglandin production in Mv1Lu cells.

  16. 21 CFR 864.2800 - Animal and human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2800 Animal and... of humans or other animals, that provide the necessary growth-promoting nutrients in a cell culture system. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). These devices are exempt from the...

  17. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-lin Xiong; Zhi-wei Chen; Ting-hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promotein vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, lfuorescence mi-croscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These ifndings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  18. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton: lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes. Before cel

  19. Stem cell transplantation in traumatic spinal cord injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Antonic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating condition that causes substantial morbidity and mortality and for which no treatments are available. Stem cells offer some promise in the restoration of neurological function. We used systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression to study the impact of stem cell biology and experimental design on motor and sensory outcomes following stem cell treatments in animal models of SCI. One hundred and fifty-six publications using 45 different stem cell preparations met our prespecified inclusion criteria. Only one publication used autologous stem cells. Overall, allogeneic stem cell treatment appears to improve both motor (effect size, 27.2%; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 25.0%-29.4%; 312 comparisons in 5,628 animals and sensory (effect size, 26.3%; 95% CI, 7.9%-44.7%; 23 comparisons in 473 animals outcome. For sensory outcome, most heterogeneity between experiments was accounted for by facets of stem cell biology. Differentiation before implantation and intravenous route of delivery favoured better outcome. Stem cell implantation did not appear to improve sensory outcome in female animals and appeared to be enhanced by isoflurane anaesthesia. Biological plausibility was supported by the presence of a dose-response relationship. For motor outcome, facets of stem cell biology had little detectable effect. Instead most heterogeneity could be explained by the experimental modelling and the outcome measure used. The location of injury, method of injury induction, and presence of immunosuppression all had an impact. Reporting of measures to reduce bias was higher than has been seen in other neuroscience domains but were still suboptimal. Motor outcomes studies that did not report the blinded assessment of outcome gave inflated estimates of efficacy. Extensive recent preclinical literature suggests that stem-cell-based therapies may offer promise, however the impact of compromised internal validity and

  20. Cell growth characteristics, differentiation frequency, and immunophenotype of adult ear mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Frazier, Trivia P; Rowan, Brian G; Bunnell, Bruce A; Chiu, Ernest S; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Ear mesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs) represent a readily accessible population of stem-like cells that are adherent, clonogenic, and have the ability to self-renew. Previously, we have demonstrated that they can be induced to differentiate into adipocyte, osteocyte, chondrocyte, and myocyte lineages. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the growth kinetics of the cells and to determine their ability to form colonies of fibroblasts, adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. In addition, the immunophenotypes of freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells were evaluated. From 1 g of tissue, we were able to isolate an average of 7.8 x 10(6) cells exhibiting a cell cycle length of approximately 2-3 days. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays indicated high proliferation potential, and confirmed previously observed multipotentiality of the cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed that EMSCs were negative for hematopoietic markers (CD4, CD45), proving that they did not derive from circulating hematopoietic cells. The FACS analyses also showed high expression of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) with only a minor population of cells expressing CD117, thus identifying Sca-1 as the more robust stem cell biomarker. Additionally, flow cytometry data revealed that the expression patterns of hematopoietic, stromal, and stem cell markers were maintained in the passaged EMSCs, consistent with the persistence of an undifferentiated state. This study indicates that EMSCs provide an alternative model for in vitro analyses of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Further studies will be necessary to determine their utility for tissue engineering and regenerative medical applications. PMID:19400629

  1. Effects of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor on cell proliferation during mandibular fracture healing in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of recombinant human basicfibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) on the cell proliferation during mandibular fracture healing in rabbits.Methods: The complex of rhbFGF and bovine type I collagen was implanted into the mandibular fracture site under periosteum of the animal. The whole mandible was harvested at 7, 14, 28, 56 and 84 days respectively after operation. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in callus was examined with immunohistochemical staining.Results: PCNA-positive cells in callus in the rhbFGF-treated group on days 7 and 14 were more than that in the control group (P<0.01).Conclusions: It indicates that rhbFGF can stimulate cell proliferation during mandibular fracture healing in rabbits.

  2. Investigation of Effect of Nutritional Drink on Chemotherapy-Induced Mucosal Injury and Tumor Growth in an Established Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schiffrin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced mucositis represents a significant burden to quality of life and healthcare costs, and may be improved through enhanced nutritional status. We first determined the safety of two nutritional drinks (plus placebo, and then potential gut protection in tumor-bearing rats in a model of methotrexate-induced mucositis. In study 1, animals were fed one of two test diets (or placebo or control chow pellets for a total of 60 days and were monitored daily. All diets were found to be safe to administer. In study 2, after seven days of receiving diets, a Dark Agouti Mammary Adenocarcinoma (DAMA was transplanted subcutaneously. Ten days after starting diets, animals had 2 mg/kg intramuscular methotrexate administered on two consecutive days; after this time, all animals were given soaked chow. Animals were monitored daily for changes in bodyweight, tumor burden and general health. Animals were killed 10, 12 and 16 days after initially starting diets, and tissues were collected at necropsy. In study 1, animals receiving diets had gained 0.8% and 10.8% of their starting bodyweight after 60 days, placebo animals 4.4%, and animals fed on standard chow had gained 15.1%. In study 2, there was no significant influence of test diet on bodyweight, organ weight, tumor burden or biochemical parameters. Only animals treated with MTX exhibited diarrhea, although animals receiving Diet A and Diet C showed a non-significant increase in incidence of diarrhea. Administration of these nutritional drinks did not improve symptoms of mucositis.

  3. Investigation of effect of nutritional drink on chemotherapy-induced mucosal injury and tumor growth in an established animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Emma; Bowen, Joanne; Stringer, Andrea; Mayo, Bronwen; Plews, Erin; Wignall, Anthony; Greenberg, Norman; Schiffrin, Eduardo; Keefe, Dorothy

    2013-09-30

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis represents a significant burden to quality of life and healthcare costs, and may be improved through enhanced nutritional status. We first determined the safety of two nutritional drinks (plus placebo), and then potential gut protection in tumor-bearing rats in a model of methotrexate-induced mucositis. In study 1, animals were fed one of two test diets (or placebo or control chow pellets) for a total of 60 days and were monitored daily. All diets were found to be safe to administer. In study 2, after seven days of receiving diets, a Dark Agouti Mammary Adenocarcinoma (DAMA) was transplanted subcutaneously. Ten days after starting diets, animals had 2 mg/kg intramuscular methotrexate administered on two consecutive days; after this time, all animals were given soaked chow. Animals were monitored daily for changes in bodyweight, tumor burden and general health. Animals were killed 10, 12 and 16 days after initially starting diets, and tissues were collected at necropsy. In study 1, animals receiving diets had gained 0.8% and 10.8% of their starting bodyweight after 60 days, placebo animals 4.4%, and animals fed on standard chow had gained 15.1%. In study 2, there was no significant influence of test diet on bodyweight, organ weight, tumor burden or biochemical parameters. Only animals treated with MTX exhibited diarrhea, although animals receiving Diet A and Diet C showed a non-significant increase in incidence of diarrhea. Administration of these nutritional drinks did not improve symptoms of mucositis.

  4. Constitutive SOCS-3 expression protects T-cell lymphoma against growth inhibition by IFNalpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Lovato, P; Sommer, V H;

    2005-01-01

    expression in tumour cells is equal to or higher than in cytokine-stimulated nonmalignant T cells, (ii) SOCS-3 is not mutated in CTCL, (iii) overexpression of SOCS-3 blocks IFNalpha-mediated growth inhibition without affecting Stat3 activation, growth, and apoptosis, and (iv) inhibition of SOCS-3...... by a dominant negative Stat3 (Stat3D) increases the IFNalpha-mediated growth inhibition. Taken together, these data show that SOCS-3 does not inhibit Stat3 activation, growth, and survival in CTCL. In contrast, SOCS3 protects tumour cells against growth inhibition by IFNalpha. Unlike SOCS-1, SOCS-3 is therefore...

  5. Effects of Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor on Fibrovascular Ingrowth into Rabbit's Hydroxyapatite Orbital Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虹; 李贵刚; 纪彩霓; 何花; 王军明; 胡维琨; 吴华; 陈憬

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The effects of different concentrations of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF)on the fibrovascular ingrowth into rabbits hydroxyapatite orbital implant were investigated. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 3 groups and received hydroxyapatite orbital implant surgery in their right eyes. Before and after the operation, the implants were treated with 10 ng/ml VEGF, 100 ng/ml VEGF, or normal saline as control group. The animals received technetium bones scan at 2, 4, and 6 weeks postoperatively. The mean radioactivity counts within region of interest (ROI) of the surgery eye (R) and the non-surgery eye (L) in the same animal were tested,and the R/L ratios were calculated. The implants were harvested at 6th weeks and examined histopathologically. The results showed that at second week, there was no significant difference in mean R/L ratios between VEGF group and control group (F=2.83, P=0. 111);At 4th week (F=7. 728, P=0.011) and 6th week (F=7.831, P=0.011) postoperatively, the mean ratios in VEGF groups were significantly higher than that in control group. At 6th week postoperatively,the fibrovascularization rates in VEGF groups were higher than in control group significantly (F=8. 711, P = 0. 008), It was suggested that VEGF could promote the fibrovascular ingrowth into hydroxyapatite orbital implant, thus might shorten the time required for complete vascularization of the HA orbital implant.

  6. Eugenol and its synthetic analogues inhibit cell growth of human cancer cells (Part I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco A, H.; Cardona, W. [Universidad Andres Bello, Vina del Mar (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Quimicas]. E-mail: hcarrasco@unab.cl; Espinoza C, L.; Gallardo, C.; Catalan M, K. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Quimica; Cardile, V.; Lombardo, L. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Physiological Sciences; Cuellar F, M. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile). Facultad de Farmacia; Russo, A. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Biological Chemistry, Medical Chemistry and Molecular Biology

    2008-07-01

    Eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) (1) has been reported to possess antioxidant and anticancer properties. In an attempt to enhance intrinsic activity of this natural compound, some derivatives were synthesized. Eugenol was extracted from cloves oil and further, the eugenol analogues (2-6) were obtained through acetylation and nitration reactions. Eugenol (1) and its analogues (2-6) were examined by in vitro model of cancer using two human cancer cell lines: DU-145 (androgeninsensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells). Cell viability, by tetrazolium salts assay, was measured. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also investigated to evaluate the presence of cell toxicity as a result of cell disruption, subsequent to membrane rupture. In the examined cancer cells, all compounds showed cell-growth inhibition activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds 5-allyl-3-nitrobenzene-1,2-diol (3) and 4-allyl- 2-methoxy-5-nitrophenyl acetate (5) were significantly (p < 0,001) more active than eugenol, with IC{sub 50} values in DU-145 cells of 19.02 x 10{sup -6} and 21.5 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, and in KB cells of 18.11 x 10{sup -6} and 21.26 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, suggesting that the presence of nitro and hydroxyl groups could be important in the activity of these compounds. In addition, our results seem to indicate that apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in KB and DU-145 cells. In fact, in our experimental conditions, no statistically significant increase in LDH release was observed in cancer cells treated with eugenol and its analogues. (author)

  7. The Effect of Spatially Inhomogeneous Electromagnetic Field and Local Inductive Hyperthermia on Nonlinear Dynamics of the Growth for Transplanted Animal Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Orel, Valerii; Romanov, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    4.1 The influence of spatially inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and inductive hyperthermia on nonlinear aspects of malignant growth Our study demonstrated that spatially inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields with asymmetry parameters aE = ­ 0.03 a.u. and aH = 0.16 a.u. and local IH in the range physiological hyperthermia cause influence on nonlinear dynamic of the growth of transplanted animal tumor (Orel et al., 2007b). The cancer processes are an example of nonequilibrium, non-linear proc...

