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Sample records for cell growth animal

  1. Growth and death of animal cells in bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.

    1996-01-01


    Animal-cell cultivation is becoming increasingly important especially for the area of hunian- health products. The products range from vaccines to therapeutic proteins and the cells themselves. The therapeutic application of proteins puts high demands upon their quality with respect to

  2. An animal component free medium that promotes the growth of various animal cell lines for the production of viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourou, Samia; Ben Ayed, Yousr; Trabelsi, Khaled; Majoul, Samy; Kallel, Héla

    2014-05-19

    IPT-AFM is a proprietary animal component free medium that was developed for rabies virus (strain LP 2061) production in Vero cells. In the present work, we demonstrated the versatility of this medium and its ability to sustain the growth of other cell lines and different virus strains. Here, three models were presented: Vero cells/rabies virus (strain LP 2061), MRC-5 cells/measles virus (strain AIK-C) and BHK-21 cells/rabies virus (strain PV-BHK21). The cell lines were first adapted to grow in IPT-AFM, by progressive reduction of the amount of serum in the culture medium. After their adaptation, BHK-21 cells grew in suspension by forming clumps, whereas MRC-5 cells remained adherent. Then, kinetics of cell growth were studied in agitated cultures for both cell lines. In addition, kinetics of virus replication were investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor cells growth and survival time with the ketogenic diet in animal models: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khodadadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  4. Tumor Cells Growth and Survival Time with the Ketogenic Diet in Animal Models: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Soheila; Sobhani, Nafiseh; Mirshekar, Somaye; Ghiasvand, Reza; Pourmasoumi, Makan; Miraghajani, Maryam; Dehsoukhteh, Somayeh Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD) which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  5. Enhancement of animal viruses growth on RK13 cells pretreated with 6-azauridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, F

    1976-09-30

    In these experiments a technique for enhancing the virus replication in tissue culture (RK13 cells) has been used. The method consisted in growing the cells in presence of mug 0.4-0.8 of 6-Azauridine/ml of cellular suspension until the monolayers were formed. This pretreatment enhances the replication of several animal viruses with increased infectious titers (vesicular stomatitis, equine arteritis, equine rhinopneumonitis, Aujeszky disease and myxomatosis virus) and with increased yield of total virus in the culture (myxomatosis virus). In other experiment the 6-Azauridine pretreatment of the cells has shown to render the cells more susceptible to interferon preparation action with subsequent high rate of vesicular stomatitis virus plaques reduction.

  6. TRIENNIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Dedifferentiated fat cells: Potential and perspectives for their use in clinical and animal science purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, M S; Bueno, R; Silva, W; Campos, C F; Gionbelli, M P; Guimarães, S E F; Silva, F F; Lopes, P S; Hausman, G J; Dodson, M V

    2017-05-01

    An increasing body of evidences has demonstrated the ability of the mature adipocyte to dedifferentiate into a population of proliferative-competent cells known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. As early as the 1970s, in vitro studies showed that DFAT cells may be obtained by ceiling culture, which takes advantage of the buoyancy property of lipid-filled cells. It was documented that DFAT cells may acquire a phenotype similar to mesenchymal stem cells and yet may differentiate into multiple cell lineages, such as skeletal and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes. Additionally, recent studies showed the ability of isolated mature adipocytes to dedifferentiate in vivo and the capacity of the progeny cells to redifferentiate into mature adipocytes, contributing to the increase of body fatness. These findings shed light on the potential for use of DFAT cells, not only for clinical purposes but also within the animal science field, because increasing intramuscular fat without excessive increase in other fat depots is a challenge in livestock production. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and redifferentiation of DFAT cells will allow the development of strategies for their use for clinical and animal science purposes. In this review, we highlight several aspects of DFAT cells, their potential for clinical purposes, and their contribution to adipose tissue mass in livestock.

  7. Animal Cell Expression Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, M; Reichl, U

    2017-10-03

    control. Over the past decade, however, there have been various commercial influenza vaccines made available from cell technology using animal host cells. Analysis of glycosylation control shows that the type of host cell has the greatest influence on the final analyzed glycan profile. Other factors such as the virus strain, the cultivation system, or various process parameters have been shown to have only a minor effect on the glycosylation pattern. We predict that the analysis of glycan profiles in viral vaccines will become increasingly important in the development and consistent manufacturing of safe and potent vaccines. Graphical Abstract.

  8. Growth of bacterial phytopathogens in animal manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledz, Wojciech; Zoledowska, Sabina; Motyka, Agata; Kadziński, Leszek; Banecki, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Animal manures are routinely applied to agricultural lands to improve crop yield, but the possibility to spread bacterial phytopathogens through field fertilization has not been considered yet. We monitored 49 cattle, horse, swine, sheep or chicken manure samples collected in 14 Polish voivodeships for the most important plant pathogenic bacteria - Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Erwinia amylovora (Eam), Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms) and Dickeya sp. (Dsp). All of the tested animal fertilizers were free of these pathogens. Subsequently, the growth dynamics of Pba, Pcc, Rsol, and Xcc in cattle, horse, swine, sheep and chicken manures sterilized either by autoclaving or filtration was evaluated. The investigated phytopathogens did not exhibit any growth in the poultry manure. However, the manure filtrates originating from other animals were suitable for microbial growth, which resulted in the optical density change of 0.03-0.22 reached within 26 h (48 h Rsol, 120 h Xcc), depending on bacterial species and the manure source. Pcc and Pba multiplied most efficiently in the cattle manure filtrate. These bacteria grew faster than Rsol and Xcc in all the tested manure samples, both the filtrates and the autoclaved semi-solid ones. Though the growth dynamics of investigated strains in different animal fertilizers was unequal, all of the tested bacterial plant pathogens were proven to use cattle, horse, swine and sheep manures as the sources of nutrients. These findings may contribute to further research on the alternative routes of spread of bacterial phytopathogens, especially because of the fact that the control of pectionolytic bacteria is only based on preventive methods.

  9. Animal studies on growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Despite the fact that no plausible biological mechanism has yet been identified how electromagnetic fields below recommended exposure limits could negatively affect health of animals or humans, many experiments have been performed in various animal species, mainly mice and rats, to investigate the possible effects on growth and development. While older studies often suffered from sub-optimal exposure conditions, recent investigations, using sophisticated exposure devices and thus preventing thermal effects, have been performed without these limitations. In principle, two types of studies can be addressed: those which have investigated the carcinogenic or co-carcinogenic effects of exposure in developing animals, and those which have been done in developing animals without the focus on carcinogenic or co-carcinogenic effects. In both areas, the vast majority of publications did not show adverse effects. The largest study so far has been done in normal mice which have been chronically exposed to UMTS signals up to 1.3 W/kg SAR, thus 16 times higher than the whole-body exposure limit for humans. Even after four generations, no systematic or dose-dependent alterations in development or fertility could be found, supporting the view that negative effects on humans are very unlikely. Ongoing experiments in our laboratory investigate the effects of head-only exposure in rats (up to 10 W/kg local SAR) which are exposed from 14 days of age daily for 2 h. A battery of behavioral tests is performed in young, adult, and pre-senile animals. The results will help to clarify possible effects of exposure on brain development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of Animation in Teaching Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2004-01-01

    To address the different learning styles of students, and because students can access animation from off-campus computers, the use of digital animation in teaching cell biology has become increasingly popular. Sample processes from cell biology that are more clearly presented in animation than in static illustrations are identified. The value of animation is evaluated on whether the process being taught involves motion, cellular location, or sequential order of numerous events. Computer progr...

  11. PROCESS FOR CONTROLLING ANIMAL GROWTH RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visek, W.J.

    1962-04-10

    A method of injecting growing animals with the enzyme urease subcutaneously in increasing dosages is described; this generates within the blood anti-urease which enters the intestinal tract and inhibits the enzymatic decomposition of urea by urease in that location. Ammonia, one of the decomposition products, is thereby kept from diffusing through the intestinal walls into the blood, and this greatly reduces the energy requirements of the liver for removing the ammonia, thereby increasing the feeding efficiency of the animals. (AEC)

  12. Characterization of companion animal pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Y Z; Kafarnik, C; Guest, D J

    2018-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the capacity to grow indefinitely in culture and differentiate into derivatives of the three germ layers. These properties underpin their potential to be used in regenerative medicine. Originally derived from early embryos, pluripotent stem cells can now be derived by reprogramming an adult cell back to a pluripotent state. Companion animals such as horses, dogs, and cats suffer from many injuries and diseases for which regenerative medicine may offer new treatments. As many of the injuries and diseases are similar to conditions in humans the use of companion animals for the experimental and clinical testing of stem cell and regenerative medicine products would provide relevant animal models for the translation of therapies to the human field. In order to fully utilize companion animal pluripotent stem cells robust, standardized methods of characterization must be developed to ensure that safe and effective treatments can be delivered. In this review we discuss the methods that are available for characterizing pluripotent stem cells and the techniques that have been applied in cells from companion animals. We describe characteristics which have been described consistently across reports as well as highlighting discrepant results. Significant steps have been made to define the in vitro culture requirements and drive lineage specific differentiation of pluripotent stem cells in companion animal species. However, additional basic research to compare pluripotent stem cell types and define characteristics of pluripotency in companion animal species is still required. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. Large animal models for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John; Roberts, R Michael; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2013-03-28

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for novel animal models to expand the range of current studies, most of which have been conducted in rodents. Extant models are providing important information but have limitations for a variety of disease categories and can have different size and physiology relative to humans. These differences can preclude the ability to reproduce the results of animal-based preclinical studies in human trials. Larger animal species, such as rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep, goats, and non-human primates, are better predictors of responses in humans than are rodents, but in each case it will be necessary to choose the best model for a specific application. There is a wide spectrum of potential stem cell-based products that can be used for regenerative medicine, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, and differentiated cellular progeny. The state of knowledge and availability of these cells from large animals vary among species. In most cases, significant effort is required for establishing and characterizing cell lines, comparing behavior to human analogs, and testing potential applications. Stem cell-based therapies present significant safety challenges, which cannot be addressed by traditional procedures and require the development of new protocols and test systems, for which the rigorous use of larger animal species more closely resembling human behavior will be required. In this article, we discuss the current status and challenges of and several major directions

  14. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  15. Time-series animation techniques for visualizing urban growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, W.; Masuoka, P.

    1997-01-01

    Time-series animation is a visually intuitive way to display urban growth. Animations of landuse change for the Baltimore-Washington region were generated by showing a series of images one after the other in sequential order. Before creating an animation, various issues which will affect the appearance of the animation should be considered, including the number of original data frames to use, the optimal animation display speed, the number of intermediate frames to create between the known frames, and the output media on which the animations will be displayed. To create new frames between the known years of data, the change in each theme (i.e. urban development, water bodies, transportation routes) must be characterized and an algorithm developed to create the in-between frames. Example time-series animations were created using a temporal GIS database of the Baltimore-Washington area. Creating the animations involved generating raster images of the urban development, water bodies, and principal transportation routes; overlaying the raster images on a background image; and importing the frames to a movie file. Three-dimensional perspective animations were created by draping each image over digital elevation data prior to importing the frames to a movie file. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Sparging - shear sensitivity of animal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly produced by modern biotechnological techniques. The in-vitro culture of animal cells in stirred tanks is one of the feasible systems, especially for proteins that require specific post-tanslational modifications to evoke a desired respons in patients.

  17. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  18. Designing media for animal cell culture: CHO cells, the industrial standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, Karlheinz

    2014-01-01

    The success of culturing CHO cells solely depends on functionality of the used media. Cell culture technology is more than 50 years old, and the knowledge of cell requirements increased steadily. In the beginning, animal-sourced components were the key to growth. Nowadays state-of-the-art media do not contain any animal or naturally sourced components. The compositions are based on scientific awareness of the needs of the cells. The result is high lot-to-lot consistency and high performance.In this book section, a method for the development of a synthetic, animal component-free medium is described. The composition is based on public available formulations and information based on the work of many scientists printed in numerous papers and manuscripts. The method shall help beginners to design their own medium, although some knowledge of biochemistry and animal cells is still required.

  19. Kin2, the Budding Yeast Ortholog of Animal MARK/PAR-1 Kinases, Localizes to the Sites of Polarized Growth and May Regulate Septin Organization and the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Si-Min; Nie, Wen-Chao; He, Fei; Jia, Zhi-Wen; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    MARK/PAR-1 protein kinases play important roles in cell polarization in animals. Kin1 and Kin2 are a pair of MARK/PAR-1 orthologs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They participate in the regulation of secretion and ER stress response. However, neither the subcellular localization of these two kinases nor whether they may have other cellular functions is clear. Here, we show that Kin2 localizes to the sites of polarized growth in addition to localization on the plasma membrane. The localization to polarity sites is mediated by two targeting domains-TD1 and TD2. TD1 locates in the N-terminal region that spans the protein kinase domain whereas TD2 locates in the C-terminal end that covers the KA1 domain. We also show that an excess of Kin2 activity impaired growth, septin organization, and chitin deposition in the cell wall. Both TD1 and TD2 contribute to this function. Moreover, we find that the C-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Cdc11, a septin subunit, and Pea2, a component of the polarisome that is known to play a role in septin organization. These findings suggest that Kin2 may play a role in the regulation of the septin cytoskeleton and the cell wall. Finally, we show that the C-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Rho3, a Rho GTPase, whereas the N-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Bmh1, a 14-3-3 protein. We speculate that Kin2 may be regulated by Bmh1, Rho3, or Pea2 in vivo. Our study provides new insight in the localization, function, and regulation of Kin2.

  20. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  1. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  2. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako; Tsuji, Osahiko; Hanyu, Aki; Okada, Seiji; Yasuda, Akimasa; Fukano, Takashi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hirotaka James

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. ► ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. ► ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. ► ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  3. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  4. INFLUENCE OF PETROCHEMICAL INDUSTRY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON ANIMAL OVARIAN CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Sirotkin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our studies was to examine (1 the effect of environmental contaminants (benzene, toluene and xylen on basic ovarian cell functions (proliferation, apoptosis, secretory activity in different animal species (rabbit, pig, cow, and (2 whether gonadotropic hormone (FSH and plant molecules (quercetin, resveratrol or extract of yucca can affect these functions and modify effect of environmental contaminants. It was observed, that the culture of either porcine or bovine ovarian cells with benzene, toluene or xylen promote apoptosis (accumulation of apoptosis markers bax and p53 and proliferation (accumulation of PCNA. Furthermore, additions of these contaminants were able either up- or down-regulate the release of progesterone, oxytocin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and prostaglandin F by cultured porcine, rabbit and bovine ovarian cells and their response to addition of FSH. FSH additions promoted proliferation, apoptosis and release of molecules listed above by porcine granulosa cells. Moreover, FSH was able to modify and to prevent. Some effects of BTEX on these cells. The effects of either quercetin or resveratrol on basic porcine ovarian cell functions were observed, but these plant molecules were not able to prevent BTEX effect. Feeding of rabbits with yucca extract caused changes in release of progesterone, IGF-I and prostaglandin F by their ovarian cells, as well as to modify and prevent the influence of benzene on ovarian hormone release. The obtained data suggest that (1 the negative effect of BTEX on reproduction can be due to their influence on ovarian cell apoptosis, proliferation, turnover and release of peptide and steroid hormones and growth factors, and that (2 FSH and plant molecules can regulate ovarian cell functions and prevent some effects of BTEX on these cells.

  5. Influence of radiosterilized cells on cells L1210 growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaise, E.P.; Decheva-Ninova, Z.; Tubiana, M.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of cells sterilized by acute X-irradiation is investigated on the growth of L 1210 cells. For this purpose young male mice DBA 2 are injected intraperitoneally or hypodermically with suspension of either live cells or live and sterile cells. The effect is considered according to survival time of treated animals and the number of leukemic cells examined in dynamics after their intraperitoneal incorporation or according to tumor size after their hypodermical incorporation. In both cases the incorporation of sterile cells has an inhibitory effect - life duration of treated mice is increased. This common effect disappears if animals are previously irradiated with 350 R. The sterile cells have also a local stimulating effect when incorporated hypodermically - time for their duplication is reduced from 15,8 to 13,7 hours. This stimulation is much more expressed when the recipients are previously irradiated - the time for tumor cells duplication being 12,2 hours. Direct stimulating effect of sterilized cells is not established when they are intraperitoneally incorporated. (author)

  6. Animated Cell Biology: A Quick and Easy Method for Making Effective, High-Quality Teaching Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H.

    2006-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that animations aid learning of dynamic concepts in cell biology. However, existing animation packages are expensive and difficult to learn, and the subsequent production of even short animations can take weeks to months. Here I outline the principles and sequence of steps for producing high-quality PowerPoint…

  7. Hormonal growth promoting agents in food producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephany, Rainer W

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the use of hormonal doping agents in sports to enhance the performance of athletes, in the livestock industry hormonal growth promoters ("anabolics") are used to increase the production of muscle meat. This leads to international disputes about the safety of meat originating from animals treated with such anabolics.As a consequence of the total ban in the EU of all hormonal active growth promoters ("hormones") in livestock production, in contrast to their legal use [e.g. of five such hormones (17beta-estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, trenbolone and zeranol) as small solid ear implants and two hormones as feed additives for feedlot heifers (melengestrol acetate) and for swine (ractopamine) in the USA], the regulatory controls also differ sharply between the EU and the USA.In the EU the treatment of slaughter animals is the regulatory offence that has to be controlled in inspection programs. In the USA testing for compliance of a regulatory maximum residue level in the edible product (muscle, fat, liver or kidney) is the purpose of the inspection program (if any).The EU inspection programs focus on sample materials that are more suitable for testing for banned substances, especially if the animals are still on the farm, such as urine and feces or hair. In the case of slaughtered animals, the more favored sample materials are bile, blood, eyes and sometimes liver. Only in rare occasions is muscle meat sampled. This happens only in the case of import controls or in monitoring programs of meat sampled in butcher shops or supermarkets.As a result, data on hormone concentrations in muscle meat samples from the EU market are very rare and are obtained in most cases from small programs on an ad hoc basis. EU data for natural hormones in meat are even rarer because of the absence of "legal natural levels" for these hormones in compliance testing. With the exception of samples from the application sites - in the EU the site of injection of liquid hormone

  8. Curvas de crescimento na produção animal Growth curves in animal production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Ribeiro de Freitas

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram discutidas as propriedades de sete modelos não-lineares, considerando-se o ajuste de curvas de crescimento na produção animal. Os modelos utilizados: Brody, Richards, Von Bertalanffy e duas alternativas de Gompertz e de Logístico foram ajustados, pelo método de Gauss Newton por meio do procedimento NLIN do SAS, a dados peso-idade de oito espécies: camarão-d'água-doce, rã-pimenta, coelho, frango, ovino, caprino, suíno e bovino. Considerando-se os critérios como: convergência ou não, coeficiente de determinação e interpretabilidade biológica dos parâmetros, concluiu-se que: a o modelo Logístico y= A/(1 + e-ktm estimou o peso em todas as espécies animais, enquanto o de Von Bertalanffy apenas não foi adequado para camarão; b os dois modelos Gompertz foram adequados para camarão, rã, frango, suíno e bovino; c em cada espécie, pelo menos dois dos sete modelos mostraram-se adequados para estimar o crescimento corporal das espécies animais estudadas, pois os coeficientes de determinação foram superiores a 92,0%.The properties of seven nonlinear models were discussed concerning its applications in the fitting of growth curves in animal production. The models used: Brody, Richards, Von Bertalanffy and two alternatives of Gompertz and Logistic models, were fitted by Gauss Newton method to weight-age data from eight animal species: freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergi, pepper frog, rabbit, poultry, sheep, goat, swine and cattle. Considering results of the fitted models such as convergence or not, coefficient of determination and biological interpretation of parameters, it was concluded that: a the Logisticmethod y = A/(1 + e-ktm estimated body weight in all species, while the Von Bertalanffy model was not adequate only for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergi; b both Gompertz models were adequate for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergi, pepper frog, poultry, swine and cattle; c for each specie, at least two

  9. Approaches to Optimizing Animal Cell Culture Process: Substrate Metabolism Regulation and Protein Expression Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanxing

    Some high value proteins and vaccines for medical and veterinary applications by animal cell culture have an increasing market in China. In order to meet the demands of large-scale productions of proteins and vaccines, animal cell culture technology has been widely developed. In general, an animal cell culture process can be divided into two stages in a batch culture. In cell growth stage a high specific growth rate is expected to achieve a high cell density. In production stage a high specific production rate is stressed for the expression and secretion of qualified protein or replication of virus. It is always critical to maintain high cell viability in fed-batch and perfusion cultures. More concern has been focused on two points by the researchers in China. First, the cell metabolism of substrates is analyzed and the accumulation of toxic by-products is decreased through regulating cell metabolism in the culture process. Second, some important factors effecting protein expression are understood at the molecular level and the production ability of protein is improved. In pace with the rapid development of large-scale cell culture for the production of vaccines, antibodies and other recombinant proteins in China, the medium design and process optimization based on cell metabolism regulation and protein expression improvement will play an important role. The chapter outlines the main advances in metabolic regulation of cell and expression improvement of protein in animal cell culture in recent years.

  10. Animal-cell culture in aqueous two-phase systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, G.M.

    1998-01-01

    In current industrial biotechnology, animal-cell culture is an important source of therapeutic protein products. The conventional animal-cell production processes, however, include many unit operations as part of the fermentation and downstream processing strategy. The research described in

  11. Plant and animal stem cells: similar yet different

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, R.; Sabatini, S.

    2014-01-01

    The astonishingly long lives of plants and their regeneration capacity depend on the activity of plant stem cells. As in animals, stem cells reside in stem cell niches, which produce signals that regulate the balance between self-renewal and the generation of daughter cells that differentiate into

  12. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in re...

  14. Auraptene induces oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in a cuprizone-induced animal model of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Shimizu, Risei; Furuta, Kohei; Sugino, Mami; Watanabe, Takashi; Aoki, Rui; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-05-15

    We investigated the effects of auraptene on mouse oligodendroglial cell lineage in an animal model of demyelination induced by cuprizone. Auraptene, a citrus coumarin, was intraperitoneally administered to mice fed the demyelinating agent cuprizone. Immunohistochemical analysis of the corpus callosum and/or Western blotting analysis of brain extracts revealed that cuprizone reduced immunoreactivity for myelin-basic protein, a marker of myelin, whereas it increased immunoreactivity to platelet derived-growth factor receptor-α, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Administration of auraptene enhanced the immunoreactivity to oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells, but had no effect on immunoreactivity to myelin-basic protein or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. These findings suggest that auraptene promotes the production of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in an animal model of demyelination and may be useful for individuals with demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sparged animal cell bioreactors: mechanism of cell damage and Pluronic F-68 protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murhammer, D W; Goochee, C F

    1990-01-01

    Pluronic F-68 is a widely used protective agent in sparged animal cell bioreactors. In this study, the attachment-independent Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cell line was used to explore the mechanism of this protective effect and the nature of cell damage in sparged bioreactors. First, bubble incorporation via cavitation or vortexing was induced by increasing the agitation rate in a surface-aerated bioreactor; insect cells were rapidly killed under these conditions of the absence of polyols. Supplementing the medium with 0.2% (w/v) Pluronic F-68, however, fully protected the cells. Next, cell growth was compared in two airlift bioreactors with similar geometry but different sparger design; one of these bioreactors consisted of a thin membrane distributor, while the other consisted of a porous stainless steel distributor. The flow rates and bubble sizes were comparable in the two bioreactors. Supplementing the medium with 0.2% (w/v) Pluronic F-68 provided full protection to cells growing in the bioreactor with the membrane distributor but provided essentially no protection in the bioreactor with the stainless steel distributor. These results strongly suggest that cell damage can occur in the vicinity of the gas distributor. In addition, these results demonstrate that bubble size and gas flow rate are not the only important considerations of cell damage in sparged bioreactors. A model of cell death in sparged bioreactors is presented.

  16. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  17. Animal and plant stem cells concepts, propagation and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlović, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a multifaceted look into the world of stem cells and explains the similarities and differences between plant and human stem cells. It explores the intersection between animals and plants and explains their cooperative role in bioengineering studies. The book treats both theoretical and practical aspects of stem cell research. It covers the advantages and limitations of many common applications related to stem cells: their sources, categories, engineering of these cells, reprogramming of their functions, and their role as novel cellular therapeutic approach. Written by experts in the field, the book focuses on aspects of stem cells ranging from expansion-propagation to metabolic reprogramming. It introduces the emergence of cancer stem cells and different modalities in targeted cancer stem cell therapies. It is a valuable source of fresh information for academics and researchers, examining molecular mechanisms of animal and plant stem cell regulation and their usage for therapeutic applicati...

  18. Defining Lipid Transport Pathways in Animal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Richard E.; Sleight, Richard G.

    1985-09-01

    A new technique for studying the metabolism and intracellular transport of lipid molecules in living cells based on the use of fluorescent lipid analogs is described. The cellular processing of various intermediates (phosphatidic acid and ceramide) and end products (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) in lipid biosynthesis is reviewed and a working model for compartmentalization during lipid biosynthesis is presented.

  19. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Concise Review: Stem Cell Trials Using Companion Animal Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Andrew M; Dow, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    Studies to evaluate the therapeutic potential of stem cells in humans would benefit from more realistic animal models. In veterinary medicine, companion animals naturally develop many diseases that resemble human conditions, therefore, representing a novel source of preclinical models. To understand how companion animal disease models are being studied for this purpose, we reviewed the literature between 2008 and 2015 for reports on stem cell therapies in dogs and cats, excluding laboratory animals, induced disease models, cancer, and case reports. Disease models included osteoarthritis, intervertebral disc degeneration, dilated cardiomyopathy, inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's fistulas, meningoencephalomyelitis (multiple sclerosis-like), keratoconjunctivitis sicca (Sjogren's syndrome-like), atopic dermatitis, and chronic (end-stage) kidney disease. Stem cells evaluated in these studies included mesenchymal stem-stromal cells (MSC, 17/19 trials), olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC, 1 trial), or neural lineage cells derived from bone marrow MSC (1 trial), and 16/19 studies were performed in dogs. The MSC studies (13/17) used adipose tissue-derived MSC from either allogeneic (8/13) or autologous (5/13) sources. The majority of studies were open label, uncontrolled studies. Endpoints and protocols were feasible, and the stem cell therapies were reportedly safe and elicited beneficial patient responses in all but two of the trials. In conclusion, companion animals with naturally occurring diseases analogous to human conditions can be recruited into clinical trials and provide realistic insight into feasibility, safety, and biologic activity of novel stem cell therapies. However, improvements in the rigor of manufacturing, study design, and regulatory compliance will be needed to better utilize these models. Stem Cells 2016;34:1709-1729. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Stem cells in animal asthma models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Nadim; Thébaud, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    Asthma control frequently falls short of the goals set in international guidelines. Treatment options for patients with poorly controlled asthma despite inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists are limited, and new therapeutic options are needed. Stem cell therapy is promising for a variety of disorders but there has been no human clinical trial of stem cell therapy for asthma. We aimed to systematically review the literature regarding the potential benefits of stem cell therapy in animal models of asthma to determine whether a human trial is warranted. The MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for original studies of stem cell therapy in animal asthma models. Nineteen studies were selected. They were found to be heterogeneous in their design. Mesenchymal stromal cells were used before sensitization with an allergen, before challenge with the allergen and after challenge, most frequently with ovalbumin, and mainly in BALB/c mice. Stem cell therapy resulted in a reduction of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid inflammation and eosinophilia as well as Th2 cytokines such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-5. Improvement in histopathology such as peribronchial and perivascular inflammation, epithelial thickness, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle layer thickening was universal. Several studies showed a reduction in airway hyper-responsiveness. Stem cell therapy decreases eosinophilic and Th2 inflammation and is effective in several phases of the allergic response in animal asthma models. Further study is warranted, up to human clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Inhibitive effects of mifepristone on growth of breast cancer: experiment with animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xing-Song; Zhou, Wen-Hong; Wu, Guo-Jun; Sun, Jing-Zhong; Cong, Ming-Hua

    2008-02-26

    To investigate the effects of mifepristone (MIF) on the growth of breast cancer. Forty female athymic BALB/c-nude mice underwent subcutaneous injection of breast cancer cells of the line MCF-7, ER +/PR +. Ten days later when tumor nodules were formed, the mice were randomly divided into 4 equal groups to be administered with MIF of the concentrations of 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg/kg x d respectively by gastric perfusion. The tumor size was observed every 3 day till 3 weeks later. Ten mice were used as normal control group, undergoing gastric perfusion of vegetable oil. Parts of the animals were killed 2 weeks later, and the remaining mice were all killed 3 weeks later. The tumors were taken out and underwent immunochemistry to measure the protein expression of CD34, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bcl-2, Ki67, p53, and CerbB-2. Microscopy was used to measure the microvessel density (MVD). The growth velocity of tumor of the mice of MIF groups were all slower than that of the control group (all P Ki67, p53, and CerbB-2 of the MIF groups were all significantly lower, time and dose-dependently, than those of the control group (all P breast cancer by the mechanisms related to apoptosis promotion and inhibition of angiogenesis, so it can be used in breast cancer endocrine therapy.

  3. Cells competition in tumor growth poroelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraldi, Massimiliano; Carotenuto, Angelo R.

    2018-03-01

    Growth of biological tissues has been recently treated within the framework of Continuum Mechanics, by adopting heterogeneous poroelastic models where the interaction between soft matrix and interstitial fluid flow is coupled with inelastic effects ad hoc introduced to simulate the macroscopic volumetric growth determined by cells division, cells growth and extracellular matrix changes occurring at the micro-scale level. These continuum models seem to overcome some limitations intrinsically associated to other alternative approaches based on mass balances in multiphase systems, because the crucial role played by residual stresses accompanying growth and nutrients walkway is preserved. Nevertheless, when these strategies are applied to analyze solid tumors, mass growth is usually assigned in a prescribed form that essentially copies the in vitro measured intrinsic growth rates of the cell species. As a consequence, some important cell-cell dynamics governing mass evolution and invasion rates of cancer cells, as well as their coupling with feedback mechanisms associated to in situ stresses, are inevitably lost and thus the spatial distribution and the evolution with time of the growth inside the tumor -which would be results rather than inputs- are forced to enter in the model simply as data. In order to solve this paradox, it is here proposed an enhanced multi-scale poroelastic model undergoing large deformations and embodying inelastic growth, where the net growth terms directly result from the "interspecific" predator-prey (Volterra/Lotka-like) competition occurring at the micro-scale level between healthy and abnormal cell species. In this way, a system of fully-coupled non-linear PDEs is derived to describe how the fight among cell species to grab the available common resources, stress field, pressure gradients, interstitial fluid flows driving nutrients and inhomogeneous growth all simultaneously interact to decide the tumor fate.

  4. Cell growth and division cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of the cell cycle in its present form was introduced more than three decades ago. Studying incorporation of DNA precursors by autoradiography, these authors observed that DNA synthesis in individual cells was discontinuous and occupied a discrete portion of the cell life (S phase). Mitotic division was seen to occur after a certain period of time following DNA replication. A distinct time interval between mitosis and DNA replication was also apparent. Thus, the cell cycle was subdivided into four consecutive phases, G/sub 1/, S, G/sub 2/, and M. The G/sub 1/ and G/sub 2/ phases represented the ''gaps'' between mitosis and the start of DNA replication, and between the end of DNA replication and the onset of mitosis, respectively. The cell cycle was defined as the interval between the midpoint of mitosis and the midpoint of the subsequent mitosis of the daughter cell(s). The authors' present knowledge on the cell cycle benefited mostly from the development of four different techniques: autoradiography, time-lapse cinematography, cell synchronization and flow cytometry. Of these, autoradiography has been the most extensively used, especially during the past two decades. By providing a means to analyse incorporation of precursors of DNA, RNA or proteins by individual cells and, in combination with various techniques of cell synchronization, autoradiography yielded most of the data fundamental to the current understanding of the cell cycle-related phenomena. Kinetics of cell progression through the cell cycle could be analysed in great detail after development of such sophisticated autoradiographic approaches as measurements of the fraction of labeled mitoses (''FLM curves'') or multiple sequential cell labelling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR

  5. Characteristics of MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells and their effect on hair growth in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegielski, Marek; Izykowska, Ilona; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Bochnia, Marek; Calkosinski, Ireneusz; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We characterized growth factors produced by MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells and attempted to apply those cells to stimulate hair growth in rabbits. We evaluated the gene and protein expression of growth factors by immunocytochemical and molecular biology techniques in MIC-1 cells. An animal model was used to assess the effects of xenogenous stem cells on hair growth. In the experimental group, rabbits were intradermally injected with MIC-1 stem cells, whereas the control group rabbits were given vehicle-only. After 1, 2 and 4 weeks, skin specimen were collected for histological and immunohistochemical tests. MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells express growth factors, as confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increase in the number of hair follicles, as well as the amount of secondary hair in the follicles, without an immune response in animals injected intradermally with MIC-1 cells, compared to animals receiving vehicle-alone. MIC-1 cells accelerated hair growth in rabbits due to the activation of cells responsible for the regulation of the hair growth cycle through growth factors. Additionally, the xenogenous cell implant did not induce immune response.

  6. Peptide modification in T cell immunology - from molecule to animal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, Ellen Christine de

    2003-01-01

    Chemical knowledge can be applied in the field of immunology. It provides a better understanding of how a peptide interacts with proteins and cells of the immune system. However, it is not possible to predict the outcome of peptide administration in an animal. Peptides are used in experimental

  7. Growth inhibitory effects of quercetin on bladder cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Feugang, Jean Magloire; Konarski, Patricia; Wang, Jian; Lu, Jianzhong; Fu, Shengjun; Ma, Baoliang; Tian, Binqiang; Zou, Changping; Wang, Zhingping

    2006-09-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in many fruits and vegetables, belongs to an extensive class of polyphenolic compounds. Previous studies reported that quercetin inhibits the proliferation of various cancer cells and tumor growth in animal models. We investigated the growth inhibition and colony formation of quercetin on three bladder cancer cells (EJ, J82 and T24). The expression of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes such as P53, Survivin, PTEN, as well as the methylation status of these genes was also evaluated. We observed that quercetin induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Quercetin (100 micromolars) significantly inhibited EJ, T24 and J82 cell growth accompanied by an increase in the G0/G1 phase. In all cell lines, quercetin decreased the expression of mutant P53 and Survivin proteins. However, there was no change in the level of PTEN protein. Moreover, the DNA methylation levels of the estrogen receptor (Er-beta), P16INK4a and RASSF1A were strongly decreased (from 35 to 70%) in the quercetin-treated group compared to the control. In conclusion, our study suggested that quercetin inhibits growth, colony formation and hypermethylation of bladder cancer cell lines. Quercetin-induced apoptosis might be associated with a decrease in mutant P53 and Survivin proteins.

  8. Free-zone electrophoresis of animal cells. 1: Experiments on cell-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P. W.; Hjerten, S.

    1985-01-01

    The electrophoretically migrating zones wasa monitored. The absence of fluid flows in the direction of migration permits direct measurement of electrophoretic velocities of any material. Sedimentation is orthogonal to electrokinetic motion and the effects of particle-particle interaction on electrophoretic mobility is studied by free zone electrophoresis. Fixed erythrocytes at high concentrations, mixtures of fixed erythrocytes from different animal species, and mixtures of cultured human cells were studied in low ionic strength buffers. The electrophoretic velocity of fixed erythrocytes was not altered by increasing cell concentration or by the mixing of erythrocytes from different species. When zones containing cultured human glial cells and neuroblastoma cells are permitted to interact during electrophoresis, altered migration patterns occur. It is found that cell-cell interactions depends upon cell type.

  9. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  10. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling in Cutaneous Wound Healing: Lessons Learned from Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnson, Kenneth W; Arany, Praveen R; Philip, Anie

    2013-06-01

    Wound healing is a complex physiological process involving a multitude of growth factors, among which transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has the broadest spectrum of effects. Animal studies have provided key information on the mechanisms of TGF-β action in wound healing and have guided the development of therapeutic strategies targeting the TGF-β pathway to improve wound healing and scarring outcome. Development of tissue-specific expression systems for overexpression or knockout of TGF-β signaling pathway components has led to novel insight into the role of TGF-β signaling in wound healing. This work has also identified molecules that might serve as molecular targets for the treatment of pathological skin conditions such as chronic wounds and excessive scarring (fibrosis). Many of the mouse models with genetic alterations in the TGF-β signaling pathway develop an underlying skin abnormality, which may pose some limitations on the interpretation of wound-healing results obtained in these animals. Also, TGF-β's pleiotropic effects on many cell types throughout all phases of wound healing present a challenge in designing specific strategies for targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway to promote wound healing or reduce scarring. Further characterization of TGF-β signaling pathway components using inducible tissue-specific overexpression or knockout technology will be needed to corroborate results obtained in mouse models that display a skin phenotype, and to better understand the role of TGF-β signaling during distinct phases of the wound-healing process. Such studies will also provide a better understanding of how TGF-β mediates its autocrine, paracrine, and double paracrine effects on cellular responses in vivo during wound healing.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology and aquatic animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Alexis M; Spyropoulos, Demetri D

    2014-06-01

    Aquatic animal species are the overall leaders in the scientific investigation of tough but important global health issues, including environmental toxicants and climate change. Historically, aquatic animal species also stand at the forefront of experimental biology, embryology and stem cell research. Over the past decade, intensive and high-powered investigations principally involving mouse and human cells have brought the generation and study of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to a level that facilitates widespread use in a spectrum of species. A review of key features of these investigations is presented here as a primer for the use of iPSC technology to enhance ongoing aquatic animal species studies. iPSC and other cutting edge technologies create the potential to study individuals from "the wild" closer to the level of investigation applied to sophisticated inbred mouse models. A wide variety of surveys and hypothesis-driven investigations can be envisioned using this new capability, including comparisons of organism-specific development and exposure response and the testing of fundamental dogmas established using inbred mice. However, with these new capabilities, also come new criteria for rigorous baseline assessments and testing. Both the methods for inducing pluripotency and the source material can negatively impact iPSC quality and bourgeoning applications. Therefore, more rigorous strategies not required for inbred mouse models will have to be implemented to approach global health issues using individuals from "the wild" for aquatic animal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Microcystin Toxicity in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Campos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MC are potent hepatotoxins produced by the cyanobacteria of the genera Planktothrix, Microcystis, Aphanizomenon, Nostoc and Anabaena. These cyclic heptapeptides have strong affinity to serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs thereby acting as an inhibitor of this group of enzymes. Through this interaction a cascade of events responsible for the MC cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in animal cells may take place. Moreover MC induces oxidative stress in animal cells and together with the inhibition of PPs, this pathway is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of MC toxicity. In recent years new insights on the key enzymes involved in the signal-transduction and toxicity have been reported demonstrating the complexity of the interaction of these toxins with animal cells. Key proteins involved in MC up-take, biotransformation and excretion have been identified, demonstrating the ability of aquatic animals to metabolize and excrete the toxin. MC have shown to interact with the mitochondria. The consequences are the dysfunction of the organelle, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell apoptosis. MC activity leads to the differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and protein kinases involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation and tumor promotion activity. This activity may result from the direct inhibition of the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. This review aims to summarize the increasing data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MC toxicity in animal systems, reporting for direct MC interacting proteins and key enzymes in the process of toxicity biotransformation/excretion of these cyclic peptides.

  13. Herbal plants and their derivatives as growth and health promoters in animal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Davoodi, Homa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the effectiveness, modes of action and commercial application of herbal plants and their derivatives as growth promoters for animal. Feed supplements are a group of feed ingredients that can cause a desired animal response in a non-nutrient role such as pH shift, growth, or metabolic modifier (Hutjens, 1991). Common feed additives used in animal diets include immunostimulators, antimicrobials, antioxidants, pH control agents and enzymes. Herbal plants, are a new class of growth promoters and in recent years this feed additives have gained extensive attention in the feed industry. They are a wide variety of herbs, spices, and products derived thereof, and are mainly essential oils. Although numerous reports have demonstrated antioxidative and antimicrobial and immune stimulation efficacy in vitro, respective experimental in vivo evidence is still quite limited. A limited number of experimental comparisons of herbal plants feed additives with antibiotics or organic acid have suggested similar effects on the animal gut microflora. Gut microflora has significant effects on host nutrition, health, and growth performance by interacting with nutrient utilization and the development of gut system of the host. In addition, some phytogenic compounds seem to promote intestinal mucus production. However, the future of using herbs in animal feeding will in great measure depend on the knowledge of chemical structure, their value and characteristics of practical herbs or their extract physiological needs and well-being of animal, and, above all on consumer's preferences and expectations.

  14. Endocrine manipulation of growth in animals: Future prospects especially in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The successful use of a number of anabolic steroid preparations in numerous countries has demonstrated that manipulation of an animal's endocrine status can lead to a substantially enhanced growth rate. Despite evidence that, used correctly, these materials present no health hazard to the consumer of treated meat, their use is not permitted in several countries. This prohibition influences the extent of world trade in meat. Modern biotechnology offers other methods of enhancing growth, e.g. the use of peptide hormones or growth factors produced by recombinant DNA technologies. Potentially, the immune response can also be exploited to increase growth and in the longer term transgenic animals may also prove a satisfactory alternative. Animals with enhanced growth potential will however require an enhanced food supply. In many parts of the world what is required is a method to lower the nutrient demands of animals during periods of feed shortage. This approach requires a substantially different philosophy and of course separate financial resources for its development. In developing countries, despite the excitement associated with new technologies, there appears to be much more to be gained, at least in the immediate future, by improving the nutrition and the health of animals. (author). 28 refs, 6 tabs

  15. Effect of water activity and temperature on the growth of Eurotium species isolated from animal feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Mariana; Pardo, Alejandro; Pose, Graciela; Patriarca, Andrea

    Xerophilic fungi represent a serious problem due to their ability to grow at low water activities causing the spoiling of low and intermediate moisture foods, stored goods and animal feeds, with the consequent economic losses. The combined effect of water activity and temperature of four Eurotium species isolated from animal feeds was investigated. Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium chevalieri, Eurotium repens and Eurotium rubrum were grown at 5, 15, 25, 37 and 45°C on malt extract agar adjusted with glycerol in the range 0.710-0.993 of water activities. The cardinal model proposed by Rosso and Robinson (2001) was applied to fit growth data, with the variable water activity at fixed temperatures, obtaining three cardinal water activities (a wmin , a wmax , a wopt ) and the specific growth rate at the optimum a w (μ opt ). A probabilistic model was also applied to define the interface between growth and no-growth. The cardinal model provided an adequate estimation of the optimal a w to grow and the maximum growth rate. The probabilistic model showed a good performance to fit growth/no-growth cases in the predicted range. The results presented here could be applied to predict Eurotium species growth in animal feeds. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved...... in beta cell differentiation and proliferation may lead to new ways of forming beta cells for treatment of diabetes in man....

  17. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P.; Howard, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  18. Evaluation of single cell protein for nutrition of farm animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oslage, H.J.; Schulz, E.

    1981-08-01

    For the production of microorganisms with high content of protein technologies on the basis of carbon rich substrates have been developed during the past years. Thus, signification of Single Cell Protein (SCP) for nutrition of farm animals has changed. While, in former times, yeasts were added only in small portions (1-2%) as vitamin supplementation today it is the aim to use microbial biomass as a protein component. The use of SCP as a feedstuff requires a careful physiological and toxicological evaluation as well as extensive investigations of possible use and frontiers of those products for farm animals. Topic of this work were bacteria, bred on methanol as well as yeasts, grown on alcanes and on whey/lactic acid respectively. SCP is preferently used as a feedstuff for poultry, pigs, calves and fishes. Digestibility and utilisation of protein is good till very good, for the a.m. animals, digestibility being between 75-93% and net protein utilisation (NPU) being between 60-76%. In rations of young animals (chicken, piglets and calves) contents of 5-10% SCP have been proved to be without any negative effect on acceptance, body gain, feed utilisation and mortality. For older animals SCP can be used as the only protein source beside the basic feedstuffs.

  19. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  20. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved......Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...

  1. FDG small animal PET permits early detection of malignant cells in a xenograft murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Castellucci, Paolo; Farsad, Mohsen; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano; Leo, Korinne di; Tonelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Pettinato, Cinzia; Rubello, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    The administration of new anticancer drugs in animal models is the first step from in vitro to in vivo pre-clinical protocols. At this stage it is crucial to ensure that cells are in the logarithmic phase of growth and to avoid vascular impairment, which can cause inhomogeneous distribution of the drug within the tumour and thus lead to bias in the final analysis of efficacy. In subcutaneous xenograft murine models, positivity for cancer is visually recognisable 2-3 weeks after inoculation, when a certain amount of necrosis is usually already present. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of FDG small animal PET for the early detection of malignant masses in a xenograft murine model of human rhabdomyosarcoma. A second goal was to analyse the metabolic behaviour of this xenograft tumour over time. We studied 23 nude mice, in which 7 x 10 6 rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RH-30 cell line) were injected in the dorsal subcutaneous tissues. Each animal underwent four FDG PET scans (GE, eXplore Vista DR) under gas anaesthesia. The animals were studied 2, 5, 14 and 20 days after inoculation. We administered 20 MBq of FDG via the tail vein. Uptake time was 60 min, and acquisition time, 20 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM 2D iterative reconstruction and the target to background ratio (TBR) was calculated for each tumour. Normal subcutaneous tissue had a TBR of 0.3. Necrosis was diagnosed when one or more cold areas were present within the mass. All the animals were sacrificed and histology was available to verify PET results. PET results were concordant with the findings of necropsy and histology in all cases. The incidence of the tumour was 69.6% (16/23 animals); seven animals did not develop a malignant mass. Ten of the 23 animals had a positive PET scan 2 days after inoculation. Nine of these ten animals developed a tumour; the remaining animal became negative, at the third scan. The positive predictive value of the early PET scan was 90% (9/10 animals

  2. Introducing the Cell Concept with Both Animal and Plant Cells: A Historical and Didactic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    In France, as well as in several other countries, the cell concept is introduced at school by two juxtaposed drawings, a plant cell and an animal cell. After indicating the didactic obstacles associated with this presentation, this paper focuses on the reasons underlying the persistence of these two prototypes, through three complementary…

  3. Growth hormone secretion during space flight and evaluation of the physiological responses of animals held in the research animal holding facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Thomas N.; Grindeland, Richard; Mehler, William; Oyama, Jiro

    1987-01-01

    The spaceflight of the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) on the Space Laboratory 3 (SL 3) provided the opportunity to evaluate the suitability of the RAHF for housing and maintaining experimental animals during spaceflight, and to determine changes in the secretion of growth hormone during spaceflight. Using ground-based studies the following were investigated: the optimum conditions for creating gravitational force on space flight animals; neural pathways that may play a role in the space flight syndrome; and the time course of muscle atrophy due to hypodynamia and hypokenesia in hindlimb-suspended animals and the role of growth hormone in these processes.

