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Sample records for cell functions critical

  1. Phenotype and functions of natural killer cells in critically-ill septic patients.

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    Jean-Marie Forel

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Natural killer cells, as a major source of interferon-γ, contribute to the amplification of the inflammatory response as well as to mortality during severe sepsis in animal models. OBJECTIVE: We studied the phenotype and functions of circulating NK cells in critically-ill septic patients. METHODS: Blood samples were taken <48 hours after admission from 42 ICU patients with severe sepsis (n = 15 or septic shock (n = 14 (Sepsis group, non-septic SIRS (n = 13 (SIRS group, as well as 21 healthy controls. The immuno-phenotype and functions of NK cells were studied by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The absolute number of peripheral blood CD3-CD56(+ NK cells was similarly reduced in all groups of ICU patients, but with a normal percentage of NK cells. When NK cell cytotoxicity was evaluated with degranulation assays (CD107 expression, no difference was observed between Sepsis patients and healthy controls. Under antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC conditions, SIRS patients exhibited increased CD107 surface expression on NK cells (62.9[61.3-70]% compared to healthy controls (43.5[32.1-53.1]% or Sepsis patients (49.2[37.3-62.9]% (p = 0.002. Compared to healthy (10.2[6.3-13.1]%, reduced interferon-γ production by NK cells (K562 stimulation was observed in Sepsis group (6.2[2.2-9.9]%, p<0.01, and especially in patients with septic shock. Conversely, SIRS patients exhibited increased interferon-γ production (42.9[30.1-54.7]% compared to Sepsis patients (18.4[11.7-35.7]%, p<0.01 or healthy controls (26.8[19.3-44.9]%, p = 0.09 in ADCC condition. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive monitoring of the NK-cell phenotype and function in critically-ill septic patients revealed early decreased NK-cell function with impaired interferon-γ production. These results may aid future NK-based immuno-interventions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NTC00699868.

  2. Spi-B is critical for plasmacytoid dendritic cell function and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Izumi; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Chihiro; Yano, Takahiro; Iizuka, Akihiko; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Takashi; Saito, Masuyoshi; Sugiyama, Masanaka; Fukuda, Yuri; Ohta, Tomokazu; Sato, Katsuaki; Ainai, Akira; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Kohara, Hiroshi; Nagasawa, Takashi; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu

    2012-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), originating from hematopoietic progenitor cells in the BM, are a unique dendritic cell subset that can produce large amounts of type I IFNs by signaling through the nucleic acid-sensing TLR7 and TLR9 (TLR7/9). The molecular mechanisms for pDC function and development remain largely unknown. In the present study, we focused on an Ets family transcription factor, Spi-B, that is highly expressed in pDCs. Spi-B could transactivate the type I IFN promoters in synergy with IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7), which is an essential transcription factor for TLR7/9-induced type I IFN production in pDCs. Spi-B-deficient pDCs and mice showed defects in TLR7/9-induced type I IFN production. Furthermore, in Spi-B-deficient mice, BM pDCs were decreased and showed attenuated expression of a set of pDC-specific genes whereas peripheral pDCs were increased; this uneven distribution was likely because of defective retainment of mature nondividing pDCs in the BM. The expression pattern of cell-surface molecules in Spi-B-deficient mice indicated the involvement of Spi-B in pDC development. The developmental defects of pDCs in Spi-B-deficient mice were more prominent in the BM than in the peripheral lymphoid organs and were intrinsic to pDCs. We conclude that Spi-B plays critical roles in pDC function and development.

  3. Direct TLR2 signaling is critical for NK cell activation and function in response to vaccinia viral infection.

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    Jennifer Martinez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play an essential role in innate immune control of poxviral infections in vivo. However, the mechanism(s underlying NK cell activation and function in response to poxviruses remains poorly understood. In a mouse model of infection with vaccinia virus (VV, the most studied member of the poxvirus family, we identified that the Toll-like receptor (TLR 2-myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 pathway was critical for the activation of NK cells and the control of VV infection in vivo. We further showed that TLR2 signaling on NK cells, but not on accessory cells such as dendritic cells (DCs, was necessary for NK cell activation and that this intrinsic TLR2-MyD88 signaling pathway was required for NK cell activation and played a critical role in the control of VV infection in vivo. In addition, we showed that the activating receptor NKG2D was also important for efficient NK activation and function, as well as recognition of VV-infected targets. We further demonstrated that VV could directly activate NK cells via TLR2 in the presence of cytokines in vitro and TLR2-MyD88-dependent activation of NK cells by VV was mediated through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway. Taken together, these results represent the first evidence that intrinsic TLR signaling is critical for NK cell activation and function in the control of a viral infection in vivo, indicate that multiple pathways are required for efficient NK cell activation and function in response to VV infection, and may provide important insights into the design of effective strategies to combat poxviral infections.

  4. Uterine NK cells are critical in shaping DC immunogenic functions compatible with pregnancy progression.

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    Irene Tirado-González

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC and natural killer (NK cell interactions are important for the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity, but their relevance during early pregnancy remains elusive. Using two different strategies to manipulate the frequency of NK cells and DC during gestation, we investigated their relative impact on the decidualization process and on angiogenic responses that characterize murine implantation. Manipulation of the frequency of NK cells, DC or both lead to a defective decidual response characterized by decreased proliferation and differentiation of stromal cells. Whereas no detrimental effects were evident upon expansion of DC, NK cell ablation in such expanded DC mice severely compromised decidual development and led to early pregnancy loss. Pregnancy failure in these mice was associated with an unbalanced production of anti-angiogenic signals and most notably, with increased expression of genes related to inflammation and immunogenic activation of DC. Thus, NK cells appear to play an important role counteracting potential anomalies raised by DC expansion and overactivity in the decidua, becoming critical for normal pregnancy progression.

  5. Uterine NK Cells Are Critical in Shaping DC Immunogenic Functions Compatible with Pregnancy Progression

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    Freitag, Nancy; Otto, Teresa; Thijssen, Victor L. J. L.; Moschansky, Petra; von Kwiatkowski, Petra; Klapp, Burghard F.; Winterhager, Elke; Bauersachs, Stefan; Blois, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) and natural killer (NK) cell interactions are important for the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity, but their relevance during early pregnancy remains elusive. Using two different strategies to manipulate the frequency of NK cells and DC during gestation, we investigated their relative impact on the decidualization process and on angiogenic responses that characterize murine implantation. Manipulation of the frequency of NK cells, DC or both lead to a defective decidual response characterized by decreased proliferation and differentiation of stromal cells. Whereas no detrimental effects were evident upon expansion of DC, NK cell ablation in such expanded DC mice severely compromised decidual development and led to early pregnancy loss. Pregnancy failure in these mice was associated with an unbalanced production of anti-angiogenic signals and most notably, with increased expression of genes related to inflammation and immunogenic activation of DC. Thus, NK cells appear to play an important role counteracting potential anomalies raised by DC expansion and overactivity in the decidua, becoming critical for normal pregnancy progression. PMID:23056436

  6. Critical Function of PRDM2 in the Neoplastic Growth of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

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    Erika Di Zazzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs derive from primordial germ cells. Their maturation is blocked at different stages, reflecting histological tumor subtypes. A common genetic alteration in TGCT is a deletion of the chromosome 1 short arm, where the PRDM2 gene, belonging to the Positive Regulatory domain gene (PRDM family, is located. Expression of PRDM2 gene is shifted in different human tumors, where the expression of the two principal protein forms coded by PRDM2 gene, RIZ1 and RIZ2, is frequently unbalanced. Therefore, PRDM2 is actually considered a candidate tumor suppressor gene in different types of cancer. Although recent studies have demonstrated that PRDM gene family members have a pivotal role during the early stages of testicular development, no information are actually available on the involvement of these genes in TGCTs. In this article we show by qRT-PCR analysis that PRDM2 expression level is modulated by proliferation and differentiation agents such as estradiol, whose exposure during fetal life is probably an important risk factor for TGCTs development in adulthood. Furthermore in normal and cancer germ cell lines, PRDM2 binds estradiol receptor α (ERα and influences proliferation, survival and apoptosis, as previously reported using MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, suggesting a potential tumor-suppressor role in TGCT formation.

  7. Divisors, Measures and Critical Functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Petracovici; L Petracovici; A Zaharescu

    2009-06-01

    In [4] we have introduced a new distance between Galois orbits over $\\mathbb{Q}$. Using generalized divisors, we have extended the notion of trace of an algebraic number to other transcendental quantities. In this article we continue the work started in [4]. We define the critical function for a class of transcendental numbers, that generalizes the notion of minimal polynomial of an algebraic number. Our results extend the results obtained by Popescu et al [5].

  8. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and N-WASP are critical for peripheral B-cell development and function

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    Dahlberg, Carin; Baptista, Marisa; Moran, Christopher J.; Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Eston, Michelle A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Terhorst, Cox; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a key cytoskeletal regulator of hematopoietic cells. Although WASP-knockout (WKO) mice have aberrant B-cell cytoskeletal responses, B-cell development is relatively normal. We hypothesized that N-WASP, a ubiquitously expressed homolog of WASP, may serve some redundant functions with WASP in B cells. In the present study, we generated mice lacking WASP and N-WASP in B cells (conditional double knockout [cDKO] B cells) and show that cDKO mice had decreased numbers of follicular and marginal zone B cells in the spleen. Receptor-induced activation of cDKO B cells led to normal proliferation but a marked reduction of spreading compared with wild-type and WKO B cells. Whereas WKO B cells showed decreased migration in vitro and homing in vivo compared with wild-type cells, cDKO B cells showed an even more pronounced decrease in the migratory response in vivo. After injection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP)–Ficoll, cDKO B cells had reduced antigen uptake in the splenic marginal zone. Despite high basal serum IgM, cDKO mice mounted a reduced immune response to the T cell–independent antigen TNP-Ficoll and to the T cell–dependent antigen TNP–keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Our results reveal that the combined activity of WASP and N-WASP is required for peripheral B-cell development and function. PMID:22411869

  9. Critical role of intestinal epithelial cell-derived IL-25 in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in intestinal function

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    The current study investigated the mechanism of immune regulation of IL-25 and the contribution of IL-25 to nematode infection-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle and epithelial cell function. Mice were infected with an enteric nematode or injected with IL-25 or IL-13. In vitro smooth m...

  10. DGCR8-mediated production of canonical microRNAs is critical for regulatory T cell function and stability.

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    Lukas T Jeker

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg are integral for immune homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that canonical microRNAs (miRNAs are required for Treg function because mice with DGCR8-deficient Treg cells spontaneously develop a scurfy-like disease. Using genetic lineage marking we show that absence of miRNAs leads to reduced FoxP3 expression in Treg cells in vivo. In vitro culture of purified DGCR8-deficient Treg leads to a loss of FoxP3 expression. We conclude that canonical miRNAs are essential to maintain stable FoxP3 expression and Treg function. Thus, signals interfering with miRNA homeostasis might contribute to autoimmune diseases.

  11. Catechol-Functionalized Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Enhance Angiogenesis and Osteogenesis of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Critical Tissue Defects.

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    Park, Hyun-Ji; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Kisuk; Lee, Changhyun; Yang, Hee Seok; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-06-13

    Over the last few decades, stem cell therapies have been highlighted for their potential to heal damaged tissue and aid in tissue reconstruction. However, materials used to deliver and support implanted cells often display limited efficacy, which has resulted in delaying translation of stem cell therapies into the clinic. In our previous work, we developed a mussel-inspired, catechol-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-CA) hydrogel that enabled effective cell transplantation due to its improved biocompatibility and strong tissue adhesiveness. The present study was performed to further expand the utility of HA-CA hydrogels for use in stem cell therapies to treat more clinically relevant tissue defect models. Specifically, we utilized HA-CA hydrogels to potentiate stem cell-mediated angiogenesis and osteogenesis in two tissue defect models: critical limb ischemia and critical-sized calvarial bone defect. HA-CA hydrogels were found to be less cytotoxic to human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in vitro compared to conventional photopolymerized HA hydrogels. HA-CA hydrogels also retained the angiogenic functionality of hADSCs and supported osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs. Because of their superior tissue adhesiveness, HA-CA hydrogels were able to mediate efficient engraftment of hADSCs into the defect regions. When compared to photopolymerized HA hydrogels, HA-CA hydrogels significantly enhanced hADSC-mediated therapeutic angiogenesis (promoted capillary/arteriole formation, improved vascular perfusion, attenuated ischemic muscle degeneration/fibrosis, and reduced limb amputation) and bone reconstruction (mineralized bone formation, enhanced osteogenic marker expression, and collagen deposition). This study proves the feasibility of using bioinspired HA-CA hydrogels as functional biomaterials for improved tissue regeneration in critical tissue defects.

  12. Dictionary criticism and lexicographical function theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2017-01-01

    This contribution discusses dictionary criticism in the light of the function theory. It starts analyzing the objective of dictionary criticism and lists eight of the most important purposes with which criticism has been made by supporters of the function theory. It then discusses the two main...... types of dictionary criticism, namely criticism of other authors’ dictionaries and self-criticism of one’s own dictionaries. Based on this discussion, it proceeds to a definition of the concept of dictionary criticism which is above all considered a theory-based activity, the outcome of which may...... by the supporters of the function theory, and the way it could be presented in order to create debate. Finally, the contribution indicates the important role dictionary criticism has had in the development of the function theory and endorses an open and critical discussion culture within lexicography....

  13. Critical role of CAV1/caveolin-1 in cell stress responses in human breast cancer cells via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy.

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    Shi, Yin; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Na-Di; Koo, Gi-Bang; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Parton, Robert G; Hill, Michelle M; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Kim, You-Sun; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CAV1 (caveolin 1, caveolae protein, 22kDa) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae, a specialized plasma membrane structure. Relatively, the caveolae-independent function of CAV1 is less studied. Autophagy is a process known to involve various membrane structures, including autophagosomes, lysosomes, and autolysosomes for degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Currently, the function of CAV1 in autophagy remains largely elusive. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that CAV1 deficiency promotes both basal and inducible autophagy. Interestingly, the promoting effect was found mainly in the late stage of autophagy via enhancing lysosomal function and autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Notably, the regulatory function of CAV1 in lysosome and autophagy was found to be caveolae-independent, and acts through lipid rafts. Furthermore, the elevated autophagy level induced by CAV1 deficiency serves as a cell survival mechanism under starvation. Importantly, downregulation of CAV1 and enhanced autophagy level were observed in human breast cancer cells and tissues. Taken together, our data reveal a novel function of CAV1 and lipid rafts in breast cancer development via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy.

  14. BCL11A is a triple-negative breast cancer gene with critical functions in stem and progenitor cells.

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    Khaled, Walid T; Choon Lee, Song; Stingl, John; Chen, Xiongfeng; Raza Ali, H; Rueda, Oscar M; Hadi, Fazal; Wang, Juexuan; Yu, Yong; Chin, Suet-Feung; Stratton, Mike; Futreal, Andy; Jenkins, Nancy A; Aparicio, Sam; Copeland, Neal G; Watson, Christine J; Caldas, Carlos; Liu, Pentao

    2015-01-09

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has poor prognostic outcome compared with other types of breast cancer. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying TNBC pathology are not fully understood. Here, we report that the transcription factor BCL11A is overexpressed in TNBC including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) and that its genomic locus is amplified in up to 38% of BLBC tumours. Exogenous BCL11A overexpression promotes tumour formation, whereas its knockdown in TNBC cell lines suppresses their tumourigenic potential in xenograft models. In the DMBA-induced tumour model, Bcl11a deletion substantially decreases tumour formation, even in p53-null cells and inactivation of Bcl11a in established tumours causes their regression. At the cellular level, Bcl11a deletion causes a reduction in the number of mammary epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Thus, BCL11A has an important role in TNBC and normal mammary epithelial cells. This study highlights the importance of further investigation of BCL11A in TNBC-targeted therapies.

  15. Critical Assessment of Function Annotation Meeting, 2011

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    Friedberg, Iddo

    2015-01-21

    The Critical Assessment of Function Annotation meeting was held July 14-15, 2011 at the Austria Conference Center in Vienna, Austria. There were 73 registered delegates at the meeting. We thank the DOE for this award. It helped us organize and support a scientific meeting AFP 2011 as a special interest group (SIG) meeting associated with the ISMB 2011 conference. The conference was held in Vienna, Austria, in July 2011. The AFP SIG was held on July 15-16, 2011 (immediately preceding the conference). The meeting consisted of two components, the first being a series of talks (invited and contributed) and discussion sections dedicated to protein function research, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of computational methods utilized in functional annotation. The second component provided a large-scale assessment of computational methods through participation in the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA).

  16. The stem cell-expressed receptor Lgr5 possesses canonical and functionally active molecular determinants critical to β-arrestin-2 recruitment.

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    Joshua C Snyder

    Full Text Available Lgr5 is a membrane protein related to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs whose expression identifies stem cells in multiple tissues and is strongly correlated with cancer. Despite the recent identification of endogenous ligands for Lgr5, its mode of signaling remains enigmatic. The ability to couple to G proteins and βarrestins are classical molecular behaviors of GPCRs that have yet to be observed for Lgr5. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if Lgr5 can engage a classical GPCR behavior and elucidate the molecular determinants of this process. Structural analysis of Lgr5 revealed several motifs consistent with its ability to recruit βarr2. Among them, a "SSS" serine cluster located at amino acid position 873-875 within the C-terminal tail (C-tail, is in a region consistent with other GPCRs that bind βarr2 with high-affinity. To test its functionality, a ligand-independent βarr2 translocation assay was implemented. We show that Lgr5 recruits βarr2 and that the "SSS" amino acids (873-875 are absolutely critical to this process. We also demonstrate that for full efficacy, this cluster requires other Lgr5 C-tail serines that were previously shown to be important for constitutive and βarr2 independent internalization of Lgr5. These data are proof of principle that a classical GPCR behavior can be manifested by Lgr5. The existence of alternative ligands or missing effectors of Lgr5 that scaffold this classical GPCR behavior and the downstream signaling pathways engaged should be considered. Characterizing Lgr5 signaling will be invaluable for assessing its role in tissue maintenance, repair, and disease.

  17. The Stem Cell-Expressed Receptor Lgr5 Possesses Canonical and Functionally Active Molecular Determinants Critical to β-arrestin-2 Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joshua C.; Rochelle, Lauren K.; Barak, Larry S.; Caron, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Lgr5 is a membrane protein related to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR)s whose expression identifies stem cells in multiple tissues and is strongly correlated with cancer. Despite the recent identification of endogenous ligands for Lgr5, its mode of signaling remains enigmatic. The ability to couple to G proteins and βarrestins are classical molecular behaviors of GPCRs that have yet to be observed for Lgr5. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if Lgr5 can engage a classical GPCR behavior and elucidate the molecular determinants of this process. Structural analysis of Lgr5 revealed several motifs consistent with its ability to recruit βarr2. Among them, a “SSS” serine cluster located at amino acid position 873-875 within the C-terminal tail (C-tail), is in a region consistent with other GPCRs that bind βarr2 with high-affinity. To test its functionality, a ligand-independent βarr2 translocation assay was implemented. We show that Lgr5 recruits βarr2 and that the “SSS” amino acids (873-875) are absolutely critical to this process. We also demonstrate that for full efficacy, this cluster requires other Lgr5 C-tail serines that were previously shown to be important for constitutive and βarr2 independent internalization of Lgr5. These data are proof of principle that a classical GPCR behavior can be manifested by Lgr5. The existence of alternative ligands or missing effectors of Lgr5 that scaffold this classical GPCR behavior and the downstream signaling pathways engaged should be considered. Characterizing Lgr5 signaling will be invaluable for assessing its role in tissue maintenance, repair, and disease. PMID:24386388

  18. Critical Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Tumor-Induced Liver Immune Suppression through Inhibition of NKT Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongru; Li, Zheng; Wang, Li; Tian, Gaofei; Tian, Jun; Yang, Zishan; Cao, Guangchao; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Liqing; Wu, Zhenzhou; Yin, Zhinan

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis followed by the tumor development is the primary cause of death for cancer patients. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the growth of tumor resulted in the immune suppression, especially at the blood-enriched organ such as liver, were largely unknown. In this report, we studied the liver immune response of tumor-bearing (TB) mice using concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model. We demonstrated that TB mice displayed an immune suppression phenotype, with attenuated alanine aminotransferase levels and liver damage upon Con A treatment. We also elucidated that large amounts of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) being influx into the liver in TB mice and these MDSCs were essential for liver immune suppression through both depletion and reconstitution approaches. We further determined that these MDSCs selectively suppressed the IFN-γ production deriving from NKT cells through membrane-bound transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Finally, we defined a tumor-derived TGF-β-triggered CXCL1/2/5- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of MDSC into the liver. In summary, our results defined a novel mechanism of liver immune suppression triggered by growing living tumor and provided possible therapeutic targets against these MDSCs.

  19. AtCDC5 regulates the G2 to M transition of the cell cycle and is critical for the function of Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang Lin; Kangquan Yin; Danling Zhu; Zhangliang Chen; Hongya Gu; LiJia Qu

    2007-01-01

    As a cell cycle regulator, the Myb-related CDC5 protein was reported to be essential for the G2 phase of the cell cycle in yeast and animals, but little is known about its function in plants. Here we report the functional characterization of the CDC5 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis CDC5 {AtCDCS) is mainly expressed in tissues with high cell division activity, and is expressed throughout the entire process of embryo formation. The AtCDCS loss-of-function mutant is embryonic lethal. In order to investigate the function of AtCDCS in vivo, we generated AtCDC5-RNAi plants in which the expression of AtCDCS was reduced by RNA interference. We found that the G2 to M (G2/M) phase transition was affected in the AtCDC5-RNAi plants, and that endoreduplication was increased. Additionally, the maintenance of shoot apical meristem (SAM) function was disturbed in the AtCDC5-KNAi plants, in which both the WUSCHEL (WUS)-CLAVATA (CLV) and the SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) pathways were impaired. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the expression of STM was greatly reduced in the shoot apical cells of the AtCDC5-KNAi plants. Moreover, cyclinBl or Histone4 was found to be expressed in some of these cells when the transcript of STM was undetectable. These results suggest that AtCDC5 is essential for the G2/M phase transition and may regulate the function of SAM by controlling the expression of STM and WUS.

  20. Media Literacy Function in Critical Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander; Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    The Internet is widely recognized as playing an important role in facilitating education on a range of issues, including media literacy. Analyzing the media critical activity of contemporary Russian bloggers, the authors of the article reveal the following reasons for popularity or, on the contrary, unpopularity of blogger's media criticism:…

  1. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  2. Safety Evaluation of Chinese Medicine Injections with a Cell Imaging-Based Multiparametric Assay Revealed a Critical Involvement of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of herbal medicine products has been a widespread concern due to their complex chemical nature and lack of proper evaluation methods. We have adapted a sensitive and reproducible multiparametric cell-based high-content analysis assay to evaluate the hepatic-safety of four Chinese medicine injections and validated it with classical animal-based toxicity assays. Our results suggested that the reported hepatotoxicity by one of the drugs, Fufangkushen injection, could be attributed at least in part to the interference of mitochondrial function in human HepG2 cells by some of its constituents. This method should be useful for both preclinical screen in a drug discovery program and postclinical evaluation of herbal medicine preparations.