  8. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25858017

  9. Ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ have inhibitory effects on growth of human neuroblastoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thiazolidinedione (TZD) or glitazone class of peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPAR-γ) ligands not only induce adipocyte differentiation and increase insulin sensitivity, but also exert growth inhibitory effects on several carcinoma cell lines in vitro as well as in vivo. In the current study the in vitro effect of four PPAR-γ agonists (ciglitazone, pioglitazone, troglitazone, rosiglitazone) on the cell growth of seven human neuroblastoma cell lines (Kelly, LAN-1, LAN-5, LS, IMR-32, SK-N-SH, SH-SY5Y) was investigated. Growth rates were assessed by a colorimetric XTT-based assay kit. Expression of PPAR-γ protein was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. All glitazones inhibited in vitro growth and viability of the human neuroblastoma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner showing considerable effects only at high concentrations (10 μM and 100 μM). Effectiveness of the glitazones on neuroblastoma cell growth differed depending on the cell line and the agent. The presence of PPAR-γ protein was demonstrated in all cell lines. Our findings indicate that ligands for PPAR-γ may be useful therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroblastoma. Thus the effect of glitazones on the growth of neuroblastoma should now be investigated in an in vivo animal model

  10. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  11. Use of glucose consumption rate (GCR) as a tool to monitor and control animal cell production processes in packed-bed bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwly, F; Papp, F; Ruffieux, P-A; Bernard, A R; Kadouri, A; von Stockar, U

    2006-03-01

    For animal cell cultures growing in packed-bed bioreactors where cell number cannot be determined directly, there is a clear need to use indirect methods that are not based on cell counts in order to monitor and control the process. One option is to use the glucose consumption rate (GCR) of the culture as an indirect measure to monitor the process in bioreactors. This study was done on a packed-bed bioreactor process using recombinant CHO cells cultured on Fibra-Cel disk carriers in perfusion mode at high cell densities. A key step in the process is the switch of the process from the cell growth phase to the production phase triggered by a reduction of the temperature. In this system, we have used a GCR value of 300 g of glucose per kilogram of disks per day as a criterion for the switch. This paper will present results obtained in routine operations for the monitoring and control of an industrial process at pilot-scale. The process operated with this GCR-based strategy yielded consistent, reproducible process performance across numerous bioreactor runs performed on multiple production sites. PMID:16153735

  12. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P.; Mathews, L S; Norstedt, G; Nielsen, J H

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and t...

  13. Inhibitory effect of celecoxib combined with cisplatin on growth of human tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell xenograft tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhong Li; Xiaoyan Wang; Zuguo Li; Yanqing Ding

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to observe the inhibitory effect of application of COX-2 inhibitor,celecoxib,combined with cisplatin on the growth of human tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell xenograft by animal experiment.Methods:The nude mice were transplanted subcutaneously with Tca 8113 cells,and then were administrated with celecoxib,cisplatin or celecoxib combined with cisplatin respectively,and were sacrificed after 35 days.The weight of xenograft was measured to calculate the tumor inhibition rate.The histological change was studied under light and electron microscope.The COX-2 protein expression was observed by immunohistological staining.And the COX-2 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR.Results:Celecoxib,the COX-2 inhibitor,could not only inhibit the growth of Tca8113 cell xenograft tumor and COX-2 protein expression,but also enhance the inhibitory effect cisplatin on xenograft tumor growth significantly.The tumor inhibition rates of celecoxib group,cisplatin group and celecoxib plus cisplatin group were 15.63%,37.50% and 82.81%respectively that was statistically significant compared to control group(P < 0.01).The combined application of celecoxib and dsplatin could inhibit tumor growth more significantly than that of separated application(P < 0.01).The inhibitory effect of celecoxib on COX-2 mRNA expression of Tca 8113 cell was weaker and not significant(P= 0.073).Conclusion:Celecoxib can not only inhibit xenograft tumor growth in nude mice,but also enhance the inhibitory effect of CDDP on Tca 8113 trans planted tumor growth in nude mice.The mechanism maybe related to inhibition of COX-2 protein expression,which offers beneficial reference to further explore the mechanism between inhibition of COX-2 enzyme activity and prevention of head and neck tumor.

  14. Study of wavy laminar growth of human urinary bladder cancer cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Guo-hong; CONG Yan-guang; LIU Jun-kang; XU Qi-wang; YUAN Ze-tao

    2001-01-01

    To observe the ordered growth behavior of human urinary bladder cancer cell line (BIU) under culture in vitro. Methods: The suspension of BIU cells was spread locally in a culture container. When the cells grew along the wall to form a cellular colony, macroscopic and microscopic observations complemented with measurements of the parameters including expanding diameter, expanding rate, cell shape, average cell density, average cell size, dehydrogenase activity and sensitivity to pH were conducted dynamically. Results: During cell culture, obvious laminar characteristics appeared in localized growing BIU cell colonies and there was difference between the cells of different zones in shape, size, density, dehydrogenase activity and sensitivity to pH. Conclusion: Space closing and bio-dissipation result in self-organization of BIU cells with ordered growth behavior. The present experiment offers a simple, controllable model for the study of wavy growth of human cells.

  15. Connective tissue growth factor is critical for proper β-cell function and pregnancy-induced β-cell hyperplasia in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Raymond C; Dunn, Jennifer C; Elsakr, Joseph M; Aramandla, Mounika; Matta, Anveetha R; Gannon, Maureen

    2016-09-01

    During pregnancy, maternal β-cells undergo compensatory changes, including increased β-cell mass and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Failure of these adaptations to occur results in gestational diabetes mellitus. The secreted protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is critical for normal β-cell development and promotes regeneration after partial β-cell ablation. During embryogenesis, CTGF is expressed in pancreatic ducts, vasculature, and β-cells. In adult pancreas, CTGF is expressed only in the vasculature. Here we show that pregnant mice with global Ctgf haploinsufficiency (Ctgf(LacZ/+)) have an impairment in maternal β-cell proliferation; no difference was observed in virgin Ctgf(LacZ/+) females. Using a conditional CTGF allele, we found that mice with a specific inactivation of CTGF in endocrine cells (Ctgf(ΔEndo)) develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but this is due to a reduction in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rather than impaired maternal β-cell proliferation. Moreover, virgin Ctgf(ΔEndo) females also display impaired GSIS with glucose intolerance, indicating that underlying β-cell dysfunction precedes the development of gestational diabetes in this animal model. This is the first time a role for CTGF in β-cell function has been reported. PMID:27460898

  16. Cell-based assays and animal models for GPCR drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Hideo; Hattori, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Miho; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-01-01

    The family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remains a central focus of basic pharmacology and drug discovery efforts. Convenient methods to assess the efficacy of potentially therapeutic reagents for GPCRs are strongly required for high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. We recently developed a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative method for detecting potential chemicals that act on GPCRs using split luciferase complementation. In principle, this is based on the detection of interactions of GPCR with β-arrestin, which translocates to the activated GPCRs. This method can facilitate the construction of HTS systems in a multi-well plate format. Particularly, the method is compatible with single-cell imaging and animal models and even deeper tissues such as organs, because of its high sensitivity, suggesting that promising candidates from HTS assay can be moved easily to the next phase for additional analysis. This system can contribute to the effective evaluation of potentially therapeutic reagents and expedite the development of new drugs for GPCRs. PMID:25563190

  17. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators: implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine eFeillet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumour growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer.

  18. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  19. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer. PMID:26029155

  20. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment inhibited RCC cells proliferation by increasing expression of miR-26a in 786-O cells (P metformin. Also over-expression of miR-26a can inhibited cell proliferation by down-regulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and up-regulating PTEN expression. Therefore, these data for the first time provide novel evidence for a mechanism that the anticancer activities of metformin are due to upregulation of miR-26a and affect its downstream target gene. PMID:25419360

  1. Effects of medium nutrition on cell growth and isocamptothecin A and B production by suspension cell culture of Camptotheca acuminata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dongyan; Yu Fang; Bai Fengwu; An Lijia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of initial sucrose concentration, nitrate to ammonium ratio, total N concentration and phosphate concentration in medium on cell growth and isocamptothecin A and B synthesis by suspension cell culture of Camptotheca acuminata were investigated in 250 mL shake flasks. 30 g L-1 sucrose concentration was beneficial to secondary metabolites synthesis. The cell growth and metabolites synthesis were also affected by the ratio of NO-3/NH+4, and nitrate was favourable for cell growth. The maximum dry weight was achieved when nitrate was used as the sole N source. The effect of total initial N on the cell cultures was also investigated with NO-3/NH+4 ratio of 1∶2. The final dry cell weight was similar throughout culture period and 50 mM initial N was favourable for secondary metabolite synthesis. 50 mM initial phosphate concentration facilitated both cell growth and secondary metabolites synthesis.

  2. Reduced tumour growth of the human colonic cancer cell lines COLO-320 and HT-29 in vivo by dietary n-3 lipids.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, M; Rowley, S; Kane, N; Imray, C.; Davies, A; Jones, C; Newbold, M.; Keighley, M R; Baker, P.; Neoptolemos, J P

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-five nude mice received subcutaneous inoculation with 1 X 10(7) cells of the human colonic cancer cell lines COLO-320 or HT-29. Tumour growth was assessed over 4 weeks in animals given one of three iso-caloric diets; standard diet, high saturated fat (20% coconut) diet and high n-3 fat (20% Maxepa fish oil) diet. The n-3 diet produced significant tumour growth reduction compared to the other diets for COLO-320 at 3 to 4 weeks (P less than 0.05 at least) and similarly for HT-29 at 4 we...