  4. Selection of phosphorus solubilizing bacteria with biocontrol potential for growth in phosphorus rich animal bone charcoal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Nijhuis, E.H.; Sommeus, E.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria with the ability to solubilize phosphorus (P) and to improve plant health were selected and tested for growth and survival in P-rich animal bone charcoal (ABC). ABC is suggested to be suitable as a carrier for biocontrol agents, offering them a protected niche as well as delivering

  5. The importance of cell physiology to the performance of animal cell bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runstadler, P W

    1992-10-13

    This report has pointed out the following: (1) the new animal cell products that will be produced commercially will have large dollar markets and will, together with cost containment and competitive pressures, place a greater emphasis on the reduction of the cost of production through the selection of appropriate culture technology; (2) the benefits to be gained by working with basic biological processes in animal cell culture that will increase cell density, cell productivity, and product quality; (3) the need to work with reactor technologies that can affect the basic biology of the cell in these positive ways; (4) it appears worthwhile to explore immobilized, high cell density culture technologies as a possible means to achieve the objectives by affecting the basic regulation of the cell through fundamental cell/cell environment biological processes.

  6. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL -1 levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL -1 ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL -1 . © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Bacterial Cell Wall Growth, Shape and Division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, A.; Terrak, M.; den Blaauwen, T.; Vollmer, W.; Remaut, H.; Fronzes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a bacterial cell is maintained by its peptidoglycan sacculus that completely surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth the sacculus is enlarged by peptidoglycan synthesis complexes that are controlled by components linked to the cytoskeleton and, in Gram-negative bacteria, by

  8. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Junfeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST.

  9. Cell therapy of periodontium: from animal to human?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofin, Elena A.; Monsarrat, Paul; Kémoun, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the soft and hard tissues supporting the teeth, which often leads to tooth loss. Its significant impact on the patient's general health and quality of life point to a need for more effective management of this condition. Existing treatments include scaling/root planning and surgical approaches but their overall effects are relatively modest and restricted in application. The goal of regenerative therapy of periodontal defects is to enhance endogenous progenitors and thus promote optimal wound healing. Considering that the host or tissue might be defective in the periodontitis context, it has been proposed that grafting exogenous stem cells would produce new tissues and create a suitable microenvironment for tissue regeneration. Thus, cell therapy of periodontium has been assessed in many animal models and promising results have been reported. However, the methodological diversity of these studies makes the conversion to clinical practice difficult. The aim of this review is to highlight the primary requirements to be satisfied before the leap to clinical trials can be made. We therefore review cell therapy applications for periodontal regeneration in animal models and the concerns to be addressed before undertaking human experiments. PMID:24298258

  10. Elastic Deformations During Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K. C.

    2010-03-01

    The wide variety of shapes and sizes found in bacterial species is almost universally defined by the cell wall, which is a cross-linked network of the material peptidoglycan. In recent years, cell shape has been shown to play a critical role in regulating many important biological functions including attachment, dispersal, motility, polar differentiation, predation, and cellular differentiation. In previous work, we have shown that the spatial organization of the peptidoglycan network can change the mechanical equilibrium of the cell wall and result in changes in cell shape. However, experimental data on the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan is currently limited. Here, we describe a straightforward, inexpensive approach for extracting the mechanical properties of bacterial cells in gels of user-defined stiffness, using only optical microscopy to match growth kinetics to the predictions of a continuum model of cell growth. Using this simple yet general methodology, we have measured the Young's modulus for bacteria ranging across a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and cell wall thicknesses, and our method can easily be extended to other commonly studied bacteria. This method makes it possible to rapidly determine how changes in genotype and biochemistry affect the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and may be particularly relevant for studying the relationship between cell shape and structure, the genetic and molecular control of the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and the identification of antibiotics and other small molecules that affect and specifically modify the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Our work also suggests that bacteria may utilize peptidoglycan synthesis to transduce mechanosensory signals from local environment.

  11. Delayed animal aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence by platelet rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hen-Yu; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Tsai, Ching-Yu; Tina Chen, Szu-Yu; Liu, Alice; Chen, Wei-Hong; Wei, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ming-Fu; Williams, David F; Deng, Win-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Aging is related to loss of functional stem cell accompanying loss of tissue and organ regeneration potentials. Previously, we demonstrated that the life span of ovariectomy-senescence accelerated mice (OVX-SAMP8) was significantly prolonged and similar to that of the congenic senescence-resistant strain of mice after platelet rich plasma (PRP)/embryonic fibroblast transplantation. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of PRP for recovering cellular potential from senescence and then delaying animal aging. We first examined whether stem cells would be senescent in aged mice compared to young mice. Primary adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) were harvested from young and aged mice, and found that cell senescence was strongly correlated to animal aging. Subsequently, we demonstrated that PRP could recover cell potential from senescence, such as promote cell growth (cell proliferation and colony formation), increase osteogenesis, decrease adipogenesis, restore cell senescence related markers and resist the oxidative stress in stem cells from aged mice. The results also showed that PRP treatment in aged mice could delay mice aging as indicated by survival, body weight and aging phenotypes (behavior and gross morphology) in term of recovering the cellular potential of their stem cells compared to the results on aged control mice. In conclusion these findings showed that PRP has potential to delay aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence and could be used as an alternative medicine for tissue regeneration and future rejuvenation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Animal Bleomycin Pulmonary Fibrosis Models: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Nadim; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is an inexorably progressive lung disease with few available treatments. New therapeutic options are needed. Stem cells have generated much enthusiasm for the treatment of several conditions, including lung diseases. Human trials of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy for pulmonary fibrosis are under way. To shed light on the potential usefulness of MSCs for human disease, we aimed to systematically review the preclinical literature to determine if MSCs are beneficial in animal bleomycin pulmonary fibrosis models. The MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for original studies of stem cell therapy in animal bleomycin models of pulmonary fibrosis. Studies using embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells were excluded. Seventeen studies were selected, all of which used MSCs in rodents. MSC therapy led to an improvement in bleomycin-induced lung collagen deposition in animal lungs and in the pulmonary fibrosis Ashcroft score in most studies. MSC therapy improved histopathology in almost all studies in which it was evaluated qualitatively. Furthermore, MSC therapy was found to improve 14-day survival in animals with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage total and neutrophil counts, as well as transforming growth factor-β levels, were also reduced by MSCs. MSCs are beneficial in rodent bleomycin pulmonary fibrosis models. Since most studies examined the initial inflammatory phase rather than the chronic fibrotic phase, preclinical data offer better support for human trials of MSCs in acute exacerbations of pulmonary fibrosis rather than the chronic phase of the disease. There has been increased interest in mesenchymal stromal cell therapy for lung diseases. A few small clinical trials are under way in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Preclinical evidence was assessed in a systematic review, as is often done for clinical studies. The existing studies offer better support for efficacy in the initial

  13. Computation of Pump-Leak Flux Balance in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Vereninov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Many vital processes in animal cells depend on monovalent ion transport across the plasma membrane via specific pathways. Their operation is described by a set of nonlinear and transcendental equations that cannot be solved analytically. Previous computations had been optimized for certain cell types and included parameters whose experimental determination can be challenging. Methods: We have developed a simpler and a more universal computational approach by using fewer kinetic parameters derived from the data related to cell balanced state. A file is provided for calculating unidirectional Na+, K+, and Cl- fluxes via all major pathways (i.e. the Na/K pump, Na+, K+, Cl- channels, and NKCC, KC and NC cotransporters under a balanced state and during transient processes. Results: The data on the Na+, K+, and Cl- distribution and the pump flux of K+ (Rb+ are obtained on U937 cells before and after inhibiting the pump with ouabain. There was a good match between the results of calculations and the experimentally measured dynamics of ion redistribution caused by blocking the pump. Conclusion: The presented approach can serve as an effective tool for analyzing monovalent ion transport in the whole cell, determination of the rate coefficients for ion transfer via major pathways and studying their alteration under various conditions.

  14. The influence of feeding GMO-peas on growth of animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Mares

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of genetically modified (GM food or feed into the commercial sale represents a very complicated process. One of the most important steps in approval process is the evaluation of all risks on the health status of people and animal models. Within our project the genetically modified peas was breeded that showed significant resistance against Pea seed-borne mosaic virus and Pea enation mosaic virus. Preclinical studies have been conducted to found out the effect of GMO peas on animals - rats of outbreeding line Wistar. In a total, 24 male, specific pathogen free Wistar rats were used in the experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, the animals were 28 days old. The three experimental groups with 8 individuals were created. The first group of rats was fed with GMO peas, the second group of rats consumed mix of pea cultivar Raman and the third group was control without pea addition (wheat and soya were used instead of pea. In the present study we focused our attention on health, growth and utility features of rats fed with GM pea. All characteristic were observed during the experiment lasting 35 days. Consumed feed was weighted daily and the weight of the animals was measured every seven days. The average values were compared within the groups. The aim of the experiment was to verify if resistant lines of pea influence the weight growth of animal models. The results of our experiment showed that even a high concentration (30% of GM pea did not influence growth rate of rats to compare with both rats fed with pea of Raman cultivar and control group. We did not observe any health problems of animal models during the experiment.

  15. Animal-cell culture media: History, characteristics, and current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tatsuma; Asayama, Yuta

    2017-04-01

    Cell culture technology has spread prolifically within a century, a variety of culture media has been designed. This review goes through the history, characteristics and current issues of animal-cell culture media. A literature search was performed on PubMed and Google Scholar between 1880 and May 2016 using appropriate keywords. At the dawn of cell culture technology, the major components of media were naturally derived products such as serum. The field then gradually shifted to the use of chemical-based synthetic media because naturally derived ingredients have their disadvantages such as large batch-to-batch variation. Today, industrially important cells can be cultured in synthetic media. Nevertheless, the combinations and concentrations of the components in these media remain to be optimized. In addition, serum-containing media are still in general use in the field of basic research. In the fields of assisted reproductive technologies and regenerative medicine, some of the medium components are naturally derived in nearly all instances. Further improvements of culture media are desirable, which will certainly contribute to a reduction in the experimental variation, enhance productivity among biopharmaceuticals, improve treatment outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies, and facilitate implementation and popularization of regenerative medicine.

  16. Block of purinergic P2X7R inhibits tumor growth in a C6 glioma brain tumor animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae K; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Serrano-Perez, Maria C; McGeer, Patrick L; McLarnon, James G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the expression and pharmacological modulation of the purinergic receptor P2X7R in a C6 glioma model. Intrastriatal injection of C6 cells induced a time-dependent growth of tumor; at 2 weeks postinjection immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher levels of P2X7R in glioma-injected versus control vehicle-injected brains. P2X7R immunoreactivity colocalized with tumor cells and microglia, but not endogenous astrocytes. Intravenous administration of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) inhibited tumor growth in a spatially dependent manner from the C6 injection site. Treatment with BBG reduced tumor volume by 52% versus that in controls. Double immunostaining indicated that BBG treatment did not alter microgliosis, astrogliosis, or vasculature vessels in C6-injected animals. In vitro, BBG reduced the expression of P2X7R and glioma chemotaxis induced by the P2X7R ligand, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (BzATP). Immunohistochemical staining of human glioblastoma tissue samples demonstrated greater expression of P2X7R compared to control nontumor samples. These results suggest that the efficacy of BBG in inhibiting tumor growth is primarily mediated by direct actions of the compound on P2X7R in glioma cells and that pharmacological inhibition of this purinergic receptor might serve as a strategy to slow the progression of brain tumors.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated expression of keratinocyte growth factor promotes secondary flap necrotic wound healing in an extended animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhua; Yu, Mengfei; Zhu, Wenyuan; Bao, Tingwei; Zhu, Liqin; Zhao, Wenquan; Zhao, Fuyan; Wang, Huiming

    2013-10-01

    No effective treatments have been found for flap necrosis. Animal models that focus on the initial flap viability are inappropriate for necrotic wound studies. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) promotes keratinocyte proliferation with stronger activity and fewer complications and thus may be useful for necrotic flap wound healing. Rats with modified flap necrosis were randomly divided into four groups. An adenoviral vector expressing KGF was injected subdermally in the back of the animals after necrosis began. The expression and effect of KGF was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and transwell, and wound healing was monitored. The plasmid and adenovirus were able to express KGF and stimulate epithelial cell growth (p = 0.029). Histology showed that the necrosis healed fastest in the KGF administration group than in the control groups (p < 0.01). The adenovirus-mediated KGF (Ad-KGF) group had the thickest epithelium on days 15 (p = 0.044) and 25 (p = 0.014). The KGF level in the blood serum soared 10 and 15 days postoperatively (p < 0.01) but returned to baseline by day 25 (p = 0.561). The KGF mRNA levels in vivo increased dramatically in the Ad-KGF group (p = 0.037). The extended flap model is applicable in necrotic wound study. Keratinocyte growth factor can promote secondary necrotic flap wound healing, and administration of KGF can be achieved by an adenoviral vector.

  19. Bone regeneration in experimental animals using calcium phosphate cement combined with platelet growth factors and human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilov-Velev, K; Clemente-de-Arriba, C; Alobera-García, M Á; Moreno-Sansalvador, E M; Campo-Loarte, J

    2015-01-01

    Many substances (growth factors and hormones) have osteoinduction properties and when added to some osteoconduction biomaterial they accelerate bone neoformation properties. The materials included 15 New Zealand rabbits, calcium phosphate cement (Calcibon(®)), human growth hormone (GH), and plasma rich in platelets (PRP). Each animal was operated on in both proximal tibias and a critical size bone defect of 6mm of diameter was made. The animals were separated into the following study groups: Control (regeneration only by Calcibon®), PRP (regeneration by Calcibon® and PRP), GH (regeneration by Calcibon® and GH). All the animals were sacrificed at 28 days. An evaluation was made of the appearance of the proximal extreme of rabbit tibiae in all the animals, and to check the filling of the critical size defect. A histological assessment was made of the tissue response, the presence of new bone formation, and the appearance of the biomaterial. Morphometry was performed using the MIP 45 image analyser. ANOVA statistical analysis was performed using the Statgraphics software application. The macroscopic appearance of the critical defect was better in the PRP and the GH group than in the control group. Histologically greater new bone formation was found in the PRP and GH groups. No statistically significant differences were detected in the morphometric study between bone formation observed in the PRP group and the control group. Significant differences in increased bone formation were found in the GH group (p=0.03) compared to the other two groups. GH facilitates bone regeneration in critical defects filled with calcium phosphate cement in the time period studied in New Zealand rabbits. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Nerve growth factor interactions with mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, A; Pantalone, A; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are involved in neurogenic inflammation where there is vasodilation and plasma protein extravasion in response to this stimulus. Nerve growth factor (NGF), identified by Rita Levi Montalcini, is a neurotrophin family compound which is important for survival of nociceptive neurons during their development. Therefore, NGF is an important neuropeptide which mediates the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. It also exerts its proinflammatory action, not only on mast cells but also in B and T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils. Human mast cells can be activated by neuropeptides to release potent mediators of inflammation, and they are found throughout the body, especially near blood vessels, epithelial tissue and nerves. Mast cells generate and release NGF after degranulation and they are involved in iperalgesia, neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. NGF is also a potent degranulation factor for mast cells in vitro and in vivo, promoting differentiation and maturation of these cells and their precursor, acting as a co-factor with interleukin-3. In conclusion, these studies are focused on cross-talk between neuropeptide NGF and inflammatory mast cells.

  1. A comparative mechanical analysis of plant and animal cells reveals convergence across kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Smet, Pauline; Chastrette, Nicolas; Guiroy, Axel; Richert, Alain; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Szecsi, Judit; Boudaoud, Arezki; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Bendhamane, Mohammed; Hamant, Oliver; Asnacios, Atef

    2014-11-18

    Plant and animals have evolved different strategies for their development. Whether this is linked to major differences in their cell mechanics remains unclear, mainly because measurements on plant and animal cells relied on independent experiments and setups, thus hindering any direct comparison. In this study we used the same micro-rheometer to compare animal and plant single cell rheology. We found that wall-less plant cells exhibit the same weak power law rheology as animal cells, with comparable values of elastic and loss moduli. Remarkably, microtubules primarily contributed to the rheological behavior of wall-less plant cells whereas rheology of animal cells was mainly dependent on the actin network. Thus, plant and animal cells evolved different molecular strategies to reach a comparable cytoplasmic mechanical core, suggesting that evolutionary convergence could include the internal biophysical properties of cells.

  2. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  3. Role of the gut microbiota in host appetite control: bacterial growth to animal feeding behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2017-01-01

    The life of all animals is dominated by alternating feelings of hunger and satiety - the main involuntary motivations for feeding-related behaviour. Gut bacteria depend fully on their host for providing the nutrients necessary for their growth. The intrinsic ability of bacteria to regulate their growth and to maintain their population within the gut suggests that gut bacteria can interfere with molecular pathways controlling energy balance in the host. The current model of appetite control is based mainly on gut-brain signalling and the animal's own needs to maintain energy homeostasis; an alternative model might also involve bacteria-host communications. Several bacterial components and metabolites have been shown to stimulate intestinal satiety pathways; at the same time, their production depends on bacterial growth cycles. This short-term bacterial growth-linked modulation of intestinal satiety can be coupled with long-term regulation of appetite, controlled by the neuropeptidergic circuitry in the hypothalamus. Indeed, several bacterial products are detected in the systemic circulation, which might act directly on hypothalamic neurons. This Review analyses the data relevant to possible involvement of the gut bacteria in the regulation of host appetite and proposes an integrative homeostatic model of appetite control that includes energy needs of both the host and its gut bacteria.

  4. Animal study of rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on inhibiting growth of breast cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Ming Tong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the inhibiting effect of rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on growth of breast cancer xenografts. Methods: C57BL/6 nude mice were selected as research subjects, animal models with breast cancer xenografts were established through subcutaneous injection of breast cancer cells in the neck and randomly divided into A-D groups, and normal saline, rh-endostatin, ginsenoside Rg3 and rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 were injected respectively. Tumor growth, serum angiogenesis factor contents, percentages of cell cycles and expression levels of cell cycle-related molecules in tumor tissue of four groups were compared. Results: 7 d, 14 d and 21 d after treatment, tumor volume as well as serum VEGF and bFGF contents of B group, C group and D group were significantly lower than those of A group, and tumor volume as well as serum VEGF and bFGF contents of D group were significantly lower than those of B group and C group; 21 d after treatment, tumor weight, percentages of S phase and G2/M phase as well as mRNA contents and protein contents of cyclin E and CDC25A in tumor tissue of B group, C group and D group were lower than those of A group, and G0/G1 phase percentages were higher than that of A group; tumor weight, percentages of S phase and G2/M phase as well as mRNA contents and protein contents of cyclin E and CDC25A in tumor tissue of D group were significantly lower than those of B group and C group, and G0/G1 phase percentage was lower than those of B group and C group. Conclusion: rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 can more effectively inhibit growth of breast cancer xenografts, make cell cycle arrest and down-regulate expression of cell cyclerelated molecules.

  5. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... that transferrin is the only obligatory factor whereas growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and TRH had modulating effects. A heat-labile heparin binding serum factor which stimulated thymidine incorporation but not cell proliferation was demonstrated in human serum. Measurements...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  6. Structural features of nonionic polyglycol polymer molecules responsible for the protective effect in sparged animal cell bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murhammer, D W; Goochee, C F

    1990-01-01

    The nonionic surfactant Pluronic F-68 polyol is commonly used to protect cultured animal cells from the detrimental effects of sparging. In this study we investigated the structural features of the Pluronic F-68 molecule responsible for this protective behavior. Poly(oxyethylene)-poly(oxypropylene) block copolymer polyols of various molecular weights and percentages of hydrophobe (poly(oxypropylene], including both Pluronic and reverse Pluronic polyols, were considered. The potential toxicity of these agents was examined in the absence of sparging (i.e., in spinner flasks) by using the attachment-independent Sf9 insect cell line as a model system. Each polyol resulted in one of three distinct types of behavior in these spinner flask experiments: (1) cells lysed at an exponential rate, (2) inhibition of cell growth (i.e., no net cell growth), or (3) uninhibited cell growth. It was then shown that all of the Pluronic and reverse Pluronic polyols that did not inhibit cell growth provided protection from sparging in the bioreactors used in this study; thus, finding a polyol that protected cells was synonymous with finding one that did not inhibit cell growth. The ability of these polyols to protect animal cells in sparged bioreactors was found to correlate well with the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). Those polyols with the largest HLB values were found to be protective agents. These poly(oxyethylene)-poly(oxypropylene) polyols were also shown to be more effective protective agents than pure poly(oxyethylene); thus, the presence of the hydrophobe (poly(oxypropylene] is important in their ability to serve as protective agents.

  7. How protein kinases co-ordinate mitosis in animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2011-04-01

    Mitosis is associated with profound changes in cell physiology and a spectacular surge in protein phosphorylation. To accomplish these, a remarkably large portion of the kinome is involved in the process. In the present review, we will focus on classic mitotic kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinases, Polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases, as well as more recently characterized players such as NIMA (never in mitosis in Aspergillus nidulans)-related kinases, Greatwall and Haspin. Together, these kinases co-ordinate the proper timing and fidelity of processes including centrosomal functions, spindle assembly and microtubule-kinetochore attachment, as well as sister chromatid separation and cytokinesis. A recurrent theme of the mitotic kinase network is the prevalence of elaborated feedback loops that ensure bistable conditions. Sequential phosphorylation and priming phosphorylation on substrates are also frequently employed. Another important concept is the role of scaffolds, such as centrosomes for protein kinases during mitosis. Elucidating the entire repertoire of mitotic kinases, their functions, regulation and interactions is critical for our understanding of normal cell growth and in diseases such as cancers.

  8. Animal protein intake, serum insulin-like growth factor I, and growth in healthy 2.5-y-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Udam, Tina Rovenna; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2004-01-01

    Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear....

  9. Antibiotic growth promoters enhance animal production by targeting intestinal bile salt hydrolase and its producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eLin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growth-promoting effect of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs was correlated with the decreased activity of bile salt hydrolase (BSH, an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization. Consistent with this finding, independent chicken studies have demonstrated that AGP usage significantly reduced population of Lactobacillus species, the major BSH-producers in the intestine. Recent finding also demonstrated that some AGPs, such as tetracycline and roxarsone, display direct inhibitory effect on BSH activity. Therefore, BSH is a promising microbiome target for developing novel alternatives to AGPs. Specifically, dietary supplementation of BSH inhibitor may promote host lipid metabolism and energy harvest, consequently enhancing feed efficiency and body weight gain in food animals.

  10. Animal models to explore the effects of glucocorticoids on skeletal growth and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Claire L; Soucek, Ondrej; Wong, Sze C; Zaman, Farasat; Farquharson, Colin; Savendahl, Lars; Ahmed, S Faisal

    2018-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are effective for the treatment of many chronic conditions, but their use is associated with frequent and wide-ranging adverse effects including osteoporosis and growth retardation. The mechanisms that underlie the undesirable effects of GCs on skeletal development are unclear, and there is no proven effective treatment to combat them. An in vivo model that investigates the development and progression of GC-induced changes in bone is, therefore, important and a well-characterized pre-clinical model is vital for the evaluation of new interventions. Currently, there is no established animal model to investigate GC effects on skeletal development and there are pros and cons to consider with the different protocols used to induce osteoporosis and growth retardation. This review will summarize the literature and highlight the models and techniques employed in experimental studies to date. © 2018 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. A model for population growth of laboratory animals subjected to marker-assisted introgression : how many animals do we need?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudande, O.D.; Thomson, P.C.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    This study provides methods for calculating the mean and variance of the number of animals with the desired genotype in each backcross generation for a marker-assisted introgression experiment. The ultimate goal is to produce animals which are homozygous for the desired loci. The methods have been

  12. Growth inhibition of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells on the feeders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl4

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be propagated in vitro on the feeders of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In this study, we found growth inhibition of mESCs cultured on embryonic fibroblast feeders derived from different livestock animals. Under the same condition, mESCs derived from mouse embryonic fibroblast ...

  13. Animal protein intake, serum insulin-like growth factor I, and growth in healthy 2.5-y-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Udam, Tina Rovenna; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2004-01-01

    Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear.......Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear....

  14. Growth of cells superinoculated onto irradiated and nonirradiated confluent monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, H.; Ueo, H.; Sugimachi, K.

    1990-01-01

    We prepared confluent monolayers of normal BALB/c 3T3 cells and compared differences in the growth of four types of cells superinoculated onto these nonirradiated and irradiated monolayers. The test cells were normal BALB/c 3T3 A31 cells, a squamous cell carcinoma from a human esophageal cancer (KSE-1), human fetal fibroblasts, and V-79 cells from Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Cell growth was checked by counting the cell number, determining [3H]thymidine incorporation and assessing colony formation. We found that on nonirradiated monolayers, colony formation of human fetal fibroblasts and normal BALB/c 3T3 cells was completely inhibited. On irradiated cells, test cells did exhibit some growth. KSE-1 cells, which had a low clonogenic efficiency on plastic surfaces, formed colonies on both irradiated and nonirradiated cells. On these monolayers, the clonogenic efficiency of V-79 cells was also higher than that on plastic surfaces. We conclude that the nonirradiated monolayer of BALB/c 3T3 cells completely inhibits the growth of superinoculated normal BALB/c 3T3 and human fetal fibroblasts, while on the other hand, they facilitate the growth of neoplastic KSE-1 and V-79 cells by providing a surface for cell adherence and growth, without affecting the presence of normal cells in co-cultures

  15. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Energy metabolism and ATP balance in animal cell cultivation using a stoichiometrically based reaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L; Wang, D I

    1996-12-05

    A metabolic reaction network is developed for the estimation of the stoichiometric production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in animal cell culture. By using the material balance data from fed-batch and batch cultures of hybridoma cells, the stoichiometric ATP productions are determined with estimated effective P/O ratios of 2 for NADH and 1.2 for FADH(2). A significant percentage of the ATP requirement (16-41%) in hybridoma cells is generated directly from free energy release without the participation of oxygen. The oxidative phosphorylation of NADH accounts for about 60% of the total ATP production in the fed-batch cultures and about 47% in the batch culture. The oxidative phosphorylation of FADH(2) accounts for less then 20% of the total ATP production in all cases.A fractional model is devised to analyze the contribution of each nutrient to the ATP production. Results show that a majority of the ATP is produced from glucose metabolism (60-76%). Less than 30% of the ATP is derived from glutamine, and less than 11% is derived from other essential amino acids. The analysis also shows that the glycolytic pathway generates more ATP in the batch (41%) than in the fed-batch (demand estimated from the dry cell weight and cell composition is significantly lower than that calculated from the maximum ATP yield, indicating that the non-growth-associated ATP demand may contain other factors than what is considered in the estimation of the biosynthetic ATP demand.

  17. Regeneration of Skin Surface by Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Adipose Tissue in Laboratory Animals with Infected Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Sahab, A. Haydar; Tretyak, S.; Nedzved, M.K.; Baranov, E.V.; Nadyrov, E.; Lobanok, H.H.; Vasilevich, I.B.; Welcome, M.O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies in laboratory animals with a simulated infected wound, for which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue were used in its treatment. The following peculiarities of MSCs for regeneration of skin defects are established: faster arrest of inflammation, accelerated wound healing processes, as well as observed stimulation of growth of skin appendages. The results of this study may serve the basis for further research from develo...

  18. Analytical strategies for residue analysis of veterinary drugs and growth-promoting agents in food-producing animals - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    2005-01-01

    After a brief introduction into the field of veterinary drugs and growth-promoting agents, the most important EU regulations and directives for the inspection of food-producing animals and animal products regarding the residue control of these substances are presented and discussed. Main attention

  19. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Senno, Laura del [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Aguiari, Gianluca, E-mail: dsn@unife.it [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  20. The cytoskeleton in plant and fungal cell tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitmann, A.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Tip-growing cells have a particular lifestyle that is characterized by the following features: (1) the cells grow in one direction, forming a cylindrical tube; (2) tip-growing cells are able to penetrate their growth environment, thus having to withstand considerable external forces; (3) the growth

  1. Dietary inclusion effects of phytochemicals as growth promoters in animal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Grijalva, Nidia Vanessa; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Muhlia-Almazan, Adriana; Domínguez-Díaz, David; González-Ríos, Humberto

    2017-01-01

    Growth promoters have been widely used as a strategy to improve productivity, and great benefits have been observed throughout the meat production chain. However, the prohibition of growth promoters in several countries, as well as consumer rejection, has led industry and the academy to search for alternatives. For decades, the inclusion of phytochemicals in animal feed has been proposed as a replacement for traditional growth promoters. However, there are many concerns about the application of phytochemicals and their impact on the various links in the meat production chain (productive performance, carcass and meat quality). Therefore, the effects of these feed additives are reviewed in this article, along with their potential safety and consumer benefits, to understand the current state of their use. In summary, the replacement of traditional growth promoters in experiments with broilers yielded benefits in all aspects of the meat production chain, such as improvements in productive performance and carcass and meat quality. Although the effects in pigs have been similar to those observed in broilers, fewer studies have been carried out in pigs, and there is a need to define the types of phytochemicals to be used and the appropriate stages for adding such compounds. In regard to ruminant diets, few studies have been conducted, and their results have been inconclusive. Therefore, it is necessary to propose more in vivo studies to determine other strategies for phytochemical inclusion in the production phases and to select the appropriate types of compounds. It is also necessary to define the variables that will best elucidate the mechanism(s) of action that will enable the future replacement of synthetic growth promoters with phytochemical feed additives.

  2. Radioimmunoassay studies on repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA in cultured animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatani, Ryuichi; Tohgo, Yukihiro; Kunishima, Nobuyoshi.

    1975-01-01

    UV (ultraviolet) damaged DNA and its repair of various cultured animal cells were observed by radioimmunoassay using anti-serum against the UV irradiation induced heat-degenerated DNA. There is some difference among the cells of used animals according to their DNA repairabilities. The cells were divided into four groups according to the existence or strength of their repairabilities. 1) excision repair type: cells of men and chimpanzees. 2) photoreactivation type: cells derived from Tachydromus tachydromoides and chicks. 3) photoreactivation with excision repair: cells of rats, kangaroos and mosquitos. 4) non-excision repair type: cells of mice, Meriones and rats. Animal cells have plural types of repair. Main types of repair will differ according to the kind of animals. (Ichikawa, K.)

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2.Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation.These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  4. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in plant cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussey, P.J.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Deeks, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Plant cells grow through increases in volume and cell wall surface area. The mature morphology of a plant cell is a product of the differential rates of expansion between neighboring zones of the cell wall during this process. Filamentous actin arrays are associated with plant cell growth, and the

  5. Nanoparticle-based sorting of circulating tumor cells by epithelial antigen expression during disease progression in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhanna, Nidal; Mepham, Adam; Mohamadi, Reza M; Chan, Harley; Khan, Tahsin; Akens, Margarete; Besant, Justin D; Irish, Jonathan; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used as markers for the detection, characterization, and targeted therapeutic management of cancer. We recently developed a nanoparticle-mediated approach for capture and sorting of CTCs based on their specific epithelial phenotype. In the current study, we investigate the phenotypic transition of tumor cells in an animal model and show the correlation of this transition with tumor progression. VX2 tumor cells were injected into rabbits, and CTCs were evaluated during tumor progression and correlated with computerized tomography (CT) measurements of tumor volume. The results showed a dramatic increase of CTCs during the four weeks of tumor growth. Following resection, CTC levels dropped but then rebounded, likely due to lymph node metastases. Additionally, CTCs showed a marked loss of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) relative to precursor cells. In conclusion, the device accurately traces disease progression and CTC phenotypic shift in an animal model. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been used to predict disease prognosis. In this study, the authors developed a nanoparticle-mediated platform based on microfluidics to analyze the differential expressions of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) on CTCs in an animal model. It was found that the loss of EpCAM correlated with disease progression. Hence, the use of this platform may be further applied in other cancer models in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of eye NGF administration on two animal models of retinal ganglion cells degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Colafrancesco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF administration on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in experimentally induced glaucoma (GL and diabetic retinopathy (DR. GL was induced in adult rats by injection of hypertonic saline into the episcleral vein of the eye and diabetes (DT was induced by administration of streptozoticin. Control and experimental rats were treated daily with either ocular application of NGF or vehicle solution. We found that both animal models present a progressive degeneration of RGCs and changing NGF and VEGF levels in the retina and optic nerve. We then proved that NGF eye drop administration exerts a protective effect on these models of retinal degeneration. In brief, our findings indicate that NGF can play a protective role against RGC degeneration occurring in GL and DR and suggest that ocular NGF administration might be an effective pharmacological approach.

  7. Establishment of the male germline and sperm cell movement during pollen germination and tube growth in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Kliwer, Irina; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Two sperm cells are required to achieve double fertilization in flowering plants (angiosperms). In contrast to animals and lower plants such as mosses and ferns, sperm cells of flowering plants (angiosperms) are immobile and are transported to the female gametes (egg and central cell) via the pollen tube. The two sperm cells arise from the generative pollen cell either within the pollen grain or after germination inside the pollen tube. While pollen tube growth and sperm behavior has been int...

  8. E-cadherin homophilic ligation inhibits cell growth and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of other cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2007-01-01

    growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-cadherin protein attached to microspheres. We find that E-cadherin ligation alone reduces the frequency...... of cells entering the S phase, demonstrating that E-cadherin ligation directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. E-cadherin binding to beta-catenin is required for cell growth inhibition, but beta-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity is not involved in growth inhibition resulting from...... homophilic binding. Neither E-cadherin binding to p120-catenin nor beta-catenin binding to alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, is required for growth inhibition. E-cadherin ligation also inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated growth signaling by a beta...

  9. Induction and analysis of antigen-specific T cell responses in melanoma patients and animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bins, Adriaan Dirk

    2007-01-01

    This thesis introduces a novel T cell vaccination method that uses a tattoo machine to inject DNA in the skin of the vaccinee. In comparison to other experimental vaccination methods DNA tattooing is very strong: besides small laboratory animals also large animals mount strong T cell responses upon

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Emeli M., E-mail: Emeli.Nilsson@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Brokken, Leon J.S., E-mail: Leon.Brokken@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Haerkoenen, Pirkko L., E-mail: Pirkko.Harkonen@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  12. Growth control and differentiation in mammary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Borellini, F; Oka, T

    1989-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of the mammary gland are controlled by various hormones and other environmental factors. The role of hormones and growth factors in mammary development is discussed with regard to animal species, physiological stages, and the various experimental systems in vitro. In the female embryo, mammary morphogenesis is induced by the mesenchyme and is hormone independent, whereas androgens cause the partial necrosis of mammary epithelium in the male. Ductal growth during ado...

  13. Stem cell-based growth, regeneration, and remodeling of the planarian intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsthoefel, David J.; Park, Amanda E.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2011-01-01

    Although some animals are capable of regenerating organs, the mechanisms by which this is achieved are poorly understood. In planarians, pluripotent somatic stem cells called neoblasts supply new cells for growth, replenish tissues in response to cellular turnover, and regenerate tissues after injury. For most tissues and organs, however, the spatiotemporal dynamics of stem cell differentiation and the fate of tissue that existed prior to injury have not been characterized systematically. Utilizing in vivo imaging and bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments, we have analyzed growth and regeneration of the planarian intestine, the organ responsible for digestion and nutrient distribution. During growth, we observe that new gut branches are added along the entire anteroposterior axis. We find that new enterocytes differentiate throughout the intestine rather than in specific growth zones, suggesting that branching morphogenesis is achieved primarily by remodeling of differentiated intestinal tissues. During regeneration, we also demonstrate a previously unappreciated degree of intestinal remodeling, in which pre-existing posterior gut tissue contributes extensively to the newly formed anterior gut, and vice versa. By contrast to growing animals, differentiation of new intestinal cells occurs at preferential locations, including within newly generated tissue (the blastema), and along pre-existing intestinal branches undergoing remodeling. Our results indicate that growth and regeneration of the planarian intestine are achieved by coordinated differentiation of stem cells and the remodeling of pre-existing tissues. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which these processes are integrated will be critical for understanding organogenesis in a post-embryonic context. PMID:21664348

  14. Development of an in situ detachment protocol of Vero cells grown on Cytodex1 microcarriers under animal component-free conditions in stirred bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourou, Samia; Riahi, Nesrine; Majoul, Samy; Trabelsi, Khaled; Kallel, Héla

    2013-08-01

    Subcultivation of Vero cells grown in a proprietary animal component-free medium named IPT-AFM, on microcarriers, was studied. TrypLE Select, a non-animal-derived protease, was used as an alternative to trypsin for cell passaging. We first studied the effect of increasing concentrations of TrypLE Select toward cell growth and then studied the inactivation of the protease using either soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) or the soy hydrolysate Hypep 1510, in six-well plates. Data showed that cell growth was impaired by residual level of TrypLE Select; STI was identified as an efficient agent to neutralize this effect. To restore cell growth and inactivate TrypLE Select, STI should be added to the medium at least at 0.2 g L(-1). Cells were also grown in spinner flask on 2 g L(-1) Cytodex1 in IPT-AFM. In these conditions, the cell detachment yield was equal to 78 ± 8 %. Furthermore, cells exhibited a typical growth profile when using the dislodged cells to seed a new culture. A cell detachment yield of 70 ± 19 % was also achieved when the cells were grown in a 2-L stirred bioreactor in IPT-AFM, on 3 g L(-1) Cytodex1. This protocol can be of great interest to scale-up the process of Vero cells cultivation in IPT-AFM on Cytodex1 from one stirred bioreactor culture to another.

  15. 2,3,5-Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction as exponential growth phase marker for mammalian cells in culture and for myeloma hybridization experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, A J; Rodríguez, I; Falero, G

    1991-06-01

    Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride in vitro reduction by cells produces a red formazan pellet which can be extracted and measured. We have shown that such reduction is associated with animal cell growth, and particularly with the specific growth rate, so the measurement of Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride reduction is proposed as a physiological marker of the exponential growth of cultured cells. Further application of this technique is shown using this Redox reaction for estimating plasmacytoma fusion potential for hybridoma cell line production.

  16. The Role of microRNAs in Animal Cell Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Santos, María Concepción; Aragón-Raygoza, Alejandro; Espinal-Centeno, Annie; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; Bako, Laszlo; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo

    2016-07-15

    Our concept of cell reprogramming and cell plasticity has evolved since John Gurdon transferred the nucleus of a completely differentiated cell into an enucleated Xenopus laevis egg, thereby generating embryos that developed into tadpoles. More recently, induced expression of transcription factors, oct4, sox2, klf4, and c-myc has evidenced the plasticity of the genome to change the expression program and cell phenotype by driving differentiated cells to the pluripotent state. Beyond these milestone achievements, research in artificial cell reprogramming has been focused on other molecules that are different than transcription factors. Among the candidate molecules, microRNAs (miRNAs) stand out due to their potential to control the levels of proteins that are involved in cellular processes such as self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we review the role of miRNAs in the maintenance and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, epimorphic regeneration, and somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells.

  17. The Target of Rapamycin and Mechanisms of Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Tee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, now referred to as mechanistic target of rapamycin is considered as the master regulator of cell growth. A definition of cell growth is a build-up of cellular mass through the biosynthesis of macromolecules. mTOR regulation of cell growth and cell size is complex, involving tight regulation of both anabolic and catabolic processes. Upon a growth signal input, mTOR enhances a range of anabolic processes that coordinate the biosynthesis of macromolecules to build cellular biomass, while restricting catabolic processes such as autophagy. mTOR is highly dependent on the supply of nutrients and energy to promote cell growth, where the network of signalling pathways that influence mTOR activity ensures that energy and nutrient homeostasis are retained within the cell as they grow. As well as maintaining cell size, mTOR is fundamental in the regulation of organismal growth. This review examines the complexities of how mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 enhances the cell’s capacity to synthesis de novo proteins required for cell growth. It also describes the discovery of mTORC1, the complexities of cell growth signalling involving nutrients and energy supply, as well as the multifaceted regulation of mTORC1 to orchestrate ribosomal biogenesis and protein translation.

  18. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote vascular growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Roura

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are promising strategies to regenerate human injured tissues, including ischemic myocardium. Here, we examined the acquisition of properties associated with vascular growth by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs, and whether they promoted vascular growth in vivo. UCBMSCs were induced in endothelial cell-specific growth medium (EGM-2 acquiring new cell markers, increased Ac-LDL uptake, and migratory capacity as assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence, and invasion assays. Angiogenic and vasculogenic potentials could be anticipated by in vitro experiments showing self organization into Matrigel-mediated cell networks, and activation of circulating angiogenic-supportive myeloid cells. In mice, following subcutaneous co-injection with Matrigel, UCBMSCs modified to co-express bioluminescent (luciferases and fluorescent proteins were demonstrated to participate in the formation of new microvasculature connected with the host circulatory system. Response of UCBMSCs to ischemia was explored in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction (MI. UCBMSCs transplanted using a fibrin patch survived 4 weeks post-implantation and organized into CD31(+network structures above the infarcted myocardium. MI-treated animals showed a reduced infarct scar and a larger vessel-occupied area in comparison with MI-control animals. Taken together, the presented results show that UCBMSCs can be induced in vitro to acquire angiogenic and vasculogenic properties and contribute to vascular growth in vivo.

  19. Immunotherapy with dendritic cells in an animal model of early pulmonary metastatic squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Hwan; Chung, Man Ki; Son, Young-Ik

    2012-11-01

    Distant metastases is becoming a more frequently recognized pattern of treatment failure in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In this study, we evaluated the effect of a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine in an early pulmonary metastatic murine model with the aim of providing an effective treatment for SCCHN patients presenting with occult pulmonary metastasis. In vivo animal experiments were conducted in C3H/He immunocompetent mice using the SCCVII syngeneic squamous carcinoma cell line. SCCVII cells were injected through the tail vein to establish early pulmonary metastases. Bone marrow-derived DCs were cultured and educated with ultraviolet B-irradiated apoptotic SCCVII cells before adoptive transfer into the inguinal area. Control groups were vaccinated with normal saline, naïve DCs, or apoptotic tumor cells. In the apoptotic SCCVII-pulsed DC group, the number of pulmonary tumor nodules was reduced, extirpated lung weight was less, and survival was longer than in control groups. Differences were statistically significant (P cells. We hope this study will help improve overall survival of patients with SCCHN, especially when they have early or occult pulmonary metastasis. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. An Agenda for Growth and Metabolism Research in Farm Animals: Healthy Food for a Healthy Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, R. S. A.; Manalo, D. D.; Garcia, J. N. M.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a paradigm shift from meat demand to health driven understanding of the effects of livestock production and meat consumption in human. Included are comments on animal nutrition research with the purpose of getting more relevant health information. The growth and metabolism research covers the principles from feed intake regulation, nutrient digestion, absorption and growth. Meat preservation provides enough food for the urban population, and its major ingredient includes the combination of salt, sugar and fats, suspected to cause food addiction in man. The reported effect of processed red meat causing systemic inflammation is a major consideration in food preparation, diet selection and reasonable control for meat consumption. In livestock “Pharming” the danger of heavy metal contamination of commercial feed poses threat to human health aside from drug residues. It is proposed that the 50% of global greenhouse gas is due to the lifestyle of the rich and epidemic of obesity-related diseases are the effect of livestock “Pharming” and addiction to fast food and or processed meat.

  1. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  2. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also led to marked accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), a breaker of DNA strand in HCT116 cells. ..... regulating cell proliferation described in the literature have been related to malignant transformation [12]. Thus, we assumed that bergenin-induced cell growth inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest.