  3. Media Literacy Function in Critical Blogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is widely recognized as playing an important role in facilitating education on a range of issues, including media literacy. Analyzing the media critical activity of contemporary Russian bloggers, the authors of the article reveal the following reasons for popularity or, on the contrary, unpopularity of blogger's media criticism: targeted orientation, emotional charge, entertainment nature, duration, interactiveness, multimedia mode, simplicity/complexity of the language of a media text, the level of conformity.

  4. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  5. Dynamic critical phenomena from spectral functions on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Berges, J; Sexty, D

    2009-01-01

    We investigate spectral functions in the vicinity of the critical temperature of a second-order phase transition. Since critical phenomena in quantum field theories are governed by classical dynamics, universal properties can be computed using real-time lattice simulations. For the example of a relativistic single-component scalar field theory in 2+1 dimensions, we compute the spectral function described by universal scaling functions and extract the dynamic critical exponent z. Together with exactly known static properties of this theory, we obtain a verification from first principles that the relativistic theory is well described by the dynamic universality class of relaxational models with conserved density (Model C).

  6. ATP hydrolysis is critically required for function of CaV1.3 channels in cochlear inner hair cells via fueling Ca2+ clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Simon; Krinner, Stefanie; Wong, Aaron B; Moser, Tobias; Pangršič, Tina

    2014-05-14

    Sound encoding is mediated by Ca(2+) influx-evoked release of glutamate at the ribbon synapse of inner hair cells. Here we studied the role of ATP in this process focusing on Ca(2+) current through CaV1.3 channels and Ca(2+) homeostasis in mouse inner hair cells. Patch-clamp recordings and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrate that hydrolyzable ATP is essential to maintain synaptic Ca(2+) influx in inner hair cells via fueling Ca(2+)-ATPases to avoid an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and subsequent Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation of CaV1.3 channels.

  7. Anatomy of quantum critical wave functions in dissipative impurity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden-Codd, Zach; Bera, Soumya; Bruognolo, Benedikt; Linden, Nils-Oliver; Chin, Alex W.; von Delft, Jan; Nazir, Ahsan; Florens, Serge

    2017-02-01

    Quantum phase transitions reflect singular changes taking place in a many-body ground state; however, computing and analyzing large-scale critical wave functions constitutes a formidable challenge. Physical insights into the sub-Ohmic spin-boson model are provided by the coherent-state expansion (CSE), which represents the wave function by a linear combination of classically displaced configurations. We find that the distribution of low-energy displacements displays an emergent symmetry in the absence of spontaneous symmetry breaking while experiencing strong fluctuations of the order parameter near the quantum critical point. Quantum criticality provides two strong fingerprints in critical low-energy modes: an algebraic decay of the average displacement and a constant universal average squeezing amplitude. These observations, confirmed by extensive variational matrix-product-state (VMPS) simulations and field theory arguments, offer precious clues into the microscopics of critical many-body states in quantum impurity models.

  8. Critical role of bicarbonate and bicarbonate transporters in cardiac function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Sheng; Wang; Yamei; Chen; Kanimozhi; Vairamani; Gary; E; Shull

    2014-01-01

    Bicarbonate is one of the major anions in mammalian tissues and extracellular fluids. Along with accompanying H+, HCO3- is generated from CO2 and H2 O, either spontaneously or via the catalytic activity of carbonic anhydrase. It serves as a component of the major buffer system, thereby playing a critical role in pH homeostasis. Bicarbonate can also be utilized by a variety of ion transporters, often working in coupled systems, to transport other ions and organic substrates across cell membranes. The functions of HCO3- and HCO3--transporters in epithelial tissues have been studied extensively, but their functions in heart are less well understood. Here we review studies of the identities and physiological functions of Cl-/HCO3- exchangers and Na+/HCO3-cotransporters of the SLC4 A and SLC26 A families in heart. We also present RNA Seq analysis of their cardiac mRNA expression levels. These studies indicate that slc4a3(AE3) is the major Cl-/HCO3- exchanger and plays a protective role in heart failure, and that Slc4a4(NBCe1) is the major Na+/HCO3- cotransporter and affects action potential duration. In addition, previous studies show that HCO3- has a positive inotropic effect in the perfused heart that is largely independent of effects on intracellular Ca2+. The importance of HCO3- in the regulation of contractility is supported by experiments showing that isolated cardiomyocytes exhibit sharply enhanced contractility, with no change in Ca2+ transients, when switched from Hepes-buffered to HCO3-- buffered solutions. These studies demonstrate that HCO3- and HCO3--handling proteins play important roles in the regulation of cardiac function.

  9. Oscillatory integrals for phase functions having certain degenerate critical points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinmyong KIM; ZHENG Quan

    2008-01-01

    The paper is concerned with oscillatory integrals for phase functions having certain de-generate critical points. Under a finite type condition of phase functions we show the estimate of oscillatory integrals of the first kind. The decay of the oscillatory integral depends on indices of the finite type, the spatial dimension and the symbol.

  10. Oscillatory integrals for phase functions having certain degenerate critical points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinmyong; KIM

    2008-01-01

    The paper is concerned with oscillatory integrals for phase functions having certain de- generate critical points. Under a finite type condition of phase functions we show the estimate of oscillatory integrals of the first kind. The decay of the oscillatory integral depends on indices of the finite type, the spatial dimension and the symbol.

  11. Antigen pulsed CpG-ODN activated dendritic cells induce host-protective immune response by regulating the T regulatory cell functioning in Leishmania donovani-infected mice: critical role of CXCL10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat eMajumder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, caused by Leishmania donovani, is a systemic infection of reticulo-endothelial system. There is currently no protective vaccine against VL and chemotherapy is increasingly limited due to appearance of drug resistance to first line drugs such as antimonials and amphotericin B. In the present study, by using a murine model of leishmaniasis we evaluated the function played by soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA pulsed-CpG-ODN stimulated dendritic cells (SLA-CpG-DCs in restricting the intracellular parasitic growth. We establish that a single dose of SLA-CpG-DCs vaccination is sufficient in rendering complete protection against Leishmania donovani infection. In probing the possible mechanism, we observed that SLA-CpG-DCs vaccination results in the significant decrease in Foxp3+GITR+CTLA4+CD4+CD25+ Treg cell population in Leishmania-infected mice. Vaccination with these antigen stimulated dendritic cells results in the decrease in the secretion of TGF-β by these Treg cells by possible regulation of the SMAD signalling. Moreover, we demonstrated that a CXC chemokine, IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10, has a direct role in the regulation of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in SLA-CpG-DCs vaccinated parasitized mice as Treg cells isolated from IP-10 depleted vaccinated mice showed significantly increased TGF-β production and suppressive activity.

  12. Exact factorization of correlation functions in 2-D critical percolation

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, Jacob J H; Ziff, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    By use of conformal field theory, we discover several exact factorizations of higher-order density correlation functions in critical two-dimensional percolation. Our formulas are valid in the upper half-plane, or any conformally equivalent region. We find excellent agreement of our results with high-precision computer simulations. There are indications that our formulas hold more generally.

  13. Critical influence of the thymus on peripheral T cell homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Pedro Henrique Oliveira; Canto, Fábio B.; Nogueira, Jeane S.; Nunes, Caroline Fraga Cabral Gomes; Bonomo, Adriana César

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A tight balance between regulatory CD4+Foxp3+ (Treg) and conventional CD4+Foxp3− (Tconv) T cell subsets in the peripheral compartment, maintained stable throughout most of lifetime, is essential for preserving self‐tolerance along with efficient immune responses. An excess of Treg cells, described for aged individuals, may critically contribute to their reported immunodeficiency. In this work, we investigated if quantitative changes in thymus emigration may alter the Treg/Tconv homeostasis regardless of the aging status of the peripheral compartment. Methods We used two different protocols to modify the rate of thymus emigration: thymectomy of adult young (4–6 weeks old) mice and grafting of young thymus onto aged (18 months old) hosts. Additionally, lymphoid cells from young and aged B6 mice were intravenously transferred to B6.RAG2−/− mice. Alterations in Treg and Tconv peripheral frequencies following these protocols were investigated after 30 days by flow cytometry. Results Thymectomized young mice presented a progressive increase in the Treg cell frequency, while the grafting of a functional thymus in aged mice restored the young‐like physiological Treg/Tconv proportion. Strikingly, T cells derived from young or aged splenocytes colonized the lymphopenic periphery of RAG−/− hosts to the same extent, giving rise to similarly elevated Treg cell levels irrespective of the age of the donor population. In the absence of thymus output, the Treg subset seems to survive longer, as confirmed by their lower proportion of Annexin‐V+ cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that the thymus‐emigrating population, harboring an adequate proportion of Treg/Tconv lymphocytes, may be essential to keep the Treg cell balance, independently of age‐related shifts intrinsic to the peripheral environment or to the T cell biology. PMID:27980781

  14. Growth factor choice is critical for successful functionalization of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine ePinkernelle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs show new characteristics compared to the corresponding bulk material. These nanoscale properties make them interesting for various applications in biomedicine and life sciences. One field of application is the use of magnetic NPs to support regeneration in the nervous system. Drug delivery requires a functionalization of NPs with bio-functional molecules. In our study, we functionalized self-made PEI-coated iron oxide NPs with nerve growth factor (NGF and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. Next, we tested the bio-functionality of NGF in a rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 and the bio-functionality of GDNF in an organotypic spinal cord culture. Covalent binding of NGF to PEI-NPs impaired bio-functionality of NGF, but non-covalent approach differentiated PC12 cells reliably. Non-covalent binding of GDNF showed a satisfying bio-functionality of GDNF:PEI-NPs, but turned out to be instable in conjugation to the PEI-NPs. Taken together, our study showed the importance of assessing bio-functionality and binding stability of functionalized growth factors using proper biological models. It also shows that successful functionalization of magnetic NPs with growth factors is dependent on the used binding chemistry and that it is hardly predictable. For use as therapeutics, functionalization strategies have to be reproducible and future studies are needed.

  15. All the zeros of the Dirichlet eta function in the critical strip are on the critical line

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, J G

    2012-01-01

    We analyse the behaviour of the Dirichet eta function in the critical strip, and show that all the zeros are on the critical line, in accordance with (an alternative version of) the Riemann hypothesis.

  16. Controlling Cell Function with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrksich, Milan

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will describe the use of patterned substrates to control cell shape with examples that illustrate the ways in which cell shape can regulate cell function. Most cells are adherent and must attach to and spread on a surface in order to survive, proliferate and function. In tissue, this surface is the extracellular matrix (ECM), an insoluble scaffold formed by the assembly of several large proteins---including fibronectin, the laminins and collagens and others---but in the laboratory, the surface is prepared by adsorbing protein to glass slides. To pattern cells, gold-coated slides are patterned with microcontact printing to create geometric features that promote cell attachment and that are surrounded by inert regions. Cells attach to these substrates and spread to adopt the shape defined by the underlying pattern and remain stable in culture for several days. Examples will be described that used a series of shapes to reveal the relationship between the shape of the cell and the structure of its cytoskeleton. These geometric cues were used to control cell polarity and the tension, or contractility, present in the cytoskeleton. These rules were further used to control the shapes of mesenchymal stem cells and in turn to control the differentiation of these cells into specialized cell types. For example, stem cells that were patterned into a ``star'' shape preferentially differentiated into bone cells whereas those that were patterned into a ``flower'' shape preferred a fat cell fate. These influences of shape on differentiation depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. These examples, and others, reveal that shape is an important cue that informs cell function and that can be combined with the more common soluble cues to direct and study cell function.

  17. Adaptation to optimal cell growth through self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-18

    A simple cell model consisting of a catalytic reaction network is studied to show that cellular states are self-organized in a critical state for achieving optimal growth; we consider the catalytic network dynamics over a wide range of environmental conditions, through the spontaneous regulation of nutrient transport into the cell. Furthermore, we find that the adaptability of cellular growth to reach a critical state depends only on the extent of environmental changes, while all chemical species in the cell exhibit correlated partial adaptation. These results are in remarkable agreement with the recent experimental observations of the present cells.

  18. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Raphaël; Shaheen, Umbreen; Cesbron, Yann; Sée, Violaine

    2010-01-01

    Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, 'nanoparticle and cell' hit). Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable). To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping.

  19. Form factor approach to dynamical correlation functions in critical models

    CERN Document Server

    Kitanine, N; Maillet, J M; Slavnov, N A; Terras, V

    2012-01-01

    We develop a form factor approach to the study of dynamical correlation functions of quantum integrable models in the critical regime. As an example, we consider the quantum non-linear Schr\\"odinger model. We derive long-distance/long-time asymptotic behavior of various two-point functions of this model. We also compute edge exponents and amplitudes characterizing the power-law behavior of dynamical response functions on the particle/hole excitation thresholds. These last results confirm predictions based on the non-linear Luttinger liquid method. Our results rely on a first principles derivation, based on the microscopic analysis of the model, without invoking, at any stage, some correspondence with a continuous field theory. Furthermore, our approach only makes use of certain general properties of the model, so that it should be applicable, with possibly minor modifications, to a wide class of (not necessarily integrable) gapless one dimensional Hamiltonians.

  20. Mast cell function: a new vision of an old cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2014-10-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role.

  1. Modular invariant partition function of critical dense polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin-Duchesne, Alexi, E-mail: a.morinduchesne@uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Pearce, Paul A., E-mail: p.pearce@ms.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rasmussen, Jørgen, E-mail: j.rasmussen@uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2013-09-01

    A lattice model of critical dense polymers is solved exactly for arbitrary system size on the torus. More generally, an infinite family of lattice loop models is studied on the torus and related to the corresponding Fortuin–Kasteleyn random cluster models. Starting with a cylinder, the commuting periodic single-row transfer matrices are built from the periodic Temperley–Lieb algebra extended by the shift operators Ω{sup ±1}. In this enlarged algebra, the non-contractible loop fugacity is α and the contractible loop fugacity is β. The torus is formed by gluing the top and bottom of the cylinder. This gives rise to a variety of non-contractible loops winding around the torus. Because of their nonlocal nature, the standard matrix trace does not produce the proper geometric torus. Instead, we introduce a modified matrix trace for this purpose. This is achieved by using a representation of the enlarged periodic Temperley–Lieb algebra with a parameter v that keeps track of the winding of defects on the cylinder. The transfer matrix representatives and their eigenvalues thus depend on v. The modified trace is constructed as a linear functional on planar connectivity diagrams in terms of matrix traces Tr{sub d} (with a fixed number of defects d) and Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind. For critical dense polymers, where β=0, the transfer matrix eigenvalues are obtained by solving a functional equation in the form of an inversion identity. The solution depends on d and is subject to selection rules which we prove. Simplifications occur if all non-contractible loop fugacities are set to α=2 in which case the traces are evaluated at v=1. In the continuum scaling limit, the corresponding conformal torus partition function obtained from finite-size corrections agrees with the known modular invariant partition function of symplectic fermions.

  2. Critical importance of RAB proteins for synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignogna, Maria Lidia; D'Adamo, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells that exhibit one of the more complex morphology and function. Neuronal intracellular trafficking plays a key role in dictating the directionality and specificity of vesicle formation, transport and fusion, allowing the transmission of information in sophisticate cellular network. Thus, the integrity of protein trafficking and spatial organization is especially important in neuronal cells. RAB proteins, small monomeric GTPases belonging to the RAS superfamily, spatially and temporally orchestrate specific vesicular trafficking steps. In this review we summarise the known roles of RAB GTPases involved in the maintenance of neuronal vesicular trafficking in the central nervous system. In particular, we discriminate the axonal pre-synaptic trafficking and dendritic post-synaptic trafficking, to better underlie how a correct orchestration of vesicle movement is necessary to maintain neuronal polarity and then, to permit an accurate architecture and functionality of synaptic activity.

  3. Preliminary Design of Critical Function Monitoring System of PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    A PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) is under development at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A critical function monitoring system of the PGSFR is preliminarily studied. The functions of CFMS are to display critical plant variables related to the safety of the plant during normal and accident conditions and guide the operators corrective actions to keep the plant in a safe condition and mitigate the consequences of accidents. The minimal critical functions of the PGSFR are composed of reactivity control, reactor core cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, primary heat transfer system(PHTS) heat removal, sodium water reaction mitigation, radiation control and containment conditions. The variables and alarm legs of each critical function of the PGSFR are as follows; - Reactivity control: The variables of reactivity control function are power range neutron flux instrumentation, intermediate range neutron flux instrumentation, source range neutron flux instrumentation, and control rod bottom contacts. The alarm leg to display the reactivity controls consists of status of control drop malfunction, high post trip power and thermal reactivity addition. - Reactor core cooling: The variables are PHTS sodium level, hot pool temperature of PHTS, subassembly exit temperature, cold pool temperature of the PHTS, PHTS pump current, and PHTS pump breaker status. The alarm leg consists of high core delta temperature, low sodium level of the PHTS, high subassembly exit temperature, and low PHTS pump load. - Reactor coolant system integrity: The variables are PHTS sodium level, cover gas pressure, and safeguard vessel sodium level. The alarm leg is composed of low sodium level of PHTS, high cover gas pressure and high sodium level of the safety guard vessel. - PHTS heat removal: The variables are PHTS sodium level, hot pool temperature of PHTS, core exit temperature, cold pool temperature of the PHTS, flow rate of passive residual heat removal system

  4. A Critical Role for Cysteine 57 in the Biological Functions of Selenium Binding Protein-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ying

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of selenium-binding protein1 (SBP1 is often lower in tumors than in the corresponding tissue and lower levels have been associated with poor clinical outcomes. SBP1 binds tightly selenium although what role selenium plays in its biological functions remains unknown. Previous studies indicated that cysteine 57 is the most likely candidate amino acid for selenium binding. In order to investigate the role of cysteine 57 in SBP1, this amino acid was altered to a glycine and the mutated protein was expressed in human cancer cells. The SBP1 half-life, as well as the cellular response to selenite cytotoxicity, was altered by this change. The ectopic expression of SBP1GLY also caused mitochondrial damage in HCT116 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine 57 is a critical determinant of SBP1 function and may play a significant role in mitochondrial function.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance and swallowing: critical literature review,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Santilli de Lima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Aspects of the neuroanatomical representation of swallowing have been investigated in humans through brain mapping techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. OBJECTIVE: This critical qualitative review of the literature analyzed international scientific publications in the PubMed database that investigated the activation of the central nervous system in humans during the act of swallowing. METHODS: This investigation was limited to articles that investigated adults older than 18 years, published in English or Portuguese, between January 2002 and December 2013. Publications that did not have access to the full text, that were repeated by overlapping keywords, case studies, literature reviews, letters to the editor, and those not directly related to the topic of the investigation were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 649 articles were identified, of which 21 matched the inclusion criteria. CONCLUSION: The main purpose of the manuscripts that investigate the swallowing process through fMRI were: to characterize swallowing in different pathologies; to compare swallowing in different age groups; to describe brain activation in different stimulation conditions. These studies indicate multiple cortical regions involved in swallowing control. Overall, the studies indicate that fMRI is a non-invasive and quantitative method that allows the investigation of characteristics that are quite often not clinically visible.

  6. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Lévy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, ‘nanoparticle and cell’ hit. Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable. To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. Raphaël Lévy is a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. He graduated in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France. In 2002, after a Master in Soft Condensed Matter Physics, he obtained a PhD in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur. He then moved to

  7. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  8. Stn1 is critical for telomere maintenance and long-term viability of somatic human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Virginia; Razdan, Neetu; Kaplunov, Jessica; Mundra, Jyoti J; Kimura, Masayuki; Aviv, Abraham; Herbig, Utz

    2015-06-01

    Disruption of telomere maintenance pathways leads to accelerated entry into cellular senescence, a stable proliferative arrest that promotes aging-associated disorders in some mammals. The budding yeast CST complex, comprising Cdc13, Stn1, and Ctc1, is critical for telomere replication, length regulation, and end protection. Although mammalian homologues of CST have been identified recently, their role and function for telomere maintenance in normal somatic human cells are still incompletely understood. Here, we characterize the function of human Stn1 in cultured human fibroblasts and demonstrate its critical role in telomere replication, length regulation, and function. In the absence of high telomerase activity, shRNA-mediated knockdown of hStn1 resulted in aberrant and fragile telomeric structures, stochastic telomere attrition, increased telomere erosion rates, telomere dysfunction, and consequently accelerated entry into cellular senescence. Oxidative stress augmented the defects caused by Stn1 knockdown leading to almost immediate cessation of cell proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of hTERT suppressed some of the defects caused by hStn1 knockdown suggesting that telomerase can partially compensate for hStn1 loss. Our findings reveal a critical role for human Stn1 in telomere length maintenance and function, supporting the model that efficient replication of telomeric repeats is critical for long-term viability of normal somatic mammalian cells.

  9. Critical early events in hematopoietic cell seeding and engraftment.

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry Stein; Isaac Yaniv; Nadir Askenasy

    2005-01-01

    Durable hematopoietic stem cell engraftment requires efficient homing to and seeding in the recipient bone marrow. Dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms by retrospective analysis of functional engraftment studies imposes severe limitations on the understanding of the early stages of this process. We have established an experimental approach for in vivo functional imaging of labeled cells at the level of recipient bone marrow in real time. The adhesive interaction of hematopoietic ce...

  10. Expression of HLA Class II Molecules in Humanized NOD.Rag1KO.IL2RgcKO Mice is Critical for Development and Function of Human T and B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    Visualization of human immunoglobulin classes and immuno- globulin light ( kappa and lambda ) chains was carried out using IEF kits (Helena Labs, Beaumont, TX...10.1371/journal.pone.0019826.g004 HLA Class II and Humanized Mice PLoS ONE | www.plosone.org 6 May 2011 | Volume 6 | Issue 5 | e19826 light chains in...did it allow development of functional human T and B cells [11]. The generation of mice bearing a mutation in the IL2R gamma chain (IL2Rcc) was a major

  11. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  12. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eCacalano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, key members of a distinct hempatopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, are critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally-infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of immune surveillance. Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anti-cancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates with poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells which determine the outcome of cancer immunity are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of natural killer cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  13. Critical early events in hematopoietic cell seeding and engraftment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Stein

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Durable hematopoietic stem cell engraftment requires efficient homing to and seeding in the recipient bone marrow. Dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms by retrospective analysis of functional engraftment studies imposes severe limitations on the understanding of the early stages of this process. We have established an experimental approach for in vivo functional imaging of labeled cells at the level of recipient bone marrow in real time. The adhesive interaction of hematopoietic cells with the bone marrow stroma evolves as the most important early event. Adhesion to the marrow, rather than the vascular endothelium, determines the efficiency of both homing and seeding, and is absolutely essential to maintain cell viability in the marrow. Seeding and engraftment may be improved either by bypassing homing or by localized transplant of a large number of cells in a relatively small marrow space. There is functional redundancy in the molecular pathways that mediate the cell-stroma interaction, such that blockage of a single pathway has only minor effect on homing and seeding. We hypothesize that successfully seeding-engrafting cells undergo extensive phenotypic changes as a consequence of interaction with the stroma, without engaging in rapid proliferation. Surprisingly, Fas-ligand appears to promote hematopoietic cell engraftment by immunomodulatory and trophic effects.