  3. Effect of active species on animal cells in culture media induced by DBD Plasma irradiation using air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Tetsuya; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Little has been reported on action mechanism of active species produced by plasmas affecting living cells. In this study, active species in culture medium generated by torch type DBD and variations of animal cells are attempted to be clarified. Animal cells are irradiated by DBD plasma through various media such as DMEM, PBS and distilled water. Irradiation period is 1 to 15 min. The distance between the lower tip of plasma touch and the surface of the medium is 10 mm. Concentrations of NO2 -, O2 in liquid are measured. After the irradiation, the cells were cultivated in culture medium and their modifications are observed by microscope and some chemical reagents. Concentration of NO2 - and H2 O2 in all media increased with discharge period. Increase rate of NO2 -concentration is much higher than that of hydrogen peroxide. After plasma irradiation for 15 min, concentrations of NO2 were 80 mg/L in DMEM, 30 mg/L in PBS and 15 mg/L in distilled water. Also, the concentration of H2 O2 became 3mg/L in DMEM, 6.5 mg/L in PBS and 6.5mg/L in distilled water. The significant inactivation of cells was observed in the PBS. Above results indicate that, in this experiment, H2 O2 or OH radicals would affect animal cells in culture media.

  4. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Kusner

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  5. Platelet lysate as a substitute for animal serum for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, Giuseppe; Amati, Eliana; Bambi, Franco; Bernardi, Martina; Chieregato, Katia; Schäfer, Richard; Sella, Sabrina; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a cell culture supplement is discouraged by regulatory authorities to limit the risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions in the transplanted host. Additionally, FBS production came under scrutiny due to animal welfare concerns. Platelet derivatives have been proposed as FBS substitutes for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) since platelet-derived growth factors can promote MSC ex-vivo expansion. Platelet-derived growth factors are present in platelet lysate (PL) obtained after repeated freezing-thawing cycles of the platelet-rich plasma or by applying physiological stimuli such as thrombin or CaCl2.PL-expanded MSCs have been used already in the clinic, taking advantage of their faster proliferation compared with FBS-expanded preparations. Should PL be applied to other biopharmaceutical products, its demand is likely to increase dramatically. The use of fresh platelet units for the production of PL raises concerns due to limited availability of platelet donors. Expired units might represent an alternative, but further data are needed to define safety, including pathogen reduction, and functionality of the obtained PL. In addition, relevant questions concerning the definition of PL release criteria, including concentration ranges of specific growth factors in PL batches for various clinical indications, also need to be addressed. We are still far from a common definition of PL and standardized PL manufacture due to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms that mediate PL-promoting cell growth. Here, we concisely discuss aspects of PL as MSC culture supplement as a preliminary step towards an agreed definition of the required characteristics of PL for the requirements of manufacturers and users. PMID:27411942

  6. Platelet lysate as a substitute for animal serum for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, Giuseppe; Amati, Eliana; Bambi, Franco; Bernardi, Martina; Chieregato, Katia; Schäfer, Richard; Sella, Sabrina; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a cell culture supplement is discouraged by regulatory authorities to limit the risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions in the transplanted host. Additionally, FBS production came under scrutiny due to animal welfare concerns. Platelet derivatives have been proposed as FBS substitutes for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) since platelet-derived growth factors can promote MSC ex-vivo expansion. Platelet-derived growth factors are present in platelet lysate (PL) obtained after repeated freezing-thawing cycles of the platelet-rich plasma or by applying physiological stimuli such as thrombin or CaCl2.PL-expanded MSCs have been used already in the clinic, taking advantage of their faster proliferation compared with FBS-expanded preparations. Should PL be applied to other biopharmaceutical products, its demand is likely to increase dramatically. The use of fresh platelet units for the production of PL raises concerns due to limited availability of platelet donors. Expired units might represent an alternative, but further data are needed to define safety, including pathogen reduction, and functionality of the obtained PL. In addition, relevant questions concerning the definition of PL release criteria, including concentration ranges of specific growth factors in PL batches for various clinical indications, also need to be addressed. We are still far from a common definition of PL and standardized PL manufacture due to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms that mediate PL-promoting cell growth. Here, we concisely discuss aspects of PL as MSC culture supplement as a preliminary step towards an agreed definition of the required characteristics of PL for the requirements of manufacturers and users.

  7. Growth suppression by transforming growth factor beta 1 of human small-cell lung cancer cell lines is associated with expression of the type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K;

    1994-01-01

    was observed in two cell lines expressing only type III receptor and in TGF-beta-r negative cell lines. In two cell lines expressing all three receptor types, growth suppression was accompanied by morphological changes. To evaluate the possible involvement of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in mediating...... the growth-suppressive effect of TGF-beta 1, the expression of functional pRb, as characterised by nuclear localisation, was examined by immunocytochemistry. Nuclear association of pRb was only seen in two of the five TGF-beta 1-responsive cell lines. These results indicate that in SCLC pRb is not required...

  8. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  9. An experimental platform for studying growth and invasiveness of tumor cells within teratomas derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tzukerman, Maty; Rosenberg, Tzur; Ravel, Yael; Reiter, Irena; Coleman, Raymond; Skorecki, Karl

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no available experimental system wherein human cancer cells can be grown in the context of a mixed population of normal differentiated human cells for testing biological aspects of cancer cell growth (e.g., tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis) or response to anti-cancer therapies. When implanted into immunocompromised mice, human embryonic stem cells develop teratomas containing complex structures comprising differentiated cell types representing the major germ line-derive...

  10. The effects of antisense PTEN gene transfection on the growth and invasion of glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-jie; ZHENG Zhao-cong; WANG Ru-mi; WANG Shou-sen; YANG Wei-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects of antisense PTEN gene on the growth and invasion of glioma cells. Methods:A pcDNA3. 1/Hygro (-) recombinant plasmid containing antisense PTEN gene fragment was constructed. Glioma cells of primary culture were transfected with antisense PTEN gene vector and stably transfected clones were selected. Then, the different growth and invasion abilities and the different MMP9 mRNA expressions of three kinds of cells were observed, including the transfected cells, untransfected cells and the cells transfected with empty vector. Results :The abilities of growth and invasion of the transfected cells and the expressions of MMP9 mRNA were obviously enhanced. Conclusion: Antisense PTEN gene could have a negative impact on the growth and invasion of primary culture glioma cells.

  11. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  12. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a combination of high-resolution pulse-chase fluorescence microscopy, 3D computational microscopy, and detailed mechanistic simulations to explore how spatial patterning results in uniform growth and maintenance of cell shape. We show that growth is happening in discrete bursts randomly distributed over the cell surface, with a well-defined mean size and average rate. We further use these techniques to explore the effects of division and cell wall disrupting antibiotics, like cephalexin and A22, respectively, on the patterning of cell wall growth in E. coli. Finally, we explore the spatial correlation between presence of the bacterial actin-like cytoskeletal protein, MreB, and local cell wall growth. Together these techniques form a powerful method for exploring the detailed dynamics and involvement of antibiotics and cell wall-associated proteins in bacterial cell growth.[4pt] In collaboration with Kerwyn Huang, Stanford University.

  13. 3H-thymidine autoradiographic study of cell proliferation and the influence of isoproterenol and kallikrein in various cell populations of the gastrointestinal tract in animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological studies were carried out with the aim of studying cell proliferation in various tissues (stable and epithelial tissues) of the gastrointestinal tract. The cells were studied by 3H thymidine autoradiography in the normal age cycle and under the influence of kallikrein or isoproterenol. Epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the forestomach, stomach, small intestine and colon were investigated and, in the case of the stomach, also connective-tissue cells of the mucotic stroma. Counts across the total epithelial thickness yielded similar results for the oesophagus and the forestomach. A count of 1000 cells per animal was found to yield representative information on a defined type of cell. Kallikrein was not found to have a constant mitosis-promoting effect. Isoproterenol caused the labelling index to increase or to decrease; in higher concentrations, it increased the proliferation rate in all cell types. In male animals, the labelling indices of connective-tissue cells of the gastric mucosa were significantly higher than in female animals. (orig./MG)

  14. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  15. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Carol Ann, E-mail: carol.greene@auckland.ac.nz; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  16. An Atypical Acidophil Cell Line Tumor Showing Focal Differentiation Toward Both Growth Hormone and Prolactin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritaka, Heiji; Kameya, Toru; Sato, Yuichi; Furuhata, Shigeru; Okui, Junichi; Kamiguchi, Yuji; Otani, Mitsuhiro; Toya, Shigeo

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of giant pituitary adenoma in a child. Computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed a suprasellar extension tumor mass with hydrocephalus. There was no clinical evidence of acromegaly, gigantism, and other hormonal symptoms. Endocrinologic studies showed within normal value of serum growth hormone (GH: 4.2 ng/mL) and slightly increased levels of prolactin (PRL: 78 ng/mL) and other pituitary hormone values were within normal range. On suppression test by bromocryptin, both GH and PRL levels were reduced. Histopathological findings revealed that the tumor consisted of predominantly chromophobic and partly eosinophilic adenoma cells. Immunohistochemical staining detected GH and PRL in a small number of distinctly different adenoma cells, respectively. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) also showed GH and PRL mRNA expression in identical immunopositive cells. Electron microscopy (EM) demonstrated adenoma cells with moderate or small numbers of two types of dense granules and without fibrous body which are characteristic of sparsely granulated GH-cell adenomas. The adenoma does not fit into any classification but may be an atypical acidophil cell line tumor showing focal differentiation toward both GH and PRL cells. PMID:12114745

  17. Inducing effects of hepatocyte growth factor on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human colorectal carcinoma cells through MEK and PI3K signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-hua; WEI Wei; XU Hao; WANG Yan-yan; WU Wen-xi

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor plays a key role in human colorectal carcinoma invasion and metastasis. However, the regulation mechanism remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that several cytokines can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor cells. In this study, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Methods Hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in human serum were measured by ELISA.The mRNA level of vascular endothelial growth factor was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. Western blot assay was performed to evaluate levels of c-Met and several other proteins involved in the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in colorectal carcinoma cells.Results Serum hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly increased in colorectal carcinoma subjects. In vitro extraneous hepatocyte growth factor markedly increased protein and mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells. Hepatocyte growth factor induced phosphorylation of c-Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in a dose-dependent manner. Specific inhibitors on MEK and PI3K inhibited the hepatocyte growth factor-induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Conclusion This present study indicates that hepatocyte growth factor upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells via the MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways.

  18. Effects of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Insulin-like Growth Factor on Cultured Cartilage Cells from Skate Raja porasa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊廷俊; 晋凌云; 汪小锋

    2003-01-01

    Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on cartilage cells from proboscis of skate, Raja porasa Günther, were investigated in this study. The cartilage cells were cultured in 20% FBS-supplemented MEM medium at 24℃. Twelve hours after culture initiation, the cartilage cells were treated with bFGF and IGF-II at different concentration combinations. It was found that 20 ng/ml of bFGF or 80 ng/ml of IGF-II was enough to have obvious stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. Test of bFGF and IGF-II together, revealed that 20 ng/ml of bFGF and 80 ng/ml of IGF-II together had the best stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. The cartilage cells cultured could form a monolayer at day 7.