  3. Isolation, purification and studies on radiation induced biochemical and physiological changes of bovine growth hormone in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Salam, H.M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Growth hormone has a great importance in the field of animal physiology. Bovine growth hormone was extracted by alteration of the hydrogen ion concentration of phosphate buffer extract of frozen pituitary glands. The extracted bovine growth hormone has similar absorption peaks at UV and infrared spectra, bands of the same location on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis plate and had a molecular weight exactly as the standard bovine growth hormone and equal to 20.9 KD. Labelling of bovine growth hormone with 131 I was carried out with fast and least expensive method. The biological and physiological effects of labelled and non labelled bovine growth hormone were studied on rabbits. The labelled bovine growth hormone decreased the biological and physiological effects of the hormone. Bovine growth hormone (unlabelled) and different effects on growth performance traits, body chemical composition (water, fat,protein and ash), and also on the serum biochemical parameters. We conclude that the bovine growth hormone affects on the biological and physiological properties but this depends on the dose, type of delivery of hormone, time of treatment, and the diet content of the animal. 6 tabs., 13.2 figs., 110 refs

  4. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Wieman, Eric A; Guan, Xiuqin; Jakubowski, Ann A; Steinherz, Peter G; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-29

    We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)) in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8%) displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5%) displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6%) did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  5. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  6. Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Related Gene Expression Changes in a Cellular and Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Su Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We employed transcriptome analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor related gene expression changes in cellular and animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD. We used a well-known Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+ to induce neuronal apoptosis in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. The MPP+-treatment of SH-SY5Y cells was capable of inducing neuro-apoptosis, but it remains unclear what kinds of transcriptional genes are affected by MPP+ toxicity. Therefore the pathways that were significantly perturbed in MPP+ treated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were identified based on genome-wide gene expression data at two time points (24 and 48 h. We found that the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR pathway-related genes showed significantly differential expression at all time points. The EGFR pathway has been linked to diverse cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Further, to evaluate the functional significance of the altered EGFR related gene expression observed in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells, the EGFR related GJB2 (Cx26 gene expression was analyzed in an MPP+-intoxicated animal PD model. Our findings identify that the EGFR signaling pathway and its related genes, such as Cx26, might play a significant role in dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal cell death during the process of neuro-apoptosis and therefore can be focused on as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  8. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  9. Separating growth from elastic deformation during cell enlargement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proseus, T.E.; Boyer, J.S. (Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies); Ortega, J.K.E. (Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-02-01

    Plants change size by deforming reversibly (elastically) whenever turgor pressure changes, and by growing. The elastic deformation is independent of growth because it occurs in nongrowing cells. Its occurrence with growth has prevented growth from being observed alone. The authors investigated whether the two processes could be separated in internode cells of Chara corallina Klien ex Willd., em R.D.W. by injecting or removing cell solution with a pressure probe to change turgor while the cell length was continuously measured. Cell size changed immediately when turgor changed, and growth rates appeared to be altered. Low temperature eliminated growth but did not alter the elastic effects. This allowed elastic deformation measured at low temperature to be subtracted from elongation at warm temperature in the same cell. After te subtraction, growth alone could be observed for the first time. Alternations in turgor caused growth to change rapidly to a new, steady rate with no evidence of rapid adjustments in wall properties. This turgor response, together with the marked sensitivity of growth to temperature, suggested that the growth rate was not controlled by inert polymer extension but rather by the biochemical reactions that include a turgor-sensitive step.

  10. Sickle cell vaso-occlusion in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurantsin-Mills, J.; Jacobs, H.M.; Lessin, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is clinically characterized with vaso-occlusive painful crisis which is pleomorphic in terms of frequency of occurrence. The intracellular polymerization of deoxygenated hemoglobin S increases the internal viscosity of the sickle cells exponentially, concurrent with binding of hemoglobin S to the membrane and discocyte-drepanocyte transformation. As a result, the red cells in sickle cell disease are heterogenous with cells of varying density and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration which alter the rheological features of the blood in the microcirculation. The cellular, physiological, biochemical and rheological factors that contribute to the vaso-occlusive events are not completely understood. Nonetheless, recent clinical studies have demonstrated that a certain fraction of the dense cells disappear during sickle cell painful crisis. In an attempt to elucidate some of the cellular and rheological factors involved in the initiation of vaso-occlusion, the authors have employed intravital videomicroscopy and radionuclide imaging of indium-III labeled sickle cells to determine the dynamics and sites of vaso-occlusion using the rat exchanged-transfused with sickle (HbSS) erythrocytes as a model

  11. Cell volume homeostasis: ionic and nonionic mechanisms. The sodium pump in the emergence of animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wilfred D

    2002-01-01

    Plant cells and bacterial cells are surrounded by a massive polysaccharide wall, which constrains their high internal osmotic pressure (tens of atmospheres). Animal cells, in contrast, are in osmotic equilibrium with their environment, have no restraining surround, and can take on a variety of shapes and can change these from moment to moment. This osmotic balance is achieved, in the first place, by the action of the energy-consuming sodium pump, one of the P-type ATPase transport protein family, members of which are found also in bacteria. The pump's action brings about a transmembranal electrochemical gradient of sodium ions, harnessed in a range of transport systems which couple the dissipation of this gradient to establishing a gradient of the coupled substrate. These transport systems include many which are responsible for short-term regulation of the cell's volume in response to acute changes of their osmotic balance. Thus, the primary role of the sodium pump as a regulator of cell volume has been built upon to provide the basis for an enormous variety of physiological functions.

  12. Animal nutrition and breeding conditions modify the physiology of isolated primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisav, Irina; Banič, Blaž; Šuput, Dušan

    2017-05-01

    Animal primary cell cultures are widely used in biomedical research to investigate cell metabolism, diseases and to devise novel treatments. Modern animal breeding techniques are developed to unify, control and reduce the amount of microorganisms that the animals are being exposed to. Furthermore, health monitoring and strict caging and handling protocols allow animals to be exposed only to a selected spectrum of microbes. We are starting to appreciate that nutrition can influence composition of gut microbiota that can impact hosting organism's physiology and can even result in development of pathological changes. Evidence is also emerging that acute as well as chronic stresses can profoundly influence the physiology of certain organs, especially heart and liver. Our preliminary data imply that changes in animal nutrition and stress levels initiated up to minutes before the cell isolation could alter the cell stress response of cultured primary hepatocytes after isolation, leading to differences in sensitivity of apoptosis triggering. Therefore, we propose the hypothesis that conditions of animal breeding, especially diet and stress levels, are reflected in the physiology of the isolated primary cells. Variations in animal breeding conditions may influence experimental results on isolated cells and their applicability for studying human disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  14. Initial crop growth in soil collected from a closed animal waste lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Kirkham, M B

    2003-03-01

    In the 21st century, remediation of the soil beneath animal waste lagoons will become an important issue, as they are closed due to environmental regulations or to abandonment. The possibility of growing crops in the soil, which has high concentrations of ammonium-N, has not been studied. The objective of this experiment was to determine if crop species would germinate and grow in lagoon soil. Soil was gathered from a lagoon that had received wastes from swine (Sus scrofa) and beef (Bos taurus) since 1968. Eight crops were grown in greenhouse pots containing the lagoon soil: winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Weskan'); field corn (Zea mays L., Cargill's hybrid 7997); 'Plainsman' winter rapeseed [Brassica napus L. spp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinsk. f. biennis]; soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. 'KS 4694'); forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench 'Norkan']; sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. 'Hysun 354'); and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)--two cultivars: '2137' and 'Turkey.' Plants were grown for 35 days in lagoon soil or an agricultural soil (Haynie very fine sandy loam; coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, calcareous, mesic Mollic Udifluvent) obtained from a field near the closed lagoon. Ammonium-N (average value of 692 mg/kg) was about 70-85 times greater than the average value of 8-10 mg/kg NH4-N in Kansan soils. The lagoon soil was nonsodic and had a salinity ranking of "medium" with an electrical conductivity averaging 2.29 dS/m. The high ammonium-N concentration in the lagoon soil was not inhibitory to emergence and growth. The eight crops grew taller in the lagoon soil than in the agricultural soil. Except for '2137' wheat, dry weight was higher in the lagoon soil than in the agricultural soil. The results showed that the lagoon soil is not detrimental to early growth of eight crops.

  15. More Reasonable Animal Model for Study the Effect of Pneumoperitoneum on Abdominal Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qijun, Lv; Jiang, Du; Chongshu, Wang

    2018-01-27

    Background: Many animal experimental studies showed that abdominal tumor cells will be widely spread during laparoscopic treatment and grow into metastases. These results are different from clinical observations. There is a hypothesis that too much tumor cells was injected in the animals lead to the results of theses bias. We aim to learn the difference of abdominal cavity volume between human body and the nude mice and to determine reasonable amount of tumor cells in the animal experiments. Methods: The insufflated CO2 volume which represents the capacity of the abdominal cavity was recorded during laparoscopic process in 212 patients and 20 nude mice respectively, the relative volume of nude mice and human body was calculated.Based on data from the literature and this study , the amount of tumor cells in the animal experiments was determined.According to these data, we set up a new animal model and a traditional one respectively,and compared the rate of successful modeling and tumor formation between two animal models. Results: The intraperitoneal volumes of humans and nude mice were 3.01±0.36 L and 0.011±0.001 L respectively.The number of tumor cells that be uesd in animal should be approximately 0.26×105 in terms of known data in human beings.Compared with the traditional animal model which formed a large number of intraperitoneal tumor metastasis, the new animal model was shows more moderately,and the rate of successful modeling was similar. Conclusion: In animal experiments, to simulate the clinical situation, about 0.26×105 tumor cells should be inject in peritoneal cavity of the nude mice. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Savannah; Takeda, Kazuyo; Stark, Felicity; Meierovics, Anda I.; Yabe, Idalia; Cowley, Siobhan C.

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells). Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates. PMID:26379269

  17. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah Maggio

    Full Text Available The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells. Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates.

  18. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  19. Another Brick in the Cell Wall: Biosynthesis Dependent Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  20. Microtubules Growth Rate Alteration in Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B. Alieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how microtubules contribute to the dynamic reorganization of the endothelial cell (EC cytoskeleton, we established an EC model expressing EB3-GFP, a protein that marks microtubule plus-ends. Using this model, we were able to measure microtubule growth rate at the centrosome region and near the cell periphery of a single human EC and in the EC monolayer. We demonstrate that the majority of microtubules in EC are dynamic, the growth rate of their plus-ends is highest in the internal cytoplasm, in the region of the centrosome. Growth rate of microtubule plus-ends decreases from the cell center toward the periphery. Our data suggest the existing mechanism(s of local regulation of microtubule plus-ends growth in EC. Microtubule growth rate in the internal cytoplasm of EC in the monolayer is lower than that of single EC suggesting the regulatory effect of cell-cell contacts. Centrosomal microtubule growth rate distribution in single EC indicated the presence of two subpopulations of microtubules with “normal” (similar to those in monolayer EC and “fast” (three times as much growth rates. Our results indicate functional interactions between cell-cell contacts and microtubules.

  1. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv [Portola Valley, CA; Pritha, Ray [Mountain View, CA

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  2. Effects of several physiochemical factors on cell growth and gallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of gallic acid in cell suspension culture of Acer ginnala Maxim was studied. Some physiochemical factors and chemical substances effect on the cell growth and the production of gallic acid were investigated. Cells harvested from plant tissue culture were extracted and applied to high performance liquid ...

  3. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Behaviour of CD11b-Positive Cells in an Animal Model of Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Heiduschka, Peter; Alex, Anne F; Niekämper, Daniel; Eter, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Immune cells, e.g. microglial cells of the retina, appear to be involved in pathological processes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically check the expression of various factors and cytokines by CD11b-positive (CD11b+) immune cells in an animal model of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV). We used the animal model of laser-induced CNV in mice. Eyes were isolated at 1, 4, 7, and 14 days after laser treatment. Cryosections were prepared and checked immunohistochemically for the presence of different growth factors and cytokines on microglial cells and other immune cells identified by CD11b immunoreactivity. We found that the number of CD11b+ cells at the laser spots increased dramatically 4 days after laser treatment, the majority of them entering the laser spot most probably by migration. CD11b+ cells in the laser spot were positive for a variety of pro-angiogenic factors, such as PDGF-β, FGF-1, FGF-2, and TGF-β1. They were also positive for some inflammatory cytokines, in particular TNF-α, IL-6, and CXCL1. In non-treated retinas, CD11b+ cells showed almost no immunoreactivity for these proteins. Microglial cells, macrophages, and other CD11b+ cells may promote the neovascularisation in the laser spot and show a moderate inflammatory behaviour. Immunoreactivity for most of these molecules was found to decrease during the time of observation. Modulation of immune cell activity may thus be a tool to reduce the extent of CNV. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Neurogenetics of slow axonal transport: from cells to animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadananda, Aparna; Ray, Krishanu

    2012-09-01

    Slow axonal transport is a multivariate phenomenon implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent reports have unraveled the molecular basis of the transport of certain slow component proteins, such as the neurofilament subunits, tubulin, and certain soluble enzymes such as Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIa (CaM kinase IIa), etc., in tissue cultured neurons. In addition, genetic analyses also implicate microtubule-dependent motors and other housekeeping proteins in this process. However, the biological relevance of this phenomenon is not so well understood. Here, the authors have discussed the possibility of adopting neurogenetic analyses in multiple model organisms to correlate molecular level measurements of the slow transport phenomenon to animal behavior, thus facilitating the investigation of its biological efficacy.

  6. Use of antimicrobial growth promoters in food animals and Enterococcus faecium resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1999-01-01

    Supplementing animal feed with antimicrobial agents to enhance growth has been common practice for more than 30 years and is estimated to constitute more than half the total antimicrobial use worldwide. The potential public health consequences of this use have been debated; however, until recentl...

  7. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  8. Veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in animal products : annual report 2012 of the National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, A.A.M.; Sterk, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    This report if the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for residues of veterinary drugs and growth promoting agents in products of animal origin according to Council Directive 96/23/EC describes the activities employed in 2012. The main tasks of the NRL are communication with Official Laboratories

  9. Use of antimicrobial growth promoters in food animals and Enterococcus faecium resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1999-01-01

    , clear evidence of a health risk was not available. Accumulating evidence now indicates that the use of the glycopeptide avoparcin as a growth promoter has created in food animals a major reservoir of Enterococcus faecium, which contains the high level glycopeptide resistance determinant vanA, located...

  10. Periodontal ligament-derived cells for periodontal regeneration in animal models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, R; Hynes, K; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-04-01

    Implantation of periodontal ligament stem cells is emerging as a potential periodontal regenerative procedure. This systematic review considers the evidence from animal models investigating the use of periodontal ligament stem cells for successful periodontal regeneration. PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE and Google Scholar were searched to December 2013 for quantitative studies examining the outcome of implanting periodontal ligament stem cells into experimental periodontal defects in animals. Inclusion criteria were: implantation of periodontal ligament stem cells into surgically created periodontal defects for periodontal regeneration; animal models only; source of cells either human or animal; and published in English. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. From the literature search, 43 studies met the inclusion criteria. A wide variety of surgical defects were created in four species of animal (dog, rat, pig and sheep). Owing to wide variability in defect type, cell source and cell scaffold, no meta-analysis was possible. Outcome measures included new bone, new cementum and new connective tissue formation. In 70.5% of the results, statistically significant improvements of these measures was recorded. These results are notable in that they indicate that irrespective of the defect type and animal model used, periodontal ligament stem cell implantation can be expected to result in a beneficial outcome for periodontal regeneration. It is recommended that there is sufficient evidence from preclinical animal studies to warrant moving to human studies to examine the efficacy, safety, feasibility (autologous vs. allogeneic transplantation) and delivery of periodontal ligament stem cells for periodontal regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Biofuel cells for biomedical applications: colonizing the animal kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Magnus; Narváez Villarrubia, Claudia W; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Shleev, Sergey

    2013-07-22

    Interdisciplinary research has combined the efforts of many scientists and engineers to gain an understanding of biotic and abiotic electrochemical processes, materials properties, biomedical, and engineering approaches for the development of alternative power-generating and/or energy-harvesting devices, aiming to solve health-related issues and to improve the quality of human life. This review intends to recapitulate the principles of biofuel cell development and the progress over the years, thanks to the contribution of cross-disciplinary researchers that have combined knowledge and innovative ideas to the field. The emergence of biofuel cells, as a response to the demand of electrical power devices that can operate under physiological conditions, are reviewed. Implantable biofuel cells operating inside living organisms have been envisioned for over fifty years, but few reports of implanted devices have existed up until very recently. The very first report of an implanted biofuel cell (implanted in a grape) was published only in 2003 by Adam Heller and his coworkers. This work was a result of earlier scientific efforts of this group to "wire" enzymes to the electrode surface. The last couple of years have, however, seen a multitude of biofuel cells being implanted and operating in different living organisms, including mammals. Herein, the evolution of the biofuel concept, the understanding and employment of catalyst and biocatalyst processes to mimic biological processes, are explored. These potentially green technology biodevices are designed to be applied for biomedical applications to power nano- and microelectronic devices, drug delivery systems, biosensors, and many more. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Imaging proteolytic activity in live cells and animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Galbán

    Full Text Available In addition to their degradative role in protein turnover, proteases play a key role as positive or negative regulators of signal transduction pathways and therefore their dysregulation contributes to many disease states. Regulatory roles of proteases include their hormone-like role in triggering G protein-coupled signaling (Protease-Activated-Receptors; their role in shedding of ligands such as EGF, Notch and Fas; and their role in signaling events that lead to apoptotic cell death. Dysregulated activation of apoptosis by the caspase family of proteases has been linked to diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity and inflammation. In an effort to better understand the role of proteases in health and disease, a luciferase biosensor is described which can quantitatively report proteolytic activity in live cells and mouse models. The biosensor, hereafter referred to as GloSensor Caspase 3/7 has a robust signal to noise (50-100 fold and dynamic range such that it can be used to screen for pharmacologically active compounds in high throughput campaigns as well as to study cell signaling in rare cell populations such as isolated cancer stem cells. The biosensor can also be used in the context of genetically engineered mouse models of human disease wherein conditional expression using the Cre/loxP technology can be implemented to investigate the role of a specific protease in living subjects. While the regulation of apoptosis by caspase's was used as an example in these studies, biosensors to study additional proteases involved in the regulation of normal and pathological cellular processes can be designed using the concepts presented herein.

  13. Linking stem cell function and growth pattern of intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalheim, Torsten; Quaas, Marianne; Herberg, Maria; Braumann, Ulf-Dietrich; Kerner, Christiane; Loeffler, Markus; Aust, Gabriela; Galle, Joerg

    2018-01-15

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) require well-defined signals from their environment in order to carry out their specific functions. Most of these signals are provided by neighboring cells that form a stem cell niche, whose shape and cellular composition self-organize. Major features of this self-organization can be studied in ISC-derived organoid culture. In this system, manipulation of essential pathways of stem cell maintenance and differentiation results in well-described growth phenotypes. We here provide an individual cell-based model of intestinal organoids that enables a mechanistic explanation of the observed growth phenotypes. In simulation studies of the 3D structure of expanding organoids, we investigate interdependences between Wnt- and Notch-signaling which control the shape of the stem cell niche and, thus, the growth pattern of the organoids. Similar to in vitro experiments, changes of pathway activities alter the cellular composition of the organoids and, thereby, affect their shape. Exogenous Wnt enforces transitions from branched into a cyst-like growth pattern; known to occur spontaneously during long term organoid expansion. Based on our simulation results, we predict that the cyst-like pattern is associated with biomechanical changes of the cells which assign them a growth advantage. The results suggest ongoing stem cell adaptation to in vitro conditions during long term expansion by stabilizing Wnt-activity. Our study exemplifies the potential of individual cell-based modeling in unraveling links between molecular stem cell regulation and 3D growth of tissues. This kind of modeling combines experimental results in the fields of stem cell biology and cell biomechanics constituting a prerequisite for a better understanding of tissue regeneration as well as developmental processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Red cell indexes made easy using an interactive animation: do students and their scores concur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachroo, Upasana; Vinod, Elizabeth; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; W, Jesi; Prince, Neetu

    2018-03-01

    A good understanding of red cell indexes can aid medical students in a considerable manner, serving as a basis to unravel both concepts in red cell physiology and abnormalities associated with the same. In this study, we tried to assess whether an interactive animation was helpful in improving student comprehension and understanding of red cell indexes compared with conventional classroom teaching. Eighty-eight first-year MBBS students participated, of which 44 were assigned to group A and 44 were assigned to group B after randomization. After further creation of smaller groups, students were provided with 45 min to revise red cell indexes, after which they were required to complete a multimodal questionnaire. Group A subgroups used written material for revision, whereas group B subgroups had access to an interactive animation. After completion of the questionnaire, group A students also used the animation after which feedback was collected from all students. Efficacy of the animation to improve learning and retention was demonstrated, as group B students scored significantly higher than group A students on the questionnaire ( P = 0.0003). A clear majority of the students agreed/strongly agreed that the animation was easy to operate, conveyed important concepts efficiently, and improved their knowledge of related clinical aspects as well. From the results and feedback, we found that the animation was a simple, well-received model, which, by significantly improving student performance, corroborated our hypothesis that inclusion of interactive animation into student curriculum can advance their academic attainment, compared with didactic teaching alone.

  15. Small molecule alteration of RNA sequence in cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lirui; Luo, Yiling; Ja, William W; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-10-18

    RNA regulation and maintenance are critical for proper cell function. Small molecules that specifically alter RNA sequence would be exceptionally useful as probes of RNA structure and function or as potential therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a photochemical approach for altering the trinucleotide expanded repeat causative of myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 (DM1), r(CUG) exp . The small molecule, 2H-4-Ru, binds to r(CUG) exp and converts guanosine residues to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine upon photochemical irradiation. We demonstrate targeted modification upon irradiation in cell culture and in Drosophila larvae provided a diet containing 2H-4-Ru. Our results highlight a general chemical biology approach for altering RNA sequence in vivo by using small molecules and photochemistry. Furthermore, these studies show that addition of 8-oxo-G lesions into RNA 3' untranslated regions does not affect its steady state levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer – biological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Brian

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other specie, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle.

  17. Cell adhesion and growth on ion-implanted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Suk; Kaibara, M.; Iwaki, M.; Sasabe, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Kusakabe, M.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion and growth of endothelial cells on ion-implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane surface were investigated. Ions of Na + , N 2 + , O 2 + , Ar + and Kr + were implanted to the polymer surface with ion fluences between 1 x 10 15 and 3 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at energy of 150 KeV at room temperature. Ion-implanted polymers were characterized by FT-IR-ATR an Raman spectroscopies. The adhesion and proliferation of bovine aorta endothelial cells on ion-implanted polymer surface were observed by an optical microscope. The rate of growth of BAECs on ion-implanted PSt was faster than that on non-implanted PSt. Complete cell adhesion and growth were observed on ion-implanted SPU, whereas the adhesion and growth of BAECs on the non-implanted SPU was not observed. It was attempted to control the cell culture on the ion-implanted domain fabricated using a mask. (author)

  18. Growth of fibroblasts and endothelial cells on wettability gradient surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The growth, spreading, and shape of human skin fibroblasts (PK 84) and human umbilical cord endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) and dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DOGS) gradient surfaces were investigated in the presence of serum proteins. Gradient surfaces were prepared on glass using

  19. Chlorhexidine Digluconate Effects on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Some Field Isolates of Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Khoshnood, Sheida; Khubani, Shahin; Dokht Faraj, Mahdi; Hakimi Alni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study chlorhexidine digluconate disinfectant effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some bacterial field isolates from animals. Objectives: The current study investigated chlorhexidine digluconate effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some field isolates of veterinary bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus. aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates for each) were examined for chlorhexidine digluconate effects on biofilm formation and planktonic growth using microtiter plates. In all of the examined strains in the presence of chlorhexidine digluconate, biofilm development and planktonic growth were affected at the same concentrations of the disinfectant. Results: Chlorhexidine digluconate inhibited the planktonic growth of different bacterial species at sub-MICs. But they were able to induce biofilm development of the E. coli, Salmonella spp., S. aureus and Str. agalactiae strains. Conclusions: Bacterial resistance against chlorhexidine is increasing. Sub-MIC doses of chlorhexidine digluconate can stimulate the formation of biofilm strains. PMID:24872940

  20. Deoxynivalenol induces cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in animal primary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Banerjee, Subham; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Borthakur, Sashin Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum, is widely found as a contaminant of food. DON is responsible for a wide range of toxic activities, including gastro-intestinal, lymphoid, bone-marrow and cardiotoxicity. But, the complete explorations of toxicity in terms of hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as well have not been documented well. Again, the mechanisms through which DON damages the DNA and promotes cellular toxicity are not well established. Considering the above fact, this research article is focused on the effects of DON-induced toxicities on experimental animal model as well as its effects on cellular level via various toxicological investigations. DON treatment showed cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Further, flow cytometric analysis of hepatocytes showed cellular apoptosis, suggesting that DON-induced hepatotoxicity is, may be partly, mediated by apoptosis. Moreover, significant differences were found in each haematology and clinical chemistry value, either (p > 0.05). No abnormality of any organ was found during histopathological examination. Hence, it can be concluded that DON induces oxidative DNA damage and increases the formation of centromere positive micronuclei due to aneugenic activity.

  1. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  2. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  3. p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells and its expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors promoting cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Sophie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p8 is a stress-induced protein with multiple functions and biochemically related to the architectural factor HMG-I/Y. We analyzed the expression and function of p8 in pancreatic cancer-derived cells. Methods Expression of p8 was silenced in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and BxPc-3 by infection with a retrovirus expressing p8 RNA in the antisense orientation. Cell growth was measured in control and p8-silenced cells. Influence on p8 expression of the induction of intracellular pathways promoting cellular growth or growth arrest was monitored. Results p8-silenced cells grew more rapidly than control cells transfected with the empty retrovirus. Activation of the Ras→Raf→MEK→ERK and JNK intracellular pathways down-regulated p8 expression. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 up-regulates expression of p8. Conversely, p38 or TGFβ-1 induced p8 expression whereas the specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 down-regulated p8 expression. Finally, TGFβ-1 induction was in part mediated through p38. Conclusions p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. p8 expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors that promote cell growth. These results suggest that p8 belongs to a pathway regulating the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

  4. Significantly different proliferative potential of oral mucosal epithelial cells between six animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makoto; Yamato, Masayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Namiki, Hideo; Okano, Teruo

    2014-06-01

    There has been an upsurge in regenerative medicine in recent years. In particular, because oral mucosal epithelial cells can be obtained noninvasively, cultured epithelial cell sheets have been used in a number of ectopic transplantations. Additionally, the verification of the properties of experimental animals' cultured cells has accelerated the application of regenerative medicine. In the present study, the properties of oral mucosal epithelial cells were compared between six animal species. The human and pig epithelia were relatively thicker than the epithelia of the other species. The colony-forming efficiency of the rat was the highest, followed by those of the dog, human, rabbit, and pig, whereas the colonies of the mouse cells were all paraclone and uncountable in the colony-forming assay. We also found that the rabbit and pig cells proliferated poorly and were unable to form cell sheets without feeder layers. In contrast, even in the absence of feeder layers and cholera toxin, cultured dog and mouse cells formed contiguous sheets, when the cell seeding density was high. These results indicate that interspecies variation is considerable in oral mucosal epithelial cells and that specific experimental animal or human cells must be chosen according to the intended use. Copyright © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  5. Gene expression profiling: cell cycle deregulation and aneuploidy do not cause breast cancer formation in WAP-SVT/t transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andreas; Guhl, Eva; Zollinger, Raphael; Tzeng, Yin-Jeh; Wessel, Ralf; Hummel, Michael; Graessmann, Monika; Graessmann, Adolf

    2005-05-01

    Microarray studies revealed that as a first hit the SV40 T/t antigen causes deregulation of 462 genes in mammary gland cells (ME cells) of WAP-SVT/t transgenic animals. The majority of deregulated genes are cell proliferation specific and Rb-E2F dependent, causing ME cell proliferation and gland hyperplasia but not breast cancer formation. In the breast tumor cells a further 207 genes are differentially expressed, most of them belonging to the cell communication category. In tissue culture breast tumor cells frequently switch off WAP-SVT/t transgene expression and regain the morphology and growth characteristics of normal ME cells, although the tumor-revertant cells are aneuploid and only 114 genes regain the expression level of normal ME cells. The profile of retransformants shows that only 38 deregulated genes are tumor-specific, and that none of them is considered to be a typical breast cancer gene.

  6. Cultivation and characterization of cornea limbal epithelial stem cells on lens capsule in animal material-free medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Réka Albert

    Full Text Available A simple, reproducible, animal-material free method for cultivating and characterizing cornea limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs on human lens capsule (LC was developed for future clinical transplantation. The limbal tissue explants (2 × 2 × 0.25 mm were harvested from 77 cadavers and expanded ex vivo on either cell culture plates or LC in medium containing human serum as the only growth supplement. Cell outgrowth at the edge of the explants was observed within 24 hours of cultivation and achieved viable outgrowth (>97% viability as measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry within two weeks. The outgrowing cells were examined by genome-wide microarray including markers of stemness (p63α, ABCG2, CK19, Vimentin and Integrin α9, proliferation (Ki-67, limbal epithelial cells (CK 8/18 and 14 and differentiated cornea epithelial cells (CK 3 and 12. Immunostaining revealed the non-hematopoietic, -endothelial and -mesenchymal stem cell phenotype of the LESCs and the localization of specific markers in situ. Cell adhesion molecules, integrins and lectin-based surface carbohydrate profiling showed a specific pattern on these cells, while colony-formation assay confirmed their clonal potency. The LESCs expressed a specific surface marker fingerprint (CD117/c-kit, CXCR4, CD144/VE-Cadherin, CD146/MCAM, CD166/ALCAM, and surface carbohydrates: WGA, ConA, RCA, PNA and AIL which can be used for better localization of the limbal stem cell niche. In summary, we report a novel method combining the use of a medium with human serum as the only growth supplement with LC for cultivating, characterizing and expanding cornea LESCs from cadavers or alternatively from autologous donors for possible treatment of LESC deficiency.

  7. Cultivation and characterization of cornea limbal epithelial stem cells on lens capsule in animal material-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Veréb, Zoltán; Csomós, Krisztián; Moe, Morten C; Johnsen, Erik O; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Rajnavölgyi, Eva; Fésüs, László; Berta, András; Petrovski, Goran

    2012-01-01

    A simple, reproducible, animal-material free method for cultivating and characterizing cornea limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) on human lens capsule (LC) was developed for future clinical transplantation. The limbal tissue explants (2 × 2 × 0.25 mm) were harvested from 77 cadavers and expanded ex vivo on either cell culture plates or LC in medium containing human serum as the only growth supplement. Cell outgrowth at the edge of the explants was observed within 24 hours of cultivation and achieved viable outgrowth (>97% viability as measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry) within two weeks. The outgrowing cells were examined by genome-wide microarray including markers of stemness (p63α, ABCG2, CK19, Vimentin and Integrin α9), proliferation (Ki-67), limbal epithelial cells (CK 8/18 and 14) and differentiated cornea epithelial cells (CK 3 and 12). Immunostaining revealed the non-hematopoietic, -endothelial and -mesenchymal stem cell phenotype of the LESCs and the localization of specific markers in situ. Cell adhesion molecules, integrins and lectin-based surface carbohydrate profiling showed a specific pattern on these cells, while colony-formation assay confirmed their clonal potency. The LESCs expressed a specific surface marker fingerprint (CD117/c-kit, CXCR4, CD144/VE-Cadherin, CD146/MCAM, CD166/ALCAM, and surface carbohydrates: WGA, ConA, RCA, PNA and AIL) which can be used for better localization of the limbal stem cell niche. In summary, we report a novel method combining the use of a medium with human serum as the only growth supplement with LC for cultivating, characterizing and expanding cornea LESCs from cadavers or alternatively from autologous donors for possible treatment of LESC deficiency.

  8. Phosphoinositide turnover in cell growth and transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischman, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Interaction of cells with various stimuli triggers a common signal transduction pathway involving breakdown and resynthesis of the minor membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). Hydrolysis of PIP 2 by phospholipase C generates two key catabolites-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ) and diacylglycerol (DAG)-which mediate and amplify cellular responses. These studies provide evidence for potential involvement of this pathway in oncogenic transformation and cell cycle progression. Altered levels of PIP 2 and its breakdown products were found in cells transformed by ras oncogenes, in contrast to untransformed counterparts. Steady-state levels of PIP 2 , DAG and inositol phosphates were measured in NIH 3T3 and NRK cells metabolically labelled with 3 H-glycerol and 3 H-inositol. DAG and inositol phosphate levels were significantly elevated by 2.5-3 fold in the transformed cells while levels of PIP 2 were decreased. These findings suggest that the ras protein may activate phospholipase C. Elevated DAG content in the transformed cells was also measured by phosphorylation of DAG using a partially purified DAG kinase, indicating that the differences seen could not be attributed to differences in labelling between the cell lines

  9. Red Cell Indexes Made Easy Using an Interactive Animation: Do Students and Their Scores Concur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachroo, Upasana; Vinod, Elizabeth; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; W., Jesi; Prince, Neetu

    2018-01-01

    A good understanding of red cell indexes can aid medical students in a considerable manner, serving as a basis to unravel both concepts in red cell physiology and abnormalities associated with the same. In this study, we tried to assess whether an interactive animation was helpful in improving student comprehension and understanding of red cell…

  10. Discussion of Animal Stem Cells in the Classroom: Engaging Students through the Lens of Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Niess, Daniel; Hutchinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning about stem cells within the context of treating pet illness or injury is an additional way for teachers to discuss the integration of science, technology, and veterinary medicine. We explain how practitioners in veterinary medicine harvest animal stem cells from adipose (fat) tissue in treating pet illness or injury. Further, we narrate…

  11. Minoxidil Promotes Hair Growth through Stimulation of Growth Factor Release from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nahyun; Shin, Soyoung; Song, Sun U; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2018-02-28

    Minoxidil directly promotes hair growth via the stimulation of dermal papilla (DP) and epithelial cells. Alternatively, there is little evidence for indirect promotion of hair growth via stimulation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). We investigated whether minoxidil stimulates ASCs and if increased growth factor secretion by ASCs facilitates minoxidil-induced hair growth. Telogen-to-anagen induction was examined in mice. Cultured DP cells and vibrissae hair follicle organ cultures were used to further examine the underlying mechanisms. Subcutaneous injection of minoxidil-treated ASCs accelerated telogen-to-anagen transition in mice, and increased hair weight at day 14 post-injection. Minoxidil did not alter ASC proliferation, but increased migration and tube formation. Minoxidil also increased the secretion of growth factors from ASCs, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF), and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C). Minoxidil increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and concomitant upregulation of PD-ECGF and PDGF-C mRNA levels were attenuated by an ERK inhibitor. Subcutaneous injection of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C enhanced anagen induction in mice, and both CXCL1 and PDGF-C increased hair length in ex vivo organ culture. Treatment with CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C also increased the proliferation index in DP cells. Finally, topical application of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C with 2% minoxidil enhanced anagen induction when compared to minoxidil alone. Minoxidil stimulates ASC motility and increases paracrine growth factor signaling. Minoxidil-stimulated secretion of growth factors by ASCs may enhance hair growth by promoting DP proliferation. Therefore, minoxidil can be used as an ASC preconditioning agent for hair regeneration.

  12. Mini-Review: Limbal Stem Cells Deficiency in Companion Animals: Time to Give Something Back?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rick F; Daniels, Julie T

    2016-04-01

    Experimental animals have been used extensively in the goal of developing sight-saving therapies for humans. One example is the development of transplantation of cultured limbal epithelial stem cells (LESC) to restore vision following ocular surface injury or disease. With clinical trials of cultured LESC therapy underway in humans and a potential companion animal population suffering from similar diseases, it is perhaps time to give something back. Comparatively to humans, what is known about the healthy limbus and corneal surface physiology of companion animals is still very little. Blinding corneal diseases in animals such as symblepharon in cats with Feline Herpes Virus-1 infections require a basic understanding of the functional companion animal limbus and corneal stem cells. Our understanding of many other vision threatening conditions such as scarring of the cornea post-inflammation with lymphocytic-plasmacytic infiltrate in dogs (aka chronic superficial keratitis) or pigment proliferation with Pigmentary Keratitis of Pugs would benefit from a better understanding of the animal cornea in health and disease. This is also vital when new therapeutic approaches are considered. This review will explore the current challenges and future research directions that will be required to increase our understanding of corneal diseases in animals and consider the potential development and delivery of cultured stem cell therapy to veterinary ocular surface patients.

  13. Radiation adaptive response for the growth of cultured glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Miura, Y.; Kano, M.; Toda, T.; Urano, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To examine the molecular mechanism of radiation adaptive response (RAR) for the growth of cultured glial cells and to investigate the influence of aging on the response, glial cells were cultured from young and aged rats (1 month and 24 months old). RAR for the growth of glial cells conditioned with a low dose of X-rays and subsequently exposed to a high dose of X-rays was examined for cell number and BrdU incorporation. Involvement of the subcellular signaling pathway factors in RAR was investigated using their inhibitors, activators and mutated glial cells. RAR was observed in cells cultured from young rats, but was not in cells from aged rats. The inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppressed RAR. The activators of PKC instead of low dose irradiation also caused RAR. Moreover, glial cells cultured from severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mice (CB-17 scid) and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells from AT patients showed no RAR. These results indicated that PKC, ATM, DNAPK and/or PI3K were involved in RAR for growth and BrdU incorporation of cultured glial cells and RAR decreased with aging. Proteomics data of glial cells exposed to severe stress of H 2 O 2 or X-rays also will be presented in the conference since little or no difference has not been observed with slight stress yet

  14. Leptin Regulation of Mammary Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pighetti, Gina

    2000-01-01

    .... The studies of this proposal were designed to test the hypothesis that the interaction of leptin with its receptor regulates normal and pathologic mammary epithelial cell proliferation and/or differentiation...

  15. Optimization of human mesenchymal stem cell manufacturing: the effects of animal/xeno-free media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; van Deen, Welmoed K; Manansala, Aida-Rae; Lacey, Precious N; Tomakili, Tamera A; Ziman, Alyssa; Hommes, Daniel W

    2015-11-13

    Due to their immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been evaluated for the treatment of immunological diseases. However, the animal-derived growth supplements utilized for MSC manufacturing may lead to clinical complications. Characterization of alternative media formulations is imperative for MSC therapeutic application. Human BMMSC and AdMSC were expanded in media supplemented with either human platelet lysates (HPL), serum-free media/xeno-free FDA-approved culture medium (SFM/XF), or fetal bovine serum (FBS) and the effects on their properties were investigated. The immunophenotype of resting and IFN-γ primed BMMSC and AdMSC remained unaltered in all media. Both HPL and SFM/XF increased the proliferation of BMMSC and AdMSC. Expansion of BMMSC and AdMSC in HPL increased their differentiation, compared to SFM/XF and FBS. Resting BMMSC and AdMSC, expanded in FBS or SFM/XF, demonstrated potent immunosuppressive properties in both non-primed and IFN-γ primed conditions, whereas HPL-expanded MSC exhibited diminished immunosuppressive properties. Finally, IFN-γ primed BMMSC and AdMSC expanded in SFM/XF and HPL expressed attenuated levels of IDO-1 compared to FBS. Herein, we provide strong evidence supporting the use of the FDA-approved SFM/XF medium, in contrast to the HPL medium, for the expansion of MSC towards therapeutic applications.

  16. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase coordinates cell growth and fat storage through phosphatidylinositol metabolism and the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During development, animals usually undergo a rapid growth phase followed by a homeostatic stage when growth has ceased. The increase in cell size and number during the growth phase requires a large amount of lipids; while in the static state, excess lipids are usually stored in adipose tissues in preparation for nutrient-limited conditions. How cells coordinate growth and fat storage is not fully understood. Through a genetic screen we identified Drosophila melanogaster CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS/CdsA, which diverts phosphatidic acid from triacylglycerol synthesis to phosphatidylinositol (PI synthesis and coordinates cell growth and fat storage. Loss of CdsA function causes significant accumulation of neutral lipids in many tissues along with reduced cell/organ size. These phenotypes can be traced back to reduced PI levels and, subsequently, low insulin pathway activity. Overexpressing CdsA rescues the fat storage and cell growth phenotypes of insulin pathway mutants, suggesting that CdsA coordinates cell/tissue growth and lipid storage through the insulin pathway. We also revealed that a DAG-to-PE route mediated by the choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase Bbc may contribute to the growth of fat cells in CdsA RNAi.

  17. Concise review: animal substance-free human embryonic stem cells aiming at clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovatta, Outi; Rodin, Sergey; Antonsson, Liselotte; Tryggvason, Karl

    2014-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have been considered the gold standard as a cell source for regenerative medicine since they were first cultured in 1998. They are pluripotent and can form principally all the cells types in the body. They are obtained from supernumerary human in vitro fertilization embryos that cannot be used for infertility treatment. Following studies on factors regulating pluripotency and differentiation, we now have techniques to establish and effectively expand these cells in animal substance-free conditions, even from single cells biopsied from eight-cell stage embryos in chemically defined feeder-free cultures. The genetic stability and absence of tumorigenic mutations can be determined. There are satisfactory animal tests for functionality and safety. The first clinical trials are ongoing for two indications: age-related macular degeneration and spinal cord injury. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities above 500...

  19. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  20. Virtual microstructural leaf tissue generation based on cell growth modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abera, M.K.; Retta, M.A.; Verboven, P.; Nicolai, B.M.; Berghuijs, H.; Struik, P.

    2016-01-01

    A cell growth algorithm for virtual leaf tissue generation is presented based on the biomechanics of plant cells in tissues. The algorithm can account for typical differences in epidermal layers, palisade mesophyll layer and spongy mesophyll layer which have characteristic differences in the

  1. A Simple Method to Reduce both Lactic Acid and Ammonium Production in Industrial Animal Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Nathaniel W; Croughan, Matthew S

    2018-01-28

    Fed-batch animal cell culture is the most common method for commercial production of recombinant proteins. However, higher cell densities in these platforms are still limited due to factors such as excessive ammonium production, lactic acid production, nutrient limitation, and/or hyperosmotic stress related to nutrient feeds and base additions to control pH. To partly overcome these factors, we investigated a simple method to reduce both ammonium and lactic acid production-termed Lactate Supplementation and Adaptation (LSA) technology-through the use of CHO cells adapted to a lactate-supplemented medium. Using this simple method, we achieved a reduction of nearly 100% in lactic acid production with a simultaneous 50% reduction in ammonium production in batch shaker flasks cultures. In subsequent fed-batch bioreactor cultures, lactic acid production and base addition were both reduced eight-fold. Viable cell densities of 35 million cells per mL and integral viable cell days of 273 million cell-days per mL were achieved, both among the highest currently reported for a fed-batch animal cell culture. Investigating the benefits of LSA technology in animal cell culture is worthy of further consideration and may lead to process conditions more favorable for advanced industrial applications.

  2. A Simple Method to Reduce both Lactic Acid and Ammonium Production in Industrial Animal Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Nathaniel W.; Croughan, Matthew S.

    2018-01-01

    Fed-batch animal cell culture is the most common method for commercial production of recombinant proteins. However, higher cell densities in these platforms are still limited due to factors such as excessive ammonium production, lactic acid production, nutrient limitation, and/or hyperosmotic stress related to nutrient feeds and base additions to control pH. To partly overcome these factors, we investigated a simple method to reduce both ammonium and lactic acid production—termed Lactate Supplementation and Adaptation (LSA) technology—through the use of CHO cells adapted to a lactate-supplemented medium. Using this simple method, we achieved a reduction of nearly 100% in lactic acid production with a simultaneous 50% reduction in ammonium production in batch shaker flasks cultures. In subsequent fed-batch bioreactor cultures, lactic acid production and base addition were both reduced eight-fold. Viable cell densities of 35 million cells per mL and integral viable cell days of 273 million cell-days per mL were achieved, both among the highest currently reported for a fed-batch animal cell culture. Investigating the benefits of LSA technology in animal cell culture is worthy of further consideration and may lead to process conditions more favorable for advanced industrial applications. PMID:29382079

  3. Dissolution of rock phosphate in animal manure soil amendment and lettuce growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Agyarko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted in pots on the field to assess the effect of different quantities of poultry manure (PM, cattle manure (CM and pig manure (PG on the release of available phosphorus from Togo rock phosphate (RP and lettuce growth. There were eleven (11 treatments which were: Control (soil only; 2.5g RP; 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 5gCM; 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 5gPM; 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 5gPG, applied per kg soil, using the Completely Randomized Design (CRD with three replications. Available phosphorus and other parameters were assessed using standard methods. Results were statistically analyzed using the the GenStat (11th Edition statistical software package. The amount and type of animal manure in the amendment affected the amount of the available P released. The addition of 2.5g manure to 2.5g RP in a kg of soil significantly (P<0.05 increased available P by 4 to 7 times over the sole 2.5g RP/kg soil treatment. Doubling the amount of manure in the amendment (5g manure + 2.5g RP almost doubled the amount of P released, with the poultry manure combinations being more significant. The amount of available P in the soil positively related to the plant height (R2=63, leaf area (R2=0.55, dry weight (R2=0.73 and the percentage P in the leaf (R2=0.88 of lettuce. The PM at 2.5gRP + 5gPM recorded the highest significant (P<0.05 values. The study has provided further basis for manure selection and quantities to be used in enhancing the release of P from rock phosphate. However, investigations need to be continued using nuclear techniques.

  4. Mechanical characterization of yeast cells: effects of growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, A; Kampen, I; Kwade, A

    2015-10-01

    Industrial biotechnology uses microbiological cells to produce a wide range of products. While the organisms in question are well understood regarding their genetic and molecular properties, less is known about their mechanical properties. Previous work has established a testing procedure for single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells using a Nanoindenter equipped with a Flat Punch probe, allowing the compression between two parallel surfaces. The resulting force-displacement curves clearly showed the bursting of the cells and served to determine characteristic values such as the bursting force, bursting energy and relative deformation. This study examined the mechanical characteristics of yeast cells under the influence of varying cultivation parameters, namely the pH value, temperature, aeration rate, stirrer speed and culture medium composition. It was observed that only temperature and medium composition showed significant effect on the mechanical properties of the cells. Higher temperatures during cultivation caused lower bursting forces and energies. Further analysis of the data showed that the mechanical characteristics of the cells were only influenced by parameters which also had an influence on the growth rate. In conclusion, higher growth rates result in a lower mechanical strength of the yeast cells. This study provides data on the influence of growth conditions on the mechanical properties of yeast cells. Single cell compression tests on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells indicate that higher growth rates result in a lower mechanical strength of the cells. As in biotechnological processes mechanical degradation is often part of the downstream process to release the product from the micro-organisms, the knowledge about the mechanical properties of the cells is relevant for process optimization. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Tornøe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device...