  14. Critical early events in hematopoietic cell seeding and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2005-01-01

    Durable hematopoietic stem cell engraftment requires efficient homing to and seeding in the recipient bone marrow. Dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms by retrospective analysis of functional engraftment studies imposes severe limitations on the understanding of the early stages of this process. We have established an experimental approach for in vivo functional imaging of labeled cells at the level of recipient bone marrow in real time. The adhesive interaction of hematopoietic cells with the bone marrow stroma evolves as the most important early event. Adhesion to the marrow, rather than the vascular endothelium, determines the efficiency of both homing and seeding, and is absolutely essential to maintain cell viability in the marrow. Seeding and engraftment may be improved either by bypassing homing or by localized transplant of a large number of cells in a relatively small marrow space. There is functional redundancy in the molecular pathways that mediate the cell-stroma interaction, such that blockage of a single pathway has only minor effect on homing and seeding. We hypothesize that successfully seeding-engrafting cells undergo extensive phenotypic changes as a consequence of interaction with the stroma, without engaging in rapid proliferation. Surprisingly, Fas-ligand appears to promote hematopoietic cell engraftment by immunomodulatory and trophic effects.

  15. Critical cell wall hole size for lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gabriel; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Nelson, Daniel; Weitz, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Gram-positive bacteria transport molecules necessary for their survival through holes in their cell wall. The holes in cell walls need to be large enough to let critical nutrients pass through. However, the cell wall must also function to prevent the bacteria's membrane from protruding through a large hole into the environment and lysing the cell. As such, we hypothesize that there exists a range of cell wall hole sizes that allow for molecule transport but prevent membrane protrusion. Here we develop and analyze a biophysical theory of the response of a Gram-positive cell's membrane to the formation of a hole in the cell wall. We predict a critical hole size in the range 15-24nm beyond which lysis occurs. To test our theory, we measured hole sizes in Streptococcus pyogenes cells undergoing enzymatic lysis via transmission electron microscopy. The measured hole sizes are in strong agreement with our theoretical prediction. Together, the theory and experiments provide a means to quantify the mechanisms of death of Gram-positive cells via enzymatically mediated lysis and provides insight into the range of cell wall hole sizes compatible with bacterial homeostasis.

  16. Non-genetic heterogeneity, criticality and cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Mainak; Ghosh, Sayantari; Bose, Indrani

    2015-02-01

    The different cell types in a living organism acquire their identity through the process of cell differentiation in which multipotent progenitor cells differentiate into distinct cell types. Experimental evidence and analysis of large-scale microarray data establish the key role played by a two-gene motif in cell differentiation in a number of cell systems. The two genes express transcription factors which repress each other's expression and autoactivate their own production. A number of theoretical models have recently been proposed based on the two-gene motif to provide a physical understanding of how cell differentiation occurs. In this paper, we study a simple model of cell differentiation which assumes no cooperativity in the regulation of gene expression by the transcription factors. The latter repress each other's activity directly through DNA binding and indirectly through the formation of heterodimers. We specifically investigate how deterministic processes combined with stochasticity contribute in bringing about cell differentiation. The deterministic dynamics of our model give rise to a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation from an undifferentiated stable steady state to two differentiated stable steady states. The stochastic dynamics of our model are studied using the approaches based on the Langevin equations and the linear noise approximation. The simulation results provide a new physical understanding of recent experimental observations. We further propose experimental measurements of quantities like the variance and the lag-1 autocorrelation function in protein fluctuations as the early signatures of an approaching bifurcation point in the cell differentiation process.

  17. Method and apparatus for monitoring dynamic cardiovascular function using n-dimensional representatives of critical functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinskow, Dwayne (Inventor); Agutter, James (Inventor); Syroid, Noah (Inventor); Strayer, David (Inventor); Albert, Robert (Inventor); Wachter, S. Blake (Inventor); Drews, Frank (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method, system, apparatus and device for the monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation of the state of a dynamic pulmonary system is disclosed. This method and system provides the processing means for receiving sensed and/or simulated data, converting such data into a displayable object format and displaying such objects in a manner such that the interrelationships between the respective variables can be correlated and identified by a user. This invention provides for the rapid cognitive grasp of the overall state of a pulmonary critical function with respect to a dynamic system.

  18. The STAT5-GATA2 pathway is critical in basophil and mast cell differentiation and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yapeng; Qi, Xiaopeng; Liu, Bing; Huang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Transcription factor GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) plays critical roles in hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation, granulocyte-monocyte progenitor differentiation, and basophil and mast cell differentiation. However, precise roles of GATA2 in basophil and mast cell differentiation and maintenance have not been delineated. We have identified GATA2 as an essential transcription factor in differentiation of newly identified common basophil and mast cell progenitors into basophils and mast cells. We observed Gata2 haploinsufficiency for mast cell differentiation, but not for basophil differentiation. We examined the precise role of GATA2 in maintaining the expression of a wide range of genes that are important for performing basophil or mast cell functions. The effects of GATA2 on gene expression were broadly based. We demonstrated that GATA2 was required for maintaining Fcer1a mRNA and FcεRIα protein expression on both basophils and mast cells, as well as for maintaining Kit mRNA and c-Kit protein expression on mast cells. GATA2 was required for histamine synthesis and was also critical for Il4 mRNA expression in basophils and Il13 mRNA expression in mast cells. We demonstrate a STAT5-GATA2 connection, showing that the STAT5 transcription factor directly bound to the promoter and an intronic region of the Gata2 gene. Overexpression of the Gata2 gene was sufficient to direct basophil and mast cell differentiation in the absence of the Stat5 gene. Our study reveals that the STAT5-GATA2 pathway is critical for basophil and mast cell differentiation and maintenance.

  19. Critical composition fluctuations in artificial and cell-derived lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia

    2014-03-01

    Cell plasma membranes contain a mixture of lipid types which can segregate into coexisting liquids, a thermodynamic phenomenon which may contribute to biological functions. Simplified, artificial three-component lipid vesicles can be prepared which display a critical miscibility transition near room temperature. We found that such vesicles exhibit concentration fluctuations whose size, composition, and timescales vary consistently with critical exponents for two-dimensional conserved order parameter systems. However, the critical miscibility transition is also observed in vesicles formed directly from the membranes of living cells, despite their more complex composition and the presence of membrane proteins. I will describe our critical fluctuation measurements and also review a variety of more recent work by other researchers. Proximity to a critical point alters the spatial distribution and aggregation tendencies of proteins, and makes lipid mixtures more susceptible to domain formation by protein-mediated interactions, such as adhesion zones. Recent work suggests that critical temperature depression may also be relevant to the mechanism of anaesthetic action.

  20. Variant B Cell Receptor Isotype Functions Differ in Hairy Cell Leukemia with Mutated BRAF and IGHV Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Forconi, Francesco; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    A functional B-cell receptor (BCR) is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg) isotypes

  1. The structure and function of fungal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and function of fungal cell walls were studied with particular emphasis on dermatophytes. Extraction, isolation, analysis, and observation of the cell wall structure and function were performed. The structure is described microscopically and chemically.

  2. DC-HIL-expressing myelomonocytic cells are critical promoters of melanoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Sung; Tamura, Kyoichi; Cruz, Ponciano D; Ariizumi, Kiyoshi

    2014-11-01

    A major barrier to successful cancer immunotherapy is the tumor's ability to induce T-cell tolerance by exploiting host regulatory mechanisms. Having discovered the DC-HIL receptor, which inhibits T-cell responses by binding to syndecan-4 on effector T cells, we posited the DC-HIL/syndecan-4 pathway to have an important role in cancer promotion. Among DC-HIL(+) myelomonocytic cells, during growth of implanted mouse melanoma, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells were the most expanded population and the most potent at suppressing T-cell activation. Deletion of the DC-HIL gene or infusion of anti-DC-HIL mAb abrogated these cells' suppressor function and expansion, and markedly diminished melanoma growth and metastasis. IL-1β and IFN-γ were elevated in mice bearing melanoma, and concurrent exposure to both cytokines optimally induced DC-HIL expression by tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells. Ligation of DC-HIL transduced phosphorylation of its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif, which in turn induced intracellular expression of IFN-γ and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), known to mediate T-cell suppression by CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells. Thus, DC-HIL is the critical mediator of these cells' suppressor function in melanoma-bearing mice and a potential target for improving melanoma immunotherapy.

  3. NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO) Is Critical for Thyroid Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Carla; Iervolino, Anna; Scudiero, Ivan; Ferravante, Angela; D'Andrea, Luca Egildo; Mazzone, Pellegrino; Zotti, Tiziana; Leonardi, Antonio; Roberto, Luca; Zannini, Mariastella; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Shanmugakonar, Muralitharan; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pasparakis, Manolis; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2016-03-11

    The I-κB kinase (IKK) subunit NEMO/IKKγ (NEMO) is an adapter molecule that is critical for canonical activation of NF-κB, a pleiotropic transcription factor controlling immunity, differentiation, cell growth, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. To explore the functional role of canonical NF-κB signaling in thyroid gland differentiation and function, we have generated a murine strain bearing a genetic deletion of the NEMO locus in thyroid. Here we show that thyrocyte-specific NEMO knock-out mice gradually develop hypothyroidism after birth, which leads to reduced body weight and shortened life span. Histological and molecular analysis indicate that absence of NEMO in thyrocytes results in a dramatic loss of the thyroid gland cellularity, associated with down-regulation of thyroid differentiation markers and ongoing apoptosis. Thus, NEMO-dependent signaling is essential for normal thyroid physiology.

  4. NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO) Is Critical for Thyroid Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Carla; Iervolino, Anna; Scudiero, Ivan; Ferravante, Angela; D'Andrea, Luca Egildo; Mazzone, Pellegrino; Zotti, Tiziana; Leonardi, Antonio; Roberto, Luca; Zannini, Mariastella; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Shanmugakonar, Muralitharan; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pasparakis, Manolis; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2016-01-01

    The I-κB kinase (IKK) subunit NEMO/IKKγ (NEMO) is an adapter molecule that is critical for canonical activation of NF-κB, a pleiotropic transcription factor controlling immunity, differentiation, cell growth, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. To explore the functional role of canonical NF-κB signaling in thyroid gland differentiation and function, we have generated a murine strain bearing a genetic deletion of the NEMO locus in thyroid. Here we show that thyrocyte-specific NEMO knock-out mice gradually develop hypothyroidism after birth, which leads to reduced body weight and shortened life span. Histological and molecular analysis indicate that absence of NEMO in thyrocytes results in a dramatic loss of the thyroid gland cellularity, associated with down-regulation of thyroid differentiation markers and ongoing apoptosis. Thus, NEMO-dependent signaling is essential for normal thyroid physiology. PMID:26786105

  5. Applying Cognitive Work Analysis to Time Critical Targeting Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Target List/Dynamic Target Queue (DTL/ DTQ ) in the same place. Figure 4-27 shows the task steps involved in achieving Goal 7. 4- 30 Figure 4-27...GUI WG to brainstorm the order of columns in the DTL/ DTQ Table, a critical component of the TCTF CUI, with successful results, which were...Cognitive Work Analysis DTD Display Task Description DTL/ DTQ Dynamic Target List/Dynamic Target Queue FDO Fighter Duty Officer FEBA Forward Edge

  6. Cell Therapy in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Compagna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical limb ischemia (CLI represents the most advanced stage of peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD with a severe obstruction of the arteries which markedly reduces blood flow to the extremities and has progressed to the point of severe rest pain and/or even tissue loss. Recent therapeutic strategies have focused on restoring this balance in favor of tissue survival using exogenous molecular and cellular agents to promote regeneration of the vasculature. These are based on stimulation of angiogenesis by extracellular and cellular components. This review article carries out a systematic analysis of the most recent scientific literature on the application of stem cells in patients with CLI. The results obtained from the detailed analysis of the recent literature data have confirmed the beneficial role of cell therapy in reducing the rate of major amputations in patients with CLI and improving their quality of life.

  7. Glucose Autoxidation Induces Functional Damage to Proteins via Modification of Critical Arginine Residues†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Hachey, David L.; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Non-enzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to αVβ3 integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while non-oxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation. PMID:21661747

  8. Glucose autoxidation induces functional damage to proteins via modification of critical arginine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A; McDonald, W Hayes; Hachey, David L; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-07-12

    Nonenzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to α(V)β(3) integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while nonoxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation.

  9. IL-35-producing B cells are critical regulators of immunity during autoimmune and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping; Roch, Toralf; Lampropoulou, Vicky; O'Connor, Richard A; Stervbo, Ulrik; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Dang, Van Duc; Jaimes, Yarúa; Daridon, Capucine; Li, Rui; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Wilantri, Siska; Sakwa, Imme; Miyazaki, Yusei; Leech, Melanie D; McPherson, Rhoanne C; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus; Hoehlig, Kai; Meinl, Edgar; Grützkau, Andreas; Grün, Joachim R; Horn, Katharina; Kühl, Anja A; Dörner, Thomas; Bar-Or, Amit; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Anderton, Stephen M; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-03-20

    B lymphocytes have critical roles as positive and negative regulators of immunity. Their inhibitory function has been associated primarily with interleukin 10 (IL-10) because B-cell-derived IL-10 can protect against autoimmune disease and increase susceptibility to pathogens. Here we identify IL-35-producing B cells as key players in the negative regulation of immunity. Mice in which only B cells did not express IL-35 lost their ability to recover from the T-cell-mediated demyelinating autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast, these mice displayed a markedly improved resistance to infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as shown by their superior containment of the bacterial growth and their prolonged survival after primary infection, and upon secondary challenge, compared to control mice. The increased immunity found in mice lacking IL-35 production by B cells was associated with a higher activation of macrophages and inflammatory T cells, as well as an increased function of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). During Salmonella infection, IL-35- and IL-10-producing B cells corresponded to two largely distinct sets of surface-IgM(+)CD138(hi)TACI(+)CXCR4(+)CD1d(int)Tim1(int) plasma cells expressing the transcription factor Blimp1 (also known as Prdm1). During EAE, CD138(+) plasma cells were also the main source of B-cell-derived IL-35 and IL-10. Collectively, our data show the importance of IL-35-producing B cells in regulation of immunity and highlight IL-35 production by B cells as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune and infectious diseases. This study reveals the central role of activated B cells, particularly plasma cells, and their production of cytokines in the regulation of immune responses in health and disease.

  10. Critical role of GFRα1 in the development and function of the main olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Carolyn; Belluscio, Leonardo; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2012-11-28

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its receptor GFRα1 are prominently expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory bulb (OB), but their importance for olfactory system development is completely unknown. We have investigated the consequences of GFRα1 deficiency for mouse olfactory system development and function. In the OE, GFRα1 was expressed in basal precursors, immature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), but was excluded from mature OSNs. The OE of newborn Gfra1 knock-out mice was thinner and contained fewer OSNs, but more dividing precursors, suggesting deficient neurogenesis. Immature OSN axon bundles were enlarged and associated OECs increased, indicating impaired migration of OECs and OSN axons. In the OB, GFRα1 was expressed in immature OSN axons and OECs of the nerve layer, as well as mitral and tufted cells, but was excluded from GABAergic interneurons. In newborn knock-outs, the nerve layer was dramatically reduced, exhibiting fewer axons and OECs. Bulbs were smaller and presented fewer and disorganized glomeruli and a significant reduction in mitral cells. Numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-, calbindin-, and calretinin-expressing interneurons were also reduced in newborn mice lacking Gfra1. At birth, the OE and OB of Gdnf knock-out mice displayed comparable phenotypes. Similar deficits were also found in adult heterozygous Gfra1(+/-) mutants, which in addition displayed diminished responses in behavioral tests of olfactory function. We conclude that GFRα1 is critical for the development and function of the main olfactory system, contributing to the development and allocation of all major classes of neurons and glial cells.

  11. Selective Function of PKC-θ in T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santhakumar Manicassamy; Sonal Gupta; Zuoming Sun

    2006-01-01

    T cell activation is a critical process in initiating adaptive immune response since only through this process the na(i)ve antigen specific T cells differentiate into armed effector T cells that mediate the actual immune response.During T cell activation, na(i)ve T cells undergo clonal expansion and acquire the capability to kill target cells infected with pathogens or produce cytokines essential for regulating immune response. Inappropriate activation or inactivation of T cells leads to autoimmunity or severe immunodeficiencies. PKC-θ is selectively expressed in T cells and required for mediating T cell activation process. Mice deficient in PKC-θ exhibit defects in T cell activation, survival and activation-inducedcell death. PKC-θ selectively translocates to immunological synapse and mediates the signals required for activation of NF-κB, AP1 and NFAT that are essential for T cell activation.Furthermore, PKC-θ-/- mice displayed multiple defects in the development of T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. PKC-θ is thus a critical molecule that regulates T cell function at multiple stages in T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):263-270.

  12. Primed 3D injectable microniches enabling low-dosage cell therapy for critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqian; Liu, Wei; Liu, Fei; Zeng, Yang; Zuo, Simin; Feng, Siyu; Qi, Chunxiao; Wang, Bingjie; Yan, Xiaojun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Bai, Jing; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-16

    The promise of cell therapy for repair and restoration of damaged tissues or organs relies on administration of large dose of cells whose healing benefits are still limited and sometimes irreproducible due to uncontrollable cell loss and death at lesion sites. Using a large amount of therapeutic cells increases the costs for cell processing and the risks of side effects. Optimal cell delivery strategies are therefore in urgent need to enhance the specificity, efficacy, and reproducibility of cell therapy leading to minimized cell dosage and side effects. Here, we addressed this unmet need by developing injectable 3D microscale cellular niches (microniches) based on biodegradable gelatin microcryogels (GMs). The microniches are constituted by in vitro priming human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded within GMs resulting in tissue-like ensembles with enriched extracellular matrices and enhanced cell-cell interactions. The primed 3D microniches facilitated cell protection from mechanical insults during injection and in vivo cell retention, survival, and ultimate therapeutic functions in treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) in mouse models compared with free cell-based therapy. In particular, 3D microniche-based therapy with 10(5) hMSCs realized better ischemic limb salvage than treatment with 10(6) free-injected hMSCs, the minimum dosage with therapeutic effects for treating CLI in literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of injectable and primed cell delivery strategy realizing superior therapeutic efficacy for treating CLI with the lowest cell dosage in mouse models. This study offers a widely applicable cell delivery platform technology to boost the healing power of cell regenerative therapy.

  13. A new functional site W115 in CdtA is critical for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a specific pathogen of localized aggressive periodontitis, produces a cytolethal distending toxin (CDT that arrests eukaryotic cells irreversibly in G0/G1 or G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Although structural studies show that the aromatic patch region of CdtA plays an important role in its biological activity, the functional sites of CdtA have not been firmly established. In this study, site-specific mutagenesis strategy was employed for cdtA point mutations construction so as to examine the contributions of individual amino acids to receptor binding and the biological activity of holotoxin. The binding ability was reduced in CdtA(Y181ABC holotoxin and the biological function of CDT was not weaken in CdtA(Y105ABC, CdtA(Y125ABC, CdtA(F109ABC and CdtA(S106NBC holotoxin suggesting that these sites were not critical to CDT. But the binding activity and cell cycle arrest ability of holotoxin complexes were inhibited in CdtA(W115GBC. And this site did not affect the holotoxin assembly by size exclusion chromatography. Therefore, W115 might be a critical site of CdtA binding ability. These findings suggest that the functional sites of CdtA are not only in the aromatic patch region. W115, the new functional site is critical for receptor binding and cell cycle arrest, which provides potential targets for pharmacological disruption of CDT activity.

  14. Biomass density-function relationships in suspended growth biological processes - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2017-03-15

    Good settling performance in suspended growth biomass systems, for example in activated sludge (AS) process, leads to efficient wastewater and sludge treatment. Factors that cause the differences in settleablility of AS include the morphology of bacteria, microbial community structure, and the density of bacteria and flocs. Density of AS at three levels, namely, cell, floc, and process, have been discussed here to explain the variations in AS settleability. Dense materials, inside or outside the cell, significantly increase density of AS bacteria or flocs. Functional bacteria, defined as those performing N and P removal and recovery such as phosphate accumulating organisms, nitrifiers, and anammox contain cellular inclusions that increase their density, and consequently a dense and well-settling biomass results at the process level in those systems. A density based selector of AS can be used to enrich functional bacteria in the process through the wasting and sludge age control operations in AS process. This paper critically reviews the latest literature to elucidate mechanisms of density enhancement from cell to process level, and identifies needs/strategies to improve the AS process through a biomass density selector.

  15. Critical function of Bmx/Etk in ischemia-mediated arteriogenesis and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yun; Luo, Yan; Tang, Shibo; Rajantie, Iiro; Salven, Petri; Heil, Matthias; Zhang, Rong; Luo, Dianhong; Li, Xianghong; Chi, Hongbo; Yu, Jun; Carmeliet, Peter; Schaper, Wolfgang; Sinusas, Albert J; Sessa, William C; Alitalo, Kari; Min, Wang

    2006-09-01

    Bmx/Etk non-receptor tyrosine protein kinase has been implicated in endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro. However, the role of Bmx in vivo is not known. Bmx is highly induced in the vasculature of ischemic hind limbs. We used both mice with a genetic deletion of Bmx (Bmx-KO mice) and transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of Bmx under the endothelial Tie-2 enhancer/promoter (Bmx-SK-Tg mice) to study the role of Bmx in ischemia-mediated arteriogenesis/angiogenesis. In response to ischemia, Bmx-KO mice had markedly reduced, whereas Bmx-SK-Tg mice had enhanced, clinical recovery, limb perfusion, and ischemic reserve capacity when compared with nontransgenic control mice. The functional outcomes in these mice were correlated with ischemia-initiated arteriogenesis, capillary formation, and vessel maturation as well as Bmx-dependent expression/activation of TNF receptor 2- and VEGFR2-mediated (TNFR2/VEGFR2-mediated) angiogenic signaling in both hind limb and bone marrow. More importantly, results of bone marrow transplantation studies showed that Bmx in bone marrow-derived cells plays a critical role in the early phase of ischemic tissue remodeling. Our study provides the first demonstration to our knowledge that Bmx in endothelium and bone marrow plays a critical role in arteriogenesis/angiogenesis in vivo and suggests that Bmx may be a novel target for the treatment of vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial disease.

  16. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Keiko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamura, Tadashi [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Yoko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroki, Masahide [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsunoda, Toshiyuki [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasazuki, Takehiko [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirasawa, Senji, E-mail: sshirasa@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  17. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  18. An Evaluation of Flash Cells Used in Critical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard B.; Flowers, David; Bergevin, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Due to the common use of Flash technology in many commercial and industrial Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) such as FPGAs and mixed-signal microcontrollers, flash technology is being utilized in fuzed munition applications. This presents a long-term reliability issue for both DoD and NASA safety- and mission-critical applications. A thorough understanding of the data retention failure modes and statistics associated with Flash data retention is of vital concern to the fuze safety community. A key retention parameter for a flash cell is the threshold voltage (VTH), which is an indirect indicator of the amount of charge stored on the cells floating gate. Initial test results based on a study of charge loss in flash cells in an FPGA device is presented. Statistical data taken from a small sample set indicates quantifiable charge loss for devices stored at both room temperature and 150 C. Initial evaluation of the distribution of threshold voltage in a large sample set (800 devices) is presented. The magnitude of charge loss from exposure to electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic fields is measured and presented. Simulated data (and measured data as available) resultant from harsh-environment testing (neutron, heavy ion, EMP) is presented.