  19. Transfection of gene Livin α/β into A549 cells and separate effect on the cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian-guo; LIAO Rong-xia; CHEN Zheng-tang; WANG Zhi-xin; ZHANG Qing; HU Yi-de; WANG Dong-lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To express two Livin isoforms (Livin α & β genes) with transfection techniques in A549 cell line respectively in order to observe their effect on growth of cell line. Methods:Two eukaryotic expression vectors of Livin, pcDNA3.1-Livin α & β, were transfected into A549 cell line by electroporation. Then G418-resistant clones were screened. RT-PCR, Northern blot and immunofluorescence cytochemistry were used to detect Livin α & β expression level in the transfected cells. Finally, observation of cell morphology, growth curve assay and colony formation analysis were performed to explore the effect of Livin on growth of the cells. Results:Livin α & β were expressed in transfected A549 cells, and induced a faster cell growth, shorter doubling time and stronger cell colony forming ability, yet had no morphology change.Conclusion:Both isoforms can accelerate the growth of A549 cells, indicating a close relationship between Livin expression and the genesis and development of lung cancer. The expression of Livin α & β in A549 cells provides basis for further study of their different biological functions of anti-apoptosis and of their role in lung cancer cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  20. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  1. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  2. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor), HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor) and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3) were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1). The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml), with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D). HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells: Mechanisms, achievements and perspectives in farm animals

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Talluri, Thirumala R; Anand, Taruna; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are unspecialized cells with unlimited self-renewal, and they can be triggered to differentiate into desired specialized cell types. These features provide the basis for an unlimited cell source for innovative cell therapies. Pluripotent cells also allow to study developmental pathways, and to employ them or their differentiated cell derivatives in pharmaceutical testing and biotechnological applications. Via blastocyst complementation, pluripotent cells are a favoured ...

  4. Evidence for osmoregulation of cell growth and buoyant density in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Kubitschek, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The buoyant density of cells of Escherichia coli B/r NC32 increased with the osmolarity of the growth medium. Growth rate and its variability were also dependent upon the osmolarity of the medium. Maximum growth rates and minimum variability of these rates were obtained in Luria broth by addition of NaCl to a concentration of about 0.23 M.

  5. Growth factors have a protective effect on neomycin-induced hair cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiangxin; Yuan, Huihua; Xie, Jing; Wang, Xianliu; Yang, Liangliang; Zhang, Yanzhong

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that selected growth factors are involved in regulating survival and proliferation of progenitor cells derived from the neonatal rat organ of Corti (OC). The protective and regenerative effects of these defined growth factors on the injured organ of Corti were therefore investigated. The organ of Corti dissected from the Wistar rat pups (P3-P5) was split into apical, middle, and basal parts, explanted and cultured with or without neomycin and growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) protected the inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) from neomycin ototoxicity. Using EGF, IGF-1, and FGF-2 alone induced no protective effect on the survival of auditory hair cells. Combining 2 growth factors (EGF + IGF-1, EGF + FGF-2, or IGF-1 + FGF-2) gave statistically protective effects. Similarly, combining all three growth factors effectively protected auditory hair cells from the ototoxic insult. None of the growth factors induced regeneration of hair cells in the explants injured with neomycin. Thus various combinations of the three defined factors (IGF-1, FGF-2, and EGF) can protect the auditory hair cells from the neomycin-induced ototoxic damage, but no regeneration was seen. This offers a possible novel approach to the treatment of hearing loss.

  6. Rice Coleoptile Growth under Water and in Air-Possible Effect of Buoyancy on Growth and Cell Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Kah-Siew, Tan; Takayuki, Hoson; Seiichiro, Kamisaka; Yoshio, Masuda

    1992-01-01

    Maximum growth was achieved in rice coleoptiles (Oryza sativa L. cv. Sasanishiki) grown under water; they reached maximum length of 81.2 mm on day 5. The maximum length of coleoptiles grown in air or under water with air bubbling was 12.4 mm and 23.5 mm in day 5,respectively. Differences in coleoptile growth between air bubbling and air conditions, namely approximately 11 mm at day 5,could be due to buoyancy effect under water. Promoted growth under water was due to a decrease in cell wall ex...

  7. New Trends and Perspectives in the Evolution of Neurotransmitters in Microbial, Plant, and Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary perspective on the universal roles of compounds known as neurotransmitters may help in the analysis of relations between all organisms in biocenosis-from microorganisms to plant and animals. This phenomenon, significant for chemosignaling and cellular endocrinology, has been important in human health and the ability to cause disease or immunity, because the "living environment" influences every organism in a biocenosis relationship (microorganism-microorganism, microorganism-plant, microorganism-animal, plant-animal, plant-plant and animal-animal). Non-nervous functions of neurotransmitters (rather "biomediators" on a cellular level) are considered in this review and ample consideration is given to similarities and differences that unite, as well as distinguish, taxonomical kingdoms. PMID:26589213

  8. Suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor expression by cannabinoids in a canine osteosarcoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo AS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andreza S Figueiredo,1 Hiram J García-Crescioni,1 Sandra C Bulla,1 Matthew K Ross,2 Chelsea McIntosh,1 Kari Lunsford,3 Camilo Bulla11Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, 2Department of Basic Sciences, 3Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Health Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USAAbstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a key regulator in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis, and cannabinoids decrease VEGF release in human and murine cancer cells. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of a synthetic cannabinoid, WIN-55,212-2, on the expression of the proangiogenic factor VEGF-A in the canine osteosarcoma cell line 8. After analysis of gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the compound decreased VEGF-A expression by 35% ± 10% (P < 0.0001 as compared with the control. This synthetic cannabinoid shows promise as a potential inhibitor of angiogenesis, and further studies are warranted to investigate its in vivo effects and to explore the potential of this and related compounds as adjuvant cancer therapy in the dog.Keywords: dog, cancer, angiogenesis, cannabinoids

  9. GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF INDIVIDUAL BACTERIAL CELLS UTILIZING NANOSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEALSON, H. K.

    2007-08-03

    This work involved the use of the Nano-SIMS Instrument at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, in an effort to utilize this unique tool for experiments in Biology. The work consisted primarily of experiments to measure in real time, C and N fixation in cyanobacteria. The work revealed a number of the difficulties in using the nano-SIMS approach with biological material, but with collaboration from a number of individuals at USC and LLNL, major progress was made. The collaborators from LLNL were from the Chemistry Group (Dr. Peter Weber), and the Biology Group (Dr. Jennifer Pett-Ridge). In addition, there were a number of other scientists involved from LLNL. The USC group consisted of Dr. K.H. Nealson, the PI on the grant, Dr. R. Popa, a postdoctoral fellow and research associate at USC, Professor Douglas Capone, and Juliet Finze, a graduate student in biology. Two major experiments were done, both of which yielded new and exciting data. (1) We studied nitrogen and carbon fixation in Anabaena, demonstrating that fixation ofN occurred rapidly in the heterocysts, and that the fixed N was transported rapidly and completely to the vegetative cells. C fixation occurred in the vegetative cells, with labeled C remaining in these cells in support of their growth and metabolism. This work was accepted in the ISME Journal (Nature Publication), and published last month. (2) We studied nitrogen and carbon fixation in Trichodesmium, a non-heterocystous cyanobacterium that also fixes nitrogen. Interestingly, the nitrogen fixation was confined to regions within the filaments that seem to be identical to the so-called cyanophycaen granules. The fixed N is then transported to other parts of the cyanobacterium, as judged by movement of the heavy N throughout the filaments. On the basis of these very exciting results, we have applied for funding from the NSF to continue the collaboration with LLNL. The results of both studies were presented in the summer of 2007 at the Gordon Research

  10. Distribution of hepatic stellate cells and their role in the development of parasitic fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukolj Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of the extracellular matrix in rats, as well as in humans, occurs as a consequence of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs activity. The objective of this work was to investigation the role of these cells in the development of fibrosis and liver cirrhosis which occurs as a consequence of infection of sheep and goats with large (Fasciola hepatica and small (Dicrocoelium dendriticum fluke. Liver samples taken from 12 cattle and 10 sheep infected under natural conditions with large and small fluke were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Paraffin clips were stained with hematoxylin- eosin and masson trichrome method, and immunohistochemical method for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. All tested samples were divided into three groups according to histological criteria: livers of infected animals with the first degree of fibrosis, livers of infected animals with the second degree of fibrosis, and livers of infected animals with cirrhosis. Distribution of HSCs depended on the degree of liver fibrosis. Immunohistochemically reactive HSCs were predominantly placed in perisinusoidal space. In liver samples with cirrhosis, HSCs were placed on the periphery of pseudolobulus. Cells of a different shape and size were positive to α-SMA. HSCs play an important role in synthesis of components of extracellular matrix during the development of parasitic fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in domestic animals.

  11. Sitagliptin Prevents Inflammation and Apoptotic Cell Death in the Kidney of Type 2 Diabetic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Marques

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitor, in preventing the deleterious effects of diabetes on the kidney in an animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus; the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rat: 20-week-old rats were treated with sitagliptin (10 mg/kg bw/day during 6 weeks. Glycaemia and blood HbA1c levels were monitored, as well as kidney function and lesions. Kidney mRNA and/or protein content/distribution of DPP-IV, GLP-1, GLP-1R, TNF-α, IL-1β, BAX, Bcl-2, and Bid were evaluated by RT-PCR and/or western blotting/immunohistochemistry. Sitagliptin treatment improved glycaemic control, as reflected by the significantly reduced levels of glycaemia and HbA1c (by about 22.5% and 1.2%, resp. and ameliorated tubulointerstitial and glomerular lesions. Sitagliptin prevented the diabetes-induced increase in DPP-IV levels and the decrease in GLP-1 levels in kidney. Sitagliptin increased colocalization of GLP-1 and GLP-1R in the diabetic kidney. Sitagliptin also decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, as well as, prevented the increase of BAX/Bcl-2 ratio, Bid protein levels, and TUNEL-positive cells which indicates protective effects against inflammation and proapoptotic state in the kidney of diabetic rats, respectively. In conclusion, sitagliptin might have a major role in preventing diabetic nephropathy evolution due to anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties.

  12. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  13. Pharmacological targeting of the KIT growth factor receptor: a therapeutic consideration for mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Akin, C; Gilfillan, A M

    2008-01-01

    KIT is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factor receptors which is expressed on a variety of haematopoietic cells including mast cells. Stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent activation of KIT is critical for mast cell homeostasis and function. However, when KIT is inappropriately activa...