  6. Hematological and hepatic effects of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) used to stimulate hair growth in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnann, Laís Angelo; Castro, Rafael Ferreira; Azzalis, Ligia Ajaime; Feder, David; Perazzo, Fabio Ferreira; Pereira, Edimar Cristiano; Rosa, Paulo César Pires; Junqueira, Virginia Berlanga Campos; Rocha, Katya Cristina; Machado, Carlos D' Aparecida; Paschoal, Francisco Camargo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso

    2013-10-29

    Alopecia areata is the hair loss usually reversible, in sharply defined areas. The treatment of alopecia using growth factors shows interesting activity in promoting hair growth. In this concept, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) is a marker of angiogenesis, stimulating hair growth by facilitating the supply of nutrients to the hair follicle, increasing follicular diameter. The aim of this study was the evaluation of a topical gel enriched with VEGF liposomes on the hair growth stimulation and its toxicological aspects. Mesocricetus auratus were randomly divided into three groups. Control group was treated with Aristoflex® gel, 1% group with the same gel but added 1% VEGF and 3% group with 3% VEGF. Biochemical, hematological and histological analyses were done. At the end of the experiment (15th day of VEGF treatment) efficacy was determined macroscopically by hair density dermatoscopy analysis, and microscopically by hair diameter analysis. They both demonstrated that hair of the VEGF group increased faster and thicker than control. On the other hand, biochemical and hematological results had shown that VEGF was not 100% inert. VEGF increased hair follicle area, but more studies are necessary to confirm its toxicity.

  7. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  8. Mechanical behavior of cells within a cell-based model of wheat leaf growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Zubairova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the principles and mechanisms of cell growth coordination in plant tissue remains an outstanding challenge for modern developmental biology. Cell-based modeling is a widely used technique for studying the geometric and topological features of plant tissue morphology during growth. We developed a quasi-one-dimensional model of unidirectional growth of a tissue layer in a linear leaf blade that takes cell autonomous growth mode into account. The model allows for fitting of the visible cell length using the experimental cell length distribution along the longitudinal axis of a wheat leaf epidermis. Additionally, it describes changes in turgor and osmotic pressures for each cell in the growing tissue. Our numerical experiments show that the pressures in the cell change over the cell cycle, and in symplastically growing tissue, they vary from cell to cell and strongly depend on the leaf growing zone to which the cells belong. Therefore, we believe that the mechanical signals generated by pressures are important to consider in simulations of tissue growth as possible targets for molecular genetic regulators of individual cell growth.

  9. Tempol inhibits growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2012-03-01

    A stable nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-osyl (Tempol) is widely used as an antioxidant in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of Tempol on the growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell cycle and cell death. Tempol dose-dependently decreased the growth of As4.1 cells with an IC50 of ~1 mM at 48 h. DNA flow cytometry analysis and BrdU staining indicated that Tempol induced S phase arrest, which is accompanied by a downregulation of cyclin A. Tempol also induced apoptotic cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆Ψm), an activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Furthermore, Tempol increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MEK and JNK inhibitors significantly attenuated a growth inhibition in Tempol-treated As4.1 cells. In conclusion, Tempol inhibited the growth of As4.1 cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Tempol also activated ERK and JNK signaling, which was responsible for cell growth inhibition. Our present data provide useful information for the toxicological effects of Tempol in juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell growth inhibition and cell death.

  10. Variation in pestivirus growth in testicle primary cell culture is more dependent on the individual cell donor than cattle breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matheus N; Bauermann, Fernando V; Gómez-Romero, Ninnet; Herring, Andy D; Canal, Cláudio W; Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2017-03-01

    The causes of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) are multifactorial and include infection with both viral and bacterial pathogens. Host factors are also involved as different breeds of cattle appear to have different susceptibilities to BRDC. Infection with bovine pestiviruses, including bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV1), BVDV2 and 'HoBi'-like viruses, is linked to the development of BRDC. The aim of the present study was to compare the growth of different bovine pestiviruses in primary testicle cell cultures obtained from taurine, indicine and mixed taurine and indicine cattle breeds. Primary cells strains, derived from testicular tissue, were generated from three animals from each breed. Bovine pestivirus strains used were from BVDV-1a, BVDV-1b, BVDV-2a and 'HoBi'-like virus. Growth was compared by determining virus titers after one passage in primary cells. All tests were run in triplicate. Virus titers were determined by endpoint dilution and RT-qPCR. Statistical analysis was performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's Multiple Comparison Test (P˂0.05). Significant differences in virus growth did not correlate with cattle breed. However, significant differences were observed between cells derived from different individuals regardless of breed. Variation in the replication of virus in primary cell strains may reflect a genetic predisposition that favors virus replication.

  11. Effects of animal source food and micronutrient fortification in complementary food products on body composition, iron status, and linear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Jutta Kloppenborg Heick; Touch, Bunthang; Chhoun, Chamnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor nutritional quality of complementary foods often limits growth. Animal source foods, such as milk or meat, are often unaffordable. Local affordable alternatives are needed. Objective: We evaluate the efficacy of 2 newly developed, rice-based complementary food products: WinFood (WF...... foods. The dietary role of edible spiders needs to be further explored. This trial was registered at controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN19918531....

  12. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  14. Stem cell therapy for joint problems using the horse as a clinically relevant animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Betts, Dean H.

    2007-01-01

    of the developmental biology of synovial joints and their pathologies. Before human clinical trials are undertaken, stem cell-based therapies for non-life-threatening disorders should be evaluated for their safety and efficacy using animal models of spontaneous disease and not solely by the existing laboratory models...... of experimentally induced lesions. The horse lends itself as a good animal model of spontaneous joint disorders that are clinically relevant to similar human disorders. Equine stem cell and tissue engineering studies may be financially feasible to principal investigators and small biotechnology companies...

  15. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Neety; Pal, Shilpa; Sapru, Sunaina; Kundu, Joydip; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Singh, N. Ibotambi; Yao, Juming

    2016-01-01

    Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins. PMID:27517047

  16. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neety Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins.

  17. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Neety; Pal, Shilpa; Sapru, Sunaina; Kundu, Joydip; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Singh, N Ibotambi; Yao, Juming; Kundu, Subhas C

    2016-01-01

    Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins.

  18. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Silvia D; Singh, Shivendra V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and it has a poor prognosis that points to an increased need to develop effective chemoprevention strategies for this disease. We examined the ability of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Exposure to PEITC inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of approximately 7 μmol/L. PEITC treatment induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, downregulated the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, upregulated the proapoptotic protein Bak, and suppressed Notch 1 and 2 levels. In addition, treatment with PEITC induced cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase and led to increased cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and subdiploid (apoptotic) fraction in pancreatic cancer cells. Oral administration of PEITC suppressed the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Our data show that PEITC exerts its inhibitory effect on pancreatic cancer cells through several mechanisms, including G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, and supports further investigation of PEITC as a chemopreventive agent for pancreatic cancer.

  19. Senescent changes in the ribosomes of animal cells in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines RNA-ribosomal changes observed in protozoa and fixed postmitotic cells, as well as the characteristics of intermitotic cells. Attention is given to a discussion of the implications of the reported ribosomal changes as to the senescent deterioration of protein synthesis and physiological functions. A survey of the literature suggests that, while the data on ribosomal change in dividing cells both in vivo and in vitro are inconclusive, there is strong histological and biochemical evidence in favor of some degree of quantitative ribosomal loss in fixed postmitotic cells. Since these decreases in ribosomes are demonstrated in differential cells from nematodes, insects and mammals, they may represent a universal manifestation of cytoplasmic senescence in certain types of fixed postmitotic animal cells. The observed variability in ribosomal loss for cells belonging to the same type suggests that this involution phenomenon is rather related to the wear and tear suffered by a particular cell.

  20. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bretlau, P

    1993-01-01

    , the cells above the basal cell layer were positive for both TGF-alpha and EGF. The same staining pattern was observed in oral mucosa obtained from healthy persons. In moderately to well differentiated carcinomas, the immunoreactivity was mainly confined to the cytologically more differentiated cells, thus......Forty oral squamous cell carcinomas have been investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The same cases were recently characterized for the expression of EGF-receptors. TGF-alpha was detected...... previous results confirms the existence of TGF-alpha, EGF, and EGF-receptors in the majority of oral squamous cell carcinomas and their metastases....

  1. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  2. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  3. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  4. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  5. The Korean herbal formulation Yukmijihwangtang stimulates longitudinal bone growth in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Min; Lee, Sun Haeng; Lee, Donghun; Lee, Ji Hong; Chang, Gyu Tae; Kim, Hocheol; Lee, Jin Yong

    2017-05-02

    Yukmijihwangtang (YJT) is a traditional Korean medicine that has been used to treat kidney-yin deficiency symptoms such as dizziness and tinnitus. In addition, because it is also thought to nourish kidney-yin, it has been used to treat short stature from congenital deficiency. This study evaluated the effects of YJT on longitudinal bone growth in rats. Female adolescent rats were randomly assigned to groups that received distilled water (per os [p.o.] twice a day; control), recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH; 20 μg/kg, subcutaneous [s.c.] once a day), or two different doses of YJT (100 or 300 mg/kg, p.o. twice a day). In each group, treatment was maintained for 4 days. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 50 mg/kg) to label proliferating chondrocytes on days 2 - 4. Tetracycline hydrochloride (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally to form fluorescent bands on the growth plates on day 3 for measuring the longitudinal bone growth rate. Expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in the growth plate was identified using immunohistochemistry. There was a significant increase in the rate of bone growth in the 300 mg/kg YJT group (523.8 ± 23.7 μm/day; P growth plate in the 300 mg/kg YJT and rhGH groups. YJT increased the longitudinal bone growth rate by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation with increasing increments of local IGF-1 and BMP-2 expression. Based on these findings, YJT may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of growth retardation during adolescence.

  6. Combinations of chromosome transfer and genome editing for the development of cell/animal models of human disease and humanized animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Narumi; Abe, Satoshi; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome transfer technology, including chromosome modification, enables the introduction of Mb-sized or multiple genes to desired cells or animals. This technology has allowed innovative developments to be made for models of human disease and humanized animals, including Down syndrome model mice and humanized transchromosomic (Tc) immunoglobulin mice. Genome editing techniques are developing rapidly, and permit modifications such as gene knockout and knockin to be performed in various cell lines and animals. This review summarizes chromosome transfer-related technologies and the combined technologies of chromosome transfer and genome editing mainly for the production of cell/animal models of human disease and humanized animal models. Specifically, these include: (1) chromosome modification with genome editing in Chinese hamster ovary cells and mouse A9 cells for efficient transfer to desired cell types; (2) single-nucleotide polymorphism modification in humanized Tc mice with genome editing; and (3) generation of a disease model of Down syndrome-associated hematopoiesis abnormalities by the transfer of human chromosome 21 to normal human embryonic stem cells and the induction of mutation(s) in the endogenous gene(s) with genome editing. These combinations of chromosome transfer and genome editing open up new avenues for drug development and therapy as well as for basic research.

  7. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  8. The contribution of human/non-human animal chimeras to stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Levine

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric animals are made up of cells from two separate zygotes. Human/non-human animal chimeras have been used for a number of research purposes, including human disease modeling. Pluripotent stem cell (PSC research has relied upon the chimera approach to examine the developmental potential of stem cells, to determine the efficacy of cell replacement therapies, and to establish a means of producing human organs. Based on ethical issues, this work has faced pushback from various sources including funding agencies. We discuss here the essential role these studies have played, from gaining a better understanding of human biology to providing a stepping stone to human disease treatments. We also consider the major ethical issues, as well as the current status of support for this work in the United States.

  9. Actin polymerization drives polar growth in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Luis Alfredo Bañuelos; Sanchez, Rosana; Hernandez-Barrera, Alejandra; Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Torres, Luis Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the actin cytoskeleton is a prime regulator of cell polarity, growth, and cytoplasmic streaming. Tip growth, as observed in root hairs, caulonema, and pollen tubes, is governed by many factors, including calcium gradients, exocytosis and endocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and the cytoskeleton. Several studies indicate that the polymerization of G-actin into F-actin also contributes to tip growth. The structure and function of F-actin within the apical dome is variable, ranging from a dense meshwork to sparse single filaments. The presence of multiple F-actin structures in the elongating apices of tip-growing cells suggests that this cytoskeletal array is tightly regulated. We recently reported that sublethal concentrations of fluorescently labeled cytochalasin could be used to visualize the distribution of microfilament plus ends using fluorescence microscopy, and found that the tip region of the growing root hair cells of a legume plant exhibits a clear response to the nodulation factors secreted by Rhizobium. (1) In this current work, we expanded our analysis using confocal microscopy and demonstrated the existence of highly dynamic fluorescent foci along Arabidopsis root hair cells. Furthermore, we show that the strongest fluorescence signal accumulates in the tip dome of the growing root hair and seems to be in close proximity to the apical plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we propose that actin polymerization within the dome of growing root hair cells regulates polar growth.

  10. Current challenges for the targeted delivery and molecular imaging of stem cells in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arezoo; Neelamegham, Sriram; Parashurama, Natesh

    2017-07-04

    In contrast to conventional, molecular medicine that focuses on targeting specific pathways, stem cell therapy aims to perturb many related mechanisms in order to derive therapeutic benefit. This emerging modality is inherently complex due to the variety of cell types that can be used, delivery approaches that need to be optimized in order to target the cellular therapeutic to specific sites in vivo, and non-invasive imaging methods that are needed to monitor cell fate. This review highlights advancements in the field, with focus on recent publications that use preclinical animal models for cardiovascular stem cell therapy. It highlights studies where cell adhesion engineering (CAE) has been used to functionalize stem cells to home them to sites of therapy, much like peripheral blood neutrophils. It also describes the current state of molecular imaging approaches that aim to non-invasively track the spatio-temporal pattern of stem cell delivery in living subjects.

  11. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.; Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improve Cardiac Perfusion in an Ovine Immunocompetent Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Victor; Sotelo, Veronica; Delfina, Valentina; Delgado, Natalia; Rodriguez, Carlos; Suanes, Carol; Langhain, María; Ferrando, Rodolfo; Keating, Armand; Benech, Alejandro; Touriño, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold considerable promise in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Most preclinical studies of MSCs for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have been performed either in syngeneic animal models or with human cells in xenogeneic immunodeficient animals. A preferable pre-clinical model, however, would involve human MSCs in an immunocompetent animal. AMI was generated in adult sheep by inducing ischemia reperfusion of the second diagonal branch. Sheep (n = 10) were randomized to receive an intravenous injection of human MSCs (1 × 10(6) cells/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. Cardiac function and remodeling were evaluated with echocardiography. Perfusion scintigraphy was used to identify sustained myocardial ischemia. Interaction between human MSCs and ovine lymphocytes was assessed by a mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). Sheep receiving human MSCs showed significant improvement in myocardial perfusion at 1 month compared with baseline measurements. There was no change in ventricular dimensions in either group after 1 month of AMI. No adverse events or symptoms were observed in the sheep receiving human MSCs. The MLR was negative. The immunocompetent ovine AMI model demonstrates the clinical safety and efficacy of human MSCs. The human cells do not appear to be immunogenic, further suggesting that immunocompetent sheep may serve as a suitable pre-clinical large animal model for testing human MSCs.

  13. Software sensors as a tool for optimization of animal-cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis software sensors are introduced that predict the biomass activity and the concentrations of glucose, glutamine, lactic acid, and ammonium on line, The software sensors for biomass activity, glucose and lactic acid can be applied for any type of animal cell that is grown in a

  14. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...... biosynthesis of pancreatic beta-cells in monolayer culture. In culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 2% normal human serum islets or dissociated islet cells from newborn rats maintained their insulin-producing capacity. When supplemented with 1-1000 ng/ml pituitary or recombinant human GH the islet cells...... was accompanied with a continuous increase in insulin release to the culture medium reaching a 10- 20-fold increase after 2-3 months with a half-maximal effect at about 10 ng/ml human GH. The biosynthesis of (pro)insulin was markedly increased with a normal rate of conversion of proinsulin to insulin...

  15. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Dvořáková, D.; Hampl, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 580, - (2006), s. 2869-2874 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA ČR GA301/03/1122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Fibroblast growth factor 2 * Embryonic stem cell * Hematopoietic progenitor cell Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2006

  16. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  17. Straw blood cell count, growth, inhibition and comparison to apoptotic bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomkins Jeffrey P

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian cells transform into individual tubular straw cells naturally in tissues and in response to desiccation related stress in vitro. The transformation event is characterized by a dramatic cellular deformation process which includes: condensation of certain cellular materials into a much smaller tubular structure, synthesis of a tubular wall and growth of filamentous extensions. This study continues the characterization of straw cells in blood, as well as the mechanisms of tubular transformation in response to stress; with specific emphasis placed on investigating whether tubular transformation shares the same signaling pathway as apoptosis. Results There are approximately 100 billion, unconventional, tubular straw cells in human blood at any given time. The straw blood cell count (SBC is 45 million/ml, which accounts for 6.9% of the bloods dry weight. Straw cells originating from the lungs, liver and lymphocytes have varying nodules, hairiness and dimensions. Lipid profiling reveals severe disruption of the plasma membrane in CACO cells during transformation. The growth rates for the elongation of filaments and enlargement of rabbit straw cells is 0.6~1.1 (μm/hr and 3.8 (μm3/hr, respectively. Studies using apoptosis inhibitors and a tubular transformation inhibitor in CACO2 cells and in mice suggested apoptosis produced apoptotic bodies are mediated differently than tubular transformation produced straw cells. A single dose of 0.01 mg/kg/day of p38 MAPK inhibitor in wild type mice results in a 30% reduction in the SBC. In 9 domestic animals SBC appears to correlate inversely with an animal's average lifespan (R2 = 0.7. Conclusion Straw cells are observed residing in the mammalian blood with large quantities. Production of SBC appears to be constant for a given animal and may involve a stress-inducible protein kinase (P38 MAPK. Tubular transformation is a programmed cell survival process that diverges from apoptosis

  18. Invited review: Pre- and postnatal adipose tissue development in farm animals: from stem cells to adipocyte physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveau, I; Perruchot, M-H; Bonnet, M; Gondret, F

    2016-11-01

    Both white and brown adipose tissues are recognized to be differently involved in energy metabolism and are also able to secrete a variety of factors called adipokines that are involved in a wide range of physiological and metabolic functions. Brown adipose tissue is predominant around birth, except in pigs. Irrespective of species, white adipose tissue has a large capacity to expand postnatally and is able to adapt to a variety of factors. The aim of this review is to update the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with pre- and postnatal adipose tissue development with a special focus on pigs and ruminants. In contrast to other tissues, the embryonic origin of adipose cells remains the subject of debate. Adipose cells arise from the recruitment of specific multipotent stem cells/progenitors named adipose tissue-derived stromal cells. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of a variety of those cells being able to differentiate into white, brown or brown-like/beige adipocytes. After commitment to the adipocyte lineage, progenitors undergo large changes in the expression of many genes involved in cell cycle arrest, lipid accumulation and secretory functions. Early nutrition can affect these processes during fetal and perinatal periods and can also influence or pre-determinate later growth of adipose tissue. How these changes may be related to adipose tissue functional maturity around birth and can influence newborn survival is discussed. Altogether, a better knowledge of fetal and postnatal adipose tissue development is important for various aspects of animal production, including neonatal survival, postnatal growth efficiency and health.

  19. S. Afr. J. Anim. Sci 7,97-103 ( 1977) GROWTH AND LAYING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TYPE PULLETS SUBJECTED TO. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE FOOD RESTRICTION. R.C. Maclachlstr*, A.J. Saunders and R.M. Gous. Receipt of MS. 20 4.t e77. Department of Animal Science and Poultry Science, Universit.v of Natal, ...

  20. Animal Rights and Human Growth: Intellectual Courage and Extending the Moral Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Bradley D.

    2009-01-01

    While the ethical dimension of human-animal relationships has become a legitimate, rich subject for contemporary moral philosophers, scholars of moral education, and to a large extent, philosophers of education, have remained surprisingly silent on this subject. The primary purpose of this essay is to illustrate the relationship between the moral…

  1. Mitotic Gene Bookmarking: An Epigenetic Mechanism for Coordination of Lineage Commitment, Cell Identity and Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic control of gene expression contributes to dynamic responsiveness of cellular processes that include cell cycle, cell growth and differentiation. Mitotic gene bookmarking, retention of sequence-specific transcription factors at target gene loci, including the RUNX regulatory proteins, provide a novel dimension to epigenetic regulation that sustains cellular identity in progeny cells following cell division. Runx transcription factor retention during mitosis coordinates physiological control of cell growth and differentiation in a broad spectrum of biological conditions, and is associated with compromised gene expression in pathologies that include cancer.

  2. The cytoskeleton in plant cell growth: lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, M.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, we compare expansion of intercalary growing cells, in which growth takes place over a large surface, and root hairs, where expansion occurs at the tip only. Research that pinpoints the role of the cytoskeleton and the cytoplasmic free calcium in both root hairs and intercalary

  3. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Promotes Cell Migration, Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Kollmar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of established extrahepatic colorectal metastasis, we analyzed whether stromal cellderived factor (SDF 1 stimulates tumor cell migration in vitro, angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: Using chemotaxis chambers, CT26.WT colorectal tumor cell migration was studied under stimulation with different concentrations of SDF-1. To evaluate angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo, green fluorescent protein-transfected CT26.WT cells were implanted in dorsal skinfold chambers of syngeneic BALB/c mice. After 5 days, tumors were locally exposed to SDF-1. Cell proliferation, tumor microvascularization, growth were studied during a further 9-day period using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry. Tumors exposed to PBS only served as controls. RESULTS:In vitro, > 30% of unstimulated CT26.WT cells showed expression of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. On chemotaxis assay, SDF-1 provoked a dose-dependent increase in cell migration. In vivo, SDF-1 accelerated neovascularization, induced a significant increase in tumor growth. Capillaries of SDF-1-treated tumors showed significant dilation. Of interest, SDF-1 treatment was associated with a significantly increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a downregulation of cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that the CXC chemokine SDF-1 promotes tumor cell migration in vitro, tumor growth of established extrahepatic metastasis in vivo due to angiogenesis-dependent induction of tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

  4. Research progress in animal models and stem cell therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabin Han,1,2 Wei Wang1, Chao Chen1 1Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, 2Department of Neurology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital/The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes degeneration of brain neurons and leads to memory loss and cognitive impairment. Since current therapeutic strategies cannot cure the disease, stem cell therapy represents a powerful tool for the treatment of AD. We first review the advances in molecular pathogenesis and animal models of AD and then discuss recent clinical studies using small molecules and immunoglobulins to target amyloid-beta plaques for AD therapy. Finally, we discuss stem cell therapy for AD using neural stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, embryonic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cell from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood. In particular, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells are proposed as a future treatment for AD. Keywords: amyloid-beta plaque, neurofibrillary tangle, neural stem cell, olfactory ensheathing cell, mesenchymal stem cell, induced pluripotent stem cell

  5. SATB2 expression increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Feng; Jordan, Ashley; Kluz, Thomas; Shen, Steven; Sun, Hong; Cartularo, Laura A.; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a protein that binds to the nuclear matrix attachment region of the cell and regulates gene expression by altering chromatin structure. In our previous study, we reported that SATB2 gene expression was induced in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells transformed by arsenic, chromium, nickel and vanadium. In this study, we show that ectopic expression of SATB2 in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell-line BEAS-2B increased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, meanwhile, shRNA-mediated knockdown of SATB2 significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth in Ni transformed BEAS-2B cells. RNA sequencing analyses of SATB2 regulated genes revealed the enrichment of those involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell-movement pathways. Our evidence supports the hypothesis that SATB2 plays an important role in BEAS-2B cell transformation. - Highlights: • We performed SATB2 overexpression in the BEAS-2B cell line. • We performed SATB2 knockdown in a Ni transformed BEAS-2B cell line. • SATB2 induced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell migration. • SATB2 knockdown significantly decreased anchorage-independent growth. • We identified alterations in gene involved in cytoskeleton, cell adhesion.

  6. [Genetic variability of growth in sheep grown at the animal husbandry research center of Dahra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missohou, A; Sow, R; Nahar, M T; Gongnet, P

    1993-01-01

    Data on growth performances of 778 Peulpeul and Touabire sheep were collected over five years (1983-1987) in APRC of Dahra. Studied parameters were: birth weight (BBW), one month weight (MBW), weaning weight (WBW) yearling weight (YBW) and growth rate between adjacent stages of growth. BBW, MBW, WBW and YBW are: 3.6 +/- 0.6 kg, 9.5 +/- 1.8 kg; 17.5 +/- 3.5 kg; 30.6 +/- 4.3 kg. Growth rates were 197.0 +/- 51.2 g between birth and one month (MGR), 87.2 +/- 28.1 g, between one month and weaning (WGR) and 50.8 +/- 15.3 g, between weaning and yearling (YGR). Year and season of birth, dam parity, prolificity, sex and race had significant effect on most of the parameters studied. The heritability estimates were 0.50 +/- 0.14 (BBW), 0.52 +/- 0.15 (MBW), 0.71 +/- 0.18 (WBW), 0.44 +/- 0.13 (MGR) and 0.60 +/- 0.16 (WGR). High and positive correlations existed between BBW and the other growth components.

  7. Hair growth-promoting effect of Geranium sibiricum extract in human dermal papilla cells and C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, William A; Yu, Miri; Choi, Youngbin; Jeong, Gi Hee; Zhang, Yi-Lin; Cho, Sunghun; Choi, Changsun; Lee, Sanghyun; Lee, Bog-Hieu

    2017-02-13

    Geranium sibiricum L. has been used as a medicinal plant to treat diarrhea, bacterial infection, and cancer in Bulgaria, Peru, and Korea. However, its hair growth-promoting effect was not investigated so far. This study examined the effects of Geranium sibiricum L. extract (GSE) on hair growth, using in vitro and in vivo models. Antioxidant, proliferation and migration assay of GSE was performed with human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs). Hair-growth promoting effect was measured in animal model. Relative expression of interleukin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta 1 was determined by real time RT-PCR. Expression of Ki-67 and stem cell factor were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. GSE treatment proliferated and migrated human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) more than treatment of 10 μM minoxidil. GSE significantly stimulated the expression of Ki-67 protein and the mRNA levels of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in hDPCs. Topical application of 1,000 ppm GSE for 3 weeks promoted more significant hair growth on shaved C57BL/6 mice than did 5% minoxidil. The histological morphology of hair follicles demonstrated an active anagen phase with the induction of stem cell factor. GSE treatment significantly reduced the number of mast cells and the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 in mouse skin tissues. These results demonstrated that GSE promotes hair growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating growth factors and the cellular response.

  8. The functional curcumin liposomes induce apoptosis in C6 glioblastoma cells and C6 glioblastoma stem cells in vitro and in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang YH

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yahua Wang, Xue Ying, Haolun Xu, Helu Yan, Xia Li, Hui Tang Key Laboratory of Xinjiang Phytomedicine Resources and Modernization of TCM, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shihezi University, Shihezi, Xinjiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glioblastoma is a kind of malignant gliomas that is almost impossible to cure due to the poor drug transportation across the blood–brain barrier and the existence of glioma stem cells. We prepared a new kind of targeted liposomes in order to improve the drug delivery system onto the glioma cells and induce the apoptosis of glioma stem cells afterward. In this experiment, curcumin was chosen to kill gliomas, while quinacrine was used to induce apoptosis of the glioma stem cells. Also, p-aminophenyl-α-d-mannopyranoside could facilitate the transport of liposomes across the blood–brain barrier and finally target the brain glioma cells. The cell experiments in vitro indicated that the targeted liposomes could significantly improve the antitumor effects of the drugs, while enhancing the uptake effects, apoptosis effects, and endocytic effects of C6 glioma cells and C6 glioma stem cells. Given the animal experiments in vivo, we discovered that the targeted liposomes could obviously increase the survival period of brain glioma-bearing mice and inhibit the growth of gliomas. In summary, curcumin and quinacrine liposomes modified with p-aminophenyl-α-d-mannopyranoside is a potential preparation to treat brain glioma cells and brain glioma stem cells. Keywords: C6 glioblastoma stem cells, apoptosis, blood–brain barrier, curcumin liposomes, brain glioma-bearing rats

  9. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  10. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs

  12. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R

    1983-01-01

    receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry either......Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a low-molecular-weight polypeptide (G. Carpenter and S. Cohen, 1979, Annu. Rev. Biochem. 48, 193-216), stimulates the proliferation and keratinisation of cultured embryonic epidermis (S. Cohen, 1965, Dev. Biol. 12, 394-407) and promotes epidermal growth, thickening......, and keratinisation when injected into neonatal mice (S. Cohen and G.A. Elliott, 1963, J. Invest. Dermatol, 40, 1-5). We have determined the distribution of the available receptors for epidermal growth factor in rat skin using autoradiography following incubation of explants with 125I-labelled mouse EGF. EGF...

  13. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients....... The malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant...... T cells enhance proliferation of the malignant cells in an SE- and MHC class II-dependent manner. Furthermore, SE and, in addition, alloantigen presentation by malignant CTCL cells to irradiated nonmalignant CD4(+) T-cell lines also enhance proliferation of the malignant cells. The growth...

  14. CD105+-mesenchymal stem cells migrate into osteoarthritis joint: An animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Pernas, Pablo; Rodríguez-Lesende, Iván; de la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Fuentes, Isaac; De Toro, Javier; Blanco, Fco J; Arufe, M C

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are being the focus of connective tissue technology and regenerative medicine, presenting a good choice cell source for improving old and well recognized techniques of cartilage defect repair. For instance, the autologous chondrocyte transplantation using new concepts of regenerative medicine. The present study investigated the risk of xenogenicity of human synovial membrane-derived MSCs, injected into the monkeys using intravenous and intra-articular administration. The animal models used were adult monkeys Rhesus which had been injured into the left knee to create an Osteoarthritis (OA) animal model. CD105+-MSCs were injected twice into the OA monkeys with an interval of one week between them. The animals were euthanized one month after treatment. Immunohistochemistry analysis of different organs: spleen, heart, fat, liver, gut, pancreas, lung, skeletal muscle and kidney from the animals revealed that CD105+-MSCs migrated towards the injured knee joint. MSCs naive were found statistically significant increased in the injured knee in front of healthy one. CD105+-MSCs were negatives for CD68 and the area where CD105+-MSCs were found presented SDF-1 increased levels in front of healthy knee. We concluded that a characterized MSCs subset could be a safe alternative for cell therapy in clearly localized pathologies.

  15. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  16. The effects of a reduced environmental deuterium concentration on growth of culture normal and neoplastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bild, Walther; Haulica, Ion; Nastasa, V.

    2002-01-01

    In connection with studies on the effects of deuterium depleted water on radioprotection and immunostimulation, research was conducted to find out effects of environmental depleted deuterium upon culture cells growth. The reduction of deuterium concentration in cellular medium was achieved by forming the culture medium for RMPI 1640, Gibco BRL cells with under-deuterated water (produced at ICSI) with different deuterium concentration (30, 60, 90, 120 ppm), as compared with control batches in the same medium constituted from normal distilled water (145-150 ppm D/(D+H). A significant stimulation in the cellular growth due to deuterium depletion in the culture media was observed. Also, variations in growth rates and the profile of proliferation curves in neoplastic cells as compared with normal cells were observed, the same trend being observed in all cultures. Paradoxically, quantitative effects were observed, peaking at 90 ppm deuterium concentration rather than at a minimal concentration, as expected. The MTT test confirmed the stimulating effects of deuterium depletion. To put into evidence the immunity stimulation, the explant rat splenocytes from laboratory animals were grown, stimulated with Concanavaline A or bacterial Lipopolysaccharides of increasing concentration. Similar effects were observed

  17. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines.In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug.These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  18. Growth and Development Symposium: promoting healthier humans through healthier livestock: animal agriculture enters the metagenomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D N

    2011-03-01

    The priorities of public health and agricultural sciences intersect through a shared objective to foster better human health. Enhancements in food quality and reductions in the environmental effects of modern agriculture represent 2 distinct paths through which animal sciences can contribute to the cause of public health. Recent developments in the study of human-associated microbial communities (microbiotas), notably in association with disease, indicate that better understanding of the microbial ecology of livestock can contribute to achieving the goals of better foods and a cleaner environment. Culture-independent microbiological technologies now permit comprehensive study of complex microbial communities in their natural environments. Microbiotas associated with both humans and animals provide myriad beneficial services to their hosts that, if lost or diminished, could compromise host health. Dysfunctional microbial communities have been noted in several human conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Examination of the mechanisms by which the human microbiota influences health and disease susceptibility can inform similar studies of host-microbe function in the animal sciences. Insights gained from human studies indicate strategies to raise not only healthier livestock, through selective manipulation of microbial communities, but also healthier humans.

  19. TOR and paradigm change: cell growth is controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael N

    2016-09-15

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of target of rapamycin (TOR), a highly conserved kinase and central controller of cell growth. In this Retrospective, I briefly describe the discovery of TOR and the subsequent elucidation of its cellular role. I place particular emphasis on an article by Barbet et al. from 1996, the first suggesting that TOR controls cell growth in response to nutrients. © 2016 Hall. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Cell-mediated transgenesis in rabbits: chimeric and nuclear transfer animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartchenko, V; Flisikowska, T; Li, S; Richter, T; Wieland, H; Durkovic, M; Rottmann, O; Kessler, B; Gungor, T; Brem, G; Kind, A; Wolf, E; Schnieke, A

    2011-02-01

    The ability to perform precise genetic engineering such as gene targeting in rabbits would benefit biomedical research by enabling, for example, the generation of genetically defined rabbit models of human diseases. This has so far not been possible because of the lack of functional rabbit embryonic stem cells and the high fetal and perinatal mortality associated with rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer. We examined cultured pluripotent and multipotent cells for their ability to support the production of viable animals. Rabbit putative embryonic stem (ES) cells were derived and shown capable of in vitro and in vivo pluripotent differentiation. We report the first live born ES-derived rabbit chimera. Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were derived from bone marrow, and multipotent differentiation was demonstrated in vitro. Nuclear transfer was carried out with both cell types, and embryo development was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Rabbit MSCs were markedly more successful than ES cells as nuclear donors. MSCs were transfected with fluorescent reporter gene constructs and assessed for nuclear transfer competence. Transfected MSCs supported development with similar efficiency as normal MSCs and resulted in the first live cloned rabbits from genetically manipulated MSCs. Reactivation of fluorescence reporter gene expression in reconstructed embryos was investigated as a means of identifying viable embryos in vitro but was not a reliable predictor. We also examined serial nuclear transfer as a means of rescuing dead animals.

  1. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  2. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  3. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  4. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells in animal models of Huntington's disease: past experiences and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkis, Irina; Haddad, Monica Santoro; Valverde, Cristiane Wenceslau; Glosman, Sabina

    2015-12-14

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes progressive nerve cell degeneration. It is triggered by a mutation in the HTT gene that strongly influences functional abilities and usually results in movement, cognitive and psychiatric disorders. HD is incurable, although treatments are available to help manage symptoms and to delay the physical, mental and behavioral declines associated with the condition. Stem cells are the essential building blocks of life, and play a crucial role in the genesis and development of all higher organisms. Ablative surgical procedures and fetal tissue cell transplantation, which are still experimental, demonstrate low rates of recovery in HD patients. Due to neuronal cell death caused by accumulation of the mutated huntingtin (mHTT) protein, it is unlikely that such brain damage can be treated solely by drug-based therapies. Stem cell-based therapies are important in order to reconstruct damaged brain areas in HD patients. These therapies have a dual role: stem cell paracrine action, stimulating local cell survival, and brain tissue regeneration through the production of new neurons from the intrinsic and likely from donor stem cells. This review summarizes current knowledge on neural stem/progenitor cell and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, which has been carried out in several animal models of HD, discussing cell distribution, survival and differentiation after transplantation, as well as functional recovery and anatomic improvements associated with these approaches. We also discuss the usefulness of this information for future preclinical and clinical studies in HD.

  5. BMI1 is expressed in canine osteosarcoma and contributes to cell growth and chemotherapy resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hayat Shahi

    Full Text Available BMI1, a stem cell factor and member of the polycomb group of genes, has been shown to contribute to growth and chemoresistance of several human malignancies including primary osteosarcoma (OSA. Naturally occurring OSA in the dog represents a large animal model of human OSA, however the potential role of BMI1 in canine primary and metastatic OSA has not been examined. Immunohistochemical staining of canine primary and metastatic OSA tumors revealed strong nuclear expression of BMI1. An identical staining pattern was found in both primary and metastatic human OSA tissues. Canine OSA cell lines (Abrams, Moresco, and D17 expressed high levels of BMI1 compared with canine osteoblasts and knockdown or inhibition of BMI1 by siRNA or by small molecule BMI1-inhibitor PTC-209 demonstrated a role for BMI1 in canine OSA cell growth and resistance to carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. These findings suggest that inhibition of BMI1 in primary or metastatic OSA may improve response to chemotherapy and that the dog may serve as a large animal model to evaluate such therapy.

  6. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling and Regulates Angiogenesis in Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshan Zhao

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the effects of 1-O-acetylbritannilactone (ABL, a compound extracted from Inula britannica L., on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling and angiogenesis in endothelial cells (ECs. We showed that ABL promotes VEGF-induced cell proliferation, growth, migration, and tube formation in cultured human ECs. Furthermore, the modulatory effect of ABL on VEGF-induced Akt, MAPK p42/44, and p38 phosphorylation, as well as on upstream VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, were associated with VEGF-dependent Matrigel angiogenesis in vivo. In addition, animals treated with ABL (26 mg/kg/day recovered blood flow significantly earlier than control animals, suggesting that ABL affects ischemia-mediated angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that ABL strongly reduced the levels of VEGFR-2 on the cell surface, enhanced VEGFR-2 endocytosis, which consistent with inhibited VE-cadherin, a negative regulator of VEGF signaling associated with VEGFR-2 complex formation, but did not alter VE-cadherin or VEGFR-2 expression in ECs. Our results suggest that ABL may serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for various cardiovascular diseases, including chronic ischemia, by regulating VEGF signaling and modulating angiogenesis.

  7. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling and Regulates Angiogenesis in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingshan; Niu, Honglin; Li, Aiying; Nie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of 1-O-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a compound extracted from Inula britannica L., on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling and angiogenesis in endothelial cells (ECs). We showed that ABL promotes VEGF-induced cell proliferation, growth, migration, and tube formation in cultured human ECs. Furthermore, the modulatory effect of ABL on VEGF-induced Akt, MAPK p42/44, and p38 phosphorylation, as well as on upstream VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, were associated with VEGF-dependent Matrigel angiogenesis in vivo. In addition, animals treated with ABL (26 mg/kg/day) recovered blood flow significantly earlier than control animals, suggesting that ABL affects ischemia-mediated angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that ABL strongly reduced the levels of VEGFR-2 on the cell surface, enhanced VEGFR-2 endocytosis, which consistent with inhibited VE-cadherin, a negative regulator of VEGF signaling associated with VEGFR-2 complex formation, but did not alter VE-cadherin or VEGFR-2 expression in ECs. Our results suggest that ABL may serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for various cardiovascular diseases, including chronic ischemia, by regulating VEGF signaling and modulating angiogenesis.

  8. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R

    1983-01-01

    markedly with age. This decrease in receptor number is similar in trend to the known drop in basal cell [3H]thymidine labelling index which occurs over the same time period. The data suggest that the distribution of EGF receptors and EGF cell surface receptor number in skin are important in the spatial......, and keratinisation when injected into neonatal mice (S. Cohen and G.A. Elliott, 1963, J. Invest. Dermatol, 40, 1-5). We have determined the distribution of the available receptors for epidermal growth factor in rat skin using autoradiography following incubation of explants with 125I-labelled mouse EGF. EGF...... receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry either...

  9. Growth of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris (Daudin, 1802) hatchlings, fed with diets of animal origin

    OpenAIRE

    PINHEIRO, M. S.; LAVORENTI, A.

    2001-01-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the growth rate of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris hatchlings, fed on four animal protein diets: (a) dead poultry from a poultry farm; (b) dead piglet from nursery and farrowing house in a swine farm; (c) whole tilapia (Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus); and (d) a balanced mixture of a, b, and c sources. Sixteen seven-month old caimans, average weight of 208 g and, 38 cm of total lenght (TL) were distributed in four treatments. Four groups ...

  10. Modeling bacterial population growth from stochastic single-cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Antonio A; Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-09-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  11. Video Bioinformatics Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Colony Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sabrina; Fonteno, Shawn; Satish, Shruthi; Bhanu, Bir; Talbot, Prue

    2010-01-01

    Because video data are complex and are comprised of many images, mining information from video material is difficult to do without the aid of computer software. Video bioinformatics is a powerful quantitative approach for extracting spatio-temporal data from video images using computer software to perform dating mining and analysis. In this article, we introduce a video bioinformatics method for quantifying the growth of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by analyzing time-lapse videos collected in a Nikon BioStation CT incubator equipped with a camera for video imaging. In our experiments, hESC colonies that were attached to Matrigel were filmed for 48 hours in the BioStation CT. To determine the rate of growth of these colonies, recipes were developed using CL-Quant software which enables users to extract various types of data from video images. To accurately evaluate colony growth, three recipes were created. The first segmented the image into the colony and background, the second enhanced the image to define colonies throughout the video sequence accurately, and the third measured the number of pixels in the colony over time. The three recipes were run in sequence on video data collected in a BioStation CT to analyze the rate of growth of individual hESC colonies over 48 hours. To verify the truthfulness of the CL-Quant recipes, the same data were analyzed manually using Adobe Photoshop software. When the data obtained using the CL-Quant recipes and Photoshop were compared, results were virtually identical, indicating the CL-Quant recipes were truthful. The method described here could be applied to any video data to measure growth rates of hESC or other cells that grow in colonies. In addition, other video bioinformatics recipes can be developed in the future for other cell processes such as migration, apoptosis, and cell adhesion. PMID:20495527

  12. Mast cells in renal inflammation and fibrosis: lessons learnt from animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjene, Lydia Celia; Pons, Maguelonne; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Ali, Liza; Madera-Salcedo, Iris K; Kassas, Asma; Pellefigues, Christophe; Marquet, Florian; Dadah, Albert; Attout, Tarik; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Gautier, Gregory; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are hematopoietic cells involved in inflammation and immunity and have been recognized also as important effector cells in kidney inflammation. In humans, only a few mast cells reside in kidneys constitutively but in progressive renal diseases their numbers increase substantially representing an essential part of the interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells. Recent data obtained in experimental animal models have emphasized a complex role of these cells and the mediators they release as they have been shown both to promote, but also to protect from disease and fibrosis development. Sometimes conflicting results have been reported in similar models suggesting a very narrow window between these activities depending on the pathophysiological context. Interestingly in mice, mast cell or mast cell mediator specific actions became also apparent in the absence of significant mast cell kidney infiltration supporting systemic or regional actions via draining lymph nodes or kidney capsules. Many of their activities rely on the capacity of mast cells to release, in a timely controlled manner, a wide range of inflammatory mediators, which can promote anti-inflammatory actions and repair activities that contribute to healing, but in some circumstances or in case of inappropriate regulation may also promote kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell cycle characteristics of the pancreas in an animal model of isolated pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui-Wu, Dai; Guang-Yu, Chen; Fa-Qun, He; Zu, Huang; Hong-Tao, Yan; Hong-Yin, Liang; Tao, Wang; Ning, Lin; Li-Jun, Tang; Li-Ping, Chen

    2014-03-01

    In our previous study, we established a small animal model that mimicked the pathophysiology of isolated pancreatic trauma. To gain further insights into the relationships between tissue damage and the ability of the pancreatic cells to regenerate, we induced pancreatic trauma in rats maintained over 7 days and analyzed both the alteration of the cell death and the cell cycle distribution of the pancreatic cells in this study. The rats were divided into two groups as follows: impact and control. The pancreas in the impact group was injured by a BIM-III biotical impact machine. Pancreatic enzyme activity, the level of Ca in the serum, pancreatic cell death, and cell cycle characteristics were examined after the trauma. In the impact groups, lipase was activated later than amylase and lasted persistently. The levels of serum Ca decreased at 6 hours after injury, sharply declined at 24 hours and 72 hours compared with the control groups, and returned to normal levels at 7 days. The pancreatic trauma also induced the compensatory proliferation of pancreatic cells. The results from a TUNEL stain, flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry indicated that pancreatic trauma induces cell death and the compensatory proliferation of pancreatic cells. Detecting amylase and lipase at the same time can help us determine the exocrine function of pancreas. Serum Ca can be used as an indicator for estimating the severity of pancreatic trauma. The cell cycle characteristics of the pancreas in the animal model of isolated pancreatic trauma indicate that the proper remedial time is in the first 24 hours after the pancreatic trauma.