  19. Fault Tolerant Hardware/Software Architecture for Flight Critical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    hace not ynt been tented or that have been disconnected to allow diagnosis of the neh function Secondly, system diagnosis for instal- lation .nd...can be noted in Figure I and Table . Tesie consist of: (1) replacing group A aircraft wiring by digital serial buses, thus saving up to 450 pounds of

  20. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  1. Modular invariant partition function of critical dense polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Morin-Duchesne, Alexi; Rasmussen, Jorgen

    2013-01-01

    A lattice model of critical dense polymers is solved exactly for arbitrary system size on the torus. More generally, an infinite family of lattice loop models is studied on the torus and related to the corresponding Fortuin-Kasteleyn random cluster models. Starting with a cylinder, the commuting periodic single-row transfer matrices are built from the periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra extended by the shift operators Omega and Omega^{-1}. In this enlarged algebra, the non-contractible loop fugacity is alpha and the contractible loop fugacity is beta. The torus is formed by gluing the top and bottom of the cylinder. This gives rise to a variety of non-contractible loops winding around the torus. Because of their nonlocal nature, the standard matrix trace does not produce the proper geometric torus. Instead, we introduce a modified matrix trace for this purpose. This is achieved by using a representation of the enlarged periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra with a parameter v that keeps track of the winding of defects o...

  2. The partition function zeroes of quantum critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crompton, P.R. [Department of Applied Maths, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.crompton@lancaster.ac.uk

    2009-04-01

    The Lee-Yang theorem for the zeroes of the partition function is not strictly applicable to quantum systems because the zeroes are defined in units of the fugacity e{sup h{delta}}{sup {tau}}, and the Euclidean-time lattice spacing {delta}{tau} can be divergent in the infrared (IR). We recently presented analytic arguments describing how a new space-Euclidean time zeroes expansion can be defined, which reproduces Lee and Yang's scaling but avoids the unresolved branch points associated with the breaking of nonlocal symmetries such as Parity. We now present a first numerical analysis for this new zeroes approach for a quantum spin chain system. We use our scheme to quantify the renormalization group flow of the physical lattice couplings to the IR fixed point of this system. We argue that the generic Finite-Size Scaling (FSS) function of our scheme is identically the entanglement entropy of the lattice partition function and, therefore, that we are able to directly extract the central charge, c, of the quantum spin chain system using conformal predictions for the scaling of the entanglement entropy.

  3. Three functions of cadherins in cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-07-22

    Cadherins are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell-cell adhesion in animals. By regulating contact formation and stability, cadherins play a crucial role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Here, we review the three major functions of cadherins in cell-cell contact formation and stability. Two of those functions lead to a decrease in interfacial tension at the forming cell-cell contact, thereby promoting contact expansion--first, by providing adhesion tension that lowers interfacial tension at the cell-cell contact, and second, by signaling to the actomyosin cytoskeleton in order to reduce cortex tension and thus interfacial tension at the contact. The third function of cadherins in cell-cell contact formation is to stabilize the contact by resisting mechanical forces that pull on the contact.

  4. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  5. Heterogeneity assessment of functional T cell avidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Kalliopi; Baumgaertner, Petra; Gannon, Philippe O.; Speiser, Michel F.; Allard, Mathilde; Hebeisen, Michael; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    The potency of cellular immune responses strongly depends on T cell avidity to antigen. Yet, functional avidity measurements are rarely performed in patients, mainly due to the technical challenges of characterizing heterogeneous T cells. The mean functional T cell avidity can be determined by the IFN-γ Elispot assay, with titrated amounts of peptide. Using this assay, we developed a method revealing the heterogeneity of functional avidity, represented by the steepness/hillslope of the peptide titration curve, documented by proof of principle experiments and mathematical modeling. Our data show that not only natural polyclonal CD8 T cell populations from cancer patients, but also monoclonal T cells differ strongly in their heterogeneity of functional avidity. Interestingly, clones and polyclonal cells displayed comparable ranges of heterogeneity. We conclude that besides the mean functional avidity, it is feasible and useful to determine its heterogeneity (hillslope) for characterizing T cell responses in basic research and patient investigation. PMID:28287160

  6. Human CD8 T cells generated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells are functionally mature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zúñiga-Pflücker Juan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell development occurs within the highly specialized thymus. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells are critical in adaptive immunity by targeting virally infected or tumor cells. In this study, we addressed whether functional CD8 T cells can be generated fully in vitro using human umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells. Results HSC/OP9-DL1 cocultures supported the differentiation of CD8 T cells, which were TCR/CD3hi CD27hi CD1aneg and thus phenotypically resembled mature functional CD8 single positive thymocytes. These in vitro-generated T cells also appeared to be conventional CD8 cells, as they expressed high levels of Eomes and low levels of Plzf, albeit not identical to ex vivo UCB CD8 T cells. Consistent with the phenotypic and molecular characterization, upon TCR-stimulation, in vitro-generated CD8 T cells proliferated, expressed activation markers (MHC-II, CD25, CD38, secreted IFN-γ and expressed Granzyme B, a cytotoxic T-cell effector molecule. Conclusion Taken together, the ability to direct human hematopoietic stem cell or T-progenitor cells towards a mature functional phenotype raises the possibility of establishing cell-based treatments for T-immunodeficiencies by rapidly restoring CD8 effector function, thereby mitigating the risks associated with opportunistic infections.

  7. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  8. Characterization of tetratricopeptide repeat-containing proteins critical for cilia formation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Xu

    Full Text Available Cilia formation and function require a special set of trafficking machinery termed intraflagellar transport (IFT, consisting mainly of protein complexes IFT-A, IFT-B, BBSome, and microtubule-dependent molecular motors. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (TTC proteins are widely involved in protein complex formation. Nine of them are known to serve as components of the IFT or BBSome complexes. How many TTC proteins are cilia-related and how they function, however, remain unclear. Here we show that twenty TTC genes were upregulated by at least 2-fold during the differentiation of cultured mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs into multiciliated cells. Our systematic screen in zebrafish identified four novel TTC genes, ttc4, -9c, -36, and -39c, that are critical for cilia formation and motility. Accordingly, their zebrafish morphants displayed typical ciliopathy-related phenotypes, including curved body, abnormal otolith, hydrocephalus, and defective left-right patterning. The morphants of ttc4 and ttc25, a known cilia-related gene, additionally showed pronephric cyst formation. Immunoprecipitation indicated associations of TTC4, -9c, -25, -36, and -39c with components or entire complexes of IFT-A, IFT-B, or BBSome, implying their participations in IFT or IFT-related activities. Our results provide a global view for the relationship between TTC proteins and cilia.

  9. Correlation Functions in non critical (super) string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Elcio; Dalmazi, D; Harada, K

    1992-01-01

    We consider the correlation functions of the tachyon vertex operator of the super Liouville theory coupled to matter fields in the super Coulomb gas formulation, on world sheets with spherical topology. After integrating over the zero mode and assuming that the $s$ parameter takes an integer value, we subsequently continue it to an arbitrary real number and compute the correlators in a closed form. We also included an arbitrary number of screening charges and, as a result, after renormalizing them, as well as the external legs and the cosmological constant, the form of the final amplitudes do not modify. The result is remarkably parallel to the bosonic case. For completeness, we discussed the calculation of bosonic correlators including arbitrary screening charges.

  10. Selectionist and evolutionary approaches to brain function: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisantha Thomas Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider approaches to brain dynamics and function that have been claimed to be Darwinian. These include Edelman’s theory of neuronal group selection, Changeux’s theory of synaptic selection and selective stabilization of pre-representations, Seung’s Darwinian synapse, Loewenstein’s synaptic melioration, Adam’s selfish synapse and Calvin’s replicating activity patterns. Except for the last two, the proposed mechanisms are selectionist but not truly Darwinian, because no replicators with information transfer to copies and hereditary variation can be identified in them. All of them fit, however, a generalized selectionist framework conforming to the picture of Price’s covariance formulation, which deliberately was not specific even to selection in biology, and therefore does not imply an algorithmic picture of biological evolution. Bayesian models and reinforcement learning are formally in agreement with selection dynamics. A classification of search algorithms is shown to include Darwinian replicators (evolutionary units with multiplication, heredity and variability as the most powerful mechanism in a sparsely occupied search space. Examples of why parallel competitive search with information transfer among the units is efficient are given. Finally, we review our recent attempts to construct and analyze simple models of true Darwinian evolutionary units in the brain in terms of connectivity and activity copying of neuronal groups. Although none of the proposed neuronal replicators include miraculous mechanisms, their identification remains a challenge but also a great promise.

  11. Natural killer cells: Biology, functions and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitive target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation and without requirement of peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell activity and functions are controlled by a considerable number of cell surface receptors, which exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. There are several groups of NK cell surface receptors: 1 killer immunoglobulin like receptors-KIR, 2 C-type lectin receptors,3natural citotoxicity receptors-NCR and 4 Toll-like receptors-TLR. Functions of NK receptors. Defining the biology of NK cell surface receptors has contributed to the concept of the manner how NK cells selectively recognize and lyse tumor and virally infected cells while sparing normal cells. Further, identification of NK receptor ligands and their expression on the normal and transformed cells has led to the development of clinical approaches to manipulating receptor/ligand interactions that showed clinical benefit. NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT and multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion. Besides their role in HSCT, NK cell receptors have an important clinical relevance that reflects from the fact that they play a crucial role in the development of some diseases as well as in possibilities of managing all NK receptors through selective expansion and usage of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy.

  12. The effect of criticism on functional brain connectivity and associations with neuroticism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Nadine Servaas

    Full Text Available Neuroticism is a robust personality trait that constitutes a risk factor for psychopathology, especially anxiety disorders and depression. High neurotic individuals tend to be more self-critical and are overly sensitive to criticism by others. Hence, we used a novel resting-state paradigm to investigate the effect of criticism on functional brain connectivity and associations with neuroticism. Forty-eight participants completed the NEO Personality Inventory Revised (NEO-PI-R to assess neuroticism. Next, we recorded resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI during two sessions. We manipulated the second session before scanning by presenting three standardized critical remarks through headphones, in which the subject was urged to please lie still in the scanner. A seed-based functional connectivity method and subsequent clustering were used to analyse the resting state data. Based on the reviewed literature related to criticism, we selected brain regions associated with self-reflective processing and stress-regulation as regions of interest. The findings showed enhanced functional connectivity between the clustered seed regions and brain areas involved in emotion processing and social cognition during the processing of criticism. Concurrently, functional connectivity was reduced between these clusters and brain structures related to the default mode network and higher-order cognitive control. Furthermore, individuals scoring higher on neuroticism showed altered functional connectivity between the clustered seed regions and brain areas involved in the appraisal, expression and regulation of negative emotions. These results may suggest that the criticized person is attempting to understand the beliefs, perceptions and feelings of the critic in order to facilitate flexible and adaptive social behavior. Furthermore, multiple aspects of emotion processing were found to be affected in individuals scoring higher on neuroticism during

  13. The effect of criticism on functional brain connectivity and associations with neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servaas, Michelle Nadine; Riese, Harriëtte; Renken, Remco Jan; Marsman, Jan-Bernard Cornelis; Lambregs, Johan; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, André

    2013-01-01

    Neuroticism is a robust personality trait that constitutes a risk factor for psychopathology, especially anxiety disorders and depression. High neurotic individuals tend to be more self-critical and are overly sensitive to criticism by others. Hence, we used a novel resting-state paradigm to investigate the effect of criticism on functional brain connectivity and associations with neuroticism. Forty-eight participants completed the NEO Personality Inventory Revised (NEO-PI-R) to assess neuroticism. Next, we recorded resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) during two sessions. We manipulated the second session before scanning by presenting three standardized critical remarks through headphones, in which the subject was urged to please lie still in the scanner. A seed-based functional connectivity method and subsequent clustering were used to analyse the resting state data. Based on the reviewed literature related to criticism, we selected brain regions associated with self-reflective processing and stress-regulation as regions of interest. The findings showed enhanced functional connectivity between the clustered seed regions and brain areas involved in emotion processing and social cognition during the processing of criticism. Concurrently, functional connectivity was reduced between these clusters and brain structures related to the default mode network and higher-order cognitive control. Furthermore, individuals scoring higher on neuroticism showed altered functional connectivity between the clustered seed regions and brain areas involved in the appraisal, expression and regulation of negative emotions. These results may suggest that the criticized person is attempting to understand the beliefs, perceptions and feelings of the critic in order to facilitate flexible and adaptive social behavior. Furthermore, multiple aspects of emotion processing were found to be affected in individuals scoring higher on neuroticism during the processing of

  14. A critical test of organic P-N photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, G.R. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We present an urgent view of the field of organic solid state photovoltaic cells. This is a proper time to select the most promising materials from the Electrophotographic Industry, materials long tried in terms of stability, high quantum yield of charge carriers, but set apart by unusually high quantum yields at low applied fields. Our experience with the candidate dyes has covered new tests for identifiable impurities and removal of these impurities by verifiable methods. A new method of purification, reactive train sublimation, has been developed for DNT, one of the simplest of the outstanding perylene dyes, and the method seems applicable to some of the other promising perylene derivatives. It removes the offending impurity by converting it into the desired pure product. The role of water of hydration in the {open_quotes}wine cellar effect{close_quotes}, the slowly rising performance of newly made phthalocyanine containing cells has been analyzed. Under the concept of feasibility testing before a final refinement for practicality of materials and production methods, the hydration can be controlled for high level testing. At the same time, efforts go forward to eliminate the need. At least one of the best phthalocyanine components, X-H{sub 2}Pc, does not require water for peak performance. Finally, we have attacked BBIP (bis-benzimidazole perylene) one of the best and most enigmatic of the near infrared sensors. It has long been known and used as a mixture of synthetic isomers, and we hypothesize that either of these would be better than the uncontrolled mixture. A partial success in the form of isolating highly enriched crystals for an X-ray structure of the trans-molecule, is first presented here. A simple optical analysis method has been developed to follow enrichment procedures. For all of its difficult history, this material seems closest to a state of readiness for critical feasibility testing.

  15. Spaceflight alters immune cell function and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Berry, Wallace D.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Lesniak, A. T.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were performed onboard Cosmos 2044 to determine spaceflight effects on immunologically important cell function and distribution. Results indicate that bone marrow cells from flown and suspended rats exhibited a decreased response to a granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor compared with the bone marrow cells from control rats. Bone marrow cells showed an increase in the percentage of cells expressing markers for helper T-cells in the myelogenous population and increased percentages of anti-asialo granulocyte/monocyte-1-bearing interleulin-2 receptor bearing pan T- and helper T-cells in the lymphocytic population.

  16. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  17. Regulation of satellite cell function in sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Alway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms contributing to sarcopenia include reduced satellite cell (myogenic stem cell function that is impacted by the environment (niche of these cells. Satellite cell function is affected by oxidative stress, which is elevated in aged muscles, and this along with changes in largely unknown systemic factors, likely contribute to the manner in which satellite cells respond to stressors such as exercise, disuse or rehabilitation in sarcopenic muscles. Nutritional intervention provides one therapeutic strategy to improve the satellite cell niche and systemic factors, with the goal of improving satellite cell function in aging muscles. Although many elderly persons consume various nutraceuticals with the hope of improving health, most of these compounds have not been thoroughly tested, and the impacts that they might have on sarcopenia, and satellite cell function are not clear. This review discusses data pertaining to the satellite cell responses and function in aging skeletal muscle, and the impact that three compounds: resveratrol, green tea catechins and β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate have on regulating satellite cell function and therefore contributing to reducing sarcopenia or improving muscle mass after disuse in aging. The data suggest that these nutraceutical compounds improve satellite cell function during rehabilitative loading in animal models of aging after disuse (i.e., muscle regeneration. While these compounds have not been rigorously tested in humans, the data from animal models of aging provide a strong basis for conducting additional focused work to determine if these or other nutraceuticals can offset the muscle losses, or improve regeneration in sarcopenic muscles of older humans via improving satellite cell function.

  18. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  19. Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor functions shared by stem cell and cancer cell strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susumu; Kohno; Shunsuke; Kitajima; Nobunari; Sasaki; Chiaki; Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinogenic transformation of somatic cells resembles nuclear reprogramming toward the generation of pluripotent stem cells.These events share eternal escape from cellular senescence,continuous self-renewal in limited but certain population of cells,and refractoriness to terminal differentiation while maintaining the potential to differentiate into cells of one or multiple lineages.As represented by several oncogenes those appeared to be first keys to pluripotency,carcinogenesis and nuclear reprogramming seem to share a number of core mechanisms.The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor product retinoblastoma(RB)seems to be critically involved in both events in highly complicated manners.However,disentangling such complicated interactions has enabled us to better understand how stem cell strategies are shared by cancer cells.This review covers recent findings on RB functions related to stem cells and stem cell-like behaviors of cancer cells.

  20. Immunosurveillance function of human mast cell?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (O)ner (O)zdemir

    2005-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) is so widely recognized as a critical effector in allergic disorders that it can be difficult to think of MC in any other context. Indeed, MCs are multifunctional and recently shown that MCs can also act as antigen presenters as well as effector elements of human immune system. First observations of their possible role as anti-tumor cells in peri- or intra-tumoral tissue were mentioned five decades ago and a high content of MCs is considered as a favorable prognosis,consistent with this study. Believers of this hypothesis assumed them to be inhibitors of tumor development through their pro-apoptotic and -necrolytic granules e.g.,granzymes and TNF-α. However, some still postulate them to be enhancers of tumor development through their effects on angiogenesis due to mostly tryptase.There are also some data suggesting increased MC density causes tumor development and indicates bad prognosis. Furthermore, since MC-associated mediators have shown to influence various aspects of tumor biology, the net effect of MCs on the development/progression of tumors has been difficult to evaluate. For instance, chymase induces apoptosis in targets; yet,tryptase, another MC protease, is a well-known mitogen.MCs with these various enzyme expression patterns may mediate different functions and the predominant MC type in tissues may be determined by the environmental needs. The coexistence of tryptase-expressing MCs(MCT) and chymase and tryptase-expressing MCs (MCTC)in physiological conditions reflects a naturally occurring balance that contributes to tissue homeostasis. We have recently discussed the role and relevance of MC serine proteases in different bone marrow diseases.

  1. Ikaros in B cell development and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MacLean; Sellars; Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor,Ikaros,is a central regulator of hematopoiesis.It is required for the development of the earliest B cell progenitors and at later stages for VDJ recombination and B cell receptor expression.Mature B cells rely on Ikaros to set the activation threshold for various stimuli,and to choose the correct antibody isotype during class switch recombination.Thus,Ikaros contributes to nearly every level of B cell differentiation and function.

  2. Counter terrorism functions to enhance critical infrastructure resilience against CBRNe terrorism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonsen, I.M.; Gaasbeek, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches in critical infrastructure protection use long lists of items that fail to give its user a structured answer to the state of protection of its object. The functionality approach uses different terrorist functions to structure the threat (which are to have intent, to scout, to tran

  3. Physiological functions of plant cell coverings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2002-08-01

    The cell coverings of plants have two important functions in plant life. Plant cell coverings are deeply involved in the regulation of the life cycle of plants: each stage of the life cycle, such as germination, vegetative growth, reproductive growth, and senescence, is strongly influenced by the nature of the cell coverings. Also, the apoplast, which consists of the cell coverings, is the field where plant cells first encounter the outer environment, and so becomes the major site of plant responses to the environment. In the regulation of each stage of the life cycle and the response to each environmental signal, some specific constituents of the cell coverings, such as xyloglucans in dicotyledons and 1,3,1,4-beta-glucans in Gramineae, act as the key component. The physiological functions of plant cell coverings are sustained by the metabolic turnover of these components. The components of the cell coverings are supplied from the symplast, but then they are modified or degraded in the apoplast. Thus, the metabolism of the cell coverings is regulated through the cross-talk between the symplast and the apoplast. The understanding of physiological functions of plant cell coverings will be greatly advanced by the use of genomic approaches. At the same time, we need to introduce nanobiological techniques for clarifying the minute changes in the cell coverings that occur in a small part within each cell.

  4. Generation of functional eyes from pluripotent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Viczian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent cells such as embryonic stem (ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are the starting point from which to generate organ specific cell types. For example, converting pluripotent cells to retinal cells could provide an opportunity to treat retinal injuries and degenerations. In this study, we used an in vivo strategy to determine if functional retinas could be generated from a defined population of pluripotent Xenopus laevis cells. Animal pole cells isolated from blastula stage embryos are pluripotent. Untreated, these cells formed only epidermis, when transplanted to either the flank or eye field. In contrast, misexpression of seven transcription factors induced the formation of retinal cell types. Induced retinal cells were committed to a retinal lineage as they formed eyes when transplanted to the flanks of developing embryos. When the endogenous eye field was replaced with induced retinal cells, they formed eyes that were molecularly, anatomically, and electrophysiologically similar to normal eyes. Importantly, induced eyes could guide a vision-based behavior. These results suggest the fate of pluripotent cells may be purposely altered to generate multipotent retinal progenitor cells, which differentiate into functional retinal cell classes and form a neural circuitry sufficient for vision.

  5. Delay estimation for CMOS functional cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis on arbitr......Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis...... on arbitrary CMOS functional cells using the proposed delay model, is presented. Both model and algorithms have been implemented as a part of a cell compiler (CELLO) working in an experimental silicon compiler environment....

  6. Tsc1 is a Critical Regulator of Macrophage Survival and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin Fang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1 has been shown to regulate M1/M2 polarization of macrophages, but the precise roles of Tsc1 in the function and stability of macrophages are not fully understood. Here we show that Tsc1 is required for regulating the survival, migration and phagocytosis of macrophages. Methods: Mice with Tsc1 homozygous deletion in myeloid cells (LysMCreTsc1flox/flox; Tsc1 KO were obtained by crossing Tsc1flox/flox mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of Lysozyme promoter (LysMCre. The apoptosis and growth of macrophages were determined by flow cytometry and Real-time PCR (RT-PCR. The phagocytosis was determined using a Vybrant™ phagocytosis assay kit. The migration of macrophages was determined using transwell migration assay. Results: Peritoneal macrophages of Tsc1 KO mice exhibited increased apoptosis and enlarged cell size. Both M1 and M2 phenotypes in Tsc1-deficient macrophages were elevated in steady-state as well as in inflammatory conditions. Tsc1-deficient macrophages demonstrated impaired migration and reduced expression of chemokine receptors including CCR2 and CCR5. Phagocytosis activity and ROS production were enhanced in Tsc1-deficient macrophages. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 partially reversed the aberrance of Tsc1-deficient macrophages. Conclusion: Tsc1 plays a critical role in regulating macrophage survival, function and polarization via inhibition of mTORC1 activity.