  14. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 is required for the regulation of rat oval cell proliferation and differentiation in the 2AAF/PHX model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C Steiger-Luther

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicole C Steiger-Luther1, Houda Darwiche1, Seh-Hoon Oh1, Jennifer M Williams1, Bryon E Petersen1,21Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Oval cell-mediated liver regeneration is a highly complex process that involves the coordination of several signaling factors, chemokines and cytokines to allow for proper maintenance of the liver architecture. When hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited, an hepatic stem cell population, often referred to as “oval cells”, is activated to aid in liver regeneration. The function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 during this process of oval cell activation is of particular interest because it is produced in liver and has been shown to induce migration and differentiation of other stem cell populations both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, IGFBP-3 production has been linked to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, a pathway known to be induced during oval cell proliferation. In this study, we set out to determine whether IGFBP-3 plays a role in oval cell proliferation, migration and differentiation during this specific type of regeneration. Through activation of the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration in a rat model, we found that IGFBP-3 is elevated in the liver and serum of animals during peak days of oval cell activation and proliferation. Furthermore, in vitro assays found that WB-344 cells, a liver stem cell line similar to oval cells, were induced to migrate in the presence of IGFBP-3. When expression of IGFBP-3 was knocked down during oval cell activation in vivo, we found that oval cell proliferation was increased and observed the appearance of numerous atypical ductular structures, which were OV-6 and Ki67-positive. Finally, quantitative realtime PCR analysis of liver tissue from IGFBP-3 small interfering

  15. FEM simulations and experimental studies of the temperature field in a large diamond crystal growth cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhan-Chang; Jia Xiao-Peng; Huang Guo-Feng; Hu Mei-Hua; Li Yong; Yan Bing-Min; Ma Hong-An

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the temperature field variation in the growth region of a diamond crystal in a sealed cell during the whole process of crystal growth by using the temperature gradient method (TGM) at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT).We employ both the finite element method (FEM) and in situ experiments.Simulation results show that the temperature in the center area of the growth cell continues to decrease during the process of large diamond crystal growth.These results are in good agreement with our experimental data,which demonstrates that the finite element model can successfully predict the temperature field variations in the growth cell.The FEM simulation will be useful to grow larger high-quality diamond crystal by using the TGM.Furthermore,this method will be helpful in designing better cells and improving the growth process of gem-quality diamond crystal.

  16. FEM simulations and experimental studies of the temperature field in a large diamond crystal growth cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the temperature field variation in the growth region of a diamond crystal in a sealed cell during the whole process of crystal growth by using the temperature gradient method (TGM) at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT). We employ both the finite element method (FEM) and in situ experiments. Simulation results show that the temperature in the center area of the growth cell continues to decrease during the process of large diamond crystal growth. These results are in good agreement with our experimental data, which demonstrates that the finite element model can successfully predict the temperature field variations in the growth cell. The FEM simulation will be useful to grow larger high-quality diamond crystal by using the TGM. Furthermore, this method will be helpful in designing better cells and improving the growth process of gem-quality diamond crystal. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  17. The FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway is critical for chordoma cell growth and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yunping; Mintz, Akiva; Shah, Sagar R.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Hsu, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the expression of brachyury is necessary for chordoma growth. However, the mechanism associated with brachyury-regulated cell growth is poorly understood. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), a regulator of brachyury expression in normal tissue, may also play an important role in chordoma pathophysiology. Using a panel of chordoma cell lines, we explored the role of FGF signaling and brachyury in cell growth and survival. Western blots showed that all chordoma cell lines expressed fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), FGFR3, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas no cell lines expressed FGFR1 and FGFR4. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that chordoma cells produced FGF2. Neutralization of FGF2 inhibited MEK/ERK phosphorylation, decreased brachyury expression and induced apoptosis while reducing cell growth. Activation of the FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway by FGF2-initiated phosphorylation of FGFR substrate 2 (FRS2)-α (Tyr196) prevented apoptosis while promoting cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Immunofluorescence staining showed that FGF2 promoted the translocation of phosphorylated ERK to the nucleus and increased brachyury expression. The selective inhibition of FGFR, MEK and ERK phosphorylation by PD173074, PD0325901 and PD184352, respectively, decreased brachyury expression, induced apoptosis, and inhibited cell growth and EMT. Moreover, knockdown of brachyury by small hairpin RNA reduced FGF2 secretion, inhibited FGFR/MEK/ERK phosphorylation and blocked the effects of FGF2 on cell growth, apoptosis and EMT. Those findings highlight that FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway coordinately regulates chordoma cell growth and survival and may represent a novel chemotherapeutic target for chordoma. PMID:24445144

  18. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor overexpression decreases growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiao-qin; CHENG Hai-qing; LI Hong; ZHU Yan; LI Yu-hua; FENG Zhen-qing; ZHANG Jian-ping

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously found that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is highly expressed in a rat model of liver cancer.Here,we examined expression of CTGFin human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and its effect on cell growth.Methods Real-time PCR was used to observe expression of CTGF in human HCC cell lines HepG2,SMMC-7721,MHCC-97H and LO2.siRNA for the CTGFgene was designed,synthesized and cloned into a Plk0.1-GFP-SP6 vector to construct a lentivirus-mediated shRNA/CTGF.CTGF mRNA and protein expression in HepG2 cells treated by CTGF-specific shRNA was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting.3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was utilized to evaluate the growth effect,and a colony formation assay was used for observing clonogenic growth.In vivo,tumor cell proliferation was evaluated in a nude mouse model of xenotransplantation.Statistical significance was determined by t test for comparison between two groups,or analysis of variance (ANOVA) for multiple groups.Results Immunohistochemical staining of CTGF was seen in 35 of 40 HCC samples (87.5%).CTGF was overexpressed 5-fold in 20 HCC tissues,compared with surrounding non-tumor liver tissue.CTGF mRNA level was 5-8-fold higher in HepG2,SMMC-7721 and MHCC-97H than in LO2 cells.This indicated that the inhibition rate of cell growth was 43% after knockdown of CTGF expression (P <0.05).Soft agar colony formation assay showed that siRNA mediated knockdown of CTGF inhibited colony formation in soft agar of HepG2 cells (P <0.05).The volume of tumors from CTGF-shRNA-expressing cells only accounted for 35% of the tumors from the scrambled control-infected HepG2 cells (P <0.05).Conclusions CTGF was overexpressed in human HCC cells and downregulation of CTGF inhibited HCC growth in vitro and in vivo.Knockdown of CTGF may be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of HCC.

  19. Estimating the number of viable animal cells in multi-well cultures based on their lactate dehydrogenase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, G; Wyatt, D; Kitos, P A

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for estimating the numbers ofanimal cells in multi-well culture by simultaneouslymeasuring the lactate dehydrogenase activity of thetotal culture and the medium. The difference betweenthe two reflects the dehydrogenase content of thecells and correlates with cell number. This LDH/INTmethod was tested using several lines of normal andtransformed suspension and adherent cells. Thelactate dehydrogenase activities of duplicate cultureswere determined colourimetrically using reactioncocktails containing lactate, NAD(+), diaphorase,and p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, with and withoutTriton X-100. The difference in absorbance at 490 nm(DeltaA(490) = A(490, test) - A(490, control)) was used to calculate the lactatedehydrogenase activity of the total culture (+ Triton)and the medium (- Triton). The cellular lactatedehydrogenase activity (difference between totaland medium dehydrogenaseactivities) was proportional to viable cell number. The effects on cell growth of four metabolicinhibitors, sodium azide, actinomycin D,cycloheximide, and taxol, were determined using theLDH/INT assay and direct cell counting. The inhibitorconcentrations that caused decreases in the LDHactivity and cell number by 50% were similar. TheLDH/INT assay is quick and sensitive, works equallywell for adherent and suspension cells, and providesinformation about LDH activities of both the mediumand cells. It is particularly useful for screeningpotential cell-growth inhibitors. PMID:19002967

  20. Inhibition of human gastric carcinoma cell growth by atofluding derivative N3-o-toluyl-fluorouracil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Liu; Wei Tang; Xian-Jun Qu; Wen-Fang Xu; Shu-Xiang Cui; Yong Zhou; Yun-Xia Yuan; Ming-Hui Chen; Ruo-Han Wang; Ruo-Yan Gai; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the growth inhibition efficacy of atofluding derivative N3-o-toluyl-fluorouracil (TFU)on human gastric carcinoma cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45.METHODS:Cell growth inhibition by TFU was measured by MTT and clonogenic assays without or with liver microsomal enzymes. Xenografts of cancer cells in nude mice were employed to study the anti-proliferative effects of TFU in vivo,RESULTS:TFU inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells. However, the inhibitory effects of TFU on cell growth were not significant. The inhibition rates were enhanced in the presence of liver microsomal enzymes, ranging 4.73%-48.57% in SGC-7901 cells and 9.0%-62.02% in MKN-45 cells. In vivo, TFU delayed the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells in nude mice. The inhibition rates were 40.49%, 63.24%, and 75.98% in SGC-7901 cells and 40.76%, 61.41%, and 82.07% in MKN-45 cells when the oral doses were 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively. TFU treatment was generally well tolerated by mice with less than 20% reduction in body weight.CONCLUSION:TFU inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cells. The inhibition rates are increased in the presence of liver microsomal enzymes. The efficacy of TFU may be associated with the sustaining release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) mediated by the enzymes.

  1. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  2. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Pyoung-Han [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Sang-Yun [Department of Alternative Therapy, School of Alternative Medicine and Health Science, Jeonju University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae-Yeol, E-mail: leedy@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-17

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  3. The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collignon, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Braam, P.;

    2005-01-01

    these countries. Poultry and pork production are unlikely to decrease by more than 2%. Average daily protein supply would decrease by no more than 0.1 g per person (or 0.2% of total protein intake). Eliminating the routine use of in-feed antibiotics will improve human and animal health, by reducing the...