  14. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  15. Anisotropic cell growth-regulated surface micropatterns in flower petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flower petals have not only diverse macroscopic morphologies but are rich in microscopic surface patterns, which are crucial to their biological functions. Both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis are conducted to reveal the physical mechanisms underlying the formation of minute wrinkles on flower petals. Three representative flowers, daisy, kalanchoe blossfeldiana, and Eustoma grandiflorum, are investigated as examples. A surface wrinkling model, incorporating the measured mechanical properties and growth ratio, is used to elucidate the difference in their surface morphologies. The mismatch between the anisotropic epidermal cell growth and the isotropic secretion of surficial wax is found to dictate the surface patterns.

  16. Effects of digoxin on cell cycle, apoptosis and NF-κB pathway in Burkitt's lymphoma cells and animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xu, Peipei; Wang, Fan; Zhou, Di; Wang, Ruju; Meng, Li; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Min; Chen, Bing; Ouyang, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Digoxin has potential antitumor properties. This study investigated whether digoxin suppressed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells. Raji and NAMALWA cells were exposed to digoxin, followed by assay of cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle. Western blotting was used to analyze NF-κB activity. A xenograft model was established for therapeutic efficacy evaluation. Digoxin inhibited cell growth and resulted in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (G0/G1 for Raji cells; G2/M for NAMALWA cells). Digoxin inhibited DNA synthesis and induced morphological apoptotic characteristics. Besides, digoxin inhibited NF-κB and TNF-α-stimulated NF-κB activity, and suppressed NF-κB initiating genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cyclin D1, and c-myc), however, increased p21 cip1 . Digoxin activated caspase-9/3. Furthermore, digoxin inhibited xenograft tumors growth and reduced Ki-67 and c-myc. Digoxin exerted antitumor effects on BL cells in vitro and in vivo might through regulating NF-κB and caspase pathway. These outcomes highlight the potential of digoxin as a therapeutic agent for BL.

  17. Collaborative study of a microbiological screening method (three-plate) for the banned antimicrobial growth promotors tylosin, virginiamycin, spiramycin, zinc bacitracin and avoparcin in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-Hofstad, I.; Lankveld, van W.D.M.; Tomassen, M.J.H.; Jong, de J.; Egmond, van H.J.

    2008-01-01

    A microbiological screening method (three-plate) for the detection of the antimicrobial growth promoters tylosin, spiramycin, virginiamycin, zinc bacitracin, and avoparcin in animal feed has been developed and validated successfully. A collaborative study involving 18 laboratories receiving 172

  18. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  19. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor-10 is a mitogen for urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagai, Shelly; Rubio, Eric; Cheng, Jang-Fang; Sweet, Robert; Thomas, Regi; Fuchs, Elaine; Grady, Richard; Mitchell, Michael; Bassuk, James A.

    2002-02-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF)-10 plays an important role in regulating growth, differentiation, and repair of the urothelium. This process occurs through a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the epithelium (urothelium). In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that (i) fibroblasts of the human lamina propria were the cell type that synthesized FGF-10 RNA and (ii) the FGF-10 gene is located at the 5p12-p13 locus of chromosome 5. Recombinant (r) preparations of human FGF-10 were found to induce proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and of transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF7-null mice in vivo. Mechanistic studies with human cells indicated two modes of FGF-10 action: (i) translocation of rFGF-10 into urothelial cell nuclei and (ii) a signaling cascade that begins with the heparin-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of surface transmembrane receptors. The normal urothelial phenotype, that of quiescence, is proposed to be typified by negligible levels of FGF-10. During proliferative phases, levels of FGF-10 rise at the urothelial cell surface and/or within urothelial cell nuclei. An understanding of how FGF-10 works in conjunction with these other processes will lead to better management of many diseases of the bladder and urinary tract.

  1. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Joji; Bell-Loncella, Elisabeth T; Purazo, Marc L; Lu, Yifeng; Dorchak, Jesse; Clancy, Rebecca; Slavik, Julianna; Cutler, Mary Lou; Shriver, Craig D

    2016-02-12

    Previous studies suggest that certain transition metal complexes, such as cisplatin, are efficacious for treating various cancer types, including ovarian, lung, and breast. In order to further evaluate ruthenium (Ru) complexes as potential anti-cancer agents, we synthesized and evaluated Ru-arene complexes. Two complexes with the general formula [Ru (η (6)-p-cym) (N-N) Cl](+) were tested for their abilities to inhibit cancer cells. The complex with o-phenylenediamine as the N-N ligand (o-PDA) significantly inhibited growth of breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, SKBR-3, and SUM149), lymphoma (Raji), melanoma (Bowes), and osteosarcoma (HT1080); however, the complex with o-benzoquinonediimine (o-BQDI) was ineffective except for SUM149. In contrast, o-PDA failed to inhibit growth of human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A. Treatment of MDA-MBA-231 cells with o-PDA resulted in a significant reduction of productions of PDGF-AA, GM-CSF, and VEGF-A proteins at the transcriptional levels. Finally, we demonstrated that o-PDA synergistically inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell growth with cyclophosphamide but not doxorubicin or paclitaxel. These results suggest that Ru-arene complexes are promising anti-cancer drugs that inhibit progression and metastasis by blocking multiple processes for breast and other types of cancer.

  2. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  3. A photoprotein in mouse embryonic stem cells measures Ca2+ mobilization in cells and in animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cainarca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous expression of pharmacological targets in transformed cell lines has been the traditional platform for high throughput screening of small molecules. However, exogenous expression in these cells is limited by aberrant dosage, or its toxicity, the potential lack of interaction partners, and alterations to physiology due to transformation itself. Instead, primary cells or cells differentiated from precursors are more physiological, but less amenable to exogenous expression of reporter systems. To overcome this challenge, we stably expressed c-Photina, a Ca(2+-sensitive photoprotein, driven by a ubiquitous promoter in a mouse embryonic stem (mES cell line. The same embryonic stem cell line was also used to generate a transgenic mouse that expresses c-Photina in most tissues. We show here that these cells and mice provide an efficient source of primary cells, cells differentiated from mES cells, including cardiomyocytes, neurons, astrocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells, pancreatic islet cells, stably and robustly expressing c-Photina, and may be exploited for miniaturized high throughput screening. Moreover, we provide evidence that the transgenic mice may be suitable for ex-vivo bioimaging studies in both cells and tissues.

  4. Effect of flupirtine on the growth and viability of U373 malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchanathan, Elango; Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Lakkakula, Bhaskar Venkata Kameswara Subrahmanya

    2013-01-01

    Flupirtine is a non-opioid analgesic without antipyretic or antiphlogistic properties but with favorable tolerability in humans. This analgesic also exhibits neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, flupirtine antagonizes glutamate- and NMDA-induced intracellular levels of Ca 2+ and counteracts the effects of focal cerebral ischemia. Although flupirtine has been used to relieve pain caused by different diseases and clinical procedures, information on the safety and efficacy of flupirtine is limited. The present study was conducted to investigate the neuroprotective effects of flupirtine on U373 malignant glioma (MG) cell lines. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis was performed by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Variations in the growth of U373 MG cells in 5 mM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), 1 mM flupirtine, and combined treatment indicated the antagonistic effects of NMDA and flupirtine on MG cell lines. The variation in the percentage of gated cell population in different cell cycle phases showed significant variations after 48 h of treatment. Flupirtine has neuroprotective effect of on U373 MG cells, which limits its use in the pain management of brain tumors. This property warrants further studies using animal models and large-scale clinical trials

  5. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W.C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    Anterior pituitaries from small (250 g) and large (400 g) rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission were pooled and trypsinized into two single-cell suspensions. Compared with ground-based controls, flight cells appeared to contain more intracellular growth hormone (GH) but release less GH over a 6-day culture period, measured by radioimmunoassay. After implantation into hypophysectomized rats, both sets of flight cells released only 50% of the GH compared with the control cells. Glands from large flight rats contained 44% somatotrophs compared with 37% for controls; small animals showed no difference. There were no striking differences in somatotroph ultrastructure between cells in the four groups. Western blot analysis indicate that there were no major differences in immunoactive GH variants. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that small flight cells released much less of a high-molecular weight variant rich in GH bioactivity. The results suggest that GH cells from rats exposed to microgravity may experience secretory dysfunction. The possibility that this occurs directly at the pituitary cell level is discussed

  6. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter

  7. Challenges in animal modelling of mesenchymal stromal cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Ng, Spencer; Velu, Vijayakumar; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-04-28

    Utilization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for the treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is of translational interest. Safety of MSC therapy has been well demonstrated in early phase clinical trials but efficacy in randomized clinical trials needs to be demonstrated. Understanding MSC mechanisms of action to reduce gut injury and inflammation is necessary to improve current ongoing and future clinical trials. However, two major hurdles impede the direct translation of data derived from animal experiments to the clinical situation: (1) limitations of the currently available animal models of colitis that reflect human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The etiology and progression of human IBD are multifactorial and hence a challenge to mimic in animal models; and (2) Species specific differences in the functionality of MSCs derived from mice versus humans. MSCs derived from mice and humans are not identical in their mechanisms of action in suppressing inflammation. Thus, preclinical animal studies with murine derived MSCs cannot be considered as an exact replica of human MSC based clinical trials. In the present review, we discuss the therapeutic properties of MSCs in preclinical and clinical studies of IBD. We also discuss the challenges and approaches of using appropriate animal models of colitis, not only to study putative MSC therapeutic efficacy and their mechanisms of action, but also the suitability of translating findings derived from such studies to the clinic.

  8. Small animal models to understand pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and use of stem cell in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piombo, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common diseases, which affect the correct functionality of synovial joints and is characterized by articular cartilage degradation. Limitation in the treatment of OA is mostly due to the very limited regenerative characteristic of articular cartilage once is damaged. Small animal models are of particular importance for mechanistic analysis to understand the processes that affect cartilage degradation. Combination of joint injury techniques with the use of stem cells has been shown to be an important tool for understanding the processes of cartilage degradation and regeneration. Implementation of stem cells and small animal models are important tools to help researchers to find a solution that could ameliorate and prevent the symptoms of OA. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Prospects for the use of animal cell cultures in screening of pharmaceutical substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, S. G.; Moiseeva, I. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is a tendency to reduce the use of animals in conducting safety tests of chemical substances. Therefore, in vitro methods are a good alternative or adjunct to in vivo safety tests. This is especially important at the stage of pre-clinical drug trial. In 2004, the international standard for the principles of good laboratory practice (GLP) [1] was adopted which regulates chemicals trials in cell cultures. However, in Russia, until recently, this issue has been neglected. Research works have been scarce. In 2013, the standard for GLP principles and compliance monitoring was adopted in Russia [2]. The feasibility of using animal cell cultures as drug testing system has been proved by the experimental base and is now being introduced into practice [3].

  10. Fractones: extracellular matrix niche controlling stem cell fate and growth factor activity in the brain in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    The stem cell niche refers to a specific microenvironment where stem cells proliferate and differentiate to produce new specialized cells throughout an organism's adulthood. Growth factors are crucial signaling molecules that diffuse through the extracellular space, reach the stem cell niche, and ultimately promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, it is not well known how multiple growth factors, often with antagonistic activities, work together in the stem cell niche to select target stem cell populations and determine stem cell fate. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules play an important role in promoting growth factor access and activity in the stem cell niche. In the adult brain neurogenic zone, where neural stem cells (NSCs) reside, there exist specialized ECM structures, which we have named fractones. The processes of NSC allow them to come into contact with fractones and interact with its individual components, which include heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and laminins. We have demonstrated that fractone-associated HSPGs bind growth factors and regulate NSC proliferation in the neurogenic zone. Moreover, emerging results show that fractones are structurally altered in animal models with autism and adult hydrocephalus, as demonstrated by changes in fractone size, quantity, or HSPG content. Interestingly, ECM structures similar to fractones have been found throughout β-amyloid plaques in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Pathological fractones may cause imbalances in growth factor activity and impair neurogenesis, leading to inflammation and disorder. Generally speaking, these stem cell niche structures play a potentially vital role in controlling growth factor activity during both health and disease.

  11. Digestibility, growth, blood chemistry, and enzyme activity of juvenile Oreochromis niloticus fed isocaloric diets containing animal and plant byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnolia Montoya-Mejía

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this work, we studied the digestibility, growth, blood chemistry, and enzyme activity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus juveniles (0.95±0.18 g using different animal (fish silage meal, whey meal, bovine blood meal, and red crab meal and plant (extruded bean, extruded chickpea meal, coconut paste, Jatropha curcas meal, and chickpea meal dietary byproducts. Nine isocaloric diets (321.92±9.10 kcal g−1 were evaluated for 60 days. The highest digestibility of crude protein values for animal and plant sources were obtained for the whey (93.6 and extruded bean meal (90.5 diets, respectively. The final body weight was higher for the red crab and extruded chickpea meal diets, meanwhile the fish silage and red crab byproducts obtained the highest protein efficiency ratio. Hematocrit was similar among the diets of each byproduct source and presented correlation with growth parameters. The highest glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride values were obtained for fish silage (138.0, 260.5, and 389.0 mg dL−1, respectively and whey meal (174.5, 242.3, and 284.0 mg dL−1, respectively groups. A positive correlation was found between the digestibility of crude protein of ingredients and chymotrypsin activity. Oreochromis niloticus is able to better utilize fish silage, whey, extruded bean, and extruded chickpea byproducts, adjusting its digestive physiology. Such ingredients can be used for formulating cheaper and efficient tilapia diets.

  12. Evaluation of porcine stem cells competence for somatic cell nuclear transfer and production of cloned animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jan; Liu, Ying; Petkov, Stoyan

    2017-01-01

    Porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been used extensively to create genetically modified pigs, but the efficiency of the methodology is still low. It has been hypothesized that pluripotent or multipotent stem cells might result in increased SCNT efficacy as these cells are closer tha...

  13. Biological X-ray irradiator characterization for use with small animals and cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Colello Bruno

    Full Text Available This study presents the characterization of an X-ray irradiator through dosimetric tests, which confirms the actual dose rate that small animals and cells will be exposed to during radiobiological experiments. We evaluated the linearity, consistency, repeatability, and dose distribution in the positions in which the animals or cells are placed during irradiation. In addition, we evaluated the performance of the X-ray tube (voltage and tube operating current, the radiometric survey (leakage radiation and safety devices. The irradiator default setting was established as 160 kV and 25 mA. Tests showed that the dose rate was linear overtime (R2=1 and remained stable for long (constant and short (repeatability intervals between readings. The mean dose rate inside the animal cages was 1.27±0.06 Gy/min with a uniform beam of 95.40% (above the minimum threshold guaranteed by the manufacturer. The mean dose rate inside the cell plates was 0.92±0.19 Gy/min. The dose rate dependence with tube voltage and current presented a quadratic and linear relationship, respectively. There was no observed mechanical failure during evaluation of the irradiator safety devices and the radiometric survey obtained a maximum ambient equivalent dose rate of 0.26 mSv/h, which exempts it from the radiological protection requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The irradiator characterization enables us to perform radiobiological experiments, and assists or even replaces traditional therapy equipment (e.g., linear accelerators for cells and small animal irradiation, especially in early research stages.

  14. Refined control of cell stemness allowed animal evolution in the oxic realm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammarlund, Emma U; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Påhlman, Sven

    2018-01-01

    Animal diversification on Earth has long been presumed to be associated with the increasing extent of oxic niches. Here, we challenge that view. We start with the fact that hypoxia (<1-3% O2) maintains cellular immaturity (stemness), whereas adult stem cells continuously-and paradoxically-regener...... is consistent with geological evidence and provides a new perspective on the challenges and evolution of multicellular life....

  15. Cells containing aragonite crystals mediate responses to gravity in Trichoplax adhaerens (Placozoa), an animal lacking neurons and synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Tatiana D; Smith, Carolyn L; Hammar, Katherine; Winters, Christine A; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D; Reese, Thomas S

    2018-01-01

    Trichoplax adhaerens has only six cell types. The function as well as the structure of crystal cells, the least numerous cell type, presented an enigma. Crystal cells are arrayed around the perimeter of the animal and each contains a birefringent crystal. Crystal cells resemble lithocytes in other animals so we looked for evidence they are gravity sensors. Confocal microscopy showed that their cup-shaped nuclei are oriented toward the edge of the animal, and that the crystal shifts downward under the influence of gravity. Some animals spontaneously lack crystal cells and these animals behaved differently upon being tilted vertically than animals with a typical number of crystal cells. EM revealed crystal cell contacts with fiber cells and epithelial cells but these contacts lacked features of synapses. EM spectroscopic analyses showed that crystals consist of the aragonite form of calcium carbonate. We thus provide behavioral evidence that Trichoplax are able to sense gravity, and that crystal cells are likely to be their gravity receptors. Moreover, because placozoans are thought to have evolved during Ediacaran or Cryogenian eras associated with aragonite seas, and their crystals are made of aragonite, they may have acquired gravity sensors during this early era.

  16. Comparison of fermented animal feed and mushroom growth media as two value-added options for waste Cassava pulp management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakulvichean, Sivalee; Chaiprasert, Pawinee; Otmakhova, Julia; Songkasiri, Warinthorn

    2017-12-01

    Cassava is one of the main processed crops in Thailand, but this generates large amounts (7.3 million tons in 2015) of waste cassava pulp (WCP). The solid WCP is sold directly to farmers or pulp-drying companies at a low cost to reduce the burden of on-site waste storage. Using an integrated direct and environmental cost model, fermented animal feed and mushroom growth media were compared as added-value waste management alternatives for WCP to mitigate environmental problems. Primary and secondary data were collected from the literature, field data, and case studies. Data boundaries were restricted to a gate-to-gate scenario with a receiving capacity of 500 t WCP/d, and based on a new production unit being set up at the starch factory. The total production cost of each WCP utilization option was analyzed from the economic and environmental costs. Fermented animal feed was an economically attractive scenario, giving a higher net present value (NPV), lower investment cost and environmental impact, and a shorter payback period for the 10-year operational period. The selling price of mushrooms was the most sensitive parameter regarding the NPV, while the NPV for the price of fermented animal feed had the highest value in the best-case scenario.

  17. Cell differentiation and germ-soma separation in Ediacaran animal embryo-like fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Xiao, Shuhai; Pang, Ke; Zhou, Chuanming; Yuan, Xunlai

    2014-12-11

    Phosphorites of the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation (∼600 million years old) yield spheroidal microfossils with a palintomic cell cleavage pattern. These fossils have been variously interpreted as sulphur-oxidizing bacteria, unicellular protists, mesomycetozoean-like holozoans, green algae akin to Volvox, and blastula embryos of early metazoans or bilaterian animals. However, their complete life cycle is unknown and it is uncertain whether they had a cellularly differentiated ontogenetic stage, making it difficult to test their various phylogenetic interpretations. Here we describe new spheroidal fossils from black phosphorites of the Doushantuo Formation that have been overlooked in previous studies. These fossils represent later developmental stages of previously published blastula-like fossils, and they show evidence for cell differentiation, germ-soma separation, and programmed cell death. Their complex multicellularity is inconsistent with a phylogenetic affinity with bacteria, unicellular protists, or mesomycetozoean-like holozoans. Available evidence also indicates that the Doushantuo fossils are unlikely crown-group animals or volvocine green algae. We conclude that an affinity with cellularly differentiated multicellular eukaryotes, including stem-group animals or algae, is likely but more data are needed to constrain further the exact phylogenetic affinity of the Doushantuo fossils.

  18. Individual cell-based models of cell scatter of ARO and MLP-29 cells in response to hepatocyte growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Merks, Roeland M H; Preziosi, Luigi; Medico, Enzo

    2009-09-07

    The different behaviors of colonies of two cell lines, ARO (thyroid carcinoma-derived cells) and MLP-29 (mouse liver progenitor cells), in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are described deducing suitable cellular Potts models (CPM). It is shown how increased motility and decreased adhesiveness are responsible for cell-cell dissociation and tissue invasion in the ARO cells. On the other hand, it is shown that, in addition to the biological mechanisms above, it is necessary to include directional persistence in cell motility and HGF diffusion to describe the scattering and the branching processes characteristic of MLP-29 cells.

  19. Zebularine inhibits the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Zebularine (Zeb) is a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor to that has an anti-tumor effect. Here, we evaluated the anti-growth effect of Zeb on A549 lung cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC50 of approximately 70 µM at 72 h. Cell cycle analysis indicated that Zeb induced an S phase arrest in A549 cells. Zeb also induced A549 cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm ), Bcl-2 decrease, Bax increase, p53 increase and activation of caspase-3 and -8. In contrast, Zeb mildly inhibited the growth of human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF) normal cells and lead to a G1 phase arrest. Zeb did not induce apoptosis in HPF cells. In relation to ROS level, Zeb increased ROS level in A549 cells and induced glutathione (GSH) depletion. The well-known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevented the death of Zeb-treated A549 cells. Moreover, Zeb increased the level of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in A549 cells. While the overexpression of TrxR1 attenuated death and ROS level in Zeb-treated A549 cells, the downregulation of TrxR1 intensified death and ROS level in these cells. In conclusion, Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The inhibition was influenced by ROS and TrxR1 levels. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Alterations in pancreatic β cell function and Trypanosoma cruzi infection: evidence from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufurrena, Quinn; Amjad, Farhad M; Scherer, Philipp E; Weiss, Louis M; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Roth, Jesse; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Kuliawat, Regina

    2017-03-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes a persistent infection, Chagas disease, affecting millions of persons in endemic areas of Latin America. As a result of immigration, this disease has now been diagnosed in non-endemic areas worldwide. Although, the heart and gastrointestinal tract are the most studied, the insulin-secreting β cell of the endocrine pancreas is also a target of infection. In this review, we summarize available clinical and laboratory evidence to determine whether T. cruzi-infection-mediated changes of β cell function is likely to contribute to the development of hyperglycemia and diabetes. Our literature survey indicates that T. cruzi infection of humans and of experimental animals relates to altered secretory behavior of β cells. The mechanistic basis of these observations appears to be a change in stimulus-secretion pathway function rather than the loss of insulin-producing β cells. Whether this attenuated insulin release ultimately contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes in human Chagas disease, however, remains to be determined. Since the etiologies of diabetes are multifactorial including genetic and lifestyle factors, the use of cell- and animal-based investigations, allowing direct manipulation of these factors, are important tools in testing if reduced insulin secretion has a causal influence on diabetes in the setting of Chagas disease. Long-term clinical investigations will be required to investigate this link in humans.

  1. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  2. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-07-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise. Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction. Noise in the system can induce the phase transition. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10275099 and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province of China under Grant Nos. 021707 and 001182

  3. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasschaert, Robert N; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-05-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes.

  4. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation...... of the GH receptor. Two mutated cDNAs encoding truncated GH receptors, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454, respectively, were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected into the RIN cells. Both receptor mutants were expressed on the cell surface and displayed normal GH binding affinity. Whereas GH-R1......-638 had a molecular mass of about 110 kDa, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454 showed molecular masses of 49 and 80 kDa, respectively. Cells expressing GH-R1-454 internalized GH to a similar extent as cells transfected with the full length receptor and the parent cell line, but GH-R1-294-expressing cells showed...

  5. TOR, the Gateway to Cellular Metabolism, Cell Growth, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenis, John

    2017-09-21

    Michael N. Hall is this year's recipient of the Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for the identification of the target of rapamycin, TOR. TOR is a master regulator of the cell's growth and metabolic state, and its dysregulation contributes to a variety of diseases, including diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, aging, and cancer, making the TOR pathway an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Systems-biology dissection of eukaryotic cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Justen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent article in BMC Biology illustrates the use of a systems-biology approach to integrate data across the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of budding yeast in order to dissect the relationship between nutrient conditions and cell growth. See research article http://jbiol.com/content/6/2/4 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/68

  7. Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: from animal disease models to human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusto, Elena; Donegà, Matteo; Cossetti, Chiara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the increasing understanding of the mechanisms governing their biology, the application of stem cell therapeutics remains challenging. The initial idea that stem cell transplants work in vivo via the replacement of endogenous cells lost or damaged owing to disease has been challenged by accumulating evidence of their therapeutic plasticity. This new concept covers the remarkable immune regulatory and tissue trophic effects that transplanted stem cells exert at the level of the neural microenvironment to promote tissue healing via combination of immune modulatory and tissue protective actions, while retaining predominantly undifferentiated features. Among a number of promising candidate stem cell sources, neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are under extensive investigation with regard to their therapeutic plasticity after transplantation. The significant impact in vivo of experimental NPC therapies in animal models of inflammatory CNS diseases has raised great expectations that these stem cells, or the manipulation of the mechanisms behind their therapeutic impact, could soon be translated to human studies. This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuro-immune interactions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Human-Derived Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasev, Dimitar; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-10-01

    Tissue regeneration requires proper vascularization. In vivo studies identified that the endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a subtype of endothelial progenitor cells that can be isolated from umbilical cord or peripheral blood, represent a promising cell source for therapeutic neovascularization. ECFCs not only are able to initiate and facilitate neovascularization in diseased tissue but also can, by acting in a paracrine manner, contribute to the creation of favorable conditions for efficient and appropriate differentiation of tissue-resident stem or progenitor cells. This review outlines the progress in the field of in vivo regenerative and tissue engineering studies and surveys why, when, and how ECFCs can be used for tissue regeneration. Reviewed literature that regard human-derived ECFCs in xenogeneic animal models implicates that ECFCs should be considered as an endothelial cell source of preference for induction of neovascularization. Their neovascularization and regenerative potential is augmented in combination with other types of stem or progenitor cells. Biocompatible scaffolds prevascularized with ECFCs interconnect faster and better with the host vasculature. The physical incorporation of ECFCs in newly formed blood vessels grants prolonged release of trophic factors of interest, which also makes ECFCs an interesting cell source candidate for gene therapy and delivery of bioactive compounds in targeted area. ECFCs possess all biological features to be considered as a cell source of preference for tissue engineering and repair of blood supply. Investigation of regenerative potential of ECFCs in autologous settings in large animal models before clinical application is the next step to clearly outline the most efficient strategy for using ECFCs as treatment.

  9. Ginger inhibits cell growth and modulates angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jennifer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc is a natural dietary component with antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. The ginger component [6]-gingerol has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects through mediation of NF-κB. NF-κB can be constitutively activated in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and may contribute towards increased transcription and translation of angiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ginger on tumor cell growth and modulation of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Methods The effect of ginger and the major ginger components on cell growth was determined in a panel of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. Activation of NF-κB and and production of VEGF and IL-8 was determined in the presence or absence of ginger. Results Ginger treatment of cultured ovarian cancer cells induced profound growth inhibition in all cell lines tested. We found that in vitro, 6-shogaol is the most active of the individual ginger components tested. Ginger treatment resulted in inhibition of NF-kB activation as well as diminished secretion of VEGF and IL-8. Conclusion Ginger inhibits growth and modulates secretion of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells. The use of dietary agents such as ginger may have potential in the treatment and prevention of ovarian cancer.

  10. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2

  11. Osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures without animal serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, Eeva; Sillat, Tarvo; Oja, Sofia; Noro, Ariel; Laitinen, Anita; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Lehenkari, Petri; Hukkanen, Mika; Korhonen, Matti

    2015-09-07

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been intensely studied for the purpose of developing solutions for clinical tissue engineering. Autologous MSCs can potentially be used to replace tissue defects, but the procedure also carries risks such as immunization and xenogeneic infection. Replacement of the commonly used fetal calf serum (FCS) with human platelet lysate and plasma (PLP) to support cell growth may reduce some of these risks. Altered media could, however, influence stem cell differentiation and we address this experimentally. We examined human MSC differentiation into the osteoblast lineage using in vitro two- and three-dimensional cultures with PLP or FCS as cell culture medium supplements. Differentiation was followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and alkaline phosphatase activity, matrix formation and matrix calcium content were quantified. Three-dimensional culture, where human MSCs were grown on collagen sponges, markedly stimulated osteoblast differentiation; a fourfold increase in calcium deposition could be observed in both PLP and FCS groups. PLP-grown cells showed robust osteogenic differentiation both in two- and three-dimensional MSC cultures. The calcium content of the matrix in the two-dimensional PLP group at day 14 was 2.2-fold higher in comparison to the FCS group (p cultures, cellular proliferation appeared to decrease during later stages of differentiation, while in the FCS group the number of cells increased throughout the experiment. In three-dimensional experiments, the PLP and FCS groups behaved more congruently, except for the alkaline phosphatase activity and mRNA levels which were markedly increased by PLP. Human PLP was at least equal to FCS in supporting osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs in two- and three-dimensional conditions; however, proliferation was inferior. As PLP is free of animal components, and thus represents reduced risk for xenogeneic infection, its use for human MSC

  12. Dissolution of rock phosphate in animal manure soil amendment and lettuce growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kofi Agyarko; Akwasi Adutwum Abunyewa; Emmanuel Kwasi Asiedu; Emmanuel Heva

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted in pots on the field to assess the effect of different quantities of poultry manure (PM), cattle manure (CM) and pig manure (PG) on the release of available phosphorus from Togo rock phosphate (RP) and lettuce growth. There were eleven (11) treatments which were: Control (soil only); 2.5g RP; 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 2.5g CM; 2.5gRP + 5gCM; 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPM; 2.5gRP + 5gPM; 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 2.5gPG; 2.5gRP + 5gPG, applied per kg soil, using the Completely Randomized Design...

  13. Abnormal changes in NKT cells, the IGF-1 axis, and liver pathology in an animal model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseny Finkelstein

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rapidly progressing fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective death of motor neurons (MN in the spinal cord, and is associated with local neuroinflammation. Circulating CD4(+ T cells are required for controlling the local detrimental inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, and for supporting neuronal survival, including that of MN. T-cell deficiency increases neuronal loss, while boosting T cell levels reduces it. Here, we show that in the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 G93A (mSOD1 mouse model of ALS, the levels of natural killer T (NKT cells increased dramatically, and T-cell distribution was altered both in lymphoid organs and in the spinal cord relative to wild-type mice. The most significant elevation of NKT cells was observed in the liver, concomitant with organ atrophy. Hepatic expression levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 decreased, while the expression of IGF binding protein (IGFBP-1 was augmented by more than 20-fold in mSOD1 mice relative to wild-type animals. Moreover, hepatic lymphocytes of pre-symptomatic mSOD1 mice were found to secrete significantly higher levels of cytokines when stimulated with an NKT ligand, ex-vivo. Immunomodulation of NKT cells using an analogue of α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer, in a specific regimen, diminished the number of these cells in the periphery, and induced recruitment of T cells into the affected spinal cord, leading to a modest but significant prolongation of life span of mSOD1 mice. These results identify NKT cells as potential players in ALS, and the liver as an additional site of major pathology in this disease, thereby emphasizing that ALS is not only a non-cell autonomous, but a non-tissue autonomous disease, as well. Moreover, the results suggest potential new therapeutic targets such as the liver for immunomodulatory intervention for modifying the disease, in addition to MN-based neuroprotection and systemic

  14. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Griseofulvin inhibits the growth of adrenocortical cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramann, E L; Willenberg, H S; Hildebrandt, B; Müller-Mattheis, V; Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A; Haase, M

    2013-04-01

    Supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy are associated with a malignant phenotype of tumor cells. Centrosomal clustering is a mechanism used by cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes to solve the threatening problem of multipolar spindles. Griseofulvin is an antifungal substance that interferes with the microtubule apparatus and inhibits centrosomal clustering. It has also been demonstrated that griseofulvin inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. However, it is not yet known whether treatment with griseofulvin inhibits growth of adrenocortical tumor cells. We studied the viability and antiproliferative effects of griseofulvin on cultured NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells using Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]-thymidine assays. For the detection of apoptosis we used a caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy techniques. We observed that incubation with griseofulvin for 24-48 h leads to a decrease in the viability and proliferation of NCI-H295R cells in a dose-dependent manner. Significant effects could be observed after incubation with griseofulvin as measured by Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]dT- uptake assays. Apoptosis of NCI-H295R cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 4.5-fold after incubation with griseofulvin 40 μM for 24 h as shown by caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy. With regard to new treatment strategies for adrenocortical cancer, griseofulvin, and possibly other agents, which interfere with the microtubule apparatus and inhibit centrosomal clustering, may turn out to be interesting targets for further research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of randomized control animal trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Wang, Yuexiang; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Ghimire, Saruna; Wellik, Kay E; Qu, Wenchun

    2017-04-01

    Background Results of animal studies assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke remain inconsistent. Aims The aims are to assess efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke in animal studies. Methods Randomized controlled animal trials assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy were eligible. Stroke therapy academic industry round table was used to assess methodologic quality of included studies. Primary outcomes were total infarction volume and modified Neurological Severity Score. Multiple prespecified sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted. Random effects models were used for meta-analysis. Results Thirty-three randomized animal trials were included with a total of 796 animals. The median quality score was 6 (interquartile range, 5-7). Bone marrow stromal cell therapy decreased total infarction volume (standardized mean difference, 0.897; 95% confidence interval, 0.553-1.241; P animals treated with bone marrow stromal cell and controls was 2.47 (95% confidence interval, 1.84-3.11; P animal studies. Conclusions Bone marrow stromal cell therapy significantly decreased total infarction volume and increased neural functional recovery in randomized controlled animal models of ischemic stroke.

  17. Optimization of growth and bacteriocin activity of the food bioprotective Carnobacterium divergens V41 in an animal origin protein free medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne BRILLET-VIEL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of Carnobacterium divergens V41 growth and bacteriocin activity in a culture medium deprived of animal protein, needs for food bioprotection, was performed by using a statistical approach. In a screening experiment, twelve factors (pH, temperature, carbohydrates, NaCl, yeast extract, soy peptone, sodium acetate, ammonium citrate, magnesium sulphate, manganese sulphate, ascorbic acid and thiamine were tested for their influence on the maximal growth and bacteriocin activity using a two-level incomplete factorial design with 192 experiments performed in microtiter plate wells. Based on results, a basic medium was developed and three variables (pH, temperature and carbohydrates concentration were selected for a scale-up study in bioreactor. A 23 complete factorial design was performed, allowing the estimation of linear effects of factors and all the first order interactions. The best conditions for the cell production were obtained with a temperature of 15°C and a carbohydrates concentration of 20 g/l whatever the pH (in the range 6.5-8, and the best conditions for bacteriocin activity were obtained at 15°C and pH 6.5 whatever the carbohydrates concentration (in the range 2-20 g/l. The predicted final count of C. divergens V41 and the bacteriocin activity under the optimized conditions (15°C, pH 6.5, 20 g/l carbohydrates were 2.4 x 1010 CFU/ml and 819200 AU/ml respectively. C. divergens V41 cells cultivated in the optimized conditions were able to grow in cold-smoked salmon and totally inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (< 50 CFU g-1 during five weeks of vacuum storage at 4° and 8°C.

  18. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  19. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico, E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro [Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  20. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  1. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand...

  2. Effect of laser modified surface microtopochemistry on endothelial cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, A C; Rouais, F; Lazare, S; Bordenave, L; Baquey, Ch

    2007-02-15

    The introduction of microelectronics technology in the area of biological sciences has brought forth previously unforeseeable applications such as DNA or protein biochips, miniaturized, multiparametric biosensors for high performance multianalyte assays, DNA sequencing, biocomputers, and substrates for controlled cell growth (i.e. tissue engineering). We developed and investigated a new method using "cold" excimer laser beam technology combined with microlithographical techniques to create surfaces with well defined 3D microdomains in order to delineate critical microscopic surface features governing cell-material interactions. Microfabricated surfaces with microgrooves 30-3 microm deep, 10 - 1 microm wide spaced 30 microm apart were obtained with micron resolution, by "microsculpturing" polymer model surfaces using a computer controlled laser KrF excimer beam coupled with a microlithographic projection technique. The laser beam after exiting a mask was focused onto the polymer target surface via an optical setup allowing for a 10-fold reduction of the mask pattern. Various 3D micropatterned features were obtained at the micron level. Reproducible submicron features could also be obtained using this method. Subsequently, model human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured on the laser microfabricated surfaces in order to study the effects of specific microscopic surface features on cell deposition and orientation. Cell deposition patterns were found to be microstructure dependant, and showed cell orientation dependency for features in the cell range dimension, a behaviour significantly different from that of a previously studied cell model (osteoprogenitor cell). This model may be a promising in so far as it is very rapid (a time frame less than a second per square centimeter of micropatterned surface) and provides further insights into the effects of surface microtopography on cell response with possible applications in the field of biosensors

  3. Human keloid cell characterization and inhibition of growth with human Wharton's jelly stem cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Subramanian, Arjunan; Srinivasan, Akshaya; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-05-01

    Keloids are firm rubbery growths that grow beyond the boundaries of human wounds and their treatment has met with limited success. Their properties and growth behavior have not been properly characterized and it has been suggested that a benign neoplastic stem cell-like phenotype in an altered cytokine microenvironment drives their uncontrolled cell proliferation. Modification of the stem cell niche may be an attractive approach to its prevention. We studied the growth behavior, stemness, and tumorigenic characteristics of keloid cells in prolonged culture. Since human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) secrete high levels of cytokines and have anti-tumorigenic properties we explored its role on the inhibition of keloid growth in vitro. Keloid cells grew readily in both adherent and sphere culture and expressed high levels of mesenchymal CD and tumor-associated fibroblast (TAF) markers up to passage 10. When they were exposed to repeat doses of hWJSC conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) and lysate (hWJSC-CL) every 72 h up to 9 days their growth was inhibited with a reduction in CD and TAF marker expression. On Days 3, 6, and 9 treated keloid cells showed linear decreases in cell proliferation (BrdU), increases in Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL-positive cells, interruptions of the cell cycle and inhibition of migration in scratch-wound assays. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR confirmed a significant downregulation of TAF and anti-apoptotic-related gene (SURVIVIN) expression and upregulation of autophagy-related (BAX, ATG5, ATG7, BECLIN-1) gene expression. The results suggest that hWJSCs or molecules secreted by them may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of keloids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) in laboratory animals: offering an insight into stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Liu, Hua-Hsing; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chen, Pin-Ru; Liu, Ming-Chao; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chang, Ko-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a pathological process secondary to underlying bone marrow (BM) insufficiency in adults. It is characterized by the emergence of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors scattered around the affected tissue, most likely in the spleen, liver, and lymph node, etc. EMH in patients frequently receives less medical attention and is neglected unless a compressive or obstructive hematopoietic mass appears to endanger the patient's life. However, on a biological basis, EMH reflects the alteration of relationships among hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and their original and new microenvironments. The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to mobilize from the bone marrow and to accommodate and function in extramedullary tissues is rather complicated and far from our current understanding. Fortunately, many reports from the studies of drugs and genetics using animals have incidentally found EMH to be involved. Thereby, the molecular basis of EMH could further be elucidated from those animals after cross-comparison. A deeper understanding of the extramedullary hematopoietic niche could help expand stem cells in vitro and establish a better treatment in patients for stem cell transplantation.

  5. Rainfed areas and animal agriculture in Asia: the wanting agenda for transforming productivity growth and rural poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra, C

    2012-01-01

    The importance of rainfed areas and animal agriculture on productivity enhancement and food security for economic rural growth in Asia is discussed in the context of opportunities for increasing potential contribution from them. The extent of the rainfed area of about 223 million hectares and the biophysical attributes are described. They have been variously referred to inter alia as fragile, marginal, dry, waste, problem, threatened, range, less favoured, low potential lands, forests and woodlands, including lowlands and uplands. Of these, the terms less favoured areas (LFAs), and low or high potential are quite widely used. The LFAs are characterised by four key features: i) very variable biophysical elements, notably poor soil quality, rainfall, length of growing season and dry periods, ii) extreme poverty and very poor people who continuously face hunger and vulnerability, iii) presence of large populations of ruminant animals (buffaloes, cattle, goats and sheep), and iv) have had minimum development attention and an unfinished wanting agenda. The rainfed humid/sub-humid areas found mainly in South East Asia (99 million ha), and arid/semi-arid tropical systems found in South Asia (116 million ha) are priority agro-ecological zones (AEZs). In India for example, the ecosystem occupies 68% of the total cultivated area and supports 40% of the human and 65% of the livestock populations. The area also produces 4% of food requirements. The biophysical and typical household characteristics, agricultural diversification, patterns of mixed farming and cropping systems are also described. Concerning animals, their role and economic importance, relevance of ownership, nomadic movements, and more importantly their potential value as the entry point for the development of LFAs is discussed. Two examples of demonstrated success concern increasing buffalo production for milk and their expanded use in semi-arid AEZs in India, and the integration of cattle and goats with oil

  6. Rainfed Areas and Animal Agriculture in Asia: The Wanting Agenda for Transforming Productivity Growth and Rural Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Devendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of rainfed areas and animal agriculture on productivity enhancement and food security for economic rural growth in Asia is discussed in the context of opportunities for increasing potential contribution from them. The extent of the rainfed area of about 223 million hectares and the biophysical attributes are described. They have been variously referred to inter alia as fragile, marginal, dry, waste, problem, threatened, range, less favoured, low potential lands, forests and woodlands, including lowlands and uplands. Of these, the terms less favoured areas (LFAs, and low or high potential are quite widely used. The LFAs are characterised by four key features: i very variable biophysical elements, notably poor soil quality, rainfall, length of growing season and dry periods, ii extreme poverty and very poor people who continuously face hunger and vulnerability, iii presence of large populations of ruminant animals (buffaloes, cattle, goats and sheep, and iv have had minimum development attention and an unfinished wanting agenda. The rainfed humid/sub-humid areas found mainly in South East Asia (99 million ha, and arid/semi-arid tropical systems found in South Asia (116 million ha are priority agro-ecological zones (AEZs. In India for example, the ecosystem occupies 68% of the total cultivated area and supports 40% of the human and 65% of the livestock populations. The area also produces 4% of food requirements. The biophysical and typical household characteristics, agricultural diversification, patterns of mixed farming and cropping systems are also described. Concerning animals, their role and economic importance, relevance of ownership, nomadic movements, and more importantly their potential value as the entry point for the development of LFAs is discussed. Two examples of demonstrated success concern increasing buffalo production for milk and their expanded use in semi-arid AEZs in India, and the integration of cattle and goats

  7. Effect of microwell chip structure on cell microsphere production of various animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yoshida, Shirou; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Mori, Rhuhei; Tamura, Tomoko; Yahiro, Kanji; Mori, Hideki; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Yamasaki, Mami; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2010-08-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids, embryoid bodies, and neurospheres has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated a technique for effective cell microsphere production by using specially prepared microchip. The basic chip design was a multimicrowell structure in triangular arrangement within a 100-mm(2) region in the center of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plate (24x24 mm(2)), the surface of which was modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to render it nonadhesive to cells. We also designed six similar chips with microwell diameters of 200, 300, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 microm to investigate the effect of the microwell diameter on the cell microsphere diameter. Rat hepatocytes, HepG2 cells, mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and mouse neural progenitor/stem (NPS) cells formed hepatocyte spheroids, HepG2 spheroids, embryoid bodies, and neurospheres, respectively, in the microwells within 5 days of culture. For all the cells, a single microsphere was formed in each microwell under all the chip conditions, and such microsphere configurations remained throughout the culture period. Furthermore, the microsphere diameters of each type of cell were strongly positively correlated with the microwell diameters of the chips, suggesting that microsphere diameter can be factitiously controlled by using different chip conditions. Thus, this chip technique is a promising cellular platform for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine research, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. Copyright 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cultivating liver cells on printed arrays of hepatocyte growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caroline N; Tuleuova, Nazgul; Lee, Ji Youn; Ramanculov, Erlan; Reddi, A Hari; Zern, Mark A; Revzin, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Growth factors are commonly present in soluble form during in vitro cell cultivation experiments in order to provide signals for cellular proliferation or differentiation. In contrast to these traditional experiments, we investigated solid-phase presentation of a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a protein important in liver development and regeneration, on microarrays of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In our experiments, HGF was mixed in solution with ECM proteins (collagen (I), (IV) or laminin) and robotically printed onto silane-modified glass slides. Primary rat hepatocytes were seeded onto HGF/ECM protein microarrays and formed cellular clusters that corresponded in size to the dimensions of individual protein spots (500 microm diameter). Analysis of liver-specific products, albumin and alpha1-antitrypsin, revealed several fold higher levels of expression of these proteins in hepatocytes cultured on HGF/ECM microarrays compared to cells cultivated on ECM proteins alone. In addition, cultivation of hepatocytes on HGF/ECM protein spots led to spontaneous reorganization of cellular clusters from a monolayer into three-dimensional spheroids. We also investigated the effects of surface-tethered HGF on hepatocytes co-cultivated with stromal cells and observed a significantly higher level of albumin in co-cultures where hepatocytes were stimulated by HGF/ECM spots compared to co-cultures created on ECM protein islands without the growth factor. In summary, our study suggests that incorporation of HGF into ECM protein microarrays has a profound and long-lasting effect on the morphology and phenotype of primary hepatocytes. In the future, the number of growth factors printed on ECM microarrays will be expanded to enable multiplexed and combinatorial screening of inducers of cellular differentiation or proliferation.