  7. REGULATORY T–CELLS: ORIGIN AND FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Freidlin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Over the past decade a population of so–called “regulatory T cells” (Treg cells has been linked to the prevention of autoimmunity. In this review we discuss the molecular mechanisms of Treg cells development and function including the identification of the unique molecular marker of Treg cells – the transcription factor Foxp3. We discuss also the mechanisms of suppression, which include the direct cell contact through binding of cell surface molecules CTLA–4 on Treg cells to CD80/CD86 molecules of effector T cells and the local secretion of cytokines (IL–10, TGFβ. Deficiency in or dysfunction of these cells can be a cause of autoimmune disease. These cells are a good target for designing ways to induce or abrogate immunological tolerance to self and non–self antigens. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 4, pp. 347–354

  8. Involvement of distinct PKC gene products in T cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried eBaier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that members of the Protein kinase C(PKC family seem to have important roles in T cells. Focusing on the physiological and non-redundant PKC functions established in primary mouse T cells via germline gene-targeting approaches, our current knowledge defines two particularly critical PKC gene products, PKCθ and PKCα, as the flavor of PKC in T cells that appear to have a positive role in signaling pathways that are necessary for full antigen receptor-mediated T cell activation ex vivo and T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. Consistently, in spite of the current dogma that PKCθ inhibition might be sufficient to achieve complete immunosuppressive effects, more recent results have indicated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ, and additionally, at least PKCα, appears to be needed to provide a successful approach for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Mast-Cell-Derived TNF Amplifies CD8+ Dendritic Cell Functionality and CD8+ T Cell Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are critical promoters of adaptive immunity in the contact hypersensitivity model, but the mechanism of allergen sensitization is poorly understood. Using Mcpt5-CreTNFFL/FL mice, we show here that the absence of TNF exclusively in mast cells impaired the expansion of CD8+ T cells upon sensitization and the T-cell-driven adaptive immune response to elicitation. T cells primed in the absence of mast cell TNF exhibited a diminished efficiency to transfer sensitization to naive recipients. Specifically, mast cell TNF promotes CD8+ dendritic cell (DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes. The peripherally released mast cell TNF further critically boosts the CD8+ T-cell-priming efficiency of CD8+ DCs, thereby linking mast cell effects on T cells to DC modulation. Collectively, our findings identify the distinct potential of mast cell TNF to amplify CD8+ DC functionality and CD8+ T-cell-dominated adaptive immunity, which may be of great importance for immunotherapy and vaccination approaches.

  10. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression.

  11. Adaptive critic autopilot design of bank-to-turn missiles using fuzzy basis function networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-Kai

    2005-04-01

    A new adaptive critic autopilot design for bank-to-turn missiles is presented. In this paper, the architecture of adaptive critic learning scheme contains a fuzzy-basis-function-network based associative search element (ASE), which is employed to approximate nonlinear and complex functions of bank-to-turn missiles, and an adaptive critic element (ACE) generating the reinforcement signal to tune the associative search element. In the design of the adaptive critic autopilot, the control law receives signals from a fixed gain controller, an ASE and an adaptive robust element, which can eliminate approximation errors and disturbances. Traditional adaptive critic reinforcement learning is the problem faced by an agent that must learn behavior through trial-and-error interactions with a dynamic environment, however, the proposed tuning algorithm can significantly shorten the learning time by online tuning all parameters of fuzzy basis functions and weights of ASE and ACE. Moreover, the weight updating law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory is capable of guaranteeing both tracking performance and stability. Computer simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive critic autopilot.

  12. Critical Filler Concentration in Sulfated Titania-Added Nafion™ Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Sgambetterra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we present a detailed study of Nafion™ composite membranes containing different amounts of nanosized sulfated titania particles, synthesized through an optimized one-step synthesis procedure. Functional membrane properties, such as ionic exchange capacity and water uptake (WU ability will be described and discussed, together with thermal analysis, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy data. Also electrochemical properties such as proton conductivity and performances in hydrogen fuel cells will be presented. It has been demonstrated that a critical concentration of filler particles can boost the fuel cell performance at low humidification, exhibiting a significant improvement of the maximum power and current density delivered under 30% low-relative humidity (RH and 70 °C with respect to bare Nafion™-based systems.

  13. Form factor approach to the asymptotic behavior of correlation functions in critical models

    CERN Document Server

    Kitanine, N; Maillet, J M; Slavnov, N A; Terras, V

    2011-01-01

    We propose a form factor approach for the computation of the large distance asymptotic behavior of correlation functions in quantum critical (integrable) models. In the large distance regime we reduce the summation over all excited states to one over the particle/hole excitations lying on the Fermi surface in the thermodynamic limit. We compute these sums, over the so-called critical form factors, exactly. Thus we obtain the leading large distance behavior of each oscillating harmonic of the correlation function asymptotic expansion, including the corresponding amplitudes. Our method is applicable to a wide variety of integrable models and yields precisely the results stemming from the Luttinger liquid approach, the conformal field theory predictions and our previous analysis of the correlation functions from their multiple integral representations. We argue that our scheme applies to a general class of non-integrable quantum critical models as well.

  14. Functional activities of receptors for tumor necrosis factor-alpha on human vascular endothelial cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paleolog, E.M.; Delasalle, S.A.; Buurman, W.A.; Feldmann, M.

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a critical role in the control of endothelial cell function and hence in regulating traffic of circulating cells into tissues in vivo. Stimulation of endothelial cells in vitro by TNF-alpha increases the surface expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules

  15. Critical role of dendritic cells in T cell retention in the interfollicular region of Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Takashi; Shibata, Naoko; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ishikawa, Izumi; Sato, Shintaro; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-07-15

    Peyer's patches (PPs) simultaneously initiate active and quiescent immune responses in the gut. The immunological function is achieved by the rigid regulation of cell distribution and trafficking, but how the cell distribution is maintained remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that binding of stromal cell-derived lymphoid chemokines to conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) is essential for the retention of naive CD4(+) T cells in the interfollicular region (IFR) of PPs. Transitory depletion of CD11c(high) cDCs in mice rapidly impaired the IFR structure in the PPs without affecting B cell follicles or germinal centers, lymphoid chemokine production from stromal cells, or the immigration of naive T cells into the IFRs of PPs. The cDC-orchestrated retention of naive T cells was mediated by heparinase-sensitive molecules that were expressed on cDCs and bound the lymphoid chemokine CCL21 produced from stromal cells. These data collectively reveal that interactions among cDCs, stromal cells, and naive T cells are necessary for the formation of IFRs in the PPs.

  16. Mast Cell: A Multi-Functional Master Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystel-Whittemore, Melissa; Dileepan, Kottarappat N; Wood, John G

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells of the myeloid lineage and are present in connective tissues throughout the body. The activation and degranulation of mast cells significantly modulates many aspects of physiological and pathological conditions in various settings. With respect to normal physiological functions, mast cells are known to regulate vasodilation, vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, and venom detoxification. On the other hand, mast cells have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases, including allergy, asthma, anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal disorders, many types of malignancies, and cardiovascular diseases. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of mast cells in many pathophysiological conditions.

  17. Critical Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model for various boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Hobrecht, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic method to calculate the scaling functions for the critical Casimir force and the according potential of the two-dimensional Ising model with various boundary conditions. Therefore we start with the dimer representation of the corresponding partition function $Z$ on an $L\\times M$ square lattice, wrapped around a torus with aspect ratio $\\rho=L/M$. By assuming periodic boundary conditions and translational invariance in at least one direction, we systematically reduce the problem to a $2\\times2$ transfer matrix representation. For the torus we first reproduce the results by Kaufman and then give a detailed calculation of the scaling functions. Afterwards we present the calculation for the cylinder with open boundary conditions. All scaling functions are given in form of combinations of infinite products and integrals. Our results reproduce the known scaling functions in the limit of thin films $\\rho\\to 0$. Additionally, for the cylinder at criticality our result confirms the predictions...

  18. A Critical Role of IL-21-Induced BATF in Sustaining CD8-T-Cell-Mediated Chronic Viral Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Xin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Control of chronic viral infections by CD8 T cells is critically dependent on CD4 help. In particular, helper-derived IL-21 plays a key role in sustaining the CD8 T cell response; however, the molecular pathways by which IL-21 sustains CD8 T cell immunity remain unclear. We demonstrate that IL-21 causes a phenotypic switch of transcription factor expression in CD8 T cells during chronic viral infection characterized by sustained BATF expression. Importantly, BATF expression during chronic infection is both required for optimal CD8 T cell persistence and anti-viral effector function and sufficient to rescue “unhelped” CD8 T cells. Mechanistically, BATF sustains the response by cooperating with IRF4, an antigen-induced transcription factor that is also critically required for CD8 T cell maintenance, to preserve Blimp-1 expression and thereby sustain CD8 T cell effector function. Collectively, these data suggest that CD4 T cells “help” the CD8 response during chronic infection via IL-21-induced BATF expression.

  19. Mycobacteria and innate cells: critical encounter for immunogenicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelo Martino

    2008-03-01

    Protective immunity against mycobacterial infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by interactions between specific T cells and activated macrophages. To date, many aspects of mycobacterial immunity have shown that innate cells are the key elements that substantially influence the subsequent adaptive host response. During the early phases of infection, phagocytic cells and innate lymphocyte subsets play a pivotal role. Here we summarize the findings of recent investigations on macrophages, dendritic cells and T lymphocytes in the response to mycobacteria.

  20. Quantum critical response function in quasi-two-dimensional itinerant antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, C. M.; Zhu, Lijun; Schröder, Almut

    2015-10-01

    We reexamine the experimental results for the magnetic response function χ''(q ,E ,T ) for q around the antiferromagnetic vectors Q , in the quantum-critical region, obtained by inelastic neutron scattering, on an Fe-based superconductor and on a heavy-fermion compound. The motivation is to compare the results with a recent theory, which shows that the fluctuations in a generic antiferromagnetic model for itinerant fermions map to those in the universality class of the dissipative quantum-XY model. The quantum-critical fluctuations in this model, in a range of parameters, are given by the correlations of spatial and temporal topological defects. The theory predicts a χ''(q ,E ,T ) (i) which is a separable function of (q -Q ) and of (E ,T ) , (ii) at criticality, the energy-dependent part is ∝tanh(E /2 T ) below a cutoff energy, (iii) the correlation time departs from its infinite value at criticality on the disordered side by an essential singularity, and (iv) the correlation length depends logarithmically on the correlation time, so that the dynamical critical exponent z is ∞ . The limited existing experimental results are found to be consistent with the first two unusual predictions from which the linear dependence of the resistivity on T and the T lnT dependence of the entropy also follow. More experiments are suggested, especially to test the theory of variations on the correlation time and length on the departure from criticality.

  1. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Bart N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  2. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  3. Functions of proteoglycans at the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höök, M; Woods, A; Johansson, S;

    1986-01-01

    Proteoglycans (primarily heparan sulphate proteoglycans) are found at the surface of most adherent eukaryotic cells. Earlier studies suggest that these molecules can be associated with the cell surface principally by two different mechanisms. Proteoglycans may occur as membrane......-intercalated glycoproteins, where the core protein of the proteoglycan is anchored in the lipid interior of the plasma membrane, or they may be bound via the polysaccharide components of the molecule to specific anchoring proteins present at the cell surface. A number of functions have been proposed for cell surface......-associated proteoglycans, including: regulation of cell-substrate adhesion; regulation of cell proliferation; participation in the binding and uptake of extracellular components; and participation in the regulation of extracellular matrix formation. Evidence is discussed suggesting that the cell-associated heparan...

  4. Generation of functional thyroid from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonica, Francesco; Kasprzyk, Dominika Figini; Opitz, Robert; Iacovino, Michelina; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Dumitrescu, Alexandra Mihaela; Refetoff, Samuel; Peremans, Kathelijne; Manto, Mario; Kyba, Michael; Costagliola, Sabine

    2012-11-01

    The primary function of the thyroid gland is to metabolize iodide by synthesizing thyroid hormones, which are critical regulators of growth, development and metabolism in almost all tissues. So far, research on thyroid morphogenesis has been missing an efficient stem-cell model system that allows for the in vitro recapitulation of the molecular and morphogenic events regulating thyroid follicular-cell differentiation and subsequent assembly into functional thyroid follicles. Here we report that a transient overexpression of the transcription factors NKX2-1 and PAX8 is sufficient to direct mouse embryonic stem-cell differentiation into thyroid follicular cells that organize into three-dimensional follicular structures when treated with thyrotropin. These in vitro-derived follicles showed appreciable iodide organification activity. Importantly, when grafted in vivo into athyroid mice, these follicles rescued thyroid hormone plasma levels and promoted subsequent symptomatic recovery. Thus, mouse embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells in vitro and generate functional thyroid tissue.

  5. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases.

  6. Yamanaka factors critically regulate the developmental signaling network in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosong Liu; Jinyan Huang; Taotao Chen; Ying Wang; Shunmei Xin; Jian Li; Gang Pei; Jiuhong Kang

    2008-01-01

    Yamanaka factors (Oct3/4,Sox2,KIf4,c-Myc) are highly expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells,and their overexpression can induce pluripotency in both mouse and human somatic cells,indicating that these factors regulate the developmental signaling network necessary for ES cell pluripotency.However,systemic analysis of the signaling pathways regulated by Yamanaka factors has not yet been fully described.In this study,we identified the target promoters of endogenous Yamanaka factors on a whole genome scale using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-on-chip in E14.1 mouse ES cells,and we found that these four factors co-occupied 58 promoters.Interestingly,when Oct4 and Sox2 were analyzed as core factors,Kif4 functioned to enhance the core factors for development regulation,whereas c-Myc seemed to play a distinct role in regulating metabolism.The pathway analysis revealed that Yamanaka factors collectively regulate a developmental signaling network composed of 16 developmental signaling pathways,nine of which represent earlier unknown pathways in ES cells,including apoptosis and cellcycle pathways.We further analyzed data from a recent study examining Yamanaka factors in mouse ES cells.Interestingly,this analysis also revealed 16 developmental signaling pathways,of which 14 pathways overlap with the ones revealed by this study,despite that the target genes and the signaling pathways regulated by each individual Yamanaka factor differ significantly between these two datasets.We suggest that Yamanaka factors critically regulate a developmental signaling network composed of approximately a dozen crucial developmental signaling pathways to maintain the pluripotency of ES cells and probably also to induce pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Mapping the current–current correlation function near a quantum critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prodan, Emil, E-mail: prodan@yu.edu [Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Bellissard, Jean [School of Mathematics and School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The current–current correlation function is a useful concept in the theory of electron transport in homogeneous solids. The finite-temperature conductivity tensor as well as Anderson’s localization length can be computed entirely from this correlation function. Based on the critical behavior of these two physical quantities near the plateau–insulator or plateau–plateau transitions in the integer quantum Hall effect, we derive an asymptotic formula for the current–current correlation function, which enables us to make several theoretical predictions about its generic behavior. For the disordered Hofstadter model, we employ numerical simulations to map the current–current correlation function, obtain its asymptotic form near a critical point and confirm the theoretical predictions.

  8. The critical size is set at a single-cell level by growth rate to attain homeostasis and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Colomina, Neus; Palmisano, Alida; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Aldea, Martí

    2012-01-01

    Budding yeast cells are assumed to trigger Start and enter the cell cycle only after they attain a critical size set by external conditions. However, arguing against deterministic models of cell size control, cell volume at Start displays great individual variability even under constant conditions. Here we show that cell size at Start is robustly set at a single-cell level by the volume growth rate in G1, which explains the observed variability. We find that this growth-rate-dependent sizer is intimately hardwired into the Start network and the Ydj1 chaperone is key for setting cell size as a function of the individual growth rate. Mathematical modelling and experimental data indicate that a growth-rate-dependent sizer is sufficient to ensure size homeostasis and, as a remarkable advantage over a rigid sizer mechanism, it reduces noise in G1 length and provides an immediate solution for size adaptation to external conditions at a population level.

  9. Cell functional enviromics: Unravelling the function of environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Paula M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While functional genomics, focused on gene functions and gene-gene interactions, has become a very active field of research in molecular biology, equivalent methodologies embracing the environment and gene-environment interactions are relatively less developed. Understanding the function of environmental factors is, however, of paramount importance given the complex, interactive nature of environmental and genetic factors across multiple time scales. Results Here, we propose a systems biology framework, where the function of environmental factors is set at its core. We set forth a "reverse" functional analysis approach, whereby cellular functions are reconstructed from the analysis of dynamic envirome data. Our results show these data sets can be mapped to less than 20 core cellular functions in a typical mammalian cell culture, while explaining over 90% of flux data variance. A functional enviromics map can be created, which provides a template for manipulating the environmental factors to induce a desired phenotypic trait. Conclusion Our results support the feasibility of cellular function reconstruction guided by the analysis and manipulation of dynamic envirome data.

  10. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment.

  11. Programs to Compute Distribution Functions and Critical Values for Extreme Value Ratios for Outlier Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. McBane

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A set of FORTRAN subprograms is presented to compute density and cumulative distribution functions and critical values for the range ratio statistics of Dixon (1951, The Annals of Mathematical Statistics These statistics are useful for detection of outliers in small samples.

  12. Validation of the Dutch functional, communicative and critical health literacy scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaart, van der Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Klooster, ten Peter M.; Hilderink-Koertshuis, Rianne T.E.; Klaase, Joost M.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: While most existing health literacy (HL) measures focus primarily on reading comprehension, the functional, communicative and critical HL scales from Ishikawa et al. [19] aim to measure a broader HL spectrum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Dutch translatio

  13. Large gaps between consecutive maxima of the Riemann zeta-function on the critical line

    CERN Document Server

    Saker, S H

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we derive new lower bounds for the normalized distances between consecutive maxima of the Riemann zeta-function on the critical line subject to the truth of the Riemann hypothesis. The method of our proofs relies on a Sobolev type inequality of one dimension and an Opial type inequality with best possible constants.

  14. The critical role of Golgi cells in regulating spatio-temporal integration and plasticity at the cerebellum input stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available After the discovery at the end of the 19th century (Golgi, 1883, the Golgi cell was precisely described by S.R. y Cajal (see Cajal, 1987, 1995 and functionally identified as an inhibitory interneuron 50 years later by J.C. Eccles and colleagues (Eccles e al., 1967. Then, its role has been casted by Marr (1969 within the Motor Learning Theory as a codon size regulator of granule cell activity. It was immediately clear that Golgi cells had to play a critical role, since they are the main inhibitory interneuron of the granular layer and control activity of as many as 100 millions granule cells. In vitro, Golgi cells show pacemaking, resonance, phase-reset and rebound-excitation in the theta-frequency band. These properties are likely to impact on their activity in vivo, which shows irregular spontaneous beating modulated by sensory inputs and burst responses to punctuate stimulation followed by a silent pause. Moreover, investigations have given insight into Golgi cells connectivity within the cerebellar network and on their impact on the spatio-temporal organization of activity. It turns out that Golgi cells can control both the temporal dynamics and the spatial distribution of information transmitted through the cerebellar network. Moreover, Golgi cells regulate the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber - granule cell synapse. Thus, the concept is emerging that Golgi cells are of critical importance for regulating granular layer network activity bearing important consequences for cerebellar computation as a whole.

  15. Critical kinetic control of non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transformation for efficient perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yaoguang; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Guo, Rui; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Li, Wenzhi; Fan, Zhiyong; Yao, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3+) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition pathways as a function of annealing conditions. The interdiffusion of MAI and DMSO varies strongly with the annealing temperature and time, thus determining the final film composition and morphology. A surprising finding reveals that the best performing cells contain ~18% of the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase, instead of pure phase OTP. The presence of such an intermediate phase enables smooth surface morphology and enhances the charge carrier lifetime. Our results highlight the importance of the intermediate phase growth kinetics that could lead to large-scale production of efficient solution processed perovskite solar cells.Organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) have attracted significant attention as a low-cost and high-efficiency solar cell material. Due to the strong coordination between lead iodide (PbI2) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent, a non-stoichiometric intermediate phase of MA2Pb3I8(DMSO)2 (MA = CH3NH3+) usually forms in the one-step deposition method that plays a critical role in attaining high power conversion efficiency. However, the kinetic understanding of how the non-stoichiometric intermediate phase transforms during thermal annealing is currently absent. In this work, we investigated such a phase transformation and provided a clear picture of three phase transition

  16. Invariant NKT cells: regulation and function during viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Juno

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT cells represent a subset of T lymphocytes that express natural killer (NK cell surface markers. A subset of NKT cells, termed invariant NKT cells (iNKT, express a highly restricted T cell receptor (TCR and respond to CD1d-restricted lipid ligands. iNKT cells are now appreciated to play an important role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses and have been implicated in infectious disease, allergy, asthma, autoimmunity, and tumor surveillance. Advances in iNKT identification and purification have allowed for the detailed study of iNKT activity in both humans and mice during a variety of chronic and acute infections. Comparison of iNKT function between non-pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection models and chronic HIV-infected patients implies a role for iNKT activity in controlling immune activation. In vitro studies of influenza infection have revealed novel effector functions of iNKT cells including IL-22 production and modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but ex vivo characterization of human iNKT cells during influenza infection are lacking. Similarly, as recent evidence suggests iNKT involvement in dengue virus pathogenesis, iNKT cells may modulate responses to a number of emerging pathogens. This Review will summarize current knowledge of iNKT involvement in responses to viral infections in both human and mouse models and will identify critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for future study. We will also highlight recent efforts to harness iNKT ligands as vaccine adjuvants capable of improving vaccination-induced cellular immune responses.

  17. Impaired Leydig cell function in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A-M; Jørgensen, N; Frydelund-Larsen, L

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether an impaired Leydig cell function is present in severely oligospermic men, serum testosterone (T), LH, estradiol (E(2)), and SHBG levels in 357 idiopathic infertile men were compared with levels in 318 proven fertile men. In addition, the T/LH ratio, E(2)/T ratio...... of the fertile levels.Thus, the group of infertile men showed significant signs of impaired Leydig cell function in parallel to their impaired spermatogenesis. The association of decreased spermatogenesis and impaired Leydig cell function might reflect a disturbed paracrine communication between the seminiferous......, and calculated free T index (cFT) were compared between the two groups.A shift toward lower serum T levels, cFT, and T/LH ratio and higher serum LH, E(2), and E(2)/T levels was observed in the group of infertile men. On average, the infertile men had 18, 26, and 34% lower serum T, cFT, and T/LH levels...

  18. Dielectric Function and Critical Point of GeSbTe Pseudo-binary Compound Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hosun; Park, Jun-Woo; Kang, Youn-Seon; Lee, Tae-Yon; Suh, Dong-Seok; Kim, Ki-Joon; Kim, Cheol Kyu; Kang, Yoon Ho; da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2009-03-01

    We measure the dielectric functions of GeSbTe pseudo-binary thin films by using spectroscopic ellipsometry. We anneal the thin films at various temperatures. According to x-ray diffraction, the as-grown thin films are amorphous and the annealed films have metastable and stable crystalline phases. By using standard critical point model, we obtain the accurate values of the energy gap of the amorphous phase as well as the critical point energies of the crystalline thin films. The critical point energies are compared to the band gap energies determined by the method of linear extrapolation of the optical absorption. As the Sb to Ge atomic ratio increases, the optical (band) gap energy of amorphous (crystalline) phase decreases. Standard critical point fitting show several higher band gaps. The electronic band structures and the dielectric functions of the thin films are calculated by using density functional theory and are compared to the measured ones. The band structure calculations show in stable phase that GeTe, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge1Sb2Te4 have indirect gap whereas Ge1Sb4Te7 and Sb2Te3 have direct gap. The measured indirect band gap energies match well with the electronic band structure calculations.