  4. Basic fibroblast growth factor protects auditory neurons and hair cells from noise exposure and glutamate neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟所强; 王大君; 王嘉陵

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine protectivie effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on cochlear neurons and hair cells in vitro and in vivo. In experiment I, cultured spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) prepared from P3 mice were exposed to 20mM glutamate for 2 hours before the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium containing 0, 25, 50, and 100 ng/ml bFGF, respectively. Fourteen days later, all cultures were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and stained with 1% toluidine blue. The number of surviving SGNs were counted and the length of SGNs neurites were measured. Exposure to 20 mM glutamate for 24 hours resulted in an inhibition on neurite outgrowth of SGNs and elevated cell death. Treatment of the cultures with bFGF led to promotion of neurite outgrowth and elevated number of surviving SGNs. Effects of bFGF were dose dependent with the highest potency at 100 ng/ml. In experiment Ⅱ, in vivo studies were carried out with guinea pigs in which bFGF or artificial perilymph was perfused into the cochlea to assess possible protective effects of bFGF on cochlear hair cells and compound action potentials(CAP). The CAPs were measured before, immediatly and 48 hours after exposure to noise. Significant differences in CAP were observed (p<0. 05 ) among the bFGF perfused group, control group(t =3. 896 ) and artificial perilymph perfused group (t =2. 520) at 48 hours after noise exposure, Cochleae were removed and hair cell Loss was analyzed in surface preparations prepared from all experimental animals. Acoustic trauma caused loss of 651 and 687 inner hair cells in the control and artificial perilymph perfused group, respectively. In sharp contrast, only 31 inner hair cells were lost in the bFGF perfused ears. Similarly, more outer hair cells died in the control and perilymph perfuesed group (41830 and 41968, respectively) than in the group treated with bFGF (34258). Our results demonstrate that bFGF protected SGNs against glutmate

  5. Transactivation of the TIEG1 confers growth inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-susceptible hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jiang; Yiu-Kay Lai; Jin-Fang Zhang; Chu-Yan Chan; Gang Lu; Marie CM Lin; Ming-Liang He; Ji-Cheng Li; Hsiang-Fu Kung

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) in TGF-β-induced growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells.METHODS:Human hepatocyte and HCC cell lines with varied susceptibilities to TGF-β1 were tested by methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT) assay.The expression changes of Smad2,Smad3,Smad4,Smad7,TIEG1 and TIEG2 gene following treatment with TGF-β1 in a TGF-β-sensitive hepatocyte cell line (MIHA),a TGF-β-sensitive hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) and two TGF-β-insensitive hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Bel7404)were examined.SiRNA targeting TIEG1 was transfected into Hep3B cells and the sensitivity of cells to TGF-β1 was examined.Overexpression of TIEG1 was induced by lentiviral-mediated transduction in TGF-β1-resistant hepatoma cell lines (Bel7404 and HepG2).MTT assay and 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole staining were used to identify cell viability and apoptosis,respectively.The expression level of stathmin was measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western-blotting analysis,and stathmin promoter activity by TIEG1 was monitored by a luciferase reporter gene system.RESULTS:TIEG1 was significantly upregulated by TGF-β1 in the TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cell line,Hep3B,but not in the resistant cell lines.The suppression of TIEG1 by siRNAs decreased the sensitivity of Hep3B cells to TGF-β1,whereas the overexpression of TIEG1 mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis in TGF-β1-resistant HCC cell lines,which resembled those of TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cells treated with TGF-β1.Our data further suggested that stathmin was a direct target of TIEG1,as stathmin was significantly downregulated by TIEG1 overexpression,and stathmin promoter activity was inhibited by TIEG1 in a dose-dependent manner.CONCLUSION:Our data suggest that transactivation of TIEG1 conferred growth inhibition of TGF-β-susceptible human HCC cells.

  6. Modelos matemáticos utilizados para descrever curvas de crescimento em aves aplicados ao melhoramento genético animal Mathematic models applied to describe growth curves in poultry applied to animal breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Tholon

    2009-10-01

    diferentes, de acordo com a espécie, o sexo e o modelo utilizados na avaliação. Outra metodologia utilizada são os modelos de regressão aleatória, permitindo mudanças graduais nas covariâncias entre idades ao longo do tempo e predizendo variâncias e covariâncias em pontos contidos ao longo da trajetória estudada. A utilização de modelos de regressões aleatórias traz como vantagem a separação da variação da curva de crescimento fenotípica em seus diferentes efeitos genético aditivo e de ambiente permanente individual, mediante a determinação dos coeficientes de regressão aleatórios para esses diferentes efeitos. Além disto, não há necessidade de utilizar fatores de ajuste para a idade. Esta revisão teve por objetivos levantar os principais modelos matemáticos frequentistas utilizados no estudo de curvas de crescimento de aves, com maior ênfase nos empregados com a finalidade de estimar parâmetros genéticos e fenotípicos.The use of mathematical models to describe animal growth is not recent. They are able to summarize information on strategic dots of animal growth development and to describe the evolution of weight according to the animal age. It is also possible to compare different individuals in similar physiologic stages. The growth models most commonly used in poultry breeding are derived from Richards function, and they present parameters that provide biological interpretation and knowledge to select a specific shape of growth curve in poultry. However, it is also possible to use segmented polynomials to describe trend changes during the animal growth. One needs to consider important variables affecting the growth curve parameters estimates, such as, production system, specie, sex and their interactions. Model Goodness-of-fit can be based on many criteria such as coefficient of determination (R2, residual mean squared error, (LSe, estimated predicted mean error (PME, the easiness the analysis to reach convergence and the possibility of

  7. Progesterone Induces the Growth and Infiltration of Human Astrocytoma Cells Implanted in the Cerebral Cortex of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Germán-Castelán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone (P4 promotes cell proliferation in several types of cancer, including brain tumors such as astrocytomas, the most common and aggressive primary intracerebral neoplasm in humans. In this work, we studied the effects of P4 and its intracellular receptor antagonist, RU486, on growth and infiltration of U373 cells derived from a human astrocytoma grade III, implanted in the motor cortex of adult male rats, using two treatment schemes. In the first one, fifteen days after cells implantation, rats were daily subcutaneously treated with vehicle (propylene glycol, 160 μL, P4 (1 mg, RU486 (5 mg, or P4 + RU486 (1 mg and 5 mg, resp. for 21 days. In the second one, treatments started 8 weeks after cells implantation and lasted for 14 days. In both schemes we found that P4 significantly increased the tumor area as compared with the rest of the treatments, whereas RU486 blocked P4 effects. All rats treated with P4 showed tumor infiltration, while 28.6% and 42.9% of the animals treated with RU486 and P4 + RU486, respectively, presented it. Our data suggest that P4 promotes growth and migration of human astrocytoma cells implanted in the motor cortex of the rat through the interaction with its intracellular receptor.

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 is induced by bone morphogenetic proteins and regulates proliferation and cell fate of neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raili Koivuniemi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural progenitor cells (NPCs in the developing neuroepithelium are regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. There is evidence that NPCs form a self-supporting niche for cell maintenance and proliferation. However, molecular interactions and cell-cell contacts and the microenvironment within the neuroepithelium are largely unknown. We hypothesized that cellular proteases especially those associated with the cell surface of NPCs play a role in regulation of progenitor cells in the brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we show that NPCs, isolated from striatal anlage of developing rat brain, express hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 and -2 (HAI-1 and HAI-2 that are cell surface-linked serine protease inhibitors. In addition, radial glia cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells also express HAI-1 and HAI-2. To study the functional significance of HAI-1 and HAI-2 in progenitor cells, we modulated their levels using expression plasmids or silencing RNA (siRNA transfected into the NPCs. Data showed that overexpression of HAI-1 or HAI-2 decreased cell proliferation of cultured NPCs, whilst their siRNAs had opposite effects. HAI-1 also influenced NPC differentiation by increasing the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expressing cells in the culture. Expression of HAI-1 in vivo decreased cell proliferation in developing neuroepithelium in E15 old animals and promoted astrocyte cell differentiation in neonatal animals. Studying the regulation of HAI-1, we observed that Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 and BMP-4 increased HAI-1 levels in the NPCs. Experiments using HAI-1-siRNA showed that these BMPs act on the NPCs partly in a HAI-1-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the cell-surface serine protease inhibitors, HAI-1 and HAI-2 influence proliferation and cell fate of NPCs and their expression levels are linked to BMP signaling. Modulation of the levels and actions of HAI-1

  9. Hormone activities and the cell cycle machinery in immunity-triggered growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, M U; Gifford, M L; Schäfer, P

    2015-04-01

    Biotic stress and diseases caused by pathogen attack pose threats in crop production and significantly reduce crop yields. Enhancing immunity against pathogens is therefore of outstanding importance in crop breeding. However, this must be balanced, as immune activation inhibits plant growth. This immunity-coupled growth trade-off does not support resistance but is postulated to reflect the reallocation of resources to drive immunity. There is, however, increasing evidence that growth-immunity trade-offs are based on the reconfiguration of hormone pathways, shared by growth and immunity signalling. Studies in roots revealed the role of hormones in orchestrating growth across different cell types, with some hormones showing a defined cell type-specific activity. This is apparently highly relevant for the regulation of the cell cycle machinery and might be part of the growth-immunity cross-talk. Since plants are constantly exposed to Immuno-activating microbes under agricultural conditions, the transition from a growth to an immunity operating mode can significantly reduce crop yield and can conflict our efforts to generate next-generation crops with improved yield under climate change conditions. By focusing on roots, we outline the current knowledge of hormone signalling on the cell cycle machinery to explain growth trade-offs induced by immunity. By referring to abiotic stress studies, we further introduce how root cell type-specific hormone activities might contribute to growth under immunity and discuss the feasibility of uncoupling the growth-immunity cross-talk.

  10. Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Andreas

    , molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) delivers high quality ZnMgO-ZnO quantum well structures. Other thin film techniques such as PLD or MOCVD are also widely used. The main problem at present is to consistently achieve reliable p-type doping. For this topic, see also Chap. 5. In the past years, there have been numerous publications on p-type doping of ZnO, as well as ZnO p-n junctions and light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, a lot of these reports are in one way or the other inconsistent or at least incomplete. It is quite clear from optical data that once a reliable hole injection can be achieved, high brightness ZnO LEDs should be possible. In contrast to that expectation, none of the LEDs reported so far shows efficient light emission, as would be expected from a reasonable quality ZnO-based LED. See also Chap. 13. As a matter of fact, there seems to be no generally accepted and reliable technique for p-type doping available at present. The reason for this is the unfavorable position of the band structure of ZnO relative to the vacuum level, with a very low lying valence band. See also Fig. 5.1. This makes the incorporation of electrically active acceptors difficult. Another difficulty is the huge defect density in ZnO. There are many indications that defects play a major role in transport and doping. In order to solve the doping problem, it is generally accepted that the quality of the ZnO material grown by the various techniques needs to be improved. Therefore, the optimization of ZnO epitaxy is thought to play a key role in the further development of this material system. Besides being used as an active material in optoelectronic devices, ZnO plays a major role as transparent contact material in thin film solar cells. Polycrystalline, heavily n-type doped ZnO is used for this, combining a high electrical conductivity with a good optical transparency. In this case, ZnO thin films are fabricated by large area growth techniques such as sputtering. For this and other

  11. Research on the Structure of Fish Collagen Nanofibers Influenced Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is highlighted in biomaterials field. The structures of nanofibers depend on various parameters, which are related closely to the bioactivity of biomaterials. The aim of this research is to analyze the structure of fish collagen nanofibers and to propose the new criterion for cell growth. This paper focused on the flow rate of solvent during the electrospinning. Through the cell culture, the relationship of the structure and cell growth is investigated. The results obtained in this study provide an understanding of the behaviors of cell growth under different structure of fish collagen nanofibers scaffold.