  9. Stem cell dynamics in muscle regeneration: Insights from live imaging in different animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Currie, Peter D

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, live imaging has been adopted to study stem cells in their native environment at cellular resolution. In the skeletal muscle field, this has led to visualising the initial events of muscle repair in mouse, and the entire regenerative response in zebrafish. Here, we review recent discoveries in this field obtained from live imaging studies. Tracking of tissue resident stem cells, the satellite cells, following injury has captured the morphogenetic dynamics of stem/progenitor cells as they facilitate repair. Asymmetric satellite cell division generated a clonogenic progenitor pool, providing in vivo validation for this mechanism. Furthermore, there is an emerging role of stem/progenitor cell guidance at the injury site by cellular protrusions. This review concludes that live imaging is a critical tool for discovering the distinct processes that occur during regeneration, emphasising the importance of imaging in diverse animal models to capture the entire scope of stem cell functions. Also see the Video Abstract. Link to: https://youtube/tgUHSBD1N0g. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. RANKL induces organized lymph node growth by stromal cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Estelle; Duheron, Vincent; Decossas, Marion; Lézot, Frédéric; Berdal, Ariane; Chea, Sylvestre; Golub, Rachel; Bosisio, Mattéo R; Bridal, S Lori; Choi, Yongwon; Yagita, Hideo; Mueller, Christopher G

    2012-02-01

    RANK and its ligand RANKL play important roles in the development and regulation of the immune system. We show that mice transgenic for Rank in hair follicles display massive postnatal growth of skin-draining lymph nodes. The proportions of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stromal cells and their organization are maintained, with the exception of an increase in B cell follicles. The hematopoietic cells are not activated and respond to immunization by foreign Ag and adjuvant. We demonstrate that soluble RANKL is overproduced from the transgenic hair follicles and that its neutralization normalizes lymph node size, inclusive area, and numbers of B cell follicles. Reticular fibroblastic and vascular stromal cells, important for secondary lymphoid organ formation and organization, express RANK and undergo hyperproliferation, which is abrogated by RANKL neutralization. In addition, they express higher levels of CXCL13 and CCL19 chemokines, as well as MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 cell-adhesion molecules. These findings highlight the importance of tissue-derived cues for secondary lymphoid organ homeostasis and identify RANKL as a key molecule for controlling the plasticity of the immune system.

  11. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  12. Cheiradone: a vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nessar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is associated with physiological (for example wound healing and pathological conditions (tumour development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are the major angiogenic regulators. We have identified a natural product (cheiradone isolated from a Euphorbia species which inhibited in vivo and in vitro VEGF- stimulated angiogenesis but had no effect on FGF-2 or EGF activity. Two primary cultures, bovine aortic and human dermal endothelial cells were used in in vitro (proliferation, wound healing, invasion in Matrigel and tube formation and in vivo (the chick chorioallantoic membrane models of angiogenesis in the presence of growth factors and cheiradone. In all cases, the concentration of cheiradone which caused 50% inhibition (IC50 was determined. The effect of cheiradone on the binding of growth factors to their receptors was also investigated. Results Cheiradone inhibited all stages of VEGF-induced angiogenesis with IC50 values in the range 5.20–7.50 μM but did not inhibit FGF-2 or EGF-induced angiogenesis. It also inhibited VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-1 and 2 with IC50 values of 2.9 and 0.61 μM respectively. Conclusion Cheiradone inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis by binding to VEGF receptors -1 and -2 and may be a useful investigative tool to study the specific contribution of VEGF to angiogenesis and may have therapeutic potential.

  13. pH and the cytotoxicity of fluoride in an animal cell culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgeland, K.; Leirskar, J.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism for the toxicity of silicate cement as observed in a cell culture system, the effects of pH and fluoride were tested on human epithelial cells (NCTC 2544). At pH 7.3, fluoride concentrations from 15 to 25 μg/ml (0.79 to 1.3 mM) had a growth inhibitory effect. When the pH of the incubation medium was lowered to the range 7.0 to 6.4, an enhanced cytotoxic effect of fluoride was found, and even at 5 to 10 μg/ml growth inhibition occurred. Concomitant with the enhanced cytotoxicity of fluoride at low pH, there was an increased utilization of glucose and formation of lactate. Upon lowering the pH of the incubation medium from 7.4 to 6.7, a twofold increase in the intracellular concentration of fluoride was found. (author)

  14. Effect of gemcitabine on the uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (18)F-fluorothymidine in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and the animal tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Deng, Sheng-Ming; Guo, Ling-Chuan; Dong, Jia-Jia; Zhu, Yan-Bo; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Zhen-Xin; Cho, William C

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the first-line drug for nonsmall cell lung cancer, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. (18F-FDG) and 18F-fluorothymidine. (18F-FLT) are positron emission tomography. (PET) imaging agents. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of gemcitabine on the uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT in A549 cells and the animal tumor model. The inhibitory effects of gemcitabine on cell growth were determined by tetrazolium blue method, and uptake rates of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT were determined under the same conditions. The adenocarcinoma-bearing nude mice before and after gemcitabine treatments were performed microPET imaging with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens were conducted. After the administration of gemcitabine, positive correlations were observed between inhibition of 18F-FDG or 18F.FLT uptake and cell growth. (r = 0.957 or 0.981, P cells at the dose of 60 mmol/L, and the expression of glucose transporter protein-1, Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in tumor cells were inhibited. 18F-FLT imaging can assess the proliferation of tumor cells and 18F-FDG imaging can reflect the changes of the tumor microenvironment after administration of gemcitabine.

  15. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Calpeptin Attenuated Inflammation, Cell Death, and Axonal Damage in Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, M. Kelly; Das, Arabinda; Samantaray, Supriti; Wallace, Gerald C.; Butler, Jonathan T.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS). Calpain has been implicated in many inflammatory and neurodegenerative events that lead to disability in EAE and MS. Thus, treating EAE animals with calpain inhibitors may block these events and ameliorate disability. To test this hypothesis, acute EAE Lewis rats were treated dose-dependently with the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (50 – 250 µg/kg). Calpain activity, gliosis, loss of myelin, and axonal damage were attenuated by calpeptin therapy, leading to improved clinical scores. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte death were also decreased with down regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins, suggesting that decreases in cell death were due to decreases in the expression or activity of pro-apoptotic proteins. These results indicate that calpain inhibition may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for treating EAE and MS. PMID:20623621

  17. Hematopoietic growth factors including keratinocyte growth factor in allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggewiss, Ruth; Einsele, Hermann

    2007-07-01

    The aim of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is to cure patients of malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and immunodeficiency disorders by redirecting the immune system: the often described graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) or graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. Unfortunately, fulfillment of this goal is often hampered by relapse of the underlying disease, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), or severe opportunistic infections, which account for the majority of post-transplantation deaths. Moreover, studies of long-term survivors of transplantation indicate an accelerated immune aging due to the transplantation procedure itself, preceding chemo- or radiotherapy, and acute and chronic GVHD. Significant advances have been made towards overcoming these obstacles by enhancing immune reconstitution with hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or erythropoietin (EPO) or through the application of cytokines. In addition, there are approaches to promote the thymic-dependent development of naive T cells, which are prepared for the interaction with a multitude of pathogens. Examples are the application of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), neuroendocrine hormones such as growth hormone or prolactin, sex hormone ablation, or the invention of a three-dimensional artificial thymus based on a cytomatrix. Might these measures result in a higher rate of healthy and fully recovered patients? Here we review progress in each of these areas.

  18. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  19. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...

  20. The resveratrol analogue trimethoxystilbene inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing multipolar cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Percario, Zulema; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2017-03-01

    Natural compounds are extensively studied for their potential use in traditional and non-traditional medicine. Several natural and synthetic Resveratrol analogues have shown interesting biological activities in the field of cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we have focused on the ability of Resveratrol and two methoxylated derivatives (Trimethoxystilbene and Pterostilbene) to inhibit human cancer cell growth particularly analyzing their ability to interfere with tubulin dynamics at mitosis. We show that Trimethoxystilbene, differently from Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, alters microtubule polymerization dynamics in HeLa cells specifically inducing multipolar spindles and mitotic arrest coupled to a reduction of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic death by mitotic catastrophe. This work demonstrates that the structural modification of Rsv causes substantial changes in the mechanism of action of the derivatives. The presence of three extra methyl groups renders Trimethoxy very efficient in impairing cell proliferation by inducing mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Does the Recent Growth of Aquaculture Create Antibiotic Resistance Threats Different from those Associated with Land Animal Production in Agriculture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Hansa Y; Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-05-01

    Important antibiotics in human medicine have been used for many decades in animal agriculture for growth promotion and disease treatment. Several publications have linked antibiotic resistance development and spread with animal production. Aquaculture, the newest and fastest growing food production sector, may promote similar or new resistance mechanisms. This review of 650+ papers from diverse sources examines parallels and differences between land-based agriculture of swine, beef, and poultry and aquaculture. Among three key findings was, first, that of 51 antibiotics commonly used in aquaculture and agriculture, 39 (or 76%) are also of importance in human medicine; furthermore, six classes of antibiotics commonly used in both agriculture and aquaculture are also included on the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of critically important/highly important/important antimicrobials. Second, various zoonotic pathogens isolated from meat and seafood were observed to feature resistance to multiple antibiotics on the WHO list, irrespective of their origin in either agriculture or aquaculture. Third, the data show that resistant bacteria isolated from both aquaculture and agriculture share the same resistance mechanisms, indicating that aquaculture is contributing to the same resistance issues established by terrestrial agriculture. More transparency in data collection and reporting is needed so the risks and benefits of antibiotic usage can be adequately assessed.

  2. Development of disease preventive method using radiated pathogenic microorganisms, cell lines and animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Yamakawa, Mutsumi [National Inst. of Animal Health, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    A radiated bone marrow chimera mouse has been constructed by grafting. This chimera mouse was thought useful for analyzing gene specific functions in vivo. This study aimed to construct a vector available for a study on the functions of various genes that were cloned from animals through their constitutive expressions. Construction of a retroviral vector was attempted using spleen focus forming virus (SFFV), a mouse leukemia virus. The virus thus obtained was demonstrated to be able to express the gene when infected to NIH3T3, a mouse fibroblast cell line. Furthermore, packaging cells were constructed by transfecting the retroviral vector into the fibroblast cell. Bone marrow cells were incubated with the packaging cells for several days to make gene transfection into the bone marrow cells. After radiation exposure at a lethal dose, the mouse was grafted with the bone marrow cells. Thus, it became possible to investigate in vivo functions of a cloned gene through its expression in the cells. Then, development of a retroviral vector was attempted to use for transfection into bone marrow cells. Aujeszky`s disease virus, a large size DNA virus was exposed to Co radiation at -78degC, but the infectivity of the irradiated virus was not detectable. Since viral RNA was demonstrated to be already broken 24 hours after the exposure to {beta}-ray, the effects of {beta}-radiation were examined with swine vesicular disease virus, a small RNA virus. This virus was exposed to {alpha}-{sup 32}dATP (37MBq) as a {beta}-ray source for 1 hour to 96 hours. However, there were no significant differences in the infectivity titer between the virus exposed for any of the durations and the control, non-radiated virus. This suggested that the virus was not inactivated under the present conditions. Further investigation to determine exposure conditions is under way. (M.N.)

  3. [The cell biology of amebas and ameba-flagellates--parasites of man and animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopina, V A

    1997-01-01

    The majority of parasitic amoebae and amoeba-flagellates are facultative parasites of animals and humans and only a few of them are obligate parasites (see reviews: Sopina, 1997; Visvesvara, Stehr-Green, 1990). Among the latter Entamoeba histolytica and among the former Naegleria fowleri and several species of Acanthamoeba are most dangerous for humans. It is still unclear whether Balamuthia mandrillaris, pathogenic for monkeys and humans, may be either obligate or facultative parasite (Visvesvara et al., 1993). Endolimax nana and Iodamoeba butschlii are commensals of humans and some animals. This review is devoted to cell biology of the above genera to provide a better understanding of cell-biological aspects of interrelations between these parasites and their hosts. In the Russian text-books on medical and veterinary parasitology these parasitic protozoa have never been regarded in terms of cell biology, and the available information seems to become out of date. This review is aimed to fill these gaps. Evidence on the ultrastructure of the above parasites, in particular that of their mitotic chromosomes, mechanisms of attachment to substratum of many of these, of locomotion and endocytosis, is provided and discussed in addition to the problem of differentiation of Naegleria amoebae into flagellates.

  4. Characterization of Coelenterazine Analogs for Measurements of Renilla Luciferase Activity in Live Cells and Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging of bioluminescent reporters relies on expression of light-emitting enzymes, luciferases, and delivery of chemical substrates to expressing cells. Coelenterazine (CLZN is the substrate for a group of bioluminescent enzymes obtained from marine organisms. At present, there are more than 10 commercially available CLZN analogs. To determine which analog is most suitable for activity measurements in live cells and living animals, we characterized 10 CLZN analogs using Renilla luciferase (Rluc as the reporter enzyme. For each analog, we monitored enzyme activity, auto-oxidation, and efficiency of cellular uptake. All CLZN analogs tested showed higher auto-oxidation signals in serum than was observed in phosphate buffer or medium, mainly as a result of auto-oxidation by binding to albumin. CLZN-f, -h, and -e analogs showed 4- to 8-fold greater Rluc activity, relative to CLZN-native, in cells expressing the enzyme from a stable integrant. In studies using living mice expressing Rluc in hepatocytes, administration of CLZN-e and -native produced the highest signal. Furthermore, distinct temporal differences in signal for each analog were revealed following intravenous or intraperitoneal delivery. We conclude that the CLZN analogs that are presently available vary with respect to hRluc utilization in culture and in vivo, and that the effective use of CLZN-utilizing enzymes in living animals depends on the selection of an appropriate substrate.

  5. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) study of rotating cylindrical filters for animal cell perfusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo-Cardero, Alvio; Chico, Ernesto; Castilho, Leda; de Andrade Medronho, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the main fluid flow features inside a rotating cylindrical filtration (RCF) system used as external cell retention device for animal cell perfusion processes were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The motivation behind this work was to provide experimental fluid dynamic data for such turbulent flow using a high-permeability filter, given the lack of information about this system in the literature. The results shown herein gave evidence that, at the boundary between the filter mesh and the fluid, a slip velocity condition in the tangential direction does exist, which had not been reported in the literature so far. In the RCF system tested, this accounted for a fluid velocity 10% lower than that of the filter tip, which could be important for the cake formation kinetics during filtration. Evidence confirming the existence of Taylor vortices under conditions of turbulent flow and high permeability, typical of animal cell perfusion RCF systems, was obtained. Second-order turbulence statistics were successfully calculated. The radial behavior of the second-order turbulent moments revealed that turbulence in this system is highly anisotropic, which is relevant for performing numerical simulations of this system. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  6. Senescent mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer cells growth via galectin-3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanju; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihua; Liu, Guangjin; Li, Yanqi; Wu, Xiaobing; Jing, Yongguang; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is linked to aging and tumorigenesis. The senescence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may influence the tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis by secreting a variety of cytokines and growth factors. The conditioned media of adipose derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) stimulated the proliferation of human LoVo colorectal-cancer cells, and the replicative senescent MSCs had the more obvious effects in comparison to that of premature AD-MSCs. Analysis of the factors secreted in the MSCs culture media determined that senescent MSCs expressed and secreted high levels of galectin-3. Galectin-3 expression correlated with the stimulatory effect of senescent AD-MSCs on LoVo cells proliferation, as knockdown of galectin-3 in senescent AD-MSCs significantly reversed the effect of MSCs-mediated growth stimulation of LoVo cells. Furthermore, the simultaneous addition of recombinant galectin-3 to the co-culture systems partially restored the tumor-promoting effect of the senescent AD-MSCs. Analysis of the mechanisms of senescent MSCs and galectin-3 on LoVo cells signal transduction determined that senescent MSCs and exogenous galectin-3 promoted cell growth by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]1/2) pathway. Senescent MSCs may alter the tissue microenvironment and affect nearby malignant cells via cytokine secretion, and galectin-3 is an important mediator of senescent AD-MSC-mediated stimulation of colon cancer cell growth. Therefore, thorough assessment of AD-MSCs prior to their implementation in clinical practice is warranted.

  7. [Mechanism of Chlorogenic Acid in Apoptotic Regulation through Notch1 
Pathway in Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma in Animal Level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Guoqian; Zhang, Linlin

    2017-08-20

    It has been proven that chlorogenic acids can produce anticancer effects by regulating cell cycle, inducing apoptosis, inhibiting cell growth, Notch signaling pathways are closely related to many human tumors. The aim of this study is to study the mechanism of chlorogenic acid on apoptosis of non-small lung cancer through Notch1 pathway in animal level, and hope to provide theory basis on clinical treatment and research aimed at targeting Notch1 signaling in non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC). MTT assay was used to evaluate the A549 cell proliferation under the treatment of chlorogenic acid. The effect of chlorogenic acid on apoptotic and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The animal model of A549 cell transplanted in nude was established, tumer size and weight were detected. The mRNA level of Notch1 signal pathway related facter were detected by RT-PCR; the expression of Notch1 signal pathway related facter in tumor tissue was detected by western blot. Chlorogenic acid inhibited the A549 cell proliferation. incresed cell apoptotic and cell percentagein G2/M (Pchlorogenic. The expression of Notch1 were decreaced, PTEN, p-PTEN, p-AKT were increced significantly in tumor tissue which treated with chlorogenic (PChlorogenic acid can regulate theapoptosis of non-small lung cancer through Notch pathway in animal level, which may be associated with the down-regulating the expression of VEGF and Delta4. Notch pathway may cross talk with PI3K/AKT pathway through PTEN in NSCLC.

  8. Of mice and men: how animal models advance our understanding of T-cell function in RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobezda, Tamás; Ghassemi-Nejad, Sheida; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    The involvement of autoreactive T cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as in autoimmune animal models of arthritis has been well established; however, unanswered questions, such as the role of joint-homing T cells, remain. Animal models of arthritis are superb experimental tools in demonstrating how T cells trigger joint inflammation, and thus can help to further our knowledge of disease mechanisms and potential therapies. In this Review, we discuss the similarities and differences in T-cell subsets and functions between RA and mouse arthritis models. For example, various T-cell subsets are involved in both human and mouse arthritis, but differences might exist in the cytokine regulation and plasticity of these cells. With regard to joint-homing T cells, an abundance of synovial T cells is present in humans compared with mice. On the other hand, local expansion of type 17 T-helper (TH17) cells is observed in some animal models, but not in RA. Finally, whereas T-cell depletion therapy essentially failed in RA, antibody targeting of T cells can work, at least preventatively, in most arthritis models. Clearly, additional human and animal studies are needed to fill the gap in our understanding of the specific contribution of T-cell subsets to arthritis in mice and men.

  9. Influence of Cell-Cell Interactions on the Population Growth Rate in a Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong

    2017-12-01

    The understanding of the macroscopic phenomenological models of the population growth at a microscopic level is important to predict the population behaviors emerged from the interactions between the individuals. In this work, we consider the influence of the population growth rate R on the cell-cell interaction in a tumor system and show that, in most cases especially small proliferative probabilities, the regulative role of the interaction will be strengthened with the decline of the intrinsic proliferative probabilities. For the high replication rates of an individual and the cooperative interactions, the proliferative probability almost has no effect. We compute the dependences of R on the interactions between the cells under the approximation of the nearest neighbor in the rim of an avascular tumor. Our results are helpful to qualitatively understand the influence of the interactions between the individuals on the growth rate in population systems. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11675008 and 21434001

  10. Protein regulation of induced pluripotent stem cells by transplanting in a Huntington's animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, S; Han, L; Zhou, G; Mo, C; Duan, J; He, Z; Wang, Z; Ren, L; Zhang, J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the functional recovery and protein regulation by transplanted induced pluripotent stem cells in a rat model of Huntington's disease (HD). In a quinolinic acid-induced rat model of striatal degeneration, induced pluripotent stem cells were transplanted into the ipsilateral lateral ventricle 10 days after the quinolinic acid injection. At 8 weeks after transplantation, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan and balance-beam test were performed to evaluate the functional recovery of experimental rats. In addition, immunofluorescence and protein array analysis were used to investigate the regulation of stimulated protein expression in the striatum. At 8 weeks after induced pluripotent stem cell transplantation, motor function was improved in comparison with the quinolinic acid-treated rats. High fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the injured striatum was also observed by PET/CT scans. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that implanted cells migrated from the lateral ventricle into the lesioned striatum and differentiated into striatal projection neurons. Array analysis showed a significant upregulation of GFR (Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor) alpha-1, Adiponectin/Acrp30, basic-fibroblast growth factors, MIP-1 (Macrophage-inflammatory protein) alpha and leptin, as well as downregulation of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-3 in striatum after transplantatation of induced pluripotent stem cells in comparison with the quinolinic acid -treated rats. The findings in this work indicate that transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cells is a promising therapeutic candidate for HD. © 2016 British Neuropathological Society.

  11. The Iron Chelator, Dp44mT, Effectively Inhibits Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehn-Chuan Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a common malignancy with a growing worldwide incidence and prevalence. The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG family of NDRG1, 2, 3, and mammary serine protease inhibitor (Maspin gene are well-known modulators in the neoplasia process. Current research has considered iron chelators as new anti-cancer agents; however, the anticancer activities of iron chelators and their target genes in OSCC have not been well investigated. We showed that iron chelators (Dp44mT, desferrioxamine (DFO, and deferasirox all significantly inhibit SAS cell growth. Flow cytometry further indicated that Dp44mT inhibition of SAS cells growth was partly due to induction of G1 cell cycle arrest. Iron chelators enhanced expressions of NDRG1 and NDRG3 while repressing cyclin D1 expression in OSCC cells. The in vivo antitumor effect on OSCC and safety of Dp44mT were further confirmed through a xenograft animal model. The Dp44mT treatment also increased Maspin protein levels in SAS and OECM-1 cells. NDRG3 knockdown enhanced the growth of OECM-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that NDRG3 is a tumor suppressor gene in OSCC cells, and Dp44mT could be a promising therapeutic agent for OSCC treatment.

  12. Strain preservation of experimental animals: vitrification of two-cell stage embryos for multiple mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Tomoo; Takahashi, Riichi; Kamisako, Tsutomu

    2015-04-01

    Strain preservation of experimental animals is crucial for experimental reproducibility. Maintaining complete animal strains, however, is costly and there is a risk for genetic mutations as well as complete loss due to disasters or illness. Therefore, the development of effective vitrification techniques for cryopreservation of multiple experimental animal strains is important. We examined whether a vitrification method using cryoprotectant solutions, P10 and PEPeS, is suitable for preservation of multiple inbred and outbred mouse strains. First, we investigated whether our vitrification method using cryoprotectant solutions was suitable for two-cell stage mouse embryos. In vitro development of embryos exposed to the cryoprotectant solutions was similar to that of fresh controls. Further, the survival rate of the vitrified embryos was extremely high (98.1%). Next, we collected and vitrified two-cell stage embryos of 14 mouse strains. The average number of embryos obtained from one female was 7.3-33.3. The survival rate of vitrified embryos ranged from 92.8% to 99.1%, with no significant differences among mouse strains. In vivo development did not differ significantly between fresh controls and vitrified embryos of each strain. For strain preservation using cryopreserved embryos, two offspring for inbred lines and one offspring for outbred lines must be produced from two-cell stage embryos collected from one female. The expected number of surviving fetuses obtained from embryos collected from one female of either the inbred or outbred strains ranged from 2.9 to 19.5. The findings of the present study indicated that this vitrification method is suitable for strain preservation of multiple mouse strains. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h...... implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain....

  14. The role of large animal studies in cardiac regenerative therapy concise review of translational stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sung Uk; Yeung, Alan C; Ikeno, Fumiaki

    2013-08-01

    Animal models have long been developed for cardiovascular research. These animal models have been helpful in understanding disease, discovering potential therapeutics, and predicting efficacy. Despite many efforts, however, translational study has been underestimated. Recently, investigations have identified stem cell treatment as a potentially promising cell therapy for regenerative medicine, largely because of the stem cell's ability to differentiate into many functional cell types. Stem cells promise a new era of cell-based therapy for salvaging the heart. However, stem cells have the potential risk of tumor formation. These properties of stem cells are considered a major concern over the efficacy of cell therapy. The translational/preclinical study of stem cells is essential but only at the beginning stages. What types of heart disease are indicated for stem cell therapy, what type of stem cell, what type of animal model, how do we deliver stem cells, and how do we improve heart function? These may be the key issues that the settlement of which would facilitate the transition of stem cell research from bench to bedside. In this review article, we discuss state-of-the-art technology in stem cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Establishment of an animal model of spontaneous cervical lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and obtaining laryngocarcinoma cells with high metastatic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L W; Wang, J L; Zhang, L Y; Yang, S M; Li, C S; Yu, N; Zhao W, J D; Zhao, L D; Li, K; Liu, M B; Zhai, S Q

    2013-01-01

    To establish an animal model of spontaneous cervical lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and obtain laryngocarcinoma cells with high metastatic potential, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line HEP-2 in logarithmic phase were inoculated under the lingual margin mucosa of nude mice. HEP-2 cells metastasized to the cervical lymph nodes were isolated, cultured, and re-inoculated under the lingual margin mucosa of nude mice twice. The tumor formation in the tongue and in the cervical lymph nodes was confirmed by pathological examination. Carcinoma cells' ability of invasion and migration was detected by transwell assay. Human specific Alu sequences were detected by PCR, which indicated that the tumor cells originated from human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line HEP-2. Finally, an animal model of spontaneous lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was successfully established. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells with high metastatic potential to lymph nodes were obtained through repeated inoculations. .

  16. CellAnimation: an open source MATLAB framework for microscopy assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Walter; Wikswo, John P; Quaranta, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Advances in microscopy technology have led to the creation of high-throughput microscopes that are capable of generating several hundred gigabytes of images in a few days. Analyzing such wealth of data manually is nearly impossible and requires an automated approach. There are at present a number of open-source and commercial software packages that allow the user to apply algorithms of different degrees of sophistication to the images and extract desired metrics. However, the types of metrics that can be extracted are severely limited by the specific image processing algorithms that the application implements, and by the expertise of the user. In most commercial software, code unavailability prevents implementation by the end user of newly developed algorithms better suited for a particular type of imaging assay. While it is possible to implement new algorithms in open-source software, rewiring an image processing application requires a high degree of expertise. To obviate these limitations, we have developed an open-source high-throughput application that allows implementation of different biological assays such as cell tracking or ancestry recording, through the use of small, relatively simple image processing modules connected into sophisticated imaging pipelines. By connecting modules, non-expert users can apply the particular combination of well-established and novel algorithms developed by us and others that are best suited for each individual assay type. In addition, our data exploration and visualization modules make it easy to discover or select specific cell phenotypes from a heterogeneous population. CellAnimation is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). CellAnimationsource code and documentation may be downloaded from www.vanderbilt.edu/viibre/software/documents/CellAnimation.zip. Sample data are available at www

  17. Growth of primary embryo cells in a microculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Max; Pope, Sara; Conover, Joanne; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2010-04-01

    We present optimal perfusion conditions for the growth of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) using a microfluidic perfusion culture system. In an effort to balance nutrient renewal while ensuring the presence of cell secreted factors, we found that the optimal perfusion rate for culturing primary embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) in our experimental setting is 10 nL/min with an average flow velocity 0.55 microm/s in the microchannel. Primary mEFs may have a greater dependence on cell secreted factors when compared to their immortalized counterpart 3T3 fibroblasts cultured under similar conditions. Both the seeding density and the perfusion rate are critical for the proliferation of primary cells. A week long cultivation of mEFs and mESCs using the microculture system exhibited similar morphology and viability to those grown in a petri dish. Both mEFs and mESCs were analyzed using fluorescence immunoassays to determine their proliferative status and protein expression. Our results demonstrate that a perfusion-based microculture environment is capable of supporting the highly proliferative status of pluripotent embryonic stem cells.

  18. [Connective tissue growth factors, CTGF and Cyr61 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth--an animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanică, Mihaela; Cianga, Corina; Căruntu, Irina-Draga; Grigore, Georgiana; Cianga, P

    2008-01-01

    Human gingival overgrowth may occur as a side effect of chronic administration of some therapeutic agents. The mechanisms responsible for the gingival tissues lesions, fibrosis and inflamation, involve an impaired balance between the production and the degradation of type I collagen. It has been demonstrated that CCN2/CTGF, a connective tissue growth factor, is highly expressed in the gingival tissues and positively correlated with the degree of fibrosis in the drug-induced gingival overgrowth. The aim of this study was to identify the presence and localization of CCN2/CTGF and CCN1/Cyr61, members of the same molecular family, in gingival tissues of cyclosporin A- and nifedipine-treated rats, by immunohistochemistry. Staining was evaluated with light microscope and the results show cellular and extracellular CTGF in nifedipin gingival overgrowth tissues with intensity of labeling higher compared to the CsA gingival overgrowth tissues or the controls. The staining for Cyr61 shows its intracellular localization with no diference of labeling intensity between drug-induced gingival overgrowth and normal tissues. Also, we were interested in the gingival TGF-â expression in those animals. We didn't find any commercial anti-rat TGF antibody and our anti-human antibody shows no cross-reactivity with rat tissues. The data from our study sustain the involvement of CTGF and Cyr61 as growth factors in the gingival tissues and the CTGF association with drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  19. Modification of MCF-10A Cells with Pioglitazone and Serum-Rich Growth Medium Increases Soluble Factors in the Conditioned Medium, Likely Reducing BT-474 Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo, Boon Yin; Miswan, Noorizan; Balaram, Prabha; Nadarajan, Kalpanah; Elstner, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to preincubate MCF-10A cells with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media and to determine adhesive and non-adhesive interactions of the preincubated MCF-10A cells with BT-474 cells. For this purpose, the MCF-10A cells were preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media, at appropriate concentrations, for 1 week. The MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media were then co-cultured adhesively and non-adhesively ...

  20. Immunopotentiator from Pantoea agglomerans 1 (IP-PA1) Promotes Murine Hair Growth and Human Dermal Papilla Cell Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakame, Koji; Okawa, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Ken-Ich; Nakata, Akifumi; Sato, Keisuke; Ingawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Nishizawa, Takashi; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-like compound derived from Pantoea agglomerans (immunopotentiator from Pantoea agglomerans 1 (IP-PA1)) has been used not only as dietary supplement or cosmetic for humans, but also by Japanese veterinarians as an anti-tumor, anti-allergy, "keep a fine coat of fur" and hair growth-promoting functional food for dogs and cats. In the present study, we focused on the hair growth-promoting effects of IP-PA1 on a hair-shaved animal model and its mechanism of action. We also investigated its potential on gene expression after stimulating human dermal papilla cells with IP-PA1. The hair on the back of a C3H/HeN mouse was shaved and IP-PA1 was orally administered or applied to the skin. The status of hair growth was observed and recorded for 14 days. Skin was collected and histological tissue examination was performed with respect to hair growth status using hematoxylin and eosin staining. After IP-PA1 administration (2 and 10 μg/ml) to human dermal papilla cell culture system for 24 h, fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. IP-PA1, when given orally, showed a tendency to promote hair growth in mice. In addition, skin application also significantly promoted hair growth, while histopathological examinations further demonstrated hair elongation from dermal papilla cells. In the human dermal papilla cell culture system, significant FGF-7 and VEGF mRNA expressions were observed (p<0.05). An underlying mechanism of gene expression by which IP-PA1 promotes hair growth was suggested to be different from that of medicine and traditional hair tonics, such as minoxidil and adenosine. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Development of Liposomal Formulation for Delivering Anticancer Drug to Breast Cancer Stem-Cell-Like Cells and its Pharmacokinetics in an Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ajaz; Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Alkharfy, Khalid M

    2016-03-07

    The objective of the present study is to develop a liposomal formulation for delivering anticancer drug to breast cancer stem-cell-like cells, ANV-1, and evaluate its pharmacokinetics in an animal model. The anticancer drug ESC8 was used in dexamethasone (Dex)-associated liposome (DX) to form ESC8-entrapped liposome named DXE. ANV-1 cells showed high-level expression of NRP-1. To enhance tumor regression, we additionally adapted to codeliver the NRP-1 shRNA-encoded plasmid using the established DXE liposome. In vivo efficacy of DXE-NRP-1 was carried out in mice bearing ANV-1 cells as xenograft tumors and the extent of tumor growth inhibition was evaluated by tumor-size measurement. A significant difference in tumor volume started to reveal between DXE-NRP-1 group and DXE-Control group. DXE-NRP-1 group showed ∼4 folds and ∼2.5 folds smaller tumor volume than exhibited by untreated and DXE-Control-treated groups, respectively. DXE disposition was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats following an intraperitoneal dose (3.67 mg/kg of ESC8 in DXE). The plasma concentrations of ESC8 in the DXE formulation were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental analysis. ESC8 had a half-life of 11.01 ± 0.29 h, clearance of 2.10 ± 3.63 L/kg/h, and volume of distribution of 33.42 ± 0.83 L/kg. This suggests that the DXE liposome formulation could be administered once or twice daily for therapeutic efficacy. In overall, we developed a potent liposomal formulation with favorable pharmacokinetic and tumor regressing profile that could sensitize and kill highly aggressive and drug-resistive cancer stem-cell-like cells.

  2. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  3. Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

  4. Modification of MCF-10A Cells with Pioglitazone and Serum-Rich Growth Medium Increases Soluble Factors in the Conditioned Medium, Likely Reducing BT-474 Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpanah Nadarajan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to preincubate MCF-10A cells with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media and to determine adhesive and non-adhesive interactions of the preincubated MCF-10A cells with BT-474 cells. For this purpose, the MCF-10A cells were preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media, at appropriate concentrations, for 1 week. The MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media were then co-cultured adhesively and non-adhesively with BT-474 cells for another week. Co-culture of BT-474 cells with the preincubated MCF-10A cells, both adhesively and non-adhesively, reduced the growth of the cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of the preincubated MCF-10A cells against the growth of BT-474 cells was likely produced by increasing levels of soluble factors secreted by the preincubated MCF-10A cells into the conditioned medium, as immunoassayed by ELISA. However, only an elevated level of a soluble factor distinguished the conditioned medium collected from the MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and serum-rich growth medium than that with pioglitazone alone. This finding was further confirmed by the induction of the soluble factor transcript expression in the preincubated MCF-10A cells, as determined using real-time PCR, for the above phenomenon. Furthermore, modification of the MCF-10A cells through preincubation did not change the morphology of the cells, indicating that the preincubated cells may potentially be injected into mammary fat pads to reduce cancer growth in patients or to be used for others cell-mediated therapy.

  5. Growth of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris (Daudin, 1802 hatchlings, fed with diets of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. PINHEIRO

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate the growth rate of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris hatchlings, fed on four animal protein diets: (a dead poultry from a poultry farm; (b dead piglet from nursery and farrowing house in a swine farm; (c whole tilapia (Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus; and (d a balanced mixture of a, b, and c sources. Sixteen seven-month old caimans, average weight of 208 g and, 38 cm of total lenght (TL were distributed in four treatments. Four groups of four caimans each were placed in cement enclosures inside a greenhouse. Diets were supplied at the average rate of 97.8% ± 34.8% of the body weight per week (average and standard deviation; wet weight basis. Body mass and total length of caimans were measured every 30 days for six months (Nov. 1995-April. 1996. An analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed. Diets provided suitable growth for weight and TL (mean ± standard deviation, respectively: (a 2,157 ± 743 g and 79.5 ± 6.9 cm; (b 1,811 ± 222 g and 75.7 ± 1.9 cm; (c 2,431 ± 780 g and 80.7 ± 5.8 cm; (d 1,683.5 ± 736 g and 74.5 ± 7.2 cm. There was no significant effect of diet on weight, but diet effect on TL of hatchlings approached significance (p < 0.10. It is concluded that all diets have good potential, in growth sense, to be used in commercial farms or ranches and for captivity propagation programs of caimans.

  6. Growth of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris (Daudin, 1802) hatchlings, fed with diets of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, M S; Lavorenti, A

    2001-08-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the growth rate of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris hatchlings, fed on four animal protein diets: (a) dead poultry from a poultry farm; (b) dead piglet from nursery and farrowing house in a swine farm; (c) whole tilapia (Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus); and (d) a balanced mixture of a, b, and c sources. Sixteen seven-month old caimans, average weight of 208 g and, 38 cm of total length (TL) were distributed in four treatments. Four groups of four caimans each were placed in cement enclosures inside a greenhouse. Diets were supplied at the average rate of 97.8% +/- 34.8% of the body weight per week (average and standard deviation; wet weight basis). Body mass and total length of caimans were measured every 30 days for six months (Nov. 1995-April. 1996). An analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed. Diets provided suitable growth for weight and TL (mean +/- standard deviation, respectively): (a) 2,157 +/- 743 g and 79.5 +/- 6.9 cm; (b) 1,811 +/- 222 g and 75.7 +/- 1.9 cm; (c) 2,431 +/- 780 g and 80.7 +/- 5.8 cm; (d) 1,683.5 +/- 736 g and 74.5 +/- 7.2 cm. There was no significant effect of diet on weight, but diet effect on TL of hatchlings approached significance (p diets have good potential, in growth sense, to be used in commercial farms or ranches and for captivity propagation programs of caimans.

  7. Livestock production, animal source food intake, and young child growth: the role of gender for ensuring nutrition impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Minchao; Iannotti, Lora L

    2014-03-01

    Animal source foods (ASF) provide critical micronutrients in highly bioavailable forms, with the potential to efficiently address undernutrition among young children living in developing countries. There is limited evidence for how livestock ownership might increase ASF intake in poor households either through own-consumption or income generation. Along with lack of nutrition knowledge, gender dimensions may affect the pathways leading from livestock ownership to child ASF intake and ultimately to young child growth. Using data from a large-scale impact evaluation conducted in Kenya, this study tested the hypothesis that co-owned/female-owned livestock would be associated with improved child growth, mediated by increases in ASF consumption. Data were collected from September 2010 to January 2011 from households in six provinces in Kenya on a broad range of agricultural, economic, social, health and nutrition factors. Children ages 6-60 months were included in this analysis (n = 183). In this sample, co-owned/female-owned livestock was valued at 18,861 Kenyan shillings in contrast with male-owned livestock valued at 66,343 Kenyan shillings. Multivariate linear regression models showed a positive association between co-owned/female-owned livestock with child weight-for-age z score (WAZ) after adjusting for caregiver education level, income, child age, and child sex. A mediating effect by child ASF intake was evident, explaining 25% of the relationship of livestock ownership with child WAZ, by Sobel-Goodman test (p livestock and height-for-age z score (HAZ), and no effect was apparent for weight-for-height z score (WHZ). The partial mediating effect may be indicative of other factors inherent in co-owned/female-owned livestock such as higher status of females in these households with greater influence over other child care practices promoting growth. Nonetheless, our study suggests targeting females in livestock production programming may better ensure improvements

  8. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Daichi; Oishi, Isao; Makino, Ryuichi; Kurumisawa, Nozomi; Nakaya, Ryuma; Ono, Tamao; Kagami, Hiroshi; Tagami, Takahiro

    2016-04-22

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2.

  9. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data...... lung cancer cell lines express the EGF receptor....... of EGF receptor mRNA in all 10 cell lines that were found to be EGF receptor-positive and in one cell line that was found to be EGF receptor-negative in the radioreceptor assay and affinity labeling. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of small cell...

  10. β-Catenin activation regulates tissue growth non-cell autonomously in the hair stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschene, Elizabeth R; Myung, Peggy; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Sun, Thomas Yang; Taketo, Makoto M; Saotome, Ichiko; Greco, Valentina

    2014-03-21

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for tissue regeneration. However, it is unclear how β-catenin controls stem cell behaviors to coordinate organized growth. Using live imaging, we show that activation of β-catenin specifically within mouse hair follicle stem cells generates new hair growth through oriented cell divisions and cellular displacement. β-Catenin activation is sufficient to induce hair growth independently of mesenchymal dermal papilla niche signals normally required for hair regeneration. Wild-type cells are co-opted into new hair growths by β-catenin mutant cells, which non-cell autonomously activate Wnt signaling within the neighboring wild-type cells via Wnt ligands. This study demonstrates a mechanism by which Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls stem cell-dependent tissue growth non-cell autonomously and advances our understanding of the mechanisms that drive coordinated regeneration.

  11. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na + , K + , and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  14. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  15. Growth inhibitory activity of Ankaferd hemostat on primary melanoma cells and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Turk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ankaferd hemostat is the first topical hemostatic agent about the red blood cell–fibrinogen relations tested in the clinical trials. Ankaferd hemostat consists of standardized plant extracts including Alpinia officinarum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Thymus vulgaris, Urtica dioica, and Vitis vinifera. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Ankaferd hemostat on viability of melanoma cell lines. Methods: Dissimilar melanoma cell lines and primary cells were used in this study. These cells were treated with different concentrations of Ankaferd hemostat to assess the impact of different dosages of the drug. All cells treated with different concentrations were incubated for different time intervals. After the data had been obtained, one-tailed T-test was used to determine whether the Ankaferd hemostat would have any significant inhibitory impact on cell growth. Results: We demonstrated in this study that cells treated with Ankaferd hemostat showed a significant decrease in cell viability compared to control groups. The cells showed different resistances against Ankaferd hemostat which depended on the dosage applied and the time treated cells had been incubated. We also demonstrated an inverse relationship between the concentration of the drug and the incubation time on one hand and the viability of the cells on the other hand, that is, increasing the concentration of the drug and the incubation time had a negative impact on cell viability. Conclusion: The findings in our study contribute to our knowledge about the anticancer impact of Ankaferd hemostat on different melanoma cells.

  16. Human amniotic fluid stem cell injection therapy for urethral sphincter regeneration in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Bum

    2012-08-01

    neuromuscular junction formation of injected hAFSCs in vivo was confirmed with expression of neuronal markers and acetylcholine receptor. Injection of hAFSCs caused no in vivo host CD8 lymphocyte aggregation or tumor formation. Conclusions hAFSCs displayed MSC characteristics and could differentiate into cells of myogenic lineage. Periurethral injection of hAFSCs into an SUI animal model restored the urethral sphincter to apparently normal histology and function, in absence of immunogenicity and tumorigenicity.

  17. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sha; Wang Yijuan; Deng, Tianzheng; Jin Fang; Liu Shouxin; Zhang Yongjie; Feng Feng; Jin Yan

    2008-01-01

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 μm) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering

  18. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B

    2017-04-11

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus.

  19. Mitochondria, Chloroplasts in Animal and Plant Cells: Significance of Conformational Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Snyder, Christopher; Kream, Richard M

    2015-07-17

    Many commonalities between chloroplasts and mitochondria exist, thereby suggesting a common origin via a bacterial ancestor capable of enhanced ATP-dependent energy production functionally linked to cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Accordingly, the molecular evolution/retention of the catalytic Qo quinol oxidation site of cytochrome b complexes as the tetrapeptide PEWY sequence functionally underlies the common retention of a chemiosmotic proton gradient mechanism for ATP synthesis in cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Furthermore, the dual regulatory targeting of mitochondrial and chloroplast gene expression by mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF) proteins to promote optimal energy production and oxygen consumption further advances these evolutionary contentions. As a functional consequence of enhanced oxygen utilization and production, significant levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be generated within mitochondria and chloroplasts, which may effectively compromise cellular energy production following prolonged stress/inflammationary conditions. Interestingly, both types of organelles have been identified in selected animal cells, most notably specialized digestive cells lining the gut of several species of Sacoglossan sea slugs. Termed kleptoplasty or kleptoplastic endosymbiosis, functional chloroplasts from algal food sources are internalized and stored within digestive cells to provide the host with dual energy sources derived from mitochondrial and photosynthetic processes. Recently, the observation of internalized algae within embryonic tissues of the spotted salamander strongly suggest that developmental processes within a vertebrate organism may require photosynthetic endosymbiosis as an internal regulator. The dual presence of mitochondria and functional chloroplasts within specialized animal cells indicates a high degree of biochemical identity, stereoselectivity, and conformational matching that are the likely

  20. Extracellular talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction with various albumin animal species on myocardial cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2017-02-01

    It is reported that the albumin has different structure among animal species. We have proposed a new methodology of cardiac ablation using talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction with short drug-light interval to realize immediate and permanent therapeutic effect by singlet oxygen production mainly in the interstitial space. The photosensitization reaction efficacy with different animal species should be investing to consider the optimal animal therapeutic model to evaluate the therapeutic effect of new cardiac ablation methodology. We studied the cell-killing efficacy of extracellular talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction using talaporfin sodium on myocardial cells in vitro with different albumin animal species: human, canine, bovine, and porcine serum albumin. We obtained that the albumin concentration tendency on the binding ratio and cell lethality was different among the animal species but there was no correlation between binding ratio and cell lethality. We found that the cell lethality dependence on albumin concentration showed 2 different groups, human-canine and bovine-porcine. We think that the canine might be useful as a therapeutic animal model since the cytotoxicity tendency on albumin concentration was similar with that of human albumin. These cell lethality tendency difference would be suggested to explain by the existence of the diazepam site that talaporfin sodium binds mainly.

  1. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient

  2. In Vivo Measurements of Tumor Metabolism and Growth after Administration of Enzastaurin Using Small Animal FDG Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Pollok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG may help to establish the antitumor activity of enzastaurin, a novel protein kinase C-beta II (PKC-II inhibitor, in mouse xenografts. Methods. The hematologic cell line RAJI and the solid tumor cell line U87MG were each implanted in NOD/SCID mice. Standard tumor growth measurements and [18F]FDG PET imaging were performed weekly for up to three weeks after tumor implantation and growth. Results. Concomitant with caliper measurements, [18F]FDG PET imaging was performed to monitor glucose metabolism. Heterogeneity of glucose uptake in various areas of the tumors was observed after vehicle or enzastaurin treatment. This heterogeneity may limit the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging to measure enzastaurin-associated changes in xenograft tumors. Conclusion. [18F]FDG PET imaging technique does not correlate with standard caliper assessments in xenografts to assess the antitumor activity of enzastaurin. Future studies are needed to determine the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging in preclinical models.