  19. Surface critical behavior and scaling functions for the three-dimensional mean spherical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Magdy E. [Mathematics Department, Ar' ar Teacher College, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Saudi Arabia) and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University (Egypt)]. E-mail: aminmagdy@yahoo.com

    2006-10-09

    The d-dimensional mean spherical model on a fully finite L{sup d} simple cubic lattice with Neumann-Dirichlet boundary conditions is considered in the presence of a surface external fields acting at the surfaces bounding the system. Exact calculations are evaluated for the fully finite system and in the case of a film geometry Lx{approx}{sup d-1}. Critical finite-size scaling functions both for the specific heat and the mean-square magnetization are derived and investigated close to and below the bulk critical temperature K{sub c}.

  20. Potential of Entropic Force in Markov Systems with Nonequilibrium Steady State, Generalized Gibbs Function and Criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Lowell; Qian, Hong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we revisit the notion of the “minus logarithm of stationary probability” as a generalized potential in nonequilibrium systems and attempt to illustrate its central role in an axiomatic approach to stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamics of complex systems. It is demonstrated that this quantity arises naturally through both monotonicity results of Markov processes and as the rate function when a stochastic process approaches a detrministic limit. We then undertake a more detailed mathematical analysis of the consequences of this quantity, culminating in a necessary and sufficient condition for the criticality of stochastic systems. This condition is then discussed in the context of recent results about criticality in biological systems.

  1. Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase E960 and phospholemman F28 are critical for their functional interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafaga, Mounir; Bossuyt, Julie; Mamikonian, Luiza; Li, Joseph C; Lee, Linda L; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Despa, Sanda; Bers, Donald M

    2012-12-11

    Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) establishes the transmembrane [Na(+)] gradient in cells. In heart, phospholemman (PLM) inhibits NKA activity by reducing its apparent Na(+) affinity, an effect that is relieved by PLM phosphorylation. The NKA crystal structure suggests regions of PLM-NKA interaction, but the sites important for functional effects in live cells are not known. We tested wild type (WT) and CFP-NKA-α1 point mutants (alanine substitution at F956, E960, L964, and F967) for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with WT-PLM-YFP in HEK293 cells. NKA-PLM FRET was unaltered with F956A or F967A, reduced with L964A, and nearly abolished with E960A. Mutating the PLM site (F28A) identified by structural analysis to interact with E960-NKA also nearly abolished NKA-PLM FRET. In contrast, NKA-PLM coimmunoprecipitation was only slightly reduced by E960A-NKA or F28A-PLM mutants, consistent with an additional interaction site. FRET titrations indicate that the additional site has higher affinity than that between E960-NKA and F28-PLM. To test whether the FRET-preventing mutations also prevent PLM functional effects, we measured NKA-mediated Na(+)-transport in intact cells. For WT-NKA, PLM reduced apparent Na(+)-affinity of NKA and PLM phosphorylation reversed the effect. In contrast, for E960A-NKA the apparent Na(+)-affinity was unaltered by either PLM or forskolin-induced PLM phosphorylation. We conclude that E960 on NKA and F28 on PLM are critical for PLM effects on both NKA function and NKA-PLM FRET, but also there is at least one additional site that is critical for tethering PLM to NKA.

  2. Critical functions of Rpa3/Ssb3 in S-phase DNA damage responses in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cavero

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Replication Protein A (RPA is a heterotrimeric, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA-binding complex required for DNA replication and repair, homologous recombination, DNA damage checkpoint signaling, and telomere maintenance. Whilst the larger RPA subunits, Rpa1 and Rpa2, have essential interactions with ssDNA, the molecular functions of the smallest subunit Rpa3 are unknown. Here, we investigate the Rpa3 ortholog Ssb3 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and find that it is dispensable for cell viability, checkpoint signaling, RPA foci formation, and meiosis. However, increased spontaneous Rad11Rpa1 and Rad22Rad52 nuclear foci in ssb3Δ cells indicate genome maintenance defects. Moreover, Ssb3 is required for resistance to genotoxins that disrupt DNA replication. Genetic interaction studies indicate that Ssb3 has a close functional relationship with the Mms1-Mms22 protein complex, which is required for survival after DNA damage in S-phase, and with the mitotic functions of Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase that is required for recovery from replication fork collapse. From these studies we propose that Ssb3 plays a critical role in mediating RPA functions that are required for repair or tolerance of DNA lesions in S-phase. Rpa3 orthologs in humans and other species may have a similar function.

  3. Generation of functional platelets from canine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Toshiya; Hatoya, Shingo; Kanegi, Ryoji; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijewardana, Viskam; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Miyuu; Yamate, Jyoji; Izawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kawate, Noritoshi; Tamada, Hiromichi; Imai, Hiroshi; Inaba, Toshio

    2013-07-15

    Thrombocytopenia (TTP) is a blood disease common to canines and human beings. Currently, there is no valid therapy for this disease except blood transfusion. In this study, we report the generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) from canine embryonic fibroblasts, and a novel protocol for creating mature megakaryocytes (MKs) and functional platelets from ciPSCs. The ciPSCs were generated using lentiviral vectors, and differentiated into MKs and platelets on OP9 stromal cells supplemented with growth factors. Our ciPSCs presented in a tightly domed shape and showed expression of a critical pluripotency marker, REX1, and normal karyotype. Additionally, ciPSCs differentiated into cells derived from three germ layers via the formation of an embryoid body. The MKs derived from ciPSCs had hyperploidy and transformed into proplatelets. The proplatelets released platelets early on that expressed specific MK and platelet marker CD41/61. Interestingly, these platelets, when activated with adenosine diphosphate or thrombin, bind to fibrinogen. Moreover, electron microscopy showed that the platelets had the same ultrastructure as peripheral platelets. Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time the generation of ciPSCs that are capable of differentiating into MKs and release functional platelets in vitro. Our system for differentiating ciPSCs into MKs and platelets promises a critical therapy for canine TTP and appears to be extensible in principle to resolve human TTP.

  4. Matrix proteoglycans as effector molecules for epithelial cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Frevert

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of a core protein and glycosaminoglycan side chains. Once thought to be the molecular glue providing structural support and imparting biomechanical properties to lung tissue, it is now apparent that proteoglycans are important biological modifiers which regulate processes such as lung development, homeostasis, inflammation and wound healing. The diverse roles of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix suggest that these molecules play a critical role in normal and diseased lungs. This short article will discuss the role extracellular matrix proteoglycans play in regulating epithelial cell function in the lungs.

  5. Eicosanoids, β-cell function, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pengcheng; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2011-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes into eicosanoids, which are involved in diverse diseases, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. During the last 30 years, evidence has been accumulated that suggests important functions for eicosanoids in the control of pancreatic β-cell function and destruction. AA metabolites of the COX pathway, especially prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), appear to be significant factors to β-cell dysfunction and destruction, participating in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Several elegant studies have contributed to the sorting out of the importance of 12-LOX eicosanoids in cytokine-mediated inflammation in pancreatic β cells. The role of CYP eicosanoids in diabetes is yet to be explored. A recent publication has demonstrated that stabilizing the levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), CYP eicosanoids, by inhibiting or deleting soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) improves β-cell function and reduces β-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In this review we summarize recent findings implicating these eicosanoid pathways in diabetes and its complications. We also discuss the development of animal models with targeted gene deletion and specific enzymatic inhibitors in each pathway to identify potential targets for the treatment of diabetes and its complications.

  6. ‘Promising Spaces’: Universities’ Critical-Moral Mission and Educative Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica McLean

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Attention has been drawn to a hollowing out of universities' purposes to serve economic interests only. This dissatisfaction has provoked thinking about how to reclaim a critical moral role for universties in society. Inspired by contemporary utopian studies the paper brings together traditional ideas about how transmitting university knowledge connects to universities' critical-moral functions; Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach adapted for education; and Bernstein's theories about knowledge distribution. Focusing on the educative function, the aim is to develop a theoretically informed and practical vision of a university education, which is both personally transformative and produces critical citizens and workers. Research evidence from two projects on university education reveals 'promising spaces' (Cooper, 2014. I conclude that there is reason to believe that the transmission and acquisition of knowledge and understanding in specific fields is key to preserving and recreating a critical-moral mission for universities wherever they are in the world, even though current conditions are inclement and unequal.

  7. Does mindfulness enhance critical thinking? Evidence for the mediating effects of executive functioning in the relationship between mindfulness and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eNoone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness originated in the Buddhist tradition as a way of cultivating clarity of thought. Despite the fact that this behaviour is best captured using critical thinking assessments, no studies have examined the effects of mindfulness on critical thinking or the mechanisms underlying any such possible relationship. Even so, mindfulness has been suggested as being beneficial for critical thinking in higher education. Critical thinking is recognised as an important higher-order cognitive process which involves the ability to analyse and evaluate evidence and arguments. Such non-automatic, reflective responses generally require the engagement of executive functioning which includes updating, inhibition and shifting of representations in working memory. Based on research showing that mindfulness enhances aspects of executive functioning and certain higher-order cognitive processes, we hypothesised that individuals higher in facets of dispositional mindfulness would demonstrate greater critical thinking performance, and that this relationship would be mediated by executive functioning. Cross-sectional assessment of these constructs in a sample of 178 university students was achieved using the observing and non-reactivity sub-scales of the Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire, a battery of executive functioning tasks and the Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment. Our hypotheses were tested by constructing a multiple meditation model which was analysed using Structural Equation Modelling. Evidence was found for inhibition mediating the relationships between both observing and non-reactivity and critical thinking in different ways. Indirect-only (or full mediation was demonstrated for the relationship between observing, inhibition and critical thinking. Competitive mediation was demonstrated for the relationship between non-reactivity, inhibition and critical thinking. This suggests additional mediators of the relationship between non-reactivity and

  8. Stem Cells in Functional Bladder Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolar, Jakub; Salemi, Souzan; Horst, Maya; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conditions impairing bladder function in children and adults, such as myelomeningocele, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy or spinal cord injury, often need urinary diversion or augmentation cystoplasty as when untreated they may cause severe bladder dysfunction and kidney failure. Currently, the gold standard therapy of end-stage bladder disease refractory to conservative management is enterocystoplasty, a surgical enlargement of the bladder with intestinal tissue. Despite providing functional improvement, enterocystoplasty is associated with significant long-term complications, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, metabolic abnormalities, stone formation, and malignancies. Therefore, there is a strong clinical need for alternative therapies for these reconstructive procedures, of which stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) is considered to be the most promising future strategy. This review is focused on the recent progress in bladder stem cell research and therapy and the challenges that remain for the development of a functional bladder wall.

  9. BAF53 Forms Distinct Nuclear Complexes and Functions as a Critical c-Myc-Interacting Nuclear Cofactor for Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeonghyeon; Wood, Marcelo A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein functions as a transcription factor that can transform normal cells into tumor cells, as well as playing a direct role in normal cell proliferation. The c-Myc protein transactivates cellular promoters by recruiting nuclear cofactors to chromosomal sites through an N-terminal transactivation domain. We have previously reported the identification and functional characterization of four different c-Myc cofactors: TRRAP, hGCN5, TIP49, and TIP48. Here we present the identification and characterization of the actin-related protein BAF53 as a c-Myc-interacting nuclear cofactor that forms distinct nuclear complexes. In addition to the human SWI/SNF-related BAF complex, BAF53 forms a complex with TIP49 and TIP48 and a separate biochemically distinct complex containing TRRAP and a histone acetyltransferase which does not contain TIP60. Using deletion mutants of BAF53, we show that BAF53 is critical for c-Myc oncogenic activity. Our results indicate that BAF53 plays a functional role in c-Myc-interacting nuclear complexes. PMID:11839798

  10. Chromatin Remodeling Protein SMAR1 Is a Critical Regulator of T Helper Cell Differentiation and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Gautam, Dipendra; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2017-01-01

    T cell differentiation from naïve T cells to specialized effector subsets of mature cells is determined by the iterative action of transcription factors. At each stage of specific T cell lineage differentiation, transcription factor interacts not only with nuclear proteins such as histone and histone modifiers but also with other factors that are bound to the chromatin and play a critical role in gene expression. In this review, we focus on one of such nuclear protein known as tumor suppressor and scaffold matrix attachment region-binding protein 1 (SMAR1) in CD4+ T cell differentiation. SMAR1 facilitates Th1 differentiation by negatively regulating T-bet expression via recruiting HDAC1–SMRT complex to its gene promoter. In contrast, regulatory T (Treg) cell functions are dependent on inhibition of Th17-specific genes mainly IL-17 and STAT3 by SMAR1. Here, we discussed a critical role of chromatin remodeling protein SMAR1 in maintaining a fine-tuned balance between effector CD4+ T cells and Treg cells by influencing the transcription factors during allergic and autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  11. Loss-of-function screen in rhabdomyosarcoma identifies CRKL-YES as a critical signal for tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C L; Ngo, V N; Grohar, P J; Arnaldez, F I; Asante, A; Wan, X; Khan, J; Hewitt, S M; Khanna, C; Staudt, L M; Helman, L J

    2013-11-21

    To identify novel signaling pathways necessary for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) survival, we performed a loss-of-function screen using an inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) library in an alveolar and an embryonal RMS cell line. This screen identified CRKL expression as necessary for growth of alveolar RMS and embryonal RMS both in vitro and in vivo. We also found that CRKL was uniformly highly expressed in both RMS cell lines and tumor tissue. As CRKL is a member of the CRK adapter protein family that contains an SH2 and two SH3 domains and is involved in signal transduction from multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, we evaluated CRKL interaction with multiple tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways in RMS cells. While we saw no interaction of CRKL with IGFIR, MET or PI3KAKT/mTOR pathways, we determined that CRKL signaling was associated with SRC family kinase (SFK) signaling, specifically with YES kinase. Inhibition of SFK signaling with dasatinib or another SFK inhibitor, sarcatinib, suppressed RMS cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data identify CRKL as a novel critical component of RMS growth. This study also demonstrates the use of functional screening to identify a potentially novel therapeutic target and treatment approach for these highly aggressive pediatric cancers.

  12. Function of laccases in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders; Holm, Preben Bach; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan

    2011-01-01

    substrate specificities and expression patterns. As part of the strategic research centre Bio4Bio, the present project deals with laccase functions in relation to cell wall formation in grasses based on a study of the model species Brachypodium distachyon. Thirty-one isozymes have been retrieved from......Laccases are multicopper oxidases capable of polymerizing monolignols. Histochemical assays have shown temporal and spatial correlation with secondary cell wall formation in both herbs and woody perennials. However, in plants laccases constitutes a relatively large group of isoenzymes with unique...... hybridization. Specific isozymes that show high correlation with the process of secondary cell wall formation will be further studied in a reverse genetic study in which candidates will be knocked out using RNA interference. Phenotypes of knock-out mutants are to be described in relation to cell wall...

  13. Runx-dependent expression of PKC is critical for cell survival in the sea urchin embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy John J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runx transcription factors play critical roles in the developmental control of cell fate and contribute variously as oncoproteins and tumor suppressors to leukemia and other cancers. To discover fundamental Runx functions in the cell biology of animal development, we have employed morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of the sea urchin Runx protein SpRunt-1. Previously we showed that embryos depleted of SpRunt-1 arrest development at early gastrula stage and underexpress the conventional protein kinase C SpPKC1. Results We report here that SpRunt-1 deficiency leads to ectopic cell proliferation and extensive apoptosis. Suppression of the apoptosis by pharmacological inhibition of caspase-3 prevents the ectopic proliferation and rescues gastrulation, indicating that many of the overt defects obtained by knockdown of SpRunt-1 are secondary to the apoptosis. Inhibition or knockdown of SpPKC1 also causes apoptosis, while cell survival is rescued in SpRunt-1 morphant embryos coinjected with SpPKC1 mRNA, suggesting that the apoptosis associated with SpRunt-1 deficiency is caused by the deficit in SpPKC1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicates that SpRunt-1 interacts physically with SpPKC1 in vivo, and cis-regulatory analysis shows that this interaction activates SpPKC1 transcription. Conclusions Our results show that Runx-dependent activation of SpPKC1 is essential for maintaining protein kinase C activity at levels conducive to cell survival during embryogenesis.

  14. Critical Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model at finite aspect ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobrecht, Hendrik; Hucht, Alfred

    2017-02-01

    We present a systematic method to calculate the universal scaling functions for the critical Casimir force and the according potential of the two-dimensional Ising model with various boundary conditions. Therefore we start with the dimer representation of the corresponding partition function Z on an L× M square lattice, wrapped around a torus with aspect ratio ρ =L/M . By assuming periodic boundary conditions and translational invariance in at least one direction, we systematically reduce the problem to a 2× 2 transfer matrix representation. For the torus we first reproduce the results by Kaufman and then give a detailed calculation of the scaling functions. Afterwards we present the calculation for the cylinder with open boundary conditions. All scaling functions are given in form of combinations of infinite products and integrals. Our results reproduce the known scaling functions in the limit of thin films ρ \\to 0 . Additionally, for the cylinder at criticality our results confirm the predictions from conformal field theory.

  15. Optimizing cell arrays for accurate functional genomics

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    Fengler Sven

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular responses emerge from a complex network of dynamic biochemical reactions. In order to investigate them is necessary to develop methods that allow perturbing a high number of gene products in a flexible and fast way. Cell arrays (CA enable such experiments on microscope slides via reverse transfection of cellular colonies growing on spotted genetic material. In contrast to multi-well plates, CA are susceptible to contamination among neighboring spots hindering accurate quantification in cell-based screening projects. Here we have developed a quality control protocol for quantifying and minimizing contamination in CA. Results We imaged checkered CA that express two distinct fluorescent proteins and segmented images into single cells to quantify the transfection efficiency and interspot contamination. Compared with standard procedures, we measured a 3-fold reduction of contaminants when arrays containing HeLa cells were washed shortly after cell seeding. We proved that nucleic acid uptake during cell seeding rather than migration among neighboring spots was the major source of contamination. Arrays of MCF7 cells developed without the washing step showed 7-fold lower percentage of contaminant cells, demonstrating that contamination is dependent on specific cell properties. Conclusions Previously published methodological works have focused on achieving high transfection rate in densely packed CA. Here, we focused in an equally important parameter: The interspot contamination. The presented quality control is essential for estimating the rate of contamination, a major source of false positives and negatives in current microscopy based functional genomics screenings. We have demonstrated that a washing step after seeding enhances CA quality for HeLA but is not necessary for MCF7. The described method provides a way to find optimal seeding protocols for cell lines intended to be used for the first time in CA.

  16. Rapid CD8+ Function Is Critical for Protection of Neonatal Mice from an Extracellular Bacterial Enteropathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefker, David T.; Adkins, Becky

    2017-01-01

    Both human and murine neonates are characteristically highly susceptible to bacterial infections. However, we recently discovered that neonatal mice are surprisingly highly resistant to oral infection with Yersinia enterocolitica. This resistance was linked with activation of both innate and adaptive responses, involving innate phagocytes, CD4+ cells, and B cells. We have now extended these studies and found that CD8+ cells also contribute importantly to neonatal protection from Y. enterocolitica. Strikingly, neonatal CD8+ cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) are rapidly mobilized, increasing in proportion, number, and IFNγ production as early as 48 h post infection. This early activation appears to be critical for protection since B2m−/− neonates are significantly more susceptible than wt neonates to primary Y. enterocolitica infection. In the absence of CD8+ cells, Y. enterocolitica rapidly disseminated to peripheral tissues. Within 48 h of infection, both the spleens and livers of B2m−/−, but not wt, neonates became heavily colonized, likely leading to their deaths from sepsis. In contrast to primary infection, CD8+ cells were dispensable for the generation of immunological memory protective against secondary infection. These results indicate that CD8+ cells in the neonatal MLN contribute importantly to protection against an extracellular bacterial enteropathogen but, notably, they appear to act during the early innate phase of the immune response. PMID:28119902

  17. Relationship Between Beta Cell Dysfunction and Severity of Disease Among Critically Ill Children: A STROBE-Compliant Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Lan; Xiao, Zheng-Hui; Qiu, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2016-05-01

    Although beta cell dysfunction has been proved to predict prognosis among humans and animals, its prediction on severity of disease remains unclear among children. The present study was aimed to examine the relationship between beta cell dysfunction and severity of disease among critically ill children.This prospective study included 1146 critically ill children, who were admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Hunan Children's Hospital from November 2011 to August 2013. Information on characteristics, laboratory tests, and prognostic outcomes was collected. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β, evaluating beta cell function, was used to divide all participants into 4 groups: HOMA-β = 100% (group I, n = 339), 80% ≤ HOMA-β Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) III score, incidence of organ damage, septic shock, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), mechanical ventilation (MV) and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of developing poor outcomes among patients in different HOMA-β groups, with group I as the reference group.Among 1146 children, incidence of HOMA-β insulin declined with the decrement of HOMA-β (P interval) for developing septic shock was 2.17 (0.59, 8.02), 2.94 (2.18, 6.46), and 2.76 (1.18, 6.46) among patients in group II, III, and IV, respectively.Beta cell dysfunction reflected the severity of disease among critically ill children. Therefore, assessment of beta cell function is critically important to reduce incidence of adverse events in PICU.

  18. Development of Functional Microfold (M Cells from Intestinal Stem Cells in Primary Human Enteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Rouch

    Full Text Available Intestinal microfold (M cells are specialized epithelial cells that act as gatekeepers of luminal antigens in the intestinal tract. They play a critical role in the intestinal mucosal immune response through transport of viruses, bacteria and other particles and antigens across the epithelium to immune cells within Peyer's patch regions and other mucosal sites. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that M cells are generated from Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs, and that infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases M cell formation. However, it is not known whether and how these findings apply to primary human small intestinal epithelium propagated in an in vitro setting.Human intestinal crypts were grown as monolayers with growth factors and treated with recombinant RANKL, and assessed for mRNA transcripts, immunofluorescence and uptake of microparticles and S. Typhimurium.Functional M cells were generated by short-term culture of freshly isolated human intestinal crypts in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. RANKL stimulation of the monolayer cultures caused dramatic induction of the M cell-specific markers, SPIB, and Glycoprotein-2 (GP2 in a process primed by canonical WNT signaling. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a pseudopod phenotype of GP2-positive M cells that preferentially take up microparticles. Furthermore, infection of the M cell-enriched cultures with the M cell-tropic enteric pathogen, S. Typhimurium, led to preferential association of the bacteria with M cells, particularly at lower inoculum sizes. Larger inocula caused rapid induction of M cells.Human intestinal crypts containing ISCs can be cultured and differentiate into an epithelial layer with functional M cells with characteristic morphological and functional properties. This study is the first to demonstrate that M cells can be induced to form from primary human intestinal epithelium, and that S. Typhimurium preferentially infect these cells in an

  19. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: sickle cell crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 32 year old man was admitted a week earlier with sickle cell pain crisis. He had developed increasing dyspnea, oxygen desaturation and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. He had a pulseless electric activity code blue and an ultrasound of the heart was obtained (Figure 1. Figure 1. Subxiphoid view ultrasound of the heart. What does the ultrasound show? 1. Aortic dissection; 2. Aortic stenosis; 3. Enlarged left ventricle; 4. Enlarged right ventricle; 5. Pericardial effusion

  20. Parametric Optimization of Some Critical Operating System Functions--An Alternative Approach to the Study of Operating Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobh, Tarek M.; Tibrewal, Abhilasha

    2006-01-01

    Operating systems theory primarily concentrates on the optimal use of computing resources. This paper presents an alternative approach to teaching and studying operating systems design and concepts by way of parametrically optimizing critical operating system functions. Detailed examples of two critical operating systems functions using the…

  1. Nuclear glutaredoxin 3 is critical for protection against oxidative stress-induced cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian glutaredoxin 3 (Grx3) has been shown to be critical in maintaining redox homeostasis and regulating cell survival pathways in cancer cells. However, the regulation of Grx3 is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigate the subcellular localization of Grx3 under normal growth...