  12. Retinoic acid. Inhibition of the clonal growth of human myeloid leukemia cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Douer, D; Koeffler, H P

    1982-01-01

    Vitamin A and its analogues (retinoids) affect normal and malignant hematopoietic cells. We examined the effect of retinoids on the clonal growth in vitro of myeloid leukemia cells. Retinoic acid inhibited the clonal growth of the KG-1, acute myeloblastic leukemia, and the HL-60, acute promyelocytic leukemia, human cell lines. The KG-1 cells were extremely sensitive to retinoic acid, with 50% of the colonies inhibited by 2.4-nM concentrations of the drug. A 50% growth inhibition of HL-60 was ...

  13. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  14. The Suitability of BV2 Cells as Alternative Model System for Primary Microglia Cultures or for Animal Experiments Examining Brain Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Henn, Anja; Lund, Søren; Hedtjärn, Maj; Schrattenholz, André; Pörzgen, Peter; Leist, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The role of microglia in neurodegeneration, toxicology and immunity is an expanding area of biomedical research requiring large numbers of animals. Use of a microglia-like cell line would accelerate many research programmes and reduce the necessity of continuous cell preparations and animal experimentation, provided that the cell line reproduces the in vivo situation or primary microglia (PM) with high fidelity. The immortalised murine microglial cell line BV-2 has been used frequently as a s...

  15. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrekt Ann-Sofie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. Results We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. Conclusions A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests.

  16. Cell growth stimulating effect of Ganoderma lucidum spores and their potential application for Chinese hamster ovary K1 cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Zhong, Qi; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Jufang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, water-soluble extracts of Ganoderma lucidum spores (Gls), a Chinese medicinal herb that possesses cell growth stimulating function, were found to be an effective growth factor for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultivation. The Gls extract was prepared and supplemented to CHO K1 cell culture media with various serum levels. Our results obtained from both the static culture and the spinner-flask suspension culture showed that use of small-amount Gls extract effectively promoted cell growth and suppressed cell apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with normal cell cycle maintained in a low-serum medium. The low-serum medium containing 1 % (v/v) fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 0.01 % (w/v) Gls extract showed a comparable performance on both cell growth and fusion protein productivity with the conventional CHO culture medium containing 10 % (v/v) FBS and a commercial serum-free medium. This is the first study of the potential of Gls extracts for use as an alternative cell growth factor and nutrient for CHO cells. The findings have presented a new approach to economic cultivation of CHO cells for therapeutic protein production.

  17. Cell growth stimulating effect of Ganoderma lucidum spores and their potential application for Chinese hamster ovary K1 cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Zhong, Qi; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Jufang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, water-soluble extracts of Ganoderma lucidum spores (Gls), a Chinese medicinal herb that possesses cell growth stimulating function, were found to be an effective growth factor for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultivation. The Gls extract was prepared and supplemented to CHO K1 cell culture media with various serum levels. Our results obtained from both the static culture and the spinner-flask suspension culture showed that use of small-amount Gls extract effectively promoted cell growth and suppressed cell apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with normal cell cycle maintained in a low-serum medium. The low-serum medium containing 1 % (v/v) fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 0.01 % (w/v) Gls extract showed a comparable performance on both cell growth and fusion protein productivity with the conventional CHO culture medium containing 10 % (v/v) FBS and a commercial serum-free medium. This is the first study of the potential of Gls extracts for use as an alternative cell growth factor and nutrient for CHO cells. The findings have presented a new approach to economic cultivation of CHO cells for therapeutic protein production. PMID:26921102

  18. Growth activity of epidermal cells from different parts of human body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Jia-ke; SHENG Zhi-yong; MA Zhong-feng; YANG Hong-ming; LIU Qiang; Liang Li-ming

    2007-01-01

    Background Most epidermal cells used in skin tissue engineering are obtained from the skins of fetuses or prepuces,which can not be widely used in culturing and transplanting autologous epidermis for patients with extensive burn wounds. To solve the problem, in this study, we cultured epidermal cells from different parts of human body in vitro, and detected their growth activity.Methods Normal epidermal cells obtained from the prepuce, scalp, and axilla of male patients, were cultured and passaged. Their growth characteristics including adherent rate and growth activity were compared. Data were analyzed by homogeneity test of variance.Results In primary culture, the growth of epidermal cells from the prepuce was significantly faster than that of the epidermal cells from the scalp and axilla. In the cells obtained from the prepuce, 80% confluence was achieved on day 12, while on day 16 and day 20 in the cells from the scalp and axilla, respectively. However, no significant difference was detected in their growth and proliferation in the second passage.Conclusions Although the growth of epidermal cells obtained from the scalp and axilla is slower than that from the prepuce in primary culture, stable cell line can be established and used in preparation of auto-epidermal grafts for patients with extensive burn wounds. Therefore, the scalp and axillary skin should be considered as important sources of epidermal cells other than the prepuce.

  19. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, T.; Urade, M.; Sakuda, M.; Miyazaki, T.

    1986-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis in HEMP cells, whereas EGF showed no effect on these activities in HEMP-RV cells. Growth of HEMP-RV cells was slightly reduced compared with that of HEMP cells. EGF stimulated growth of HEMP cells and to a lesser extent of HEMP-RV cells. Binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to cell-surface receptors in HEMP-RV cells was, to our surprise, twice as much as that in HEMP cells. However, internalization of bound /sup 125/I-EGF in HEMP-RV cells was profoundly diminished. Thus, persistent RV infection causes not only changes in HEMP cell growth and differentiation but a decrease in or loss of HEMP cell responsiveness to EGF. The effects of persistent RV infection on palatal cell differentiation as well as growth may be responsible for the pathogenesis of congenital rubella. Furthermore, since HEMP cells appear to be closely related to osteoblasts, these results suggest a mechanism for RV-induced osseous abnormalities manifested in congenital rubella patients.

  20. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  1. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  2. Gremlin is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma and increases cell growth and proliferation in normal lung cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Mulvihill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gremlin, a member of the Dan family of BMP antagonists, is a glycosylated extracellular protein. Previously Gremlin has been shown to play a role in dorsal-ventral patterning, in tissue remodeling, and recently in angiogenesis. Evidence has previously been presented showing both over- and under-expression of Gremlin in different tumor tissues. Here, we sought to quantify expression of Gremlin in cancers of the lung and performed in vitro experiments to check whether Gremlin promotes cell growth and proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of Gremlin in 161 matched tumor and normal lung cancer specimens is quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and protein level is measured by immunohistochemistry. GREM1 was transfected into lung fibroblast and epithelial cell lines to assess the impact of overexpression of Gremlin in vitro. RESULTS: Lung adenocarcinoma but not squamous cell carcinoma shows a significant increase in Gremlin expression by mRNA and protein level. Lung fibroblast and epithelial cell lines transfected with GREM1 show significantly increased cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Gremlin acts in an oncogenic manner in lung adenocarcinoma and could hold promise as a new diagnostic marker or potential therapeutic target in lung AD or general thoracic malignancies.

  3. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimitoshi Kohno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143 regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, aurora kinase B (AURKB and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM. However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  4. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Hiroto, E-mail: h-izumi@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Kohno, Kimitoshi [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-19

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), aurora kinase B (AURKB) and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM). However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells) and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  5. Tritium-Labelled Thymidine (H3TDR): Its Somatic Toxicity and Use in the Study of Growth Rates and Potentials in Normal and Malignant Tissue of Man and Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium, with its low energy beta-emission produces high-resolution autoradiograms (ARG). H3TDR is chemically stable, labels desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and thereafter is non-exchangeable. The DNA is diluted only by new DNA at the time of chromosomal replications. The intensity of the label is thus diminished by successive cell divisions. The behaviour of the labelled population is apparently consistent with the Taylor-Woods-Hughes (TWH) model of chromosome replication. Intuitively one expects to observe radiation toxicity when radio-active elements have been incorporated into DNA. The toxicity has been considered in respect to the properties of tritium and influence of chromosomal replication (TWH model), and studied empirically in mammalian testes and lymphocytes. After doses satisfactory for serial autoradiographic studies, radiation injury or perturbations in cell proliferation have not been demonstrated. To date normal hemopoiesis, acute and chronic leukaemias, multiple myeloma and selected solid tumours have been studied in man and animals. Serial data on the fraction of cells labelled and the rate of diminution in the intensity of the label have been collected. These data will be presented. Interpretation of these data is complicated by the limitations of cytologic identification, establishment of morphologic boundaries between successive stages in cell proliferation from the stem cell to non-dividing progeny and by our inability to determine whether a cell not in mitosis or DNA synthesis retains the capacity to divide again. These problems will be discussed in principle and practice. It has been established tentatively that growth rate for some normal proliferating organ systems in steady state equilibrium is greater than the growth rate in many expanding tumours. (author)

  6. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  7. Fatty acid control of growth of human cervical and endometrial cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, R P; Ayub, M.; Wright, J T; Wood, C B; Habib, N.A.; Soutter, W P; Sullivan, M. H.; White, J. O.

    1990-01-01

    Stearic acid and iodo-stearic and inhibited cell growth in a cervical cancer cell line (HOG-1) in a dose-related manner, with a half maximal effect at 50 microM stearic acid. Addition of oleic acid abrogated the effect of stearic acid. EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis and growth of HOG-1 cells was inhibited in the presence of stearic acid without any apparent effect on EGF receptor number or affinity.

  8. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiss, Dietmar M.W.; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P.J.; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.; Roovers, Rob C.; Coffer, Paul J.; Sijts, Alice J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, m...

  9. In vivo cell wall loosening by hydroxyl radicals during cress seed germination and elongation growth

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Vreeburg, Robert A. M.; Fry, Stephen C; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Loosening of cell walls is an important developmental process in key stages of plant life cycles, including seed germination, elongation growth and fruit ripening. Here we report direct in vivo evidence for hydroxyl radical (•OH)-mediated cell wall loosening during plant seed germination and seedling growth. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spectroscopy to show that •OH is generated in the cell wall during radicle elongation and weakening of the endosperm of cress (Lepidium sativ...

  10. Expression of a hyperactive androgen receptor leads to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Cai, Changmeng; Giwa, Ahmed; Bivins, Aaronica; Chen, Shao-Yong; Sabry, Dina; Govardhan, Kumara; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2008-07-01

    Cellular changes that affect the androgen receptor (AR) can cause prostate cancer to transition from androgen dependent to androgen independent, which is usually lethal. One common change in prostate tumors is overexpression of the AR, which has been shown to lead to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This led us to hypothesize that expression of a hyperactive AR would be sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, stable lune cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell lines were generated, which express a virion phosphoprotein (VP)16-AR hybrid protein that contains full-length AR fused to the strong viral transcriptional activation domain VP16. This fusion protein elicited as much as a 20-fold stronger transcriptional activity than the natural AR. Stable expression of VP16-AR in LNCaP cells yielded androgen-independent cell proliferation, while under the same growth conditions the parental LNCaP cells exhibited only androgen-dependent growth. These results show that expression of a hyperactive AR is sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To study the molecular basis of this enhanced growth, we measured the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase-alpha1 (sGCalpha1), a subunit of the sGC, an androgen-regulated gene that has been shown to be involved in prostate cancer cell growth. Interestingly, the expression of sGCalpha1 is androgen independent in VP16-AR-expressing cells, in contrast to its androgen-induced expression in control LNCaP cells. RNA(I)-dependent inhibition of sGCalpha1 expression resulted in significantly reduced proliferation of VP16-AR cells, implicating an important role for sGCalpha1 in the androgen-independent growth of these cells. PMID:18469090

  11. Growth inhibition of thyroid follicular cell-derived cancers by the opioid growth factor (OGF - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donahue Renee N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the thyroid gland is an uncommon cancer, but the most frequent malignancy of the endocrine system. Most thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cell. Follicular carcinoma (FTC is considered more malignant than papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most lethal human cancers. Opioid Growth Factor (OGF; chemical term - [Met5]-enkephalin and its receptor, OGFr, form an inhibitory axis regulating cell proliferation. Both the peptide and receptor have been detected in a wide variety of cancers, and OGF is currently used clinically as a biotherapy for some non-thyroid neoplasias. This study addressed the question of whether the OGF-OGFr axis is present and functional in human thyroid follicular cell - derived cancer. Methods Utilizing human ATC (KAT-18, PTC (KTC-1, and FTC (WRO 82-1 cell lines, immunohistochemistry was employed to ascertain the presence and location of OGF and OGFr. The growth characteristics in the presence of OGF or the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX, and the specificity of opioid peptides for proliferation of ATC, were established in KAT-18 cells. Dependence on peptide and receptor were investigated using neutralization studies with antibodies and siRNA experiments, respectively. The mechanism of peptide action on DNA synthesis and cell survival was ascertained. The ubiquity of the OGF-OGFr axis in thyroid follicular cell-derived cancer was assessed in KTC-1 (PTC and WRO 82-1 (FTC tumor cells. Results OGF and OGFr were present in KAT-18 cells. Concentrations of 10-6 M OGF inhibited cell replication up to 30%, whereas NTX increased cell growth up to 35% relative to cultures treated with sterile water. OGF treatment reduced cell number by as much as 38% in KAT-18 ATC in a dose-dependent and receptor-mediated manner. OGF antibodies neutralized the inhibitory effects of OGF, and siRNA knockdown of OGFr negated growth inhibition by OGF. Cell survival

  12. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  13. Generation of human/rat xenograft animal model for the study of human donor stem cell behaviors in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Xing-Hua Pan; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Guang-Hui Cui; Xi-Gu Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To accurately and realistically elucidate human stem cell behaviors In vivo and the fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in vivo, which is urgently required in regenerative medicine and treatments for some human diseases, a surrogate human-rat chimera model was developed.METHODS: Human-rat chimeras were achieved by in utero transplanting low-density mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood into the fetal rats at 9-11 d of gestation, and subsequently, a variety of methods, including flow cytometry, PCR as well as immunohistochemical assay, were used to test the human donor contribution in the recipients.RESULTS: Of 29 live-born recipients, 19 had the presence of human CD45+ cells in peripheral blood (PB) detected by flow cytometry, while PCR analysis on genomic DNA from 11 different adult tissues showed that 14 selected from flow cytometry-positive 19 animals possessed of donor-derived human cell engraftment in multiple tissues (i.e. liver, spleen, thymus, heart, kidney, blood, lung, muscle, gut and skin) examined at the time of tissue collection, as confirmed by detecting human β2-microglobulin expression using immunohistochemistry.In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in multiple tissues for at least 6 mo after birth. Moreover, transplanted human donor cells underwent site-specific differentiation into CK18-positive human cells in chimeric liver and CD45-positive human cells in chimeric spleen and thymus of recipients.CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings suggest that we successfully developed human-rat chimeras, in which xenogeneic human cells exist up to 6 mo later. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling to the situations in human, provides an invaluable and effective approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future

  14. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li, Hai Wang, Bin Yang, Jichen Yang, Xiuyan Ruan, Yadong Yang, Edward K. Wakeland, Quanzhen Li, Xiangdong Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC and further evaluated the growth and apoptosis status of SMC and HuVEC. After SMC and HuVEC were exposed to CO for 7-day, the growth of SMC and HuVEC was significantly inhibited by CO in vitro on day 5 of CO exposure. And CO blocked cell cycle progress of SMC and HuVEC, more SMC and HuVEC stagnated at G0/G1 phase by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, CO treatment inhibited SMC and HuVEC apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide through decreasing caspase 3 and 9 activities. To confirm the molecular mechanism of CO effect on SMC and HuVEC growth, we compared the gene expression profile in SMC and CO-treated SMC, HuVEC and CO-treated HuVEC. By microarray analysis, we found the expression level of some genes which are related to cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and apoptosis were changed during CO exposure. We further identified that the down-regulated CDK2 contributed to arresting cell growth and the down-regulated Caspase 3 (CASP3 and Caspase 9 (CASP9 were associated with the inhibition of cell apoptosis. Therefore, CO exerts a certain growth arrest on SMC and HuVEC by inhibiting cell cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase and has regulatory effect on cell apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated genes.

  15. Analysis of cell growth and gene expression of porcine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as nuclear donor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Rhee, Sang Ho; Lim, Sang Hyun; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-12-01

    In several laboratory animals and humans, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) are of considerable interest because they are easy to harvest and can generate a huge proliferation of cells from a small quantity of fat. In this study, we investigated: (i) the expression patterns of reprogramming-related genes in porcine ASC; and (ii) whether ASC can be a suitable donor cell type for generating cloned pigs. For these experiments, ASC, adult skin fibroblasts (AF) and fetal fibroblasts (FF) were derived from a 4-year-old female miniature pig. The ASC expressed cell-surface markers characteristic of stem cells, and underwent in vitro differentiation when exposed to specific differentiation-inducing conditions. Expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 in ASC was similar to that in AF, but the highest expression of the DNMT3B gene was observed in ASC. The expression of OCT4 was significantly higher in FF and ASC than in AF (P development rate of cloned embryos derived from ASC was comparable to the development of those derived using FF. Total cell numbers of blastocysts derived using ASC and FF were significantly higher than in embryos made with AF. The results demonstrated that ASC used for SCNT have a potential comparable to those of AF and FF in terms of embryo in vitro development and blastocyst formation.

  16. Effects of EPO Gene on Growth and Apoptosis of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line A549

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing WU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Published data on the association between erythropoietin (EPO and cancer cell are inconclusive. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of erythropoietin (EPO on the growth and survival of lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Methods The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(--hEPO was constructed and transfected into A549 cells by liposome protoco1. The Levels of EPO in culture supernatant were detected by ELISA. Effects of EPO gene on growth and survival of the transfected cells were evaluated by MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM . Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were also evaluated by ELISA. Results The recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(--hEPO was successfully constructed. The growth of cells in hEPO transfected cells was significantly inhibited after transfection (P < 0.01. More cells were blocked in S phase in hEPO transfected group compared with control group (P < 0.05, and the apoptotic rate were also significantly higher than those of their controls (P < 0.01. Levels of VEGF in hEPO transfected cells were significantly lower than controls (P < 0.01. Conclusion Exogenous EPO gene expression in A549 cells can induce cell growth inhibition and apoptosis of A549 cells, and expression of VEGF can also be inhibited.

  17. Effects of transforming growth interacting factor on biological behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang Hu; Ji-Fang Wen; De-Sheng Xiao; Hui Zhen; Chun-Yan Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM:Transforming growth interacting factor (TGIF) is an inhibitor of both transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, the activation of MAPK pathway can prolong its half-life. However, its role in carcinogenesis is still unknown. Thus we attempted to investigate the effect of TGIF on biologic behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells.METHODS: Gastric carcinoma cell line, SGC-7901, was stably transfected with plasmid PcDNA3.1-TGIF. Western blotting and cell immunohistochemistry screening for the highly expressing clone of TGIF were employed. The growth of transfected cells was investigated by MTT and colonyformation assays, and apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy.Tumorigenicity of the transfectant cells was also analyzed.RESULTS: TGIF had no effect on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells, but cellular organelles of cells transfected with TGIF were richer than those of vector control or parental cells. Its clones were smaller than the control ones in plate efficiency, and its tumor tissues also had no obvious necrosis compared with the vector control or parental cells. Moreover, TGIF could resist TGF-β mediated growth inhibition.CONCLUSION: TGIF may induce differentiation of stomach neoplastic cells. In addition, TGIF can counteract the growth inhibition induced by TGF-β.

  18. Effect of tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 on growth inhibition of MG63 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qin; Yang Lin; Wenjian Chen; Wentao Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the osteosarcoma cell sublines which stably expressing tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) gene and evaluate its effect on growth inhibition of human osteosarcoma cell line MG63. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pCI-TSLC1 was stably transfected into MG63 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. The positive clones were developed by selection by G418. Biological characteristics of one of the 6 cell lines which highly expressing TSLC1, namely, the M8T were studied. Cell growth was analyzed with MTT assay. 2 × 107 cells suspended in 0.2 mL phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected into the two flanks of 5-6-week-old female BALB/C nu/nu athymic nude mice. The volumes of subcutaneous of tumor growth were evaluated and calculated by the formula V= Length × Width × Height × 0.5 once a week. Results: The M8T cell subline which stably expressing TSLC1 was characterized by Western blot. The genetic stability and purity of M8T cells were stable. TSLC1 significantly suppressed the growth of M8T cells in vitro. Moreover, the tumorigenicity of M8T cells was suppressed in vivo. Conclusion: The osteosarcoma cell sublines M8T which stably expressing TSLC1 had been successfully established. The ability of growth and metastasis of M8T was significantly suppressed both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Curcumin inhibits cell growth and invasion and induces apoptosis through down-regulation of Skp2 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingna; Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Lixia; Yin, Xuyuan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Natural polyphenol compound curcumin has been found to exhibit its anticancer activity in a variety of human malignancies including pancreatic cancer (PC). However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2) plays an oncogenic role in the development and progression of human cancers. In this study, we aim to explore the molecular basis of curcumin-induced cell growth inhibition in PC cells.Multiple methods such as CTG assay, Flow cytometry, clonogenic assay, wound healing assay, Transwell invasion assay, Western blotting, and transfection were performed to validate the oncogenic role of curcumin in PC cells. We found that curcumin suppressed cell growth, clonogenic potential, migration and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we observed thatover-expression of Skp2 significantly promoted cell growth, whereas down-regulation of Skp2 with siRNAs inhibited cell growth. The molecular basis of curcumin-mediated cell growth inhibition we identified is that curcumin significantly suppressed Skp2 expression and subsequently induced p21 expression. These findings suggested thattargeting Skp2 by curcumin could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PC patients.