  3. Species determination using the red blood cells morphometry in domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezar Adili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This investigation is placed in the context of continuity of a preliminary study already published; it was conducted in cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and dogs; the main aim is to reveal and develop criteria for the animal species determination based on the morphometric parameters of red blood cells. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein; and the smears were confectioned on slides immediately after the blood collection and stained according to the May-Gründwald Giemsa method. For the morphometric study, three parameters were considered which are: The diameter, the circumference, and the surface of erythrocytes; and measurements were achieved using the OPTIKATM Vision Pro software. Statistical analysis was performed by both analysis of variances and Student’s t analytical tests. Results: The recorded data showed that the three morphometric parameters of red blood cells are higher in dogs followed, respectively, by those of horses, cattle, and sheep, whereas, the goats have the lowest ones. In addition, the obtained results allowed us to propose new reference values for the circumference and the surface of erythrocyte in considered species. Conclusion: This investigation permit concluding that from a drop of blood it is possible to characterize the different animal species, taking into account the diameter, the circumference, and the surface of erythrocytes.

  4. Species determination using the red blood cells morphometry in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adili, Nezar; Melizi, Mohamed; Belabbas, Hadj

    2016-09-01

    This investigation is placed in the context of continuity of a preliminary study already published; it was conducted in cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and dogs; the main aim is to reveal and develop criteria for the animal species determination based on the morphometric parameters of red blood cells. Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein; and the smears were confectioned on slides immediately after the blood collection and stained according to the May-Gründwald Giemsa method. For the morphometric study, three parameters were considered which are: The diameter, the circumference, and the surface of erythrocytes; and measurements were achieved using the OPTIKATM Vision Pro software. Statistical analysis was performed by both analysis of variances and Student's t analytical tests. The recorded data showed that the three morphometric parameters of red blood cells are higher in dogs followed, respectively, by those of horses, cattle, and sheep, whereas, the goats have the lowest ones. In addition, the obtained results allowed us to propose new reference values for the circumference and the surface of erythrocyte in considered species. This investigation permit concluding that from a drop of blood it is possible to characterize the different animal species, taking into account the diameter, the circumference, and the surface of erythrocytes.

  5. Evaluation of Stem Cell-Derived Red Blood Cells as a Transfusion Product Using a Novel Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandeep N; Gelderman, Monique P; Lewis, Emily M A; Farrel, John; Wood, Francine; Strader, Michael Brad; Alayash, Abdu I; Vostal, Jaroslav G

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on volunteer blood donors can lead to transfusion product shortages, and current liquid storage of red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with biochemical changes over time, known as 'the storage lesion'. Thus, there is a need for alternative sources of transfusable RBCs to supplement conventional blood donations. Extracorporeal production of stem cell-derived RBCs (stemRBCs) is a potential and yet untapped source of fresh, transfusable RBCs. A number of groups have attempted RBC differentiation from CD34+ cells. However, it is still unclear whether these stemRBCs could eventually be effective substitutes for traditional RBCs due to potential differences in oxygen carrying capacity, viability, deformability, and other critical parameters. We have generated ex vivo stemRBCs from primary human cord blood CD34+ cells and compared them to donor-derived RBCs based on a number of in vitro parameters. In vivo, we assessed stemRBC circulation kinetics in an animal model of transfusion and oxygen delivery in a mouse model of exercise performance. Our novel, chronically anemic, SCID mouse model can evaluate the potential of stemRBCs to deliver oxygen to tissues (muscle) under resting and exercise-induced hypoxic conditions. Based on our data, stem cell-derived RBCs have a similar biochemical profile compared to donor-derived RBCs. While certain key differences remain between donor-derived RBCs and stemRBCs, the ability of stemRBCs to deliver oxygen in a living organism provides support for further development as a transfusion product.

  6. Glucose Signaling-Mediated Coordination of Cell Growth and Cell Cycle in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

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    Stefano Busti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides being the favorite carbon and energy source for the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, glucose can act as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple aspects of yeast physiology. Yeast cells have evolved several mechanisms for monitoring the level of glucose in their habitat and respond quickly to frequent changes in the sugar availability in the environment: the cAMP/PKA pathways (with its two branches comprising Ras and the Gpr1/Gpa2 module, the Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway and the main repression pathway involving the kinase Snf1. The cAMP/PKA pathway plays the prominent role in responding to changes in glucose availability and initiating the signaling processes that promote cell growth and division. Snf1 (the yeast homologous to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is primarily required for the adaptation of yeast cell to glucose limitation and for growth on alternative carbon source, but it is also involved in the cellular response to various environmental stresses. The Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway regulates the expression of genes required for glucose uptake. Many interconnections exist between the diverse glucose sensing systems, which enables yeast cells to fine tune cell growth, cell cycle and their coordination in response to nutritional changes.

  7. Combination of α-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Huang

    Full Text Available α-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or α-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of α-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the α-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-κB activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with α-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with α-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of α-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that α-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer.

  8. UVB-irradiated apoptotic cells induce accelerated growth of co-implanted viable tumor cells in immune competent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurio, Ricardo; Janko, Christina; Schorn, Christine; Maueröder, Christian; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Gaipl, Udo; Schett, Georg; Berens, Christian; Frey, Benjamin; Munoz, Luis E

    2013-08-01

    The presence of a solid tumor is the result of a complex balance between rejection, tolerance and regeneration in which the interactions of tumor cells with cells of the host immune system contribute strongly to the final outcome. Here we report on a model where lethally UVB-irradiated cells cause accelerated growth of viable tumor cells in vitro and in allogeneic immune competent mice. UVB-irradiated tumor cells alone did not form tumors and failed to induce tolerance for a second challenge with the same allogeneic tumor. Our data show an important role for dying cells in promoting accelerated tumor cell growth of a small number of viable tumor cells in a large inoculum of UVB-irradiated tumor cells. This occurs when viable and dying/dead tumor cells are in close proximity, suggesting that mobile factors contribute to growth promotion. The anti-inflammatory and growth promoting properties of apoptotic cells are based on several independent effects. UVB-irradiated apoptotic cells directly release a growth promoting activity and clearance by macrophages of apoptotic cells is accompanied by the secretion of IL10, TGFß, and PGE2. Growth promotion is even observed with dying heterologous cells implying a conserved mechanism. Future experiments should focus on the effects of dying tumor cells generated in vivo on the outgrowth of surviving tumor cells which is prone to have implications for cancer therapy.

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in IBD: From Animal Models to Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cabezón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosa undergoes continuous antigenic exposure from food antigens, commensal flora derived ligands, and pathogens. This constant stimulation results in controlled inflammatory responses that are effectively suppressed by multiple factors. This tight regulation, necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis, is affected during inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD resulting in altered immune responses to harmless microorganisms. Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of immunity, located in peripheral and lymphoid tissues, which are essential for homeostasis of T cell-dependent immune responses. The expression of a particular set of pathogen recognition receptors allows DCs to initiate immune responses. However, in the absence of danger signals, different DC subsets can induce active tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg, inhibiting inflammatory T helper cell responses, or both. Interestingly, several protocols to generate clinical grade tolerogenic DC (tol-DCs in vitro have been described, opening the possibility to restore the intestinal homeostasis to bacterial flora by cellular therapy. In this review, we discuss different DC subsets and their role in IBD. Additionally, we will review preclinical studies performed in animal models while describing recent characterization of tol-DCs from Crohn’s disease patients for clinical application.

  10. Scaffold-cell bone engineering in a validated preclinical animal model: precursors vs differentiated cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, A; Henkel, J; Woodruff, M A; Saifzadeh, S; Kirby, G; Zaiss, S; Gohlke, J; Reichert, J C; Nerlich, M; Schuetz, M A; Hutmacher, D W

    2017-07-01

    The properties of osteoblasts (OBs) isolated from the axial skeleton (tOBs) differ from OBs of the orofacial skeleton (mOBs) due to the different embryological origins of the bones. The aim of the study was to assess and compare the regenerative potential of allogenic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells with allogenic tOBs and allogenic mOBs in combination with a mPCL-TCP scaffold in critical-sized segmental bone defects in sheep tibiae. After 6 months, the tibiae were explanted and underwent biomechanical testing, micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Allogenic MPCs demonstrated a trend towards a better outcome in biomechanical testing and the mean values of newly formed bone. Biomechanical, microCT and histological analysis showed no significant differences in the bone regeneration potential of tOBs and mOBs in our in vitro study, as well as in the bone regeneration potential of different cell types in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Promotes Pulmonary Epithelial Cell Senescence and Is Associated with COPD Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-Ho; Chand, Hitendra S; Bruse, Shannon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Royer, Christopher; McDonald, Jacob; Qualls, Clifford; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Lin, Yong; Mallampalli, Rama; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Nyunoya, Toru

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is consistent in humans and animal models of COPD and to investigate the role of this protein in lung epithelial cells. CTGF in lung epithelial cells of ex-smokers with COPD was compared with ex-smokers without COPD by immunofluorescence. A total of twenty C57Bl/6 mice and sixteen non-human primates (NHPs) were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks. Ten mice of these CS-exposed mice and eight of the CS-exposed NHPs were infected with H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV), while the remaining ten mice and eight NHPs were mock-infected with vehicle as control. Both mRNA and protein expression of CTGF in lung epithelial cells of mice and NHPs were determined. The effects of CTGF overexpression on cell proliferation, p16 protein, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity were examined in cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). In humans, CTGF expression increased with increasing COPD severity. We found that protein expression of CTGF was upregulated in lung epithelial cells in both mice and NHPs exposed to CS and infected with IAV compared to those exposed to CS only. When overexpressed in HBECs, CTGF accelerated cellular senescence accompanied by p16 accumulation. Both CTGF and p16 protein expression in lung epithelia are positively associated with the severity of COPD in ex-smokers. These findings show that CTGF is consistently expressed in epithelial cells of COPD lungs. By accelerating lung epithelial senescence, CTGF may block regeneration relative to epithelial cell loss and lead to emphysema.

  12. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

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    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  13. Sirtuin1 Regulates the Stem Cell Therapeutic Effects on Regenerative Capability for Treating Severe Heart Failure in a Juvenile Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hideto; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Itoh, Emiko; Harada, Akima; Saito, Atsuhiro; Ueno, Takayoshi; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-09-01

    This study hypothesized that autologous cell transplantation therapy could have greater therapeutic efficacy in juvenile patients than in adult patients, related to differences in sirtuin1 (SIRT1) expression in transplanted cells. A model of heart failure was established in mini-pigs by using coronary artery occlusion. Stem cell cultures were established from juvenile and adult mini-pigs. The cells were prepared as cell sheets and transplanted into corresponding adult or juvenile mini-pigs, and the therapeutic effects were examined in vivo and in vitro. Next, SIRT1 knockdown cells were established using small interfering RNAs for SIRT1, and the therapeutic effects of the cells were examined in vitro and in vivo in Lewis rat models of heart failure. Cardiac function showed significantly more improvement in juvenile than in adult pigs. Histologic analysis revealed significant reduction of myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophic response in juvenile pigs. In vitro analysis demonstrated that doubling time was significantly shorter, the ratio of Ki67-positive cells was significantly greater, and the expression of SIRT1, hypoxia-induced factor-1α, hepatocyte growth factor, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 was significantly upregulated in juvenile cells. SIRT1 knockdown cells showed decreased proliferation and cytokine release potential compared with wild-type cells. Transplantation of SIRT1 knockdown stem cell sheets showed lesser improvement of cardiac function after severe heart failure in Lewis rats than in controls. Sirtuin1 expression in transplanted cells enhances the skeletal stem cell sheet therapeutic effects for treating severe heart failure in a juvenile animal model. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential Use of Surface-active Agents for Controlling Mycoplasma Contamination in Animal Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Roberta K.; Hetrick, Frank M.

    1969-01-01

    Seven nonionic detergents, which were determined to be relatively nontoxic to selected animal cell cultures, were tested for their lethal effect on the GDL strain of Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Of the seven detergents tested, five were found to cause complete lysis of the organism in vitro within 24 hr at 37 C. These detergents included Triton WR-1339 and Tweens 20, 40, 60, and 80. When different concentrations of the detergents were tested, Tween 80 was found to be the most effective and Triton WR-1339 the least effective in lysing the mycoplasmata. These same five detergents were used to treat a rat nephroma cell line which was chronically infected with the GDL strain. The mycoplasmata were eliminated from those cultures treated with Triton but they persisted in cultures exposed to the Tween compounds. The Triton-treated cells remained free from infection over a 7-month period, as determined both by cultural methods and fluorescent-antibody staining. The “cure” was effected by treating the cells for either 48 hr with maintenance media containing 1 mg of Triton per ml or for 96 hr with a concentration of 500 μg/ml. Triton was also effective in eliminating the GDL, strain from experimentally infected rat embryo cells after a 48-hr treatment with a concentration of 1 mg/ml. Four other species of Mycoplasma, which were completely lysed by Triton in vitro, were not eliminated from experimentally infected cells by a single treatment with Triton, although the severity of the infection was apparently reduced. Images PMID:4888862

  15. Functionalized silica nanoparticles: a platform for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kemin; He, Xiaoxiao; Yang, XiaoHai; Shi, Hui

    2013-07-16

    Going in vivo, including living cells and the whole body, is very important for gaining a better understanding of the mystery of life and requires specialized imaging techniques. The diversity, composition, and temporal-spatial variation of life activities from cells to the whole body require the analysis techniques to be fast-response, noninvasive, highly sensitive, and stable, in situ and in real-time. Functionalized nanoparticle-based fluorescence imaging techniques have the potential to meet such needs through real-time and noninvasive visualization of biological events in vivo. Functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) doped with fluorescent dyes appear to be an ideal and flexible platform for developing fluorescence imaging techniques used in living cells and the whole body. We can select and incorporate different dyes inside the silica matrix either noncovalently or covalently. These form the functionalized hybrid SiNPs, which support multiplex labeling and ratiometric sensing in living systems. Since the silica matrix protects dyes from outside quenching and degrading factors, this enhances the photostability and biocompatibility of the SiNP-based probes. This makes them ideal for real-time and long-time tracking. One nanoparticle can encapsulate large numbers of dye molecules, which amplifies their optical signal and temporal-spatial resolution response. Integrating fluorescent dye-doped SiNPs with targeting ligands using various surface modification techniques can greatly improve selective recognition. Along with the endocytosis, functionalized SiNPs can be efficiently internalized into cells for noninvasive localization, assessment, and monitoring. These unique characteristics of functionalized SiNPs substantially support their applications in fluorescence imaging in vivo. In this Account, we summarize our efforts to develop functionalized dye-doped SiNPs for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels. We first discuss how to design and

  16. Feeder Cell Type Affects the Growth of In Vitro Cultured Bovine Trophoblast Cells

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    Islam M. Saadeldin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trophectoderm cells are the foremost embryonic cells to differentiate with prospective stem-cell properties. In the current study, we aimed at improving the current approach for trophoblast culture by using granulosa cells as feeders. Porcine granulosa cells (PGCs compared to the conventional mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were used to grow trophectoderm cells from hatched bovine blastocysts. Isolated trophectoderm cells were monitored and displayed characteristic epithelial/cuboidal morphology. The isolated trophectoderm cells expressed mRNA of homeobox protein (CDX2, cytokeratin-8 (KRT8, and interferon tau (IFNT. The expression level was higher on PGCs compared to MEFs throughout the study. In addition, primary trophectoderm cell colonies grew faster on PGCs, with a doubling time of approximately 48 hrs, compared to MEFs. PGCs feeders produced a fair amount of 17β-estradiol and progesterone. We speculated that the supplementation of sex steroids and still-unknown factors during the trophoblasts coculture on PGCs have helped to have better trophectoderm cell’s growth than on MEFs. This is the first time to use PGCs as feeders to culture trophectoderm cells and it proved superior to MEFs. We propose PGCs as alternative feeders for long-term culture of bovine trophectoderm cells. This model will potentially benefit studies on the early trophoblast and embryonic development in bovines.

  17. The intraportal injection model: A practical animal model for hepatic metastases and tumor cell dissemination in human colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalheimer, Andreas; Waaga-Gasser, Ana M; Otto, Christoph; Bueter, Marco; Illert, Bertram; Gattenlohner, Stefan; Gasser, Martin; Meyer, Detlef; Fein, Martin; Germer, Christoph T

    2009-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of metastasized colorectal carcinoma requires biologically relevant and adequate animal models that generate both reproducible metastasis and the dissemination of tumor cells in the form of so-called minimal residual disease (MRD), an expression of the systemic character of neoplastic disease. We injected immunoincompetent nude mice intraportally with different numbers (1 × 10 5 , 1 × 10 6 and 5 × 10 6 cells) of the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and SW-620 and investigated by histological studies and CK-20 RT-PCR the occurrence of hematogenous metastases and the dissemination of human tumor cells in bone marrow. Only the injection of 1 × 10 6 cells of each colon carcinoma cell line produced acceptable perioperative mortality with reproducible induction of hepatic metastases in up to 89% of all animals. The injection of 1 × 10 6 cells also generated tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow in up to 63% of animals with hepatic metastases. The present intraportal injection model in immunoincompetent nude mice represents a biologically relevant and adequate animal model for the induction of both reproducible hepatic metastasis and tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow as a sign of MRD

  18. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2016-03-01

    different treatment groups: vehicle, vatalanib (oral treatment 50 mg/kg/d, HET0016 (intraperitoneal treatment 10 mg/kg/d, and combined (vatalanib and HET0016. Following scheduled treatments, all animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging on day 22, followed by euthanasia. Brain specimens were equally divided for immunohistochemistry and protein array analysis.Results: Our results demonstrated a trend that HET0016, alone or in combination with vatalanib, is capable of controlling the tumor growth compared with that of vatalanib alone, indicating attenuation of the unwanted effect of vatalanib. When both vatalanib and HET0016 were administered together on the day of the tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment, tumor volume, tumor blood volume, permeability, extravascular and extracellular space volume, tumor cell proliferation, and cell migration were decreased compared with that of the vehicle-treated group. Conclusion: HET0016 is capable of controlling tumor growth and migration, but these effects are dependent on the timing of drug administration. The addition of HET0016 to vatalanib may attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib.Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, glioblastoma, antiangiogenic treatments, HET0016, vascular parameters, protein array

  19. Targeted p53 activation by saRNA suppresses human bladder cancer cells growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenghe; Ge, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Qingsong; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jia; Li, Fan; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-03-25

    Previous study showed that dsP53-285 has the capacity to induce tumor suppressor gene p53 expression by targeting promoter in non-human primates' cells. And it is well known that TP53 gene is frequently mutant or inactivated in human bladder cancer. Hereby, whether this small RNA can activate the expression of wild-type p53 and inhibit human bladder cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Oligonucleotide and lentivirus were used to overexpress dsP53-285 and dsControl. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to detect genes' mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell proliferation assay, colony formation, flow cytometry, transwell assay and wound healing assay were performed to determine the effects on bladder cancer cells proliferation and migration/invasion in vitro. Animal models were carried out to analyze the effects on cells growth and metastasis in vivo. Transfection of dsP53-285 into human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and EJ readily activate wild-type p53 expression by targeting promoter. Moreover, dsP53-285 exhibited robust capacity to inhibit cells proliferation and colony formation, induce cells G0/G1 arrest, suppress migration and invasion. Besides, the Cyclin-CDK genes (Cyclin D1 and CDK4/6) were down-regulated and the EMT-associated genes (E-cadherin, β-catenin, ZEB1 and Vimentin) were also expressed inversely after dsP53-285 treatment. In addition, dsP53-285 could also significantly suppress the growth of bladder cancer xenografts and metastasis in nude mice. Most importantly, the anti-tumor effects mediated by dsP53-285 were mainly achieved by manipulating wild-type p53 expression. Our findings indicate that the dsP53-285 can upregulate wild-type p53 expression in human bladder cancer cells through RNA activation, and suppresses cells proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Understanding pollen tube growth: the hydrodynamic model versus the cell wall model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonia, L.; Munnik, T.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific progress stimulates the evolution of models used to understand and conceptualize biological behaviors. The widely accepted cell wall model of pollen tube growth explains stochastic growth of the apical pectin wall, but fails to explain the mechanism driving oscillations in growth and cell

  1. Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy II. Cell-internal factors for conditional growth in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephanie A; Gromeier, Matthias

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of virus-host interactions have fueled new studies in the field of oncolytic viruses. The first part of this review explained how cell-external factors, such as cellular receptors, influence tumor tropism and specificity of oncolytic virus candidates. In the second part of this review, we focus on cellinternal factors that mediate tumor-specific virus growth. An oncolytic virus must be able to replicate within cancerous cells and kill them without collateral damage to healthy surrounding cells. This desirable property is inherent to some proposed oncolytic viral agents or has been achieved by genetic manipulation in others.

  2. Results of a survey to determine demographic and business management factors associated with size and growth rate of rural mixed-animal veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusk, Amy M; White, Brad J; Goehl, Dan R; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C

    2010-12-15

    To determine potential associations between demographic and business management factors and practice size and growth rate in rural mixed-animal veterinary practices. Cross-sectional survey. 54 mixed-animal practitioners. A cross-sectional survey (96 questions) was electronically disseminated. Responses were collected, and outcomes (number of veterinarians [NV], growth in number of veterinarians [NVG], gross practice income [GPI], growth in gross practice income [GPIG], gross practice income per veterinarian [GPIV], and growth in gross practice income per veterinarian [GPIVG]) were calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed and multivariable models created to determine associations between survey responses and outcomes of interest. Survey respondents were from mixed-animal practices, and most (46/54 [85.2%]) practiced in small communities (< 25,000 people). Study practices had a median ± SD NV of 2.3 ± 1.9 veterinarians, median GPI of $704,547 ± 754,839, and median GPIV of $282,065 ± 182,344. Multivariable regression analysis revealed several factors related to practice size, including the number of associate veterinarians and veterinary technicians in the practice, service fee structure, and employment of a business manager. Typically, practices had positive mean growth in NVG (4.4%), GPIG (8.5%), and GPIVG (8.1%), but growth rate was highly variable among practices. Factors associated with growth rate included main species interest, frequency for adjusting prices, use of a marketing plan, service fee structure, and sending a client newsletter. Mixed-animal practices had a large range in size and growth rate. Economic indices were impacted by common business management practices.

  3. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase (ASNS) suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. ASNS is deemed as a promising therapeutic target and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance in several human cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis has not been investigated. In this study, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transiently knockdown ASNS in two gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN-45, followed by growth rate assay and colony formation assay. Dose response curve analysis was performed in AGS and MKN-45 cells with stable ASNS knockdown to assess sensitivity to cisplatin. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo synergistic effects of ASNS depletion and cisplatin on tumor growth. Expression level of ASNS was evaluated in human patient samples using quantitative PCR. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was performed to evaluate association between ASNS expression and patient survival. Transient knockdown of ASNS inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in AGS and MKN-45 cells. Stable knockdown of ASNS conferred sensitivity to cisplatin in these cells. Depletion of ASNS and cisplatin treatment exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth in AGS xenografts. Moreover, ASNS was found to be up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Low expression of ASNS was significantly associated with better survival in gastric cancer patients. ASNS may contribute to gastric cancer tumorigenesis and may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of gastric cancer.

  4. Atg9 antagonizes TOR signaling to regulate intestinal cell growth and epithelial homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jung-Kun; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Cheng-Wen; Liao, Hsiao-Man; Hung, Chin-Chun; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2017-11-16

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival under various stress conditions. Autophagy-related gene 9 (Atg9) encodes a multipass transmembrane protein thought to act as a membrane carrier for forming autophagosomes. However, the molecular regulation and physiological importance of Atg9 in animal development remain largely unclear. Here, we generated Atg9 null mutant flies and found that loss of Atg9 led to shortened lifespan, locomotor defects, and increased susceptibility to stress. Atg9 loss also resulted in aberrant adult midgut morphology with dramatically enlarged enterocytes. Interestingly, inhibiting the TOR signaling pathway rescued the midgut defects of the Atg9 mutants. In addition, Atg9 interacted with PALS1-associated tight junction protein (Patj), which associates with TSC2 to regulate TOR activity. Depletion of Atg9 caused a marked decrease in TSC2 levels. Our findings revealed an antagonistic relationship between Atg9 and TOR signaling in the regulation of cell growth and tissue homeostasis.

  5. Human Placenta-Derived Multipotent Cells (hPDMCs) Modulate Cardiac Injury: From Bench to Small and Large Animal Myocardial Ischemia Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Hung; Peng, Kai-Yen; Chiu, Yu-Wei; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Wang, Yao-Horng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Huang, Shih-Yun; Lin, Yi-Shuan; de Vries, Antoine A F; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Lee, Nan-Ting; Yen, B Linju; Yen, Men-Luh

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally, and stem cell therapy remains one of the most promising strategies for regeneration or repair of the damaged heart. We report that human placenta-derived multipotent cells (hPDMCs) can modulate cardiac injury in small and large animal models of myocardial ischemia (MI) and elucidate the mechanisms involved. We found that hPDMCs can undergo in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation when cocultured with mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes. Moreover, hPDMCs exert strong proangiogenic responses in vitro toward human endothelial cells mediated by secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, growth-regulated oncogene-α, and interleukin-8. To test the in vivo relevance of these results, small and large animal models of acute MI were induced in mice and minipigs, respectively, by permanent left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation, followed by hPDMC or culture medium-only implantation with follow-up for up to 8 weeks. Transplantation of hPDMCs into mouse heart post-acute MI induction improved left ventricular function, with significantly enhanced vascularity in the cell-treated group. Furthermore, in minipigs post-acute MI induction, hPDMC transplantation significantly improved myocardial contractility compared to the control group (p = 0.016) at 8 weeks postinjury. In addition, tissue analysis confirmed that hPDMC transplantation induced increased vascularity, cardiomyogenic differentiation, and antiapoptotic effects. Our findings offer evidence that hPDMCs can modulate cardiac injury in both small and large animal models, possibly through proangiogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, and suppression of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Our study offers mechanistic insights and preclinical evidence on using hPDMCs as a therapeutic strategy to treat severe cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Cannabidiol rather than Cannabis sativa extracts inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Sindiswa T; Motadi, Lesetja R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer remains a global health related issue among females of Sub-Saharan Africa, with over half a million new cases reported each year. Different therapeutic regimens have been suggested in various regions of Africa, however, over a quarter of a million women die of cervical cancer, annually. This makes it the most lethal cancer amongst black women and calls for urgent therapeutic strategies. In this study we compare the anti-proliferative effects of crude extract of Cannabis sativa and its main compound cannabidiol on different cervical cancer cell lines. To achieve our aim, phytochemical screening, MTT assay, cell growth analysis, flow cytometry, morphology analysis, Western blot, caspase 3/7 assay, and ATP measurement assay were conducted. Results obtained indicate that both cannabidiol and Cannabis sativa extracts were able to halt cell proliferation in all cell lines at varying concentrations. They further revealed that apoptosis was induced by cannabidiol as shown by increased subG0/G1 and apoptosis through annexin V. Apoptosis was confirmed by overexpression of p53, caspase 3 and bax. Apoptosis induction was further confirmed by morphological changes, an increase in Caspase 3/7 and a decrease in the ATP levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that cannabidiol rather than Cannabis sativa crude extracts prevent cell growth and induce cell death in cervical cancer cell lines.

  7. SDN-1/syndecan regulates growth factor signaling in distal tip cell migrations in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabiuk, Megan; Coudiere, Ludivine; Merz, David C

    2009-10-01

    Mutations in the sdn-1/syndecan gene act as genetic enhancers of the ventral-to-dorsal distal tip cell (DTC) migration defects caused by a weak allele of the netrin receptor gene unc-5. The sdn-1(ev697) allele was identified in a genetic screen for enhancers of unc-5 DTC migration defects, and carried a nonsense mutation predicted to truncate the SDN-1 protein prior to the transmembrane domain. The enhancement of unc-5 caused by an sdn-1 mutation was rescued by expression of wild-type sdn-1 in the hypodermis or nervous system rather than the DTCs, indicating a cell non-autonomous function of sdn-1. The enhancement was also partially reversed by mutations in the egl-17/FGF or egl-20/Wnt genes, suggesting that sdn-1 affects UNC-5 function through a mis-regulation of signaling in growth factor pathways. egl-20 reporter constructs exhibited increased and mis-localized EGL-20 distribution in sdn-1 mutants compared to wild-type animals. Finally, using loss of function mutations, we show that egl-17/Fgf and egl-20/Wnt are partially redundant in regulating the migration pattern of the posterior DTC, as double mutants exhibit significant frequencies of defects in migration phases along both the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. Together these results suggest that SDN-1 affects UNC-5 function by regulating the proper extracellular distribution of growth factors.

  8. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on growth and craniofacial proportion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunior, A.; Zengel, A.E.; Mullenix, P.J.; Tarbell, N.J.; Howes, A.; Tassinari, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Many long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have short stature, as well as craniofacial and dental abnormalities, as side effects of central nervous system prophylactic therapy. An animal model is presented to assess these adverse effects on growth. Cranial irradiation (1000 cGy) with and without prednisolone (18 mg/kg i.p.) and methotrexate (2 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to 17- and 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. Animals were weighed 3 times/week. Final body weight and body length were measured at 150 days of age. Femur length and craniofacial dimensions were measured directly from the bones, using calipers. For all exposed groups there was a permanent suppression of weight gain with no catch-up growth or normal adolescent growth spurt. Body length was reduced for all treated groups, as were the ratios of body weight to body length and cranial length to body length. Animals subjected to cranial irradiation exhibited microcephaly, whereas those who received a combination of radiation and chemotherapy demonstrated altered craniofacial proportions in addition to microcephaly. Changes in growth patterns and skeletal proportions exhibited sexually dimorphic characteristics. The results indicate that cranial irradiation is a major factor in the growth failure in exposed rats, but chemotherapeutic agents contribute significantly to the outcome of growth and craniofacial dimensions

  9. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D regulates ectoderm specification and adhesion properties of animal cap cells in the early Xenopus embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz Imberman, Sandra; Kolpakova, Alina; Keren, Aviad; Bengal, Eyal

    2015-08-01

    In Xenopus, animal cap (AC) cells give rise to ectoderm and its derivatives: epidermis and the central nervous system. Ectoderm has long been considered a default pathway of embryonic development, with cells that are not under the influence of vegetal Nodal signaling adopting an ectodermal program of gene expression. In the present study, we describe the involvement of the animally-localized maternal transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor (Mef) 2D in regulating the identity of AC cells. We find that Mef2D is required for the formation of both ectodermal lineages: neural and epidermis. Gain and loss of function experiments indicate that Mef2D regulates early gastrula expression of key ectodermal/epidermal genes in the animal region. Mef2D controls the activity of zygotic bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling known to dictate the epidermal differentiation program. Exogenous expression of Mef2D in vegetal blastomeres was sufficient to induce ectopic expression of ectoderm/epidermal genes in the vegetal half of the embryo, when Nodal signaling was inhibited. Depletion of Mef2D caused a loss of AC cell adhesion that was rescued by the expression of E-cadherin or bone morphogenetic protein 4. In addition, expression of Mef2D in the prospective endoderm caused unusual aggregation of vegetal cells with animal cells in vitro and inappropriate segregation to other germ layers in vivo. Mef2D cooperates with another animally-expressed transcription factor, FoxI1e. Together, they regulate the expression of genes encoding signaling proteins and the transcription factors that control the regional identity of animal cells. Therefore, we describe a new role for the animally-localized Mef2D protein in early ectoderm specification, which is similar to that of the vegetally-localized VegT in endoderm and mesoderm formation. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Assessment of Safety and Functional Efficacy of Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Approaches Using Retinal Degenerative Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction and death of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and or photoreceptors can lead to irreversible vision loss. The eye represents an ideal microenvironment for stem cell-based therapy. It is considered an “immune privileged” site, and the number of cells needed for therapy is relatively low for the area of focused vision (macula. Further, surgical placement of stem cell-derived grafts (RPE, retinal progenitors, and photoreceptor precursors into the vitreous cavity or subretinal space has been well established. For preclinical tests, assessments of stem cell-derived graft survival and functionality are conducted in animal models by various noninvasive approaches and imaging modalities. In vivo experiments conducted in animal models based on replacing photoreceptors and/or RPE cells have shown survival and functionality of the transplanted cells, rescue of the host retina, and improvement of visual function. Based on the positive results obtained from these animal experiments, human clinical trials are being initiated. Despite such progress in stem cell research, ethical, regulatory, safety, and technical difficulties still remain a challenge for the transformation of this technique into a standard clinical approach. In this review, the current status of preclinical safety and efficacy studies for retinal cell replacement therapies conducted in animal models will be discussed.

  11. Depletion of cutaneous macrophages and dendritic cells promotes growth of basal cell carcinoma in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone König

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC belongs to the group of non-melanoma skin tumors and is the most common tumor in the western world. BCC arises due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene Patched1 (Ptch. Analysis of the conditional Ptch knockout mouse model for BCC reveals that macrophages and dendritic cells (DC of the skin play an important role in BCC growth restraining processes. This is based on the observation that a clodronate-liposome mediated depletion of these cells in the tumor-bearing skin results in significant BCC enlargement. The depletion of these cells does not modulate Ki67 or K10 expression, but is accompanied by a decrease in collagen-producing cells in the tumor stroma. Together, the data suggest that cutaneous macrophages and DC in the tumor microenvironment exert an antitumor effect on BCC.

  12. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica R P Elmore

    Full Text Available Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg or phosphate buffered saline (PBS was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function

  13. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Monica R P; Lee, Rafael J; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R)/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS) resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function similarly to the

  14. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells. Our

  15. Plasticity of tumor cell invasion: governance by growth factors and cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenthal, Julia; Takes, Robert; Friedl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Tumor cell migration, the basis for metastatic dissemination, is an adaptive process which depends upon coordinated cell interaction with the environment, influencing cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal dynamics and extracellular matrix remodeling. Growth factors and cytokines, released within the reactive tumor microenvironment and their intracellular effector signals strongly impact mechanocoupling functions in tumor cells and thereby control the mode and extent of tumor invasion, including collective and single-cell migration and their interconversions. Besides their role in controlling tumor cell growth and survival, cytokines and growth factors thus provide complex orchestration of the metastatic cascade and tumor cell adaptation to environmental challenge. We here review the mechanisms by which growth factors and cytokines control the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment, and the consequences for the efficacy and plasticity of invasion programs and metastasis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alterations in cell growth and signaling in ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Myounghee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1 belongs to a family of DNA/RNA binding proteins implicated in cell growth, apoptosis and differentiation. However, the physiological role of Ebp1 in the whole organism is not known. Therefore, we generated Ebp1-deficient mice carrying a gene trap insertion in intron 2 of the Ebp1 (pa2g4 gene. Results Ebp1-/- mice were on average 30% smaller than wild type and heterozygous sex matched littermates. Growth retardation was apparent from Day 10 until Day 30. IGF-1 production and IGBP-3 and 4 protein levels were reduced in both embryo fibroblasts and adult knock-out mice. The proliferation of fibroblasts derived from Day 12.5 knock out embryos was also decreased as compared to that of wild type cells. Microarray expression analysis revealed changes in genes important in cell growth including members of the MAPK signal transduction pathway. In addition, the expression or activation of proliferation related genes such as AKT and the androgen receptor, previously demonstrated to be affected by Ebp1 expression in vitro, was altered in adult tissues. Conclusion These results indicate that Ebp1 can affect growth in an animal model, but that the expression of proliferation related genes is cell and context specific. The Ebp1-/- mouse line represents a new in vivo model to investigate Ebp1 function in the whole organism.

  18. Cell binding and growth inhibition by hexachlorophene of decanoate and their reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, B C; Freese, E

    1978-01-01

    More than 80% of the hexachlorophene added to a Bacillus subtilis culture binds to the cells. Complete growth inhibition requires 6 x 10(5) molecules bound per cell. In contrast, more than 99% decanoate remains in solution and 3.8 x 10(7) molecules bound per cell are needed to inhibit growth. Centrifugation and resuspension of cells in growth medium removes only decanoate, whereas the addition of 1% bovine serum albumin to the growth medium removes both inhibitors from their binding sites on the cells. The addition of untreated cells to a hexachlorophene-treated culture enables the hexachlorophene molecules to redistribute among all the cells with the result that the inhibited cells can resume growth.

  19. Plasticity in sunflower leaf and cell growth under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céccoli, G; Bustos, D; Ortega, L I; Senn, M E; Vegetti, A; Taleisnik, E

    2015-01-01

    A group of sunflower lines that exhibit a range of leaf Na(+) concentrations under high salinity was used to explore whether the responses to the osmotic and ionic components of salinity can be distinguished in leaf expansion kinetics analysis. It was expected that at the initial stages of the salt treatment, leaf expansion kinetics changes would be dominated by responses to the osmotic component of salinity, and that later on, ion inclusion would impose further kinetics changes. It was also expected that differential leaf Na(+) accumulation would be reflected in specific changes in cell division and expansion rates. Plants of four sunflower lines were gradually treated with a relatively high (130 mm NaCl) salt treatment. Leaf expansion kinetics curves were compared in leaves that were formed before, during and after the initiation of the salt treatment. Leaf areas were smaller in salt-treated plants, but the analysis of growth curves did not reveal differences that could be attributed to differential Na(+) accumulation, since similar changes in leaf expansion kinetics were observed in lines with different magnitudes of salt accumulation. Nevertheless, in a high leaf Na(+) -including line, cell divisions were affected earlier, resulting in leaves with proportionally fewer cells than in a Na(+) -excluding line. A distinct change in leaf epidermal pavement shape caused by salinity is reported for the first time. Mature pavement cells in leaves of control plants exhibited typical lobed, jigsaw-puzzle shape, whereas in treated plants, they tended to retain closer-to-circular shapes and a lower number of lobes. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Breviscapine suppresses the growth of non-small cell lung cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Breviscapine (BVP) has previously been shown to inhibit the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.However, little is known about the effects of BVP on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth. Here, we aimedto study the effects of BVP on human NSCLC growth. We employed A549, NCL-H460 and A549 cells ...

  1. Hypoxia is a key regulator of limbal epithelial stem cell growth and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Chris; Yang, Sufang; Muttuvelu, Danson

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth and differentiation of limbal epithelial stem cell cultures could be controlled through manipulation of the oxygen tension. Limbal epithelial cells were isolated from corneoscleral disks, and cultured using either feeder cells in a growth ...

  2. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton : lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes.

  3. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-12-08

    Dec 8, 2012 ... Collectively, our findings indicate that human SFMBT2 may regulate cell growth via epigenetic regulation of HOXB13 gene expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. [Lee K, Na W , Maeng J-H, Wu H and Ju B-G 2013 Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with four mbt domains 2. J.

  4. Autophagy dysregulation in cell culture and animals models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Sara K; Androphy, Elliot J

    2014-07-01

    Abnormal autophagy has become a central thread linking neurodegenerative diseases, particularly of the motor neuron. One such disease is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene resulting in low levels of Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. Despite knowing the causal protein, the exact intracellular processes that are involved in the selective loss of motor neurons remain unclear. Autophagy induction can be helpful or harmful depending on the situation, and we sought to understand the state of the autophagic response in SMA. We show that cell culture and animal models demonstrate induction of autophagy accompanied by attenuated autophagic flux, resulting in the accumulation of autophagosomes and their associated cargo. Expression of the SMN-binding protein a-COP, a known modulator of autophagic flux, can ameliorate this autophagic traffic jam. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Muscle Tissue Engineering Using Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells Encapsulated in Alginate Hydrogels Containing Multiple Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Annabi, Nasim; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Wu, Benjamin M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    Repair and regeneration of muscle tissue following traumatic injuries or muscle diseases often presents a challenging clinical situation. If a significant amount of tissue is lost the native regenerative potential of skeletal muscle will not be able to grow to fill the defect site completely. Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with appropriate scaffold material, present an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for muscle tissue engineering in comparison to current treatment modalities available. To date, there has been no report on application of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of the current study were to develop an injectable 3D RGD-coupled alginate scaffold with multiple growth factor delivery capacity for encapsulating GMSCs, and to evaluate the capacity of encapsulated GMSCs to differentiate into myogenic tissue in vitro and in vivo where encapsulated GMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. The results demonstrate that after 4 weeks of differentiation in vitro, GMSCs as well as the positive control human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) exhibited muscle cell-like morphology with high levels of mRNA expression for gene markers related to muscle regeneration (MyoD, Myf5, and MyoG) via qPCR measurement. Our quantitative PCR analyzes revealed that the stiffness of the RGD-coupled alginate regulates the myogenic differentiation of encapsulated GMSCs. Histological and immunohistochemical/fluorescence staining for protein markers specific for myogenic tissue confirmed muscle regeneration in subcutaneous transplantation in our in vivo animal model. GMSCs showed significantly greater capacity for myogenic regeneration in comparison to hBMMSCs (p alginate hydrogel with multiple growth factor delivery capacity is a promising candidate for muscle tissue engineering.

  6. Current Evidence of Adult Stem Cells to Enhance Anterior Cruciate Ligament Treatment: A Systematic Review of Animal Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruipeng; Gao, Liang; Xu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    To systematically review the available preclinical evidence of adult stem cells as a biological augmentation in the treatment of animal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Systematic review. PubMed (MEDLINE) and Embase were searched for the eligible studies. The inclusion criteria were controlled animal trials of adult stem cells used in ACL treatment (repair or reconstruction). Studies of natural ACL healing without intervention, in vitro studies, ex vivo studies, and studies without controls were excluded. Evidence level, methodologic quality, and risk of bias of each included study were identified using previously established tools. Thirteen animal studies were included. Six of 7 studies using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (BMSCs) reported a positive enhancement in histology, biomechanics, and biochemistry within 12 weeks postoperatively. Four studies using ACL-derived vascular stem cells showed a promoting effect in histology, biomechanics, and imaging within 8 weeks postoperatively. Two studies focusing on animal tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) reported promotable effects for the early healing in a small animal ACL model. BMSCs, ACL-derived vascular stem cells, TDSCs, and hUCB-MSCs were shown to enhance the healing of ACL injury during the early phase in small animal models. Results of clinical trials using adult stem cells in ACL treatment are conflicting, and a systematic review of the current best preclinical evidence is crucial to guide further application. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Andrographolide inhibits growth of acute promyelocytic leukaemia cells by inducing retinoic acid receptor-independent cell differentiation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikam, Shiamala D; Manikam, Shiamala T; Stanslas, Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The growth inhibiting potential of andrographolide was evaluated in three acute promyelocytic leukaemia cell line models (HL-60, NB4 and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-resistant NB4-R2). In elucidating the mechanisms of growth inhibition, a special emphasis was placed on assessing the induction of differentiation and apoptosis by andrographolide in the primary acute promyelocytic leukaemia NB4 cells. The compound was 2- and 3-fold more active in inhibiting the growth of HL-60 and NB4-R2 cells compared with NB4 cells, respectively. At IC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the cells (compared with medium only treated control cells) is inhibited; 4.5 microM) the compound exhibited strong cell-differentiating activity in NB4 cells, similar to ATRA (IC50 1.5 microM). In the presence of a pure retinoic acid receptor antagonist AGN193109, the growth inhibition of NB4 cells by ATRA was reversed, whereas the activity of andrographolide was not affected. This clearly suggested that andrographolide's cell differentiating activity to induce growth inhibition of NB4 cells most likely occurred via a retinoic acid receptor-independent pathway. At higher concentration (2xIC50), andrographolide was an efficient inducer of apoptosis in NB4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest andrographolide and its derivatives, apparently with a novel cell differentiating mechanism and with ability to induce apoptosis, might be beneficial in the treatment of primary and ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

  8. Banned antibacterial growth promoters in animal feed: Collaborative trial on the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method developed in the feedstuffs-radius project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poucke, C.V.; Dumoulin, F.; Yakkundi, S.; Situ, C.; Elliott, C.T.; Grutters, E.M.; Verheijen, R.; Schilt, R.; Eriksson, S.; Peteghem, C.V.

    2006-01-01

    A chemical confirmation method for the identification and quantification of five banned antibacterial growth promoters (AGPs) in animal feed was developed and in-house validated as part of the European Feedstuffs-RADIUS project [1]. To complete the validation process a collaborative trial was

  9. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  10. The Inhibitory Effect of Ellagic Acid on Cell Growth of Ovarian Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chiang Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellagic acid (EA is able to inhibit the growth of several cancer cells; however, its effect on human ovarian carcinoma cells has not yet been investigated. Ovarian carcinoma ES-2 and PA-1 cells were treated with EA (10~100 μM and assessed for viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, anoikis, autophagy, and chemosensitivity to doxorubicin and their molecular mechanisms. EA inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner by arresting both cell lines at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, which were from elevating p53 and Cip1/p21 and decreasing cyclin D1 and E levels. EA also induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis by increasing the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and restored anoikis in both cell lines. The enhancement of apoptosis and/or inhibition of autophagy in these cells by EA assisted the chemotherapy efficacy. The results indicated that EA is a potential novel chemoprevention and treatment assistant agent for human ovarian carcinoma.

  11. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Li, Le; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Mao, Mike Ming; Wu, Lijun

    2017-10-21

    CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor)-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment) from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  12. Troglitazone inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with t(14;18).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenokuchi, M; Saigo, K; Nakamachi, Y; Kawano, S; Hashimoto, M; Fujioka, T; Koizumi, T; Tatsumi, E; Kumagai, S

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been detected in several human leukemia cells. Recent studies reported that PPARgamma ligands inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in both normal and malignant B-lineage cells. We investigated the expression of PPARgamma and the effects of PPARgamma ligands on UTree-O2, Bay91 and 380, three B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines with t(14;18), which show a poor prognosis, accompanying c-myc abnormality. Western blot analysis identified expression of PPARgamma protein and real-time PCR that of PPARgamma mRNA on the three cell lines. Troglitazone (TGZ), a synthetic PPARgamma ligand, inhibited cell growth in these cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We also found this effect PPARgamma independent since PPARgamma antagonists failed to reverse this effect. We assessed the expression of c-myc, an apoptosis-regulatory gene, since c-myc abnormality was detected in most B-ALL cells with t(14;18). TGZ was found to dose-dependently downregulate the expression of c-myc mRNA and c-myc protein in the three cell lines. These results suggest that TGZ inhibits cell growth via induction of G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in these cell lines and that TGZ-induced apoptosis, at least in part, may be related to the downregulation of c-myc expression. Moreover, the downregulation of c-myc expression by TGZ may depend on a PPARgamma-independent mechanism. Further studies indicate that PPARgamma ligands may serve as a therapeutic agent in B-ALL with t(14;18).