  2. Functional Assessment of Pharmacological Telomerase Activators in Human T Cells

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    Rita B. Effros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are structures at the ends of chromosomes that shorten during cell division and eventually signal an irreversible state of growth arrest known as cellular senescence. To delay this cellular aging, human T cells, which are critical in the immune control over infections and cancer, activate the enzyme telomerase, which binds and extends the telomeres. Several different extracts from the Astragalus membranaceus root have been documented to activate telomerase activity in human T cells. The objective of this research was to compare two extracts from Astragalus membranaceus, TA-65 and HTA, for their effects on both telomerase and proliferative activity of human CD4 and CD8 T cells. Our results demonstrate that, TA-65 increased telomerase activity significantly (1.3 to 3.3-fold relative to controls in T cell cultures from six donors tested, whereas HTA only increased telomerase levels in two out of six donors. We also demonstrate that TA-65 activates telomerase by a MAPK- specific pathway. Finally, we determine that during a three-day culture period, only the T cells treated with the TA-65 extract showed a statistically significant increase in proliferative activity. Our results underscore the importance of comparing multiple telomerase activators within the same experiment, and of including functional assays in addition to measuring telomerase activity.

  3. Cell cycle phase regulates glucocorticoid receptor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Matthews

    Full Text Available The glucocorticoid receptor (GR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. In contrast to many other nuclear receptors, GR is thought to be exclusively cytoplasmic in quiescent cells, and only translocate to the nucleus on ligand binding. We now demonstrate significant nuclear GR in the absence of ligand, which requires nuclear localisation signal 1 (NLS1. Live cell imaging reveals dramatic GR import into the nucleus through interphase and rapid exclusion of the GR from the nucleus at the onset of mitosis, which persists into early G(1. This suggests that the heterogeneity in GR distribution is reflective of cell cycle phase. The impact of cell cycle-driven GR trafficking on a panel of glucocorticoid actions was profiled. In G2/M-enriched cells there was marked prolongation of glucocorticoid-induced ERK activation. This was accompanied by DNA template-specific, ligand-independent GR transactivation. Using chimeric and domain-deleted receptors we demonstrate that this transactivation effect is mediated by the AF1 transactivation domain. AF-1 harbours multiple phosphorylation sites, which are consensus sequences for kinases including CDKs, whose activity changes during the cell cycle. In G2/M there was clear ligand independent induction of GR phosphorylation on residues 203 and 211, both of which are phosphorylated after ligand activation. Ligand-independent transactivation required induction of phospho-S211GR but not S203GR, thereby directly linking cell cycle driven GR modification with altered GR function. Cell cycle phase therefore regulates GR localisation and post-translational modification which selectively impacts GR activity. This suggests that cell cycle phase is an important determinant in the cellular response to Gc, and that mitotic index contributes to tissue Gc sensitivity.

  4. New insights into the controversy of adrenal function during critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Eva; Bornstein, Stefan R; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-10-01

    Critical illness represents a life-threatening disorder necessitating recruitment of defence mechanisms for survival. Herein, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is essential. However, the relevance of a relative insufficiency of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in critical illness, which is diagnosed by a suppressed cortisol response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) irrespective of the plasma cortisol concentration, is controversial. Findings from several studies have provided insights that clarify at least part of this controversy. Rather than an activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, ACTH-independent regulators have been reported to contribute to increased cortisol availability during critical illness. One of these regulators is reduced cortisol breakdown, mediated by suppressed expression and activity of cortisol metabolising enzymes in the liver and kidneys. This downstream mechanism increases concentrations of plasma cortisol, but the ensuing feedback-inhibited ACTH release, when sustained for more than 1 week, has been shown to negatively affect adrenocortical integrity and function. Reduced adrenocortical ACTH signalling could explain reduced cortisol responses to exogenous ACTH. Whether such reduced cortisol responses in the presence of raised plasma (free) cortisol identifies adrenal failure needing treatment is unlikely. Additionally, reduced cortisol breakdown affects the optimum dose of hydrocortisone treatment during critical illness. Identification of patients with an insufficient hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response and the optimum treatment for this disorder clearly need more well designed preclinical and clinical studies.

  5. Report on the 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Iddo [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The Critical Assessment of Function Annotation meeting was held July 14-15, 2011 at the Austria Conference Center in Vienna, Austria. There were 73 registered delegates at the meeting. We thank the DOE for this award. It helped us organize and support a scientific meeting AFP 2011 as a special interest group (SIG) meeting associated with the ISMB 2011 conference. The conference was held in Vienna, Austria, in July 2011. The AFP SIG was held on July 15-16, 2011 (immediately preceding the conference). The meeting consisted of two components, the first being a series of talks (invited and contributed) and discussion sections dedicated to protein function research, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of computational methods utilized in functional annotation. The second component provided a large-scale assessment of computational methods through participation in the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA). The meeting was exciting and, based on feedback, quite successful. There were 73 registered participants. The schedule was only slightly different from the one proposed, due to two cancellations. Dr. Olga Troyanskaya has canceled and we invited Dr. David Jones instead. Similarly, instead of Dr. Richard Roberts, Dr. Simon Kasif gave a closing keynote. The remaining invited speakers were Janet Thornton (EBI) and Amos Bairoch (University of Geneva).

  6. Elective amputation and bionic substitution restore functional hand use after critical soft tissue injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, Oskar C.; Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D.; Salminger, Stefan; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hruby, Laura A.; Pittermann, Anna; Hofer, Christian; Amsuess, Sebastian; Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Critical soft tissue injuries may lead to a non-functional and insensate limb. In these cases standard reconstructive techniques will not suffice to provide a useful outcome, and solutions outside the biological arena must be considered and offered to these patients. We propose a concept which, after all reconstructive options have been exhausted, involves an elective amputation along with a bionic substitution, implementing an actuated prosthetic hand via a structured tech-neuro-rehabilitation program. Here, three patients are presented in whom this concept has been successfully applied after mutilating hand injuries. Clinical tests conducted before, during and after the procedure, evaluating both functional and psychometric parameters, document the benefits of this approach. Additionally, in one of the patients, we show the possibility of implementing a highly functional and natural control of an advanced prosthesis providing both proportional and simultaneous movements of the wrist and hand for completing tasks of daily living with substantially less compensatory movements compared to the traditional systems. It is concluded that the proposed procedure is a viable solution for re-gaining highly functional hand use following critical soft tissue injuries when existing surgical measures fail. Our results are clinically applicable and can be extended to institutions with similar resources. PMID:27721419

  7. Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-02

    further enable enzyme encapsulation to improve the efficiency of light-driven hydrogen fuel production. 5. Changes in key personnel, if applicable : -None ...Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W9132T-14-2-0002 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...cycloadditions to modify reactive groups within the phospholipid membrane structure and how the nature of the reactive elements, the copper catalyst

  8. Self-Organizing Global Gene Expression Regulated through Criticality: Mechanism of the Cell-Fate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Masa; Giuliani, Alessandro; Hashimoto, Midori; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Background A fundamental issue in bioscience is to understand the mechanism that underlies the dynamic control of genome-wide expression through the complex temporal-spatial self-organization of the genome to regulate the change in cell fate. We address this issue by elucidating a physically motivated mechanism of self-organization. Principal Findings Building upon transcriptome experimental data for seven distinct cell fates, including early embryonic development, we demonstrate that self-organized criticality (SOC) plays an essential role in the dynamic control of global gene expression regulation at both the population and single-cell levels. The novel findings are as follows: i) Mechanism of cell-fate changes: A sandpile-type critical transition self-organizes overall expression into a few transcription response domains (critical states). A cell-fate change occurs by means of a dissipative pulse-like global perturbation in self-organization through the erasure of initial-state critical behaviors (criticality). Most notably, the reprogramming of early embryo cells destroys the zygote SOC control to initiate self-organization in the new embryonal genome, which passes through a stochastic overall expression pattern. ii) Mechanism of perturbation of SOC controls: Global perturbations in self-organization involve the temporal regulation of critical states. Quantitative evaluation of this perturbation in terminal cell fates reveals that dynamic interactions between critical states determine the critical-state coherent regulation. The occurrence of a temporal change in criticality perturbs this between-states interaction, which directly affects the entire genomic system. Surprisingly, a sub-critical state, corresponding to an ensemble of genes that shows only marginal changes in expression and consequently are considered to be devoid of any interest, plays an essential role in generating a global perturbation in self-organization directed toward the cell-fate change

  9. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  10. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  11. Environmental drivers of soil microbial community structure and function at the Avon River Critical Zone Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Deirdre; Mathes, Falko; Farrell, Mark; Leopold, Matthias

    2016-11-15

    The Critical Zone is defined as the thin, permeable layer from the tops of the trees to the bottom of the bedrock that sustains terrestrial life on Earth. The geometry and shape of the various weathering zones are known as the critical zone architecture. At the centre of the Critical Zone are soils and the microorganisms that inhabit them. In Western Australia, the million-year-old stable weathering history and more recent lateral erosion during the past hundreds of thousands of years have created a geomorphic setting where deep weathering zones are now exposed on the surface along the flanks of many lateritic hills. These old weathering zones provide diverse physical and chemical properties that influence near surface pedologic conditions and thus likely shape current surface microbiology. Here, we present data derived from a small lateritic hill on the UWA Farm Ridgefield. Spatial soil sampling revealed the contrasting distribution patterns of simple soil parameters such as pH (CaCl2) and electric conductivity. These are clearly linked with underlying changes of the critical zone architecture and show a strong contrast with low values of pH3.3 at the top of the hill to pH5.3 at the bottom. These parameters were identified as major drivers of microbial spatial variability in terms of bacterial and archaeal community composition but not abundance. In addition, we used sensitive (14)C labelling to assess turnover of three model organic nitrogen compounds - an important biogeochemical functional trait relating to nutrient availability. Though generally rapid and in the order of rates reported elsewhere (t½10h). In conclusion, we have shown that the weathering and erosion history of ancient Western Australia affects the surface pedology and has consequences for microbial community structure and function.

  12. CD28–B7 Interaction Modulates Short- and Long-Lived Plasma Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of CD28, which is constitutively expressed on T cells, with B7.1/B7.2 expressed on APCs is critical for T cell activation. CD28 is also expressed on murine and human plasma cells but its function on these cells remains unclear. There are two types of plasma cells: short-lived ones that appear in the secondary lymphoid tissue shortly after Ag exposure, and long-lived plasma cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow. We demonstrate that CD28-deficient murine short- and long-li...

  13. Functional renormalization group analysis of the soft mode at the QCD critical point

    CERN Document Server

    Yokota, Takeru; Morita, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We make an intensive investigation of the soft mode at the QCD critical point on the basis of the the functional renormalization group (FRG) method in the local potential approximation. We calculate the the spectral functions $\\rho_{\\sigma, \\pi}(\\omega, p)$ in the scalar ($\\sigma$) and pseudoscalar ($\\pi$) channels beyond the random phase approximation in the quark-meson model. At finite baryon chemical potential $\\mu$ with a finite quark mass, the baryon-number fluctuation is coupled to the scalar channel and the spectral function in the $\\sigma$ channel has a support not only in the time-like ($\\omega > p$) and but also in the space-like ($\\omega < p$) regions, which correspond to the mesonic and the particle-hole phonon excitations, respectively. We find that the energy of the peak position of the latter becomes vanishingly small with the height being enhanced as the system approaches the QCD critical point, which is a manifestation of the fact that the phonon mode is the soft mode associated with the s...

  14. Critical Quality Source Diagnosis for Dam Concrete Construction Based on Quality Gain-loss Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In dam concrete construction process, it not only has quality loss arising from quality fluctuation, but also gains quality compensation effect due to the mutual cooperation and adaptation coupling between working procedures (WPs. The calculation and transmission complexity of the quality loss and quality compensation affect the quality management of dam concrete construction. As the quality compensation effect existing in the production practice cannot be described by Taguchi quality loss function, the concept of quality gain-loss function was presented in this paper, which was based on endowing the constant term in the expansion of Taylor series with physical meaning—quality compensation. Based on quality gain-loss function theory, a new quality gain-loss transmission model of dam concrete construction based on GERT network was constructed and its effective algorithm was designed. WP quality gain-loss and its impact on the final product were reasonably measured, and the critical quality routes and critical quality WPs were detected and diagnosed in dam concrete construction network. Summer temperature-controlled concrete construction in the third phase of Three Gorges Project (TGP was taken as an example to carry out the study, and the calculation results showed the validity and practicability of the presented model and algorithm.

  15. Critical Rayleigh number of for error function temperature profile with a quasi-static assumption

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Oliver S

    2016-01-01

    When a semi-infinite body is heated from below by a sudden increase in temperature (or cooled from above) an error function temperature profile grows as the heat diffuses into the fluid. The stability of such a profile is investigated using a large-wavelength asymptotic expansion under the quasi-static, or frozen-time, approximation. The critical Rayleigh number for this layer is found to be $Ra=\\pi^{1/2}$ based on the length-scale $(\\kappa t)^{1/2}$ where $\\kappa$ is the thermal diffusivity and $t$ the time since the onset of heating.

  16. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  17. Classifying the expansion kinetics and critical surface dynamics of growing cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Block, M; Drasdo, D

    2006-01-01

    Based on a cellular automaton model the growth kinetics and the critical surface dynamics of cell monolayers is systematically studied by variation of the cell migration activity, the size of the proliferation zone and the cell cycle time distribution over wide ranges. The model design avoids lattice artifacts and ensures high performance. The monolayer expansion velocity derived from our simulations can be interpreted as a generalization of the velocity relationship for a traveling front in the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP) equation that is frequently used to model tumor growth phenomena by continuum models. The critical surface dynamics corresponds to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class for all parameters and model variations studied. While the velocity agrees quantitatively with experimental observations by Bru et al, the critical surface dynamics is in contrast to their interpretation as generic molecular-beam-epitaxy-like growth.

  18. Creep Function of a Single Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprat, Nicolas; Richert, Alain; Simeon, Jacqueline; Asnacios, Atef

    2005-01-01

    We used a novel uniaxial stretching rheometer to measure the creep function J(t) of an isolated living cell. We show, for the first time at the scale of the whole cell, that J(t) behaves as a power-law J(t) = Atα. For N = 43 mice myoblasts (C2-7), we find α = 0.24 ± 0.01 and A = (2.4 ± 0.3) 10−3 Pa−1 s−α. Using Laplace Transforms, we compare A and α to the parameters G0 and β of the complex modulus G*(ω) = G0ωβ measured by other authors using magnetic twisting cytometry and atomic force microscopy. Excellent agreement between A and G0 on the one hand, and between α and β on the other hand, indicated that the power-law is an intrinsic feature of cell mechanics and not the signature of a particular technique. Moreover, the agreement between measurements at very different size scales, going from a few tens of nanometers to the scale of the whole cell, suggests that self-similarity could be a central feature of cell mechanical structure. Finally, we show that the power-law behavior could explain previous results first interpreted as instantaneous elasticity. Thus, we think that the living cell must definitely be thought of as a material with a large and continuous distribution of relaxation time constants which cannot be described by models with a finite number of springs and dash-pots. PMID:15596508

  19. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsa, Callie A S; Brenot, Audrey; Grither, Whitney R; Van Hove, Samantha; Loza, Andrew J; Zhang, Kun; Ponik, Suzanne M; Liu, Yuming; DeNardo, David G; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-06-14

    High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  20. Structural and functional neuroimaging in patients with Parkinson's disease and visual hallucinations: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Saini, Jitender; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop various non-motor symptoms (NMS) during the course of the illness and psychosis is one of the common NMS of PD. Visual hallucinations (VH) are the most common manifestation of psychosis in PD. The exact pathogenesis of VH in patients with PD is not clearly understood. Presence of VH has been described to be associated with rapid cognitive decline and increased nursing home placements in PD patients. A large number of structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted to understand the cerebral basis of VH in PD. Structural imaging studies (Voxel Based Morphometry) have reported grey matter atrophy in multiple regions of the brain such as primary visual cortex, visual association cortex, limbic regions, cholinergic structures such as pedunculopontine nucleus and substantia innominata, which conclude possible alterations of brain regions associated with functions such as visuospatial-perception, attention control and memory. Most functional neuroimaging studies (functional MRI, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computerized tomography) have reported altered activation, blood flow, or reduced metabolism in both dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which probably indicates an alteration in the normal bottom-top visual processing and the presence of an aberrant top-down visual processing. This review critically analyzes the published studies on the structural and functional neuroimaging in PD patients with VH.

  1. Catastrophes in non-equilibrium many-particle wave functions: universality and critical scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, J.; Kirkby, W.; O’Dell, D. H. J.

    2017-02-01

    As part of the quest to uncover universal features of quantum dynamics, we study catastrophes that form in simple many-particle wave functions following a quench, focusing on two-mode systems that include the two-site Bose–Hubbard model, and under some circumstances optomechanical systems and the Dicke model. When the wave function is plotted in Fock space certain characteristic shapes, that we identify as cusp catastrophes, appear under generic conditions. In the vicinity of a cusp the wave function takes on a universal structure described by the Pearcey function and obeys scaling relations which depend on the total number of particles N. In the thermodynamic limit (N\\to ∞ ) the cusp becomes singular, but at finite N it is decorated by an interference pattern. This pattern contains an intricate network of vortex–antivortex pairs, initiating a theory of topological structures in Fock space. In the case where the quench is a δ-kick the problem can be solved analytically and we obtain scaling exponents for the size and position of the cusp, as well as those for the amplitude and characteristic length scales of its interference pattern. Finally, we use these scalings to describe the wave function in the critical regime of a {{{Z}}}2 symmetry-breaking dynamical phase transition.

  2. Impact of MAPK pathway activation in BRAFV600 melanoma on T cell and Dendritic Cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Alexander Ott

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive upregulation of the MAPK pathway by a BRAFV600 mutation occurs in about half of melanomas. This leads to increased oncogenic properties such as tumor cell invasion, metastatic potential, and resistance to apoptosis. Blockade of the MAPK pathway with highly specific kinase inhibitors induces unprecedented tumor response rates in patients with advanced BRAFV600 mutant melanoma. Immune checkpoint blockade with monoclonal antibodies targeting CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 has also demonstrated striking anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced melanoma. Tumor responses are likely limited by multiple additional layers of immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. There is emerging preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that MAPK inhibition has a beneficial effect on the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for combined immunotherapy and MAPK pathway inhibition in melanoma. The T cell response has been the main focus in the studies reported to date. Since dendritic cells (DCs are important in the induction of tumor-specific T cell responses, the impact of MAPK pathway activation in melanoma on DC function is critical for the melanoma directed immune response. BRAFV600E melanoma cells modulate DC through the MAPK pathway because its blockade in melanoma cells can reverse suppression of DC function. As both MEK/BRAF inhibition and immune checkpoint blockade have recently taken center stage in the treatment of melanoma, a deeper understanding of how MAPK pathway inhibition affects the tumor immune response is needed.

  3. A critical analysis of the models connecting molecular mass distribution and shear viscosity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastics having various short and long-chain branches, characterized by the melt index measured at the processing temperature – according to their average molecular mass – can be processed using universal principles, independently of their chemical composition. The average molecular mass is the result of a molecular mass distribution, being the fingerprint of the chemical synthetic technology. The actual shape of the shear viscosity function aiming at the quantitative characterization of viscous flow, containing material-dependent parameters, depends on the ratio of high and low molecular mass fractions, the width of the molecular mass distribution function and on the number of short and long chain branches. This publication deals with the critical analysis of the mathematical methods of transforming these two curves of basic importance into each other.

  4. Critical Crossover Functions for Simple Fluids: Towards the Crossover Modelling Uniqueness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Marre, Samuel; LeNeindre, Bernard; Hahn, Inseob

    2016-11-01

    Based on a single non-universal temperature scaling factor present in a simple fluid case, a detailed analysis of non-universal parameters involved in different critical-to-classical crossover models is given. For the infinite limit of the cutoff wave number, a set of three scaling-parameters is defined for each model such that it shows all the shapes of the theoretical crossover functions overlap on the mean crossover function shapes close to the non-trivial fixed point. The analysis of corresponding links between their fluid-dependent parameters opens a route to define a parametric model of crossover equation-of-state, closely satisfying the universal features calculated from the Ising-like limit in the massive renormalization scheme.

  5. Controlling the Morphology and Efficiency of Hybrid ZnO : Polythiophene Solar Cells Via Side Chain Functionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, Stefan D.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; van Bavel, Svetlana S.; Loos, Joachim; Stenzel, Ole; Thiedmann, Ralf; Schmidt, Volker; Campo, Bert; Cleij, Thomas J.; Lutzen, Laurence; Vanderzande, Dirk; Wienk, Martijn M.; Janssen, Rene A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of polymer - metal oxide hybrid solar cells depends critically on the intimacy of mixing of the two semiconductors. The effect of side chain functionalization on the morphology and performance of conjugated polymer:ZnO solar cells is investigated. Using an ester-functionalized side ch

  6. Dielectric function and critical points of AlP determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.Y.; Kim, T.J.; Jung, Y.W.; Barange, N.S.; Park, H.G.; Kim, J.Y.; Kang, Y.R. [Nano-Optical Property Laboratory and Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.D., E-mail: ydkim@khu.ac.kr [Nano-Optical Property Laboratory and Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, S.H.; Song, J.D. [Center for Opto-Electronic Convergence Systems, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Liang, C.-T.; Chang, Y.-C. [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • We report the dielectric function ε of AlP from 0.74 to 6.54 eV. • The critical points (CPs) in the E{sub 2} spectral range are important for band-structure analysis. • We extract ε of AlP, using the multilayer parametric model. • The CP energies are obtained from numerically calculated second-energy-derivatives. • We identify these CPs from the linear augmented Slater-type orbital method. -- Abstract: We report the room-temperature dielectric function ε of AlP from 0.74 to 6.54 eV obtained by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. Measurements were done on a 1.2 μm thick film grown on (0 0 1) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy, with ε extracted using a multilayer parametric model. Critical point energies of features in the ε spectra were obtained from numerically calculated second-energy-derivatives, and their Brillouin-zone origins identified by band-structure calculations done using the linear augmented Slater-type orbital method.

  7. Evaluation of critical materials in five additional advance design photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.; Martin, P.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. The Critical Materials Assessment Program (CMAP) screens the designs and their supply chains and identifies potential shortages which might preclude large-scale use of the technologies. The results of the screening of five advanced PV cell designs are presented: (1) indium phosphide/cadmium sulfide, (2) zinc phosphide, (3) cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide, (4) copper indium selenium, and (5) cadmium selenide photoelectrochemical. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 Gwe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has a 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online capacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary baseline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. The CMAP methodology used to identify critical materials is described; and detailed characterizations of the advanced photovoltaic cell designs under investigation, descriptions of additional cell production processes, and the results are presented. (WHK)

  8. Spectral functions in functional renormalization group approach -- analysis of the collective soft modes at the QCD critical point --

    CERN Document Server

    Yokota, Takeru; Morita, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We first review the method to calculate the spectral functions in the functional renormalization group (FRG) approach, which has been recently developed. We also provide the numerical stability conditions given by the present authors for a generic nonlinear evolution equation that are necessary for obtaining the accurate effective potential from the flow equation in the FRG. As an interesting example, we report the recent calculation of the spectral functions of the mesonic and particle-hole excitations using a chiral effective model of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD); we extract the dispersion relations from them and try to reveal the nature of the soft modes at the QCD critical point (CP) where the phase transition is second order. Our result shows that a clear development and the softening of the phonon mode in the space-like region as the system approaches the CP; furthermore it turns out that the sigma mesonic mode once in the time-like region gets to merge with the phonon mode in the close vicinity of the ...

  9. Single cell cytometry of protein function in RNAi treated cells and in native populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High Content Screening has been shown to improve results of RNAi and other perturbations, however significant intra-sample heterogeneity is common and can complicate some analyses. Single cell cytometry can extract important information from subpopulations within these samples. Such approaches are important for immune cells analyzed by flow cytometry, but have not been broadly available for adherent cells that are critical to the study of solid-tumor cancers and other disease models. Results We have directly quantitated the effect of resolving RNAi treatments at the single cell level in experimental systems for both exogenous and endogenous targets. Analyzing the effect of an siRNA that targets GFP at the single cell level permits a stronger measure of the absolute function of the siRNA by gating to eliminate background levels of GFP intensities. Extending these methods to endogenous proteins, we have shown that well-level results of the knockdown of PTEN results in an increase in phospho-S6 levels, but at the single cell level, the correlation reveals the role of other inputs into the pathway. In a third example, reduction of STAT3 levels by siRNA causes an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, but does not induce apoptosis or necrosis when compared to control cells that express the same levels of STAT3. In a final example, the effect of reduced p53 levels on increased adriamycin sensitivity for colon carcinoma cells was demonstrated at the whole-well level using siRNA knockdown and in control and untreated cells at the single cell level. Conclusion We find that single cell analysis methods are generally applicable to a wide range of experiments in adherent cells using technology that is becoming increasingly available to most laboratories. It is well-suited to emerging models of signaling dysfunction, such as oncogene addition and oncogenic shock. Single cell cytometry can demonstrate effects on cell

  10. Na+/K+-ATPase E960 and phospholemman F28 are critical for their functional interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Khafaga, Mounir; Bossuyt, Julie; Mamikonian, Luiza; Li, Joseph C.; Lee, Linda L.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Despa, Sanda; Bers, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) establishes the transmembrane [Na+] gradient in cells. In heart, phospholemman (PLM) inhibits NKA activity by reducing its apparent Na+ affinity, an effect that is relieved by PLM phosphorylation. The NKA crystal structure suggests regions of PLM–NKA interaction, but the sites important for functional effects in live cells are not known. We tested wild type (WT) and CFP–NKA-α1 point mutants (alanine substitution at F956, E960, L964, and F967) for fluorescence resonance ene...

  11. Effects of Interactive Function Forms and Refractoryperiod in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOULi-Ming; CHENTian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-fire mechanism, we investigate the effect of the nonlinear interactive function on the self-organized criticality in our model. Based on the sewe also investigate the effect of the refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality of the system.

  12. Effects of Interactive Function Forms and Refractoryperiod in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ming; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-tire mechanism, we investigate the effect of the nonlinear interactive function on the self-organized criticality in our model. Based on these we also investigate the effect of the refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality of the system.

  13. Critical appraisal of 13C breath tests for microsomal liver function: aminopyrine revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijls, Kirsten E; de Vries, Hanne; Nikkessen, Suzan; Bast, Aalt; Wodzig, Will K W H; Koek, Ger H

    2014-04-01

    As liver diseases are a major health problem and especially the incidence of metabolic liver diseases like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, the demand for non-invasive tests is growing to replace liver biopsy. Non-invasive tests such as carbon-labelled breath tests can provide a valuable contribution to the evaluation of metabolic liver function. This review aims to critically appraise the value of the (13) C-labelled microsomal breath tests for the evaluation of metabolic liver function, and to discuss the role of cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of the different probe drugs, especially of aminopyrine. Although a number of different probe drugs have been used in breath tests, the perfect drug to assess the functional metabolic capacity of the liver has not been found. Data suggest that both the (13) C(2) -aminopyrine and the (13) C-methacetin breath test can play a role in assessing the capacity of the microsomal liver function and may be useful in the follow-up of patients with chronic liver diseases. Furthermore, CYP2C19 seems to be an important enzyme in the N-demethylation of aminopyrine, and polymorphisms in this gene may influence breath test values, which should be kept in mind when performing the (13) C(2) -aminopyrine breath test in clinical practice.

  14. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  15. Critical interfaces in organic solar cells and their influence on the open-circuit voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potscavage, William J; Sharma, Asha; Kippelen, Bernard

    2009-11-17

    Organic photovoltaics, which convert sunlight into electricity with thin films of organic semiconductors, have been the subject of active research over the past 20 years. The global energy challenge has greatly increased interest in this technology in recent years. Low-temperature processing of organic small molecules from the vapor phase or of polymers from solution can confer organic semiconductors with a critical advantage over inorganic photovoltaic materials since the high-temperature processing requirements of the latter limit the range of substrates on which they can be deposited. Unfortunately, despite significant advances, the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells remains low, with maximum values in the range of 6%. A better understanding of the physical processes that determine the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells is crucial to enhancing their competitiveness with other thin-film technologies. Maximum values for the photocurrent can be estimated from the light-harvesting capability of the individual molecules or polymers in the device. However, a better understanding of the materials-level processes, particularly those in layer-to-layer interfaces, that determine the open-circuit voltage (V(OC)) in organic solar cells is critical and remains the subject of active research. The conventional wisdom is to use organic semiconductors with smaller band gaps to harvest a larger portion of the solar spectrum. This method is not always an effective prescription for increasing efficiency: it ignores the fact that the value of V(OC) is generally decreased in devices employing materials with smaller band gaps, as is the case with inorganic semiconductors. In this Account, we discuss the influence of the different interfaces formed in organic multilayer photovoltaic devices on the value of V(OC); we use pentacene-C(60) solar cells as a model. In particular, we use top and bottom electrodes with different work function values, finding that V(OC) is

  16. Cutting edge: CXCR4 is critical for CD8+ memory T cell homeostatic self-renewal but not rechallenge self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Julie; Nish, Simone A; Lin, Wen-Hsuan W; Rothman, Nyanza J; Ding, Lei; Wherry, E John; Reiner, Steven L

    2014-08-01

    Central memory (CM) CD8(+) T cells "remember" prior encounters because they maintain themselves through cell division in the absence of ongoing challenge (homeostatic self-renewal), as well as reproduce the CM fate while manufacturing effector cells during secondary Ag encounters (rechallenge self-renewal). We tested the consequence of conditional deletion of the bone marrow homing receptor CXCR4 on antiviral T cell responses. CXCR4-deficient CD8(+) T cells have impaired memory cell maintenance due to defective homeostatic proliferation. Upon rechallenge, however, CXCR4-deficient T cells can re-expand and renew the CM pool while producing secondary effector cells. The critical bone marrow-derived signals essential for CD8(+) T cell homeostatic self-renewal appear to be dispensable to yield self-renewing, functionally asymmetric cell fates during rechallenge.

  17. Determination of the third critical field of superconductors using constrained effective wave function containing two variational parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Longdao; Gao Yuliang

    1985-09-01

    Two variational parameters are included in the most probable constrained effective wave function with the accurate Hamiltonian remained. The third critical field which coincides with the result in paper (1) has been easily obtained through the variational principle.

  18. Probabilistic map of critical functional regions of the human cerebral cortex: Broca's area revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Matthew C; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Tate, Joseph E; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    The organization of basic functions of the human brain, particularly in the right hemisphere, remains poorly understood. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have improved our understanding of cortical organization but do not allow for direct interrogation or determination of essential (versus participatory) cortical regions. Direct cortical stimulation represents a unique opportunity to provide novel insights into the functional distribution of critical epicentres. Direct cortical stimulation (bipolar, 60 Hz, 1-ms pulse) was performed in 165 consecutive patients undergoing awake mapping for resection of low-grade gliomas. Tasks included motor, sensory, counting, and picture naming. Stimulation sites eliciting positive (sensory/motor) or negative (speech arrest, dysarthria, anomia, phonological and semantic paraphasias) findings were recorded and mapped onto a standard Montreal Neurological Institute brain atlas. Montreal Neurological Institute-space functional data were subjected to cluster analysis algorithms (K-means, partition around medioids, hierarchical Ward) to elucidate crucial network epicentres. Sensorimotor function was observed in the pre/post-central gyri as expected. Articulation epicentres were also found within the pre/post-central gyri. However, speech arrest localized to ventral premotor cortex, not the classical Broca's area. Anomia/paraphasia data demonstrated foci not only within classical Wernicke's area but also within the middle and inferior frontal gyri. We report the first bilateral probabilistic map for crucial cortical epicentres of human brain functions in the right and left hemispheres, including sensory, motor, and language (speech, articulation, phonology and semantics). These data challenge classical theories of brain organization (e.g. Broca's area as speech output region) and provide a distributed framework for future studies of neural networks.

  19. MSFD2A is critical for the formation and function of the blood brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Kur, Esther; Andreone, Benjamin J.; Mayshar, Yoav; Yan, Han; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) requires a tightly controlled environment free of toxins and pathogens to provide the proper chemical composition for neural function. This environment is maintained by the ‘blood brain barrier’ (BBB), which is composed of blood vessels whose endothelial cells display specialized tight junctions and extremely low rates of transcellular vesicular transport (transcytosis)1–3. In concert with pericytes and astrocytes, this unique brain endothelial physiological barrier seals the CNS and controls substance influx and efflux4–6. While BBB breakdown has recently been associated with initiation and perpetuation of various neurological disorders, an intact BBB is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the CNS7–10. A limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control BBB formation has hindered our ability to manipulate the BBB in disease and therapy. Here, we identify mechanisms governing the establishment of a functional BBB. First, using a novel embryonic tracer injection method, we demonstrate spatiotemporal developmental profiles of BBB functionality and find that the mouse BBB becomes functional at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5). We then screen for BBB-specific genes expressed during BBB formation, and find that major facilitator super family domain containing 2a (Mfsd2a) is selectively expressed in BBB-containing blood vessels in the CNS. Genetic ablation of Mfsd2a results in a leaky BBB from embryonic periods through adulthood, while maintaining the normal patterning of vascular networks. Electron microscopy examination reveals a dramatic increase in CNS endothelial cell vesicular transcytosis in Mfsd2a−/− mice, without obvious tight junction defects. Finally we show that MFSD2A endothelial expression is regulated by pericytes to facilitate BBB integrity. These findings identify MFSD2A as a key regulator of BBB function that may act by suppressing transcytosis in CNS endothelial cells. Further our findings may aid

  20. Mfsd2a is critical for the formation and function of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Kur, Esther; Andreone, Benjamin J; Mayshar, Yoav; Yan, Han; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-05-22

    The central nervous system (CNS) requires a tightly controlled environment free of toxins and pathogens to provide the proper chemical composition for neural function. This environment is maintained by the 'blood-brain barrier' (BBB), which is composed of blood vessels whose endothelial cells display specialized tight junctions and extremely low rates of transcellular vesicular transport (transcytosis). In concert with pericytes and astrocytes, this unique brain endothelial physiological barrier seals the CNS and controls substance influx and efflux. Although BBB breakdown has recently been associated with initiation and perpetuation of various neurological disorders, an intact BBB is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the CNS. A limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control BBB formation has hindered our ability to manipulate the BBB in disease and therapy. Here we identify mechanisms governing the establishment of a functional BBB. First, using a novel tracer-injection method for embryos, we demonstrate spatiotemporal developmental profiles of BBB functionality and find that the mouse BBB becomes functional at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5). We then screen for BBB-specific genes expressed during BBB formation, and find that major facilitator super family domain containing 2a (Mfsd2a) is selectively expressed in BBB-containing blood vessels in the CNS. Genetic ablation of Mfsd2a results in a leaky BBB from embryonic stages through to adulthood, but the normal patterning of vascular networks is maintained. Electron microscopy examination reveals a dramatic increase in CNS-endothelial-cell vesicular transcytosis in Mfsd2a(-/-) mice, without obvious tight-junction defects. Finally we show that Mfsd2a endothelial expression is regulated by pericytes to facilitate BBB integrity. These findings identify Mfsd2a as a key regulator of BBB function that may act by suppressing transcytosis in CNS endothelial cells. Furthermore, our findings may aid in efforts

  1. The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a critical mediator of cell death program induced by WIN/TRAIL combined treatment in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaro, Antonietta; Sabella, Selenia; Pellerito, Ornella; Vento, Renza; Calvaruso, Giuseppe; Giuliano, Michela

    2016-03-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a multi-functional protein which modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In cancer cells, SPARC behaves as a tumor promoter in a number of tumors, but it can also act as a tumor suppressor factor. Our previous results showed that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (WIN), a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist, is able to sensitize osteosarcoma MG63 cells to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis which is accompanied with endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress induction and the increase in autophagic markers. In the present investigation, we studied the role of SPARC in WIN/TRAIL-induced apoptosis demonstrating that WIN increased the level of SPARC protein and mRNA in a time-dependent manner. This event was functional to WIN/TRAIL-dependent apoptosis as demonstrated by RNA interfering analysis which indicated that SPARC-silenced cells were less sensitive to cytotoxic effects induced by the combined treatment. Our experiments also demonstrate that SPARC interacts with caspase-8 thus probably favoring its translocation to plasma membrane and the activation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, our results are the first to show that WIN-dependent increase in the level of SPARC plays a critical role in sensitizing osteosarcoma cells to TRAIL action.

  2. Notch signalling suppresses regulatory T-cell function in murine experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Hua; Shen, Hongjie; Xu, Yueli; Yang, Hai

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an intraocular inflammatory disorder in developed countries. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and modulation of immune reaction in uveitic eyes is critical for designing therapeutic interventions. Here we investigated the role of Notch signalling in regulatory T-cell (Treg cell) function during experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Using the Foxp3-GFP reporter mouse strain, the significance of Notch signalling for the function of infiltrating Treg cells was characterized in an EAU model. We found that infiltrating Treg cells substantially expressed Notch-1, Notch-2, JAG1 and DLL1 in uveitic eyes. Activation of Notch signalling, represented by expression of HES1 and HES5, was enhanced in infiltrating Treg cells. Treatment with JAG1 and DLL1 down-regulated Foxp3 expression and immunosuppressive activity of isolated infiltrating Treg cells in vitro, whereas neutralizing antibodies against JAG1 and DLL1 diminished Notch ligand-mediated negative effects on Treg cells. To investigate the significance of Notch signalling for Treg cell function in vivo, lentivirus-derived Notch short hairpin RNAs were transduced into in vitro expanded Treg cells before adoptive transfer of Treg cells into EAU mice. Transfer of Notch-1-deficient Treg cells remarkably reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and inflammatory cell infiltration in uveitic eyes. Taken together, Notch signalling negatively modulates the immunosuppressive function of infiltrating Treg cells in mouse EAU.

  3. Solutions for data integration in functional genomics: a critical assessment and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Damian; Swertz, Morris A; Wolstencroft, Katy; Proctor, Glenn; Zouberakis, Michael; Bard, Jonathan; Hancock, John M; Schofield, Paul

    2008-11-01

    The torrent of data emerging from the application of new technologies to functional genomics and systems biology can no longer be contained within the traditional modes of data sharing and publication with the consequence that data is being deposited in, distributed across and disseminated through an increasing number of databases. The resulting fragmentation poses serious problems for the model organism community which increasingly rely on data mining and computational approaches that require gathering of data from a range of sources. In the light of these problems, the European Commission has funded a coordination action, CASIMIR (coordination and sustainability of international mouse informatics resources), with a remit to assess the technical and social aspects of database interoperability that currently prevent the full realization of the potential of data integration in mouse functional genomics. In this article, we assess the current problems with interoperability, with particular reference to mouse functional genomics, and critically review the technologies that can be deployed to overcome them. We describe a typical use-case where an investigator wishes to gather data on variation, genomic context and metabolic pathway involvement for genes discovered in a genome-wide screen. We go on to develop an automated approach involving an in silico experimental workflow tool, Taverna, using web services, BioMart and MOLGENIS technologies for data retrieval. Finally, we focus on the current impediments to adopting such an approach in a wider context, and strategies to overcome them.

  4. Mutational analysis of βCOP (Sec26p identifies an appendage domain critical for function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerione Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appendage domain of the γCOP subunit of the COPI vesicle coat bears a striking structural resemblance to adaptin-family appendages despite limited primary sequence homology. Both the γCOP appendage domain and an equivalent region on βCOP contain the FxxxW motif; the conservation of this motif suggested the existence of a functional appendage domain in βCOP. Results Sequence comparisons in combination with structural prediction tools show that the fold of the COOH-terminus of Sec26p is strongly predicted to closely mimic that of adaptin-family appendages. Deletion of the appendage domain of Sec26p results in inviability in yeast, over-expression of the deletion construct is dominant negative and mutagenesis of this region identifies residues critical for function. The ArfGAP Glo3p was identified via suppression screening as a potential downstream modulator of Sec26p in a manner that is independent of the GAP activity of Glo3p but requires the presence of the COOH-terminal ISS motifs. Conclusion Together, these results indicate an essential function for the predicted βCOP appendage and suggest that both COPI appendages perform a biologically active regulatory role with a structure related to adaptin-family appendage domains.

  5. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Catherine K; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S; Madden, Victoria J; Bagnell, C Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-04-21

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction.

  6. Separation of photo-induced radical pair in cryptochrome to a functionally critical distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Domratcheva, Tatiana; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochrome is a blue light receptor that acts as a sensor for the geomagnetic field and assists many animals in long-range navigation. The magnetoreceptor function arises from light-induced formation of a radical pair through electron transfer between a flavin cofactor (FAD) and a triad...... of tryptophan residues. Here, this electron transfer is investigated by quantum chemical and classical molecular dynamics calculations. The results reveal how sequential electron transfer, assisted by rearrangement of polar side groups in the cryptochrome interior, can yield a FAD-Trp radical pair state...... with the FAD and Trp partners separated beyond a critical distance. The large radical pair separation reached establishes cryptochrome's sensitivity to the geomagnetic field through weakening of distance-dependent exchange and dipole-dipole interactions. It is estimated that the key secondary electron transfer...

  7. Dnd Is a Critical Specifier of Primordial Germ Cells in the Medaka Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cell (PGC specification occurs early in development. PGC specifiers have been identified in Drosophila, mouse, and human but remained elusive in most animals. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein Dnd as a critical PGC specifier in the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes. Dnd depletion specifically abolished PGCs, and its overexpression boosted PGCs. We established a single-cell culture procedure enabling lineage tracing in vitro. We show that individual blastomeres from cleavage embryos at the 32- and 64-cell stages are capable of PGC production in culture. Importantly, Dnd overexpression increases PGCs via increasing PGC precursors. Strikingly, dnd RNA forms prominent particles that segregate asymmetrically. Dnd concentrates in germ plasm and stabilizes germ plasm RNA. Therefore, Dnd is a critical specifier of fish PGCs and utilizes particle partition as a previously unidentified mechanism for asymmetric segregation. These findings offer insights into PGC specification and manipulation in medaka as a lower vertebrate model.

  8. Regulated proteolysis of a transcription factor complex is critical to cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Kasia G; Cantin, Amber; Wohlever, Matthew; Joshi, Kamal K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle transitions are often triggered by the proteolysis of key regulatory proteins. In Caulobacter crescentus, the G1-S transition involves the degradation of an essential DNA-binding response regulator, CtrA, by the ClpXP protease. Here, we show that another critical cell cycle regulator, SciP, is also degraded during the G1-S transition, but by the Lon protease. SciP is a small protein that binds directly to CtrA and prevents it from activating target genes during G1. We demonstrate that SciP must be degraded during the G1-S transition so that cells can properly activate CtrA-dependent genes following DNA replication initiation and the reaccumulation of CtrA. These results indicate that like CtrA, SciP levels are tightly regulated during the Caulobacter cell cycle. In addition, we show that formation of a complex between CtrA and SciP at target promoters protects both proteins from their respective proteases. Degradation of either protein thus helps trigger the destruction of the other, facilitating a cooperative disassembly of the complex. Collectively, our results indicate that ClpXP and Lon each degrade an important cell cycle regulator, helping to trigger the onset of S phase and prepare cells for the subsequent programmes of gene expression critical to polar morphogenesis and cell division.

  9. C/EBPβ regulates transcription factors critical for proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rekha; Janz, Martin; Galson, Deborah L.; Gries, Margarete; Li, Shirong; Jöhrens, Korinna; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Dörken, Bernd; Mapara, Markus Y.; Borghesi, Lisa; Kardava, Lela; Roodman, G. David; Milcarek, Christine

    2009-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ), also known as nuclear factor–interleukin-6 (NF-IL6), is a transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of myeloid and lymphoid cells. Mice deficient in C/EBPβ show impaired generation of B lymphocytes. We show that C/EBPβ regulates transcription factors critical for proliferation and survival in multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary multiple myeloma cells strongly expressed C/EBPβ, whereas normal B cells and plasma cells had little or no detectable levels of C/EBPβ. Silencing of C/EBPβ led to down-regulation of transcription factors such as IRF4, XBP1, and BLIMP1 accompanied by a strong inhibition of proliferation. Further, silencing of C/EBPβ led to a complete down-regulation of antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, C/EBPβ directly bound to the promoter region of IRF4, BLIMP1, and BCL2. Our data indicate that C/EBPβ is involved in the regulatory network of transcription factors that are critical for plasma cell differentiation and survival. Targeting C/EBPβ may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of multiple myeloma. PMID:19717648

  10. Metabolic regulation of regulatory T cell development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David John Coe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require ATP-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets have been shown to require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses.

  11. Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) is critical for transcriptional control of SLAMF1 gene in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Anton M; Putlyaeva, Lidia V; Covich, Milica; Klepikova, Anna V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Korneev, Kirill V; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Polanovsky, Oleg L; Sidorenko, Svetlana P; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1 (SLAMF1)/CD150 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on a variety of hematopoietic cells, in particular on mature lymphocytes activated by specific antigen, costimulation and cytokines. Changes in CD150 expression level have been reported in association with autoimmunity and with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We characterized the core promoter for SLAMF1 gene in human B-cell lines and explored binding sites for a number of transcription factors involved in B cell differentiation and activation. Mutations of SP1, STAT6, IRF4, NF-kB, ELF1, TCF3, and SPI1/PU.1 sites resulted in significantly decreased promoter activity of varying magnitude, depending on the cell line tested. The most profound effect on the promoter strength was observed upon mutation of the binding site for Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1). This mutation produced a 10-20 fold drop in promoter activity and pinpointed EBF1 as the master regulator of human SLAMF1 gene in B cells. We also identified three potent transcriptional enhancers in human SLAMF1 locus, each containing functional EBF1 binding sites. Thus, EBF1 interacts with specific binding sites located both in the promoter and in the enhancer regions of the SLAMF1 gene and