  13. Tracing the Origins of IgE, Mast Cells, and Allergies by Studies of Wild Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Lars Torkel; Akula, Srinivas; Thorpe, Michael; Fu, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    In most industrialized countries, allergies have increased in frequency quite dramatically during the past 50 years. Estimates show that 20-30% of the populations are affected. Allergies have thereby become one of the major medical challenges of the twenty-first century. Despite several theories including the hygiene hypothesis, there are still very few solid clues concerning the causes of this increase. To trace the origins of allergies, we have studied cells and molecules of importance for the development of IgE-mediated allergies, including the repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. These studies have shown that IgE and IgG most likely appeared by a gene duplication of IgY in an early mammal, possibly 220-300 million years ago. Receptors specific for IgE and IgG subsequently appeared in parallel with the increase in Ig isotypes from a subfamily of the recently identified Fc receptor-like molecules. Circulating IgE levels are generally very low in humans and laboratory rodents. However, when dogs and Scandinavian wolfs were analyzed, IgE levels were found to be 100-200 times higher compared to humans, indicating a generally much more active IgE synthesis in free-living animals, most likely connected to intestinal parasite infections. One of the major effector molecules released upon IgE-mediated activation by mast cells are serine proteases. These proteases, which belong to the large family of hematopoietic serine proteases, are extremely abundant and can account for up to 35% of the total cellular protein. Recent studies show that several of these enzymes, including the chymases and tryptases, are old. Ancestors for these enzymes were most likely present in an early mammal more than 200 million years ago before the separation of the three extant mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials, and placental mammals. The aim is now to continue these studies of mast cell biology and IgE to obtain additional clues to their evolutionary conserved functions. A focus

  14. Eugenol and its synthetic analogues inhibit cell growth of human cancer cells (Part I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco A, H.; Cardona, W. [Universidad Andres Bello, Vina del Mar (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Quimicas]. E-mail: hcarrasco@unab.cl; Espinoza C, L.; Gallardo, C.; Catalan M, K. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Quimica; Cardile, V.; Lombardo, L. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Physiological Sciences; Cuellar F, M. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile). Facultad de Farmacia; Russo, A. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Biological Chemistry, Medical Chemistry and Molecular Biology

    2008-07-01

    Eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) (1) has been reported to possess antioxidant and anticancer properties. In an attempt to enhance intrinsic activity of this natural compound, some derivatives were synthesized. Eugenol was extracted from cloves oil and further, the eugenol analogues (2-6) were obtained through acetylation and nitration reactions. Eugenol (1) and its analogues (2-6) were examined by in vitro model of cancer using two human cancer cell lines: DU-145 (androgeninsensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells). Cell viability, by tetrazolium salts assay, was measured. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also investigated to evaluate the presence of cell toxicity as a result of cell disruption, subsequent to membrane rupture. In the examined cancer cells, all compounds showed cell-growth inhibition activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds 5-allyl-3-nitrobenzene-1,2-diol (3) and 4-allyl- 2-methoxy-5-nitrophenyl acetate (5) were significantly (p < 0,001) more active than eugenol, with IC{sub 50} values in DU-145 cells of 19.02 x 10{sup -6} and 21.5 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, and in KB cells of 18.11 x 10{sup -6} and 21.26 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, suggesting that the presence of nitro and hydroxyl groups could be important in the activity of these compounds. In addition, our results seem to indicate that apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in KB and DU-145 cells. In fact, in our experimental conditions, no statistically significant increase in LDH release was observed in cancer cells treated with eugenol and its analogues. (author)

  15. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Natural sex steroids and their xenobiotic analogs in animal production: growth, carcass quality, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, mode of action, residues, methods, and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, K P

    1997-03-01

    Natural and xenobiotic compounds having sex-related actions have long been used for growth promotion and various changes in carcass quality in meat animals. The first compounds used were synthetic estrogens; however, later on a whole battery of compounds having androgenic, and progestogenic actions have also been involved. In surveying the effects of these compounds in meat-producing animals, it became clear that these drugs increase the growth rate of the treated animals and bring about changes in the carcass that are generally characterized by lower fat content and more lean mass. Extensive studies undertaken in various countries, including the European Economic Community (EEC), have shown that if used according to good husbandry practices, the meat from treated animals does not have excessive amounts of residues compared with the endogenous amount of steroid production in the animals in question and also in human beings. The banning of these compounds in the European community brought a new phenomenon of illegal or black market cocktails. These mixtures of anabolic steroids are injected into the body of the animals rather than implanted in the ears, which is the normal practice in countries where they have not yet been banned. Several screening and confirmatory methods are now available for monitoring programs. However, these programs need excessive resources in terms of manpower, funds, and proper legislation, which in underdeveloped countries is questionable, particularly in the absence of strong scientific evidence for the exercise.

  17. Animal study on transplantation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells for corneal endothelial decompensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the feasibility of culturing human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECon acellular corneal stroma and performing the posterior lamellar endothelial keratoplasty(PLEKtreating corneal endothelial decompensation.METHODS: Thirty New-Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups randomly, 10 rabbits for experimental group, 10 for stroma group and 10 for control group. Corneal endothelial cells were removed to establish animal model of corneal endothelial failure. PLEK was performed on the rabbits of experimental group and stroma group, and nothing was transplantated onto the rabbits of control group with the deep layer excised only. Postoperative observation was taken for 3mo. The degree of corneal edema and central corneal thickness were recorded for statistical analysis.RESULTS: Corneas in experimental group were relieved in edema obviously compared with that in stroma group and the control group, and showed increased transparency 7d after the operation. The average density of endothelial cells was 2 026.4±129.3cells/mm2, and average central corneal thickness was 505.2±25.4μm in experimental group, while 1 535.6±114.5μm in stroma group and 1 493.5±70.2μm in control group 3mo after operation.CONCLUSION:We achieved preliminary success in our study that culturing HUVEC on acellular corneal stroma and performing PLEK for corneal endothelial decompensation. HUVEC transplanted could survive in vivo, and have normal biological function of keeping cornea transparent. This study provides a new idea and a new way clinically for the treatment of corneal endothelial diseases.

  18. Amelioration of anaphylaxis, mast cell degranulation and bronchospasm by Euphorbia hirta L. extracts in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam Parmar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The current investigation was aimed to assess anti-anaphylactic, mast cell stabilizing and anti-asthmatic activity of methanol and aqueous extract of Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae on experimental animals. Anaphylaxis was induced by administration of horse serum and triple antigen vaccine subcutaneously in albino Wistar rats. Extracts of E. hirta (EH were administered to the rats in dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w. orally for 14 days. At the end of treatment, asthma score was measured and various blood parameters like differential count (DC, total WBC count and IgE were estimated. Interleukin (IL-4, IL-5 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α were measured by ELISA commercial kit from Broncho alveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Histopathological changes of lungs were observed. Anti-asthmatic activity of extracts of EH was also studied on histamine-induced bronchospasm in guinea pigs. In vitro mast cell stabilizing activity of extracts was evaluated on compound 48/80 challenged rat intestinal mesenteric mast cells. The treatment with extracts of EH produced significant decrease in asthma score and they also brought to normalcy the increased total WBC, DC counts, serum IgE, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF. The histopathological study further supported the protective effect of EH extracts. The pre-treatment with extracts of EH displayed significant reduction in degranulation of mesenteric mast cell numbers. The treatment with extracts of EH significantly increased in time of pre-convulsive dyspnoea (PCD. Thus, these findings concluded that E. hirta could be effectively used in the treatment of anaphylaxis and asthma.

  19. Establishment of animal model for the analysis of cancer cell metastasis during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Park, Sunhoo; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kang, Joo Hyun; Um, Hong-Duck

    2012-01-01

    Γ-Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is one of major therapeutic tools in cancer treatment. Nevertheless, γ-IR therapy failed due to occurrence of metastasis, which constitutes a significant obstacle in cancer treatment. The main aim of this investigation was to construct animal model which present metastasis during radiotherapy in a mouse system in vivo and establishes the molecular mechanisms involved. The C6L transfectant cell line expressing firefly luciferase (fLuc) was treated with γ-IR, followed by immunoblotting, zymography and invasion assay in vitro. We additionally employed the C6L transfectant cell line to construct xenografts in nude mice, which were irradiated with γ-IR. Irradiated xenograft-containing mice were analyzed via survival curves, measurement of tumor size, and bioluminescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo. Metastatic lesions in organs of mice were further assessed using RT-PCR, H & E staining and immunohistochemistry. γ-IR treatment of C6L cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased cell invasion. In irradiated xenograft-containing mice, tumor sizes were decreased dramatically and survival rates extended. Almost all non-irradiated xenograft-containing control mice had died within 4 weeks. However, we also observed luminescence signals in about 22.5% of γ-IR-treated mice. Intestines or lungs of mice displaying luminescence signals contained several lesions, which expressed the fLuc gene and presented histological features of cancer tissues as well as expression of EMT markers. These findings collectively indicate that occurrences of metastases during γ-IR treatment accompanied induction of EMT markers, including increased MMP activity. Establishment of a murine metastasis model during γ-IR treatment should aid in drug development against cancer metastasis and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process

  20. Separation of cell survival, growth, migration, and mesenchymal transdifferentiation effects of fibroblast secretome on tumor cells of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Veronika Maria; Pritz, Christian; Riml, Anna; Romani, Angela; Tuertscher, Raphaela; Steinbichler, Teresa; Dejaco, Daniel; Riechelmann, Herbert; Dudás, József

    2017-11-01

    Fibroblasts play a central role in tumor invasion, recurrence, and metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor cell self-produced factors and paracrine fibroblast-secreted factors in comparison to indirect co-culture on cancer cell survival, growth, migration, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition using the cell lines SCC-25 and human gingival fibroblasts. Thereby, we particularly focused on the participation of the fibroblast-secreted transforming growth factor beta-1.Tumor cell self-produced factors were sufficient to ensure tumor cell survival and basic cell growth, but fibroblast-secreted paracrine factors significantly increased cell proliferation, migration, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related phenotype changes in tumor cells. Transforming growth factor beta-1 generated individually migrating disseminating tumor cell groups or single cells separated from the tumor cell nest, which were characterized by reduced E-cadherin expression. At the same time, transforming growth factor beta-1 inhibited tumor cell proliferation under serum-starved conditions. Neutralizing transforming growth factor beta antibody reduced the cell migration support of fibroblast-conditioned medium. Transforming growth factor beta-1 as a single factor was sufficient for generation of disseminating tumor cells from epithelial tumor cell nests, while other fibroblast paracrine factors supported tumor nest outgrowth. Different fibroblast-released factors might support tumor cell proliferation and invasion, as two separate effects.

  1. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, Poul Henrik; Emerich, D F

    2012-01-01

    , capable of local delivery of NGF by a genetically modified human cell line, NGC-0295. The NsG0202 devices have shown promising safety and therapeutic results in a small phase 1b clinical study. However, results also show that the NGF dose could advantageously be increased. We have used the sleeping beauty......Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG0202...... patients, we have validated the bioactivity of devices with NGC0211 and NGC-0295 cells in normal rat striatum as well as in the quinolinic acid striatal lesion model. These preclinical animal studies show that implantation of devices with NGC0211 cells lead to significantly higher NGF output, which in both...

  2. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 is a key molecular target for mithramycin A-induced apoptosis in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells and a tumor xenograft animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Jung, Ji-Youn; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2013-01-01

    Mithramycin A (Mith) is a natural polyketide that has been used in multiple areas of research including apoptosis of various cancer cells. Here, we examined the critical role of Mith in apoptosis and its molecular mechanism in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and tumor xenografts. Mith decreased cell growth and induced apoptosis in DU145 and PC-3 cells. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was over-expressed in both cell lines compared to RWPE1 cells. Mith inhibited Mcl-1 protein expression in both cells, but only altered Mcl-1 mRNA levels in PC-3 cells. We also found that Mith reduced Mcl-1 protein levels through both proteasome-dependent protein degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis in DU145 cells. Studies using siRNA confirmed that the knockdown of Mcl-1 induced apoptosis. Mith significantly suppressed TPA-induced neoplastic cell transformation through the down-regulation of the Mcl-1 protein in JB6 cells, and suppressed the transforming activity of both cell types. Mith also inhibited tumor growth and Mcl-1 levels, in addition to inducing apoptosis, in athymic nude mice bearing DU145 cell xenografts without affecting five normal organs. Therefore, Mith inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis by suppressing Mcl-1 in both prostate cancer cells and xenograft tumors, and thus is a potent anticancer drug candidate for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tat-PRAS40 prevent hippocampal HT-22 cell death and oxidative stress induced animal brain ischemic insults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Jea; Kim, Dae Won; Jo, Hyo Sang; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Kim, Ji An; Hwang, Jung Soon; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Jeong, Ji-Heon; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Cho, Yong-Jun; Lee, Keunwook; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-08-01

    Proline rich Akt substrate (PRAS40) is a component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is known to play an important role against reactive oxygen species-induced cell death. However, the precise function of PRAS40 in ischemia remains unclear. Thus, we investigated whether Tat-PRAS40, a cell-permeable fusion protein, has a protective function against oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal (HT-22) cell death in an animal model of ischemia. We showed that Tat-PRAS40 transduced into HT-22 cells, and significantly protected against cell death by reducing the levels of H2O2 and derived reactive species, and DNA fragmentation as well as via the regulation of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase 3 expression levels in H2O2 treated cells. Also, we showed that transduced Tat-PARS40 protein markedly increased phosphorylated RRAS40 expression levels and 14-3-3σ complex via the Akt signaling pathway. In an animal ischemia model, Tat-PRAS40 effectively transduced into the hippocampus in animal brain and significantly protected against neuronal cell death in the CA1 region. We showed that Tat-PRAS40 protein effectively transduced into hippocampal neuronal cells and markedly protected against neuronal cell damage. Therefore, we suggest that Tat-PRAS40 protein may be used as a therapeutic protein for ischemia and oxidative stress-induced brain disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel function for selenium in biological system: selenite as a highly effective iron carrier for Chinese hamster ovary cell growth and monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyou; Robinson, David; Salmon, Peter

    2006-12-20

    As the market for biopharmaceuticals especially monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) rapidly grows, their manufacturing methods are coming under increasing regulatory scrutiny, particularly due to concerns about the potential introduction of adventitious agents from animal-sourced components in the media used for their production in mammalian cell culture. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are by far the most commonly used production vehicles for these recombinant glycoproteins. In developing animal-component free media for CHO and other mammalian cell lines, the iron-transporter function of serum or human/bovine transferrin is usually replaced by certain organic or inorganic chelators capable of delivering iron for cell respiration and metabolism, but few of them are sufficiently effective. Selenium is a well-known essential trace element (TE) for cell growth and development, and its positive role in biological system includes detoxification of free radicals by activating glutathione peroxidase. In cell culture, selenium in the form of selenite can help cells to detoxify the medium thus protect them from oxidative damage. In this presentation, we describe the discovery and application of a novel function of selenite, that is, as a highly effective carrier to deliver iron for cell growth and function. In our in-house-developed animal protein-free (APF) medium for CHO cells, using an iron-selenite compound to replace the well-established tropolone delivery system for iron led to comparable or better cell growth and antibody production. A high cell density of >10 x 10(6) viable cells/mL and excellent antibody titer of approximately 3 g/L were achieved in 14-day fed-batch cultures in shake flasks, followed by successful scale-up to stirred bioreactors. The preparation of the commercially unavailable iron-selenite compound from respective ions, and its effectiveness in cell-culture performance, were dependent on reaction time, substrates, and other conditions. Copyright 2006

  5. Glycosaminoglycan synthesis and shedding induced by growth factors are cell and compound specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah R; Nohara, Angela S; Mataveli, Fábio D; de Matos, Leandro L; Nader, Helena B; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida S

    2007-02-01

    The interactions between growth factors and sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) have been extensively studied. The aim of this study is to investigate if growth factors would show specificity of action on the synthesis and shedding of sulphated GAG, using two different cell lines: endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The cells were grown in the presence or absence of growth factors: EGF, FGF2, VEGF121, VEGF165. Transfection assays were also performed using recombinant pcDNA3.1, containing VEGF165 cDNA. In order to analyse the different types of GAG the cells were metabolically labelled with [(35)S]-sulphate. At low doses, VEGF121 was the only growth factor able to increase both the synthesis and secretion of heparan sulphate (HS) in endothelial cells. Over expression of VEGF165 stimulated HS synthesis in both cells. The combined results showed that growth factors affect GAG synthesis in a cell specific and dose dependent manner.

  6. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  7. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  8. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-15

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems.

  9. Gene delivery process in a single animal cell after femtosecond laser microinjection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Iguchi, Seriya; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    Microinjection of extracellular molecules into a single animal cell was performed by an amplified femtosecond laser irradiation. When a single-shot laser pulse was focused on the plasma membrane of a single fibroblast from the mouse cell line NIH3T3 with a high-numerical aperture objective lens, a transient hole with a diameter of 1 μm was formed. The delivery process of extracellular molecules immediately after the hole formation was monitored by a fluorescence staining with fluoresceinisothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran). Then the gene expression was confirmed using a DNA plasmid of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The gene expression was observed when the laser pulse was focused first on the cellular membrane and then on the nuclear membrane, while the gene was not expressed when the laser was focused only on the cellular membrane. On the basis of these results, the efficiency of gene delivery by the femtosecond laser microinjection and the subsequent gene expression were clarified.

  10. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptors, TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 production and autocrine growth control in osteosarcoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloen, P.; Jennings, C. L.; Gebhardt, M. C.; Springfield, D. S.; Mankin, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a polypeptide with multiple physiological functions. Isoforms of this growth factor have important roles in control of the cell cycle, in regulation of cell-cell interactions and in growth and development. Malignant transformation has been shown to be

  11. Tumor cells secrete an angiogenic factor that stimulates basic fibroblast growth factor and urokinase expression in vascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peverali, F.A.; Mandriota, S.J.; Ciana, P.; Marelli, R.; Quax, P.; Rifkin, D.B.; Della Valle, G.; Mignatti, P.

    1994-01-01

    Culture medium conditioned by human SK-Hep1 hepatoma cells or mouse S180 sarcoma cells rapidly up-regulates endothelial cell expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and induces formation of capillary-like structures by vascular endothelial cells grown on three-dimensional fibrin gels (in

  12. Stomagenesis versus myogenesis: Parallels in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of transcription factor mediated specialized cell-type differentiation in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Torii, Keiko U

    2016-05-01

    Although the last common unicellular ancestor of plants and animals diverged several billion years ago, and while having developed unique developmental programs that facilitate differentiation and proliferation specific to plant and animal systems, there still exists a high degree of conservation in the logic regulating these developmental processes within these two seemingly diverse kingdoms. Stomatal differentiation in plants involves a series of orchestrated cell division events mediated by a family of closely related bHLH transcription factors (TFs) to create a pair of mature guard cells. These TFs are in turn regulated by a number of upstream signaling components that ultimately function to achieve lineage specific differentiation and organized tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. The logic involved in the specification of the myogenic differentiation program in animals is intriguingly similar to stomatal differentiation in plants: Closely-related myogenic bHLHs, known as MRFs (Myogenic Regulatory Factors) provide lineage specificity essential for cell-fate determination. These MRFs, similar to the bHLHs in plants, are regulated by several upstream signaling cascades that succinctly regulate each differentiation step, leading to the production of mature muscle fibers. This review aims at providing a perspective on the emerging parallels in the logic employed by key bHLH transcription factors and their upstream signaling components that function to precisely regulate key cell-state transition events in the stomatal as well as myogenic cell lineages. © 2016 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  13. Households across all income quintiles, especially the poorest, increased animal source food expenditures substantially during recent Peruvian economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Debbie L; Behrman, Jere R; Crookston, Benjamin T; Dearden, Kirk A; Schott, Whitney; Penny, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Relative to plant-based foods, animal source foods (ASFs) are richer in accessible protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin B-12 and other nutrients. Because of their nutritional value, particularly for childhood growth and nutrition, it is important to identify factors influencing ASF consumption, especially for poorer households that generally consume less ASFs. To estimate differential responsiveness of ASF consumption to changes in total household expenditures for households with different expenditures in a middle-income country with substantial recent income increases. The Peruvian Young Lives household panel (n = 1750) from 2002, 2006 and 2009 was used to characterize patterns of ASF expenditures. Multivariate models with controls for unobserved household fixed effects and common secular trends were used to examine nonlinear relationships between changes in household expenditures and in ASF expenditures. Households with lower total expenditures dedicated greater percentages of expenditures to food (58.4% vs.17.9% in 2002 and 24.2% vs. 21.5% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively) and lower percentages of food expenditures to ASF (22.8% vs. 33.9% in 2002 and 30.3% vs. 37.6% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively). Average percentages of overall expenditures spent on food dropped from 47% to 23.2% between 2002 and 2009. Households in the lowest quintiles of expenditures showed greater increases in ASF expenditures relative to total consumption than households in the highest quintiles. Among ASF components, meat and poultry expenditures increased more than proportionately for households in the lowest quintiles, and eggs and fish expenditures increased less than proportionately for all households. Increases in household expenditures were associated with substantial increases in consumption of ASFs for households, particularly households with lower total expenditures. Increases in ASF expenditures for all but the top quintile of

  14. Households across All Income Quintiles, Especially the Poorest, Increased Animal Source Food Expenditures Substantially during Recent Peruvian Economic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Debbie L.; Behrman, Jere R.; Crookston, Benjamin T.; Dearden, Kirk A.; Schott, Whitney; Penny, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relative to plant-based foods, animal source foods (ASFs) are richer in accessible protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin B-12 and other nutrients. Because of their nutritional value, particularly for childhood growth and nutrition, it is important to identify factors influencing ASF consumption, especially for poorer households that generally consume less ASFs. Objective To estimate differential responsiveness of ASF consumption to changes in total household expenditures for households with different expenditures in a middle-income country with substantial recent income increases. Methods The Peruvian Young Lives household panel (n = 1750) from 2002, 2006 and 2009 was used to characterize patterns of ASF expenditures. Multivariate models with controls for unobserved household fixed effects and common secular trends were used to examine nonlinear relationships between changes in household expenditures and in ASF expenditures. Results Households with lower total expenditures dedicated greater percentages of expenditures to food (58.4% vs.17.9% in 2002 and 24.2% vs. 21.5% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively) and lower percentages of food expenditures to ASF (22.8% vs. 33.9% in 2002 and 30.3% vs. 37.6% in 2009 for lowest and highest quintiles respectively). Average percentages of overall expenditures spent on food dropped from 47% to 23.2% between 2002 and 2009. Households in the lowest quintiles of expenditures showed greater increases in ASF expenditures relative to total consumption than households in the highest quintiles. Among ASF components, meat and poultry expenditures increased more than proportionately for households in the lowest quintiles, and eggs and fish expenditures increased less than proportionately for all households. Conclusions Increases in household expenditures were associated with substantial increases in consumption of ASFs for households, particularly households with lower total expenditures. Increases in ASF

  15. Dynamic expression of cell surface hydrophobicity during initial yeast cell growth and before germ tube formation of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, B W; Hazen, K C

    1988-01-01

    Expression of cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) during initial growth of Candida albicans was monitored. CSH of hydrophobic and hydrophilic yeast cells changed within 30 min upon subculture into fresh medium. Morphologic evidence of germination was preceded by expression of CSH. These results indicate that CSH expression is important in C. albicans growth.

  16. Reduction in placental growth factor impaired gestational beta-cell proliferation through crosstalk between beta-cells and islet endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaosheng; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reduced placental growth factor (PLGF) during pregnancy is known to be a reason for developing preeclampsia (PE) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, it has been shown that reduced PLGF may induce GDM through suppressing beta-cell mass growth in a PI3k/Akt signalling-dependent manner. Here, we dissected the interaction between beta-cells and islet endothelial cells in this model. We analysed proliferation of beta-cells and islet endothelial cells at different time points of gestation in mice. We cultured mouse islet endothelial cells (MS1), with or without PLGF. We cultured primary mouse beta-cells in conditioned media from PLGF-treated MS1. We cultured MS1 cells in conditioned media from proliferating beta-cells that were activated with conditioned media from PLGF-treated MS1 cells. We analysed cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation. We analysed cell growth by a MTT assay. We found that during mouse gestation, the increases in cell proliferation occurred earlier in beta-cells than in islet endothelial cells. In vitro, PLGF itself failed to induce proliferation of MS1 cells. However, conditioned media from the PLGF-treated MS1 cells induced beta-cell proliferation, resulting in increases in beta-cell number. Moreover, proliferation of MS1 cells significantly increased when MS1 cells were cultured in conditioned media from proliferating beta-cells activated with conditioned media from PLGF-treated MS1 cells. Thus, our data suggest that gestational PLGF may stimulate islet endothelial cells to release growth factors to promote beta-cell proliferation, and proliferating beta-cells in turn release endothelial cell growth factor to increase proliferation of endothelial cells. PE-associated reduction in PLGF impairs these processes to result in islet growth impairment, and subsequently the onset of GDM.

  17. miR-449 overexpression inhibits papillary thyroid carcinoma cell growth by targeting RET kinase-β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyu; Huang, Xin; Xu, Jinkai; Su, Qinghua; Zhao, Jun; Ma, Jiancang

    2016-10-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common thyroid cancer and represent approximately 80% of all thyroid cancers. The present study is aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-449 in the progression of PTC. Our results revealed that miR-449 was underexpressed in the collected PTC specimens compared with non-cancerous PTC tissues. Overexpression of miR-449 induced a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and inhibited PTC cell growth in vitro. Further studies revealed that RET proto-oncogene (RET) is a novel miR-449 target, due to miR-449 bound directly to its 3'-untranslated region and miR-449 mimic reduced the protein expression of RET. Similar to the effects of miR-449 overexpression, RET downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas RET overexpression reversed the inhibitive effect of miR-449 mimic. Furthermore, miR-449 overexpression inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and reduced the expression of several downstream genes, including c-Myc, cyclin D1, T cell-specific transcription factor (TCF) and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1), and inactivated the β-catenin pathway in TPC-1 cells. Moreover, overexpression of β-catenin prevented miR-449-reduced cell cycle arrest and cell viability. In xenograft animal experiments, miR-449 overexpression effectively suppressed the tumor growth of PTC. Taken together, our research indicated that miR-449 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting RET, and that miR-449 overexpression inhibited the growth of PTC by inactivating the β-catenin pathway. Thus, miR-449 may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PTC.

  18. Daidzein-estrogen interaction in the rat uterus and its effect on human breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Leonardo; Tchernitchin, Andrei N; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Villena, Joan; Lemus, Igor; Gidekel, Manuel; Cabrera, Gustavo; Astorga, Paola

    2012-12-01

    Sex hormone replacement therapy provides several advantages in the quality of life for climacteric women. However, estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and mammary gland increases the risk of cancer development in these organs. The lower incidence of mammary cancer in Asian women as compared with Western women has been attributed to high intake of soy isoflavones, including genistein. We have previously shown that genistein induces an estradiol-like hypertrophy of uterine cells, but does not induce cell proliferation, uterine eosinophilia, or endometrial edema. It also inhibits estradiol-induced mitosis in uterine cells and hormone-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. Nevertheless, genistein stimulates growth of human breast cancer cells in culture; therefore, it is not an ideal estrogen for use in hormone replacement therapy (HRD). The present study investigated the effect of another soy isoflavone, daidzein (subcutaneous, 0.066 mg/kg body weight), in the same animal model, and its effect on responses induced by subsequent treatment (1 h later) with estradiol-17β (E(2); subcutaneous, 0.33 mg/kg body weight). In addition, we investigated the effects of daidzein (1 μg/mL) or E(2) on the growth of human breast cancer cells in culture. Results indicate that daidzein stimulates growth of breast cancer cells and potentiates estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus. We suggest caution for the use of daidzein or formulas containing this compound in HRD. Future research strategies should be addressed in the search for new phytoestrogens that selectively inhibit cell proliferation in the uterus and breast.

  19. Daidzein–Estrogen Interaction in the Rat Uterus and Its Effect on Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Leonardo; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Villena, Joan; Lemus, Igor; Gidekel, Manuel; Cabrera, Gustavo; Astorga, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Sex hormone replacement therapy provides several advantages in the quality of life for climacteric women. However, estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and mammary gland increases the risk of cancer development in these organs. The lower incidence of mammary cancer in Asian women as compared with Western women has been attributed to high intake of soy isoflavones, including genistein. We have previously shown that genistein induces an estradiol-like hypertrophy of uterine cells, but does not induce cell proliferation, uterine eosinophilia, or endometrial edema. It also inhibits estradiol-induced mitosis in uterine cells and hormone-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. Nevertheless, genistein stimulates growth of human breast cancer cells in culture; therefore, it is not an ideal estrogen for use in hormone replacement therapy (HRD). The present study investigated the effect of another soy isoflavone, daidzein (subcutaneous, 0.066 mg/kg body weight), in the same animal model, and its effect on responses induced by subsequent treatment (1 h later) with estradiol-17β (E2; subcutaneous, 0.33 mg/kg body weight). In addition, we investigated the effects of daidzein (1 μg/mL) or E2 on the growth of human breast cancer cells in culture. Results indicate that daidzein stimulates growth of breast cancer cells and potentiates estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus. We suggest caution for the use of daidzein or formulas containing this compound in HRD. Future research strategies should be addressed in the search for new phytoestrogens that selectively inhibit cell proliferation in the uterus and breast. PMID:23216111

  20. Seeding cell approach for tissue-engineered urethral reconstruction in animal study: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jing-Dong; Gao, Jing; Fu, Qiang; Feng, Chao; Xie, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We systematically reviewed published preclinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness of cell-seeded tissue engineering approach for urethral reconstruction in an animal model. The outcomes were summarized by success factors in the animal experiments, which evaluate the possibility and feasibility of a clinical application in the future. Preclinical studies of tissue engineering approaches for urethral reconstruction were identified through a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, and Biosis Previews (web of science SP) databases for studies published from 1 January 1980 to 23 November 2014. Primary studies were included if urethral reconstruction was performed using a tissue-engineered biomaterial in any animal species (with the experiment group being a cell-seeded scaffold and the control group being a cell-free scaffold) with histology and urethrography as the outcome measure. A total of 15 preclinical studies were included in our meta-analysis. The histology and urethrography outcome between the experimental and control groups were considered to be the most clinically relevant. Through this systematic approach, our outcomes suggested that applying the cell-seeded biomaterial in creating a neo-urethra was stable and effective. And multi-type cells including epithelial cells as well as smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts seemed to be a better strategy. Stem cells, especially after epithelial differentiation, could be a promising choice for future researches. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  1. Calpastatin ablation aggravates the molecular phenotype in cell and animal models of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jonasz Jeremiasz; Kloock, Simon Johannes; Nagel, Maike; Ortiz-Rios, Midea Malena; Hofmann, Julian; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2018-02-02

    Deciphering the molecular pathology of Huntington disease is of particular importance, not only for a better understanding of this neurodegenerative disease, but also to identify potential therapeutic targets. The polyglutamine-expanded disease protein huntingtin was shown to undergo proteolysis, which results in the accumulation of toxic and aggregation-prone fragments. Amongst several classes of proteolytic enzymes responsible for huntingtin processing, the group of calcium-activated calpains has been found to be a significant mediator of the disease protein toxicity. To confirm the impact of calpain-mediated huntingtin cleavage in Huntington disease, we analysed the effect of depleting or overexpressing the endogenous calpain inhibitor calpastatin in HEK293T cells transfected with wild-type or polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin. Moreover, we crossbred huntingtin knock-in mice with calpastatin knockout animals to assess its effect not only on huntingtin cleavage and aggregation but also additional molecular markers. We demonstrated that a reduced or ablated expression of calpastatin triggers calpain overactivation and a consequently increased mutant huntingtin cleavage in cells and in vivo. These alterations were accompanied by an elevated formation of predominantly cytoplasmic huntingtin aggregates. On the other hand, overexpression of calpastatin in cells attenuated huntingtin fragmentation and aggregation. In addition, we observed an enhanced cleavage of DARPP-32, p35 and synapsin-1 in neuronal tissue upon calpain overactivation. Our results corroborate the important role of calpains in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington disease and endorse targeting these proteolytic enzymes as a therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of integrated animal-fish production system under subtropical hill agro ecosystem in India: growth performance of animals, total biomass production and monetary benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, A; Pathak, K A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Vinod, K

    2009-03-01

    The present study assessed the benefits of integration of animals with fish production in optimizing the bio mass production from unit land in subtropical hill agro ecosystem. Hampshire pigs and Khaki Campbell ducks were integrated with composite fish culture. The pig and duck excreta were directly allowed into the pond and no supplementary feed was given to fish during the period of study. The average levels of N, P and K in dried pig and duck manure were 0.9, 0.7 and 0.6 per cent and 1.3, 0.6 and 0.5 per cent, respectively. The average body weight of pig and duck at 11 months age was 90 and 1.74 kg with an average daily weight gain of 333.33 and 6.44 g, respectively. The fish production in pig-fish and duck-fish systems were 2209 and 2964 kg/ha, respectively while the fish productivity in control pond was only 820 kg/ha. The total biomass (animal and fish) production was higher (pfeeding system compared to the traditional system, however the input/output ratio was 1:1.2 and 1:1.55 for commercial and traditional systems, respectively. It was inferred that the total biomass production per unit land was high (pfish were integrated together.

  3. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors.

  4. Stem cell transplantation in traumatic spinal cord injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Antonic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating condition that causes substantial morbidity and mortality and for which no treatments are available. Stem cells offer some promise in the restoration of neurological function. We used systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression to study the impact of stem cell biology and experimental design on motor and sensory outcomes following stem cell treatments in animal models of SCI. One hundred and fifty-six publications using 45 different stem cell preparations met our prespecified inclusion criteria. Only one publication used autologous stem cells. Overall, allogeneic stem cell treatment appears to improve both motor (effect size, 27.2%; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 25.0%-29.4%; 312 comparisons in 5,628 animals and sensory (effect size, 26.3%; 95% CI, 7.9%-44.7%; 23 comparisons in 473 animals outcome. For sensory outcome, most heterogeneity between experiments was accounted for by facets of stem cell biology. Differentiation before implantation and intravenous route of delivery favoured better outcome. Stem cell implantation did not appear to improve sensory outcome in female animals and appeared to be enhanced by isoflurane anaesthesia. Biological plausibility was supported by the presence of a dose-response relationship. For motor outcome, facets of stem cell biology had little detectable effect. Instead most heterogeneity could be explained by the experimental modelling and the outcome measure used. The location of injury, method of injury induction, and presence of immunosuppression all had an impact. Reporting of measures to reduce bias was higher than has been seen in other neuroscience domains but were still suboptimal. Motor outcomes studies that did not report the blinded assessment of outcome gave inflated estimates of efficacy. Extensive recent preclinical literature suggests that stem-cell-based therapies may offer promise, however the impact of compromised internal validity and

  5. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Carol Ann, E-mail: carol.greene@auckland.ac.nz; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  6. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, Carol Ann; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors

  7. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  8. The Expression of BTS-2 Enhances Cell Growth and Invasiveness in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quoc Thang; Oue, Naohide; Yamamoto, Yuji; Shigematsu, Yoshinori; Sekino, Yohei; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Uraoka, Naohiro; Tiwari, Mamata; Yasui, Wataru

    2017-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of cancer in developed countries. Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2) gene, which encodes BST2 transmembrane glycoprotein, is overexpressed in several cancer types. In the present study, we analyzed the expression and function of BST2 in RCC. BST2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 123 RCC cases. RNA interference was used to inhibit BST2 expression in a RCC cell line. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that 32% of the 123 RCC cases were positive for BST2. BST2 expression was positively associated with tumour stage. Furthermore, BST2 expression was an independent predictor of survival in patients with RCC. BST2 siRNA-transfected Caki-1 cells displayed significantly reduced cell growth and invasive activity relative to negative control siRNA-transfected cells. These results suggest that BST2 plays an important role in the progression of RCC. Because BST2 is expressed on the cell membrane, BST2 is a good therapeutic target for RCC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of triamterene as an inhibitor of the TGR5 receptor: identification in cells and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yingxiao Li,1,2 Kai Chun Cheng,1 Chiang-Shan Niu,3 Shih-Hsiang Lo,3,4 Juei-Tang Cheng,2,5 Ho-Shan Niu31Department of Psychosomatic Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 2Department of Medical Research, Chi Mei Medical Center, Yong Kang, Tainan City, 3Department of Nursing, Tzu Chi College of Technology, Hualien City, 4Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Hsing Branch of Taipei City Hospital, 5Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Health Science, Chang-Jung Christian University, Guei-Ren, Tainan City, TaiwanBackground: G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1, also known as TGR5 has been shown to participate in glucose homeostasis. In animal models, a TGR5 agonist increases incretin secretion to reduce hyperglycemia. Many agonists have been developed for clinical use. However, the effects of TGR5 blockade have not been studied extensively, with the exception of studies using TGR5 knockout mice. Therefore, we investigated the potential effect of triamterene on TGR5.Methods: We transfected the TGR5 gene into cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 cells to express TGR5. Then, we applied a fluorescent indicator to examine the glucose uptake of these transfected cells. In addition, NCI-H716 cells that secrete incretin were also evaluated. Fura-2, a fluorescence indicator, was applied to determine the changes in calcium concentrations. The levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1 were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Moreover, rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1-like diabetes were used to investigate the effects in vivo.Results: Triamterene dose dependently inhibits the increase in glucose uptake induced by TGR5 agonists in CHO-K1 cells expressing the TGR5 gene. In cultured NCI-H716 cells, TGR5 activation also increases GLP-1 secretion by increasing calcium levels

  10. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  11. SBDS-deficiency results in deregulation of reactive oxygen species leading to increased cell death and decreased cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar, Chhaya; Das, Bikul; Yeger, Herman; Dror, Yigal

    2010-12-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by reduced hematopoietic and exocrine pancreatic cell numbers and a marked propensity for leukemia. Most patients have mutations in the SBDS gene. We previously reported that SBDS-deficient cells overexpress Fas, undergo accelerated spontaneous and Fas-mediated apoptosis and grow slowly. However the mechanism of how SBDS regulates apoptosis remains unknown. Several studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate cell growth and spontaneous and Fas-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that SBDS-deficiency disrupts ROS regulation and subsequently increases sensitivity to Fas stimulation and reduced cell growth. SBDS was knocked down in HeLa cervical cancer cells and TF-1 myeloid cells using short hairpin RNA. ROS levels were evaluated by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Apoptosis and cell growth were evaluated with and without antioxidants by annexin V/propidium iodide and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays, respectively. We found that shRNA mediated SBDS-knockdown resulted in a significant increase in ROS levels compared to control cells. Fas stimulation further increased ROS levels in the SBDS-knockdown HeLa cells more than in the controls. Importantly, balancing ROS levels by antioxidants rescued SBDS-deficient cells from spontaneous and Fas-mediated apoptosis and reduced cell growth. ROS levels are increased in SBDS-deficient cells, which leads to increased apoptosis and decreased cell growth. Increased baseline and Fas-mediated ROS levels in SBDS-deficient cells can enhance the sensitivity to Fas stimulation. By balancing ROS levels, antioxidants can improve cell growth and survival in SBDS-deficient cells.

  12. Assessment of a chemically induced model of lung squamous cell carcinoma in mice by 18F-FDG small-animal PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Nanni, Cristina; Pettinato, Cinzia; Fini, Milena; D'Errico, Antonia; Trepidi, Silvia; Spinelli, Antonello; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Rubello, Domenico; Zompatori, Maurizio; Fabbri, Mario; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2007-08-01

    Small-animal imaging has become a relevant research field in pre-clinical oncology. In particular, metabolic information provided by small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) is very useful to closely monitor tumour growth and assess therapy response in murine models of human disease. There are various murine models for human lung adenocarcinoma, but those for squamous cell lung carcinoma, the most common form of human cancer, are lacking. To assess the feasibility of 18F-FDG small-animal PET to monitor tumour growth in a chemically induced model of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Nineteen NIH Swiss mice were skin painted by N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU) twice a week, with a 3 day interval, for 8 months and 10 NIH Swiss mice skin painted with NTCU solvent (acetone) were used as controls. 18F-FDG PET was performed under sevofluorane anaesthesia and oxygen supplementation at 2, 4, 6 and 8 months from initial treatment. Images were assessed by visual analysis and semi-quantitatively. When a diffuse distribution of tumour was noted, the mean of the counts/pixel measured at three lung levels, corrected for the effective dose injected and for decay, was used for comparison between mutagen-painted and control mice. Pathological evaluation was carried out from the time of the first positive PET results in a subgroup of the whole population to assess correlation with PET findings. Small animal CT was performed at 8 months in another subgroup. In both terms of visual analysis and measurement of total lung activity, 18F-FDG PET at 2 and 4 months from initial treatment were comparable in mutagen-painted and controls. At 6 months, PET images showed a faint and diffuse uptake over both lung fields in mutagen-painted mice with multiple focal areas of increased tracer uptake that merged into confluent masses at 8 months and seriously subverting lung architecture on computed tomography. Total lung activity was significantly higher in mutagen-painted versus

  13. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and insulin-like growth factor on cultured cartilage cells from skate Raja porasa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingjun; Jin, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2003-12-01

    Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on cartilage cells from proboscis of skate, Raja porasa Günther, were investigated in this study. The cartilage cells were cultured in 20% FBS-supplemented MEM medium at 24°C. Twelve hours after culture initiation, the cartilage cells were treated with bFGF and IGF-II at different concentration combinations. It was found that 20 ng/ml of bFGF or 80 ng/ml of IGF-II was enough to have obvious stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. Test of bFGF and IGF-II together, revealed that 20 ng/ml of bFGF and 80 ng/ml of IGF-II together had the best stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. The cartilage cells cultured could form a monolayer at day 7.

  14. Combined delivery of chondroitinase ABC and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuroepithelial cells promote tissue repair in an animal model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Führmann, Tobias; Anandakumaran, Priya N; Payne, Samantha L; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Varga, Balazs V; Nagy, Andras; Tator, Charles; Shoichet, Molly S

    2018-02-02

    The lack of tissue regeneration after traumatic spinal cord injury in animal models is largely attributed to the local inhibitory microenvironment. To overcome this inhibitory environment while promoting tissue regeneration, we investigated the combined delivery of chondroitinase ABC (chABC) with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs). ChABC was delivered to the injured spinal cord at the site of injury by affinity release from a crosslinked methylcellulose (MC) hydrogel by injection into the intrathecal space. NESCs were distributed in a hydrogel comprised of hyaluronan and MC and injected into the spinal cord tissue both rostral and caudal to the site of injury. Cell transplantation led to reduced cavity formation, but did not improve motor function. While few surviving cells were found 2 weeks post injury, the majority of live cells were neurons, with only few astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and progenitor cells. At 9 weeks post injury, there were more progenitor cells and a more even distribution of cell types compared to those at 2 weeks post injury, suggesting preferential survival and differentiation. Interestingly, animals that received cells and chABC had more neurons than animals that received cells alone, suggesting that chABC influenced the injury environment such that neuronal differentiation or survival was favoured.

  15. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ling; Hausmann, Martin; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Kellermeier, Silvia; Pesch, Theresa; Stieber-Gunckel, Manuela; Lippert, Elisabeth; Klebl, Frank; Rogler, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor), HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor) and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3) were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1). The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml), with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D). HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab

  16. Triazolopyrimidine (trapidil), a platelet-derived growth factor antagonist, inhibits parathyroid bone disease in an animal model for chronic hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotinun, Sutada; Sibonga, Jean D.; Turner, Russell T.

    2003-01-01

    Parathyroid bone disease in humans is caused by chronic hyperparathyroidism (HPT). Continuous infusion of PTH into rats results in histological changes similar to parathyroid bone disease, including increased bone formation, focal bone resorption, and severe peritrabecular fibrosis, whereas pulsatile PTH increases bone formation without skeletal abnormalities. Using a cDNA microarray with over 5000 genes, we identified an association between increased platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A) signaling and PTH-induced bone disease in rats. Verification of PDGF-A overexpression was accomplished with a ribonuclease protection assay. Using immunohistochemistry, PDGF-A peptide was localized to mast cells in PTH-treated rats. We also report a novel strategy for prevention of parathyroid bone disease using triazolopyrimidine (trapidil). Trapidil, an inhibitor of PDGF signaling, did not have any effect on indexes of bone turnover in normal rats. However, dramatic reductions in marrow fibrosis and bone resorption, but not bone formation, were observed in PTH-treated rats given trapidil. Also, trapidil antagonized the PTH-induced increases in mRNA levels for PDGF-A. These results suggest that PDGF signaling is important for the detrimental skeletal effects of HPT, and drugs that target the cytokine or its receptor might be useful in reducing or preventing parathyroid bone disease.

  17. Comparative effects of 4-phenyl-3-butenoic acid and vorinostat on cell growth and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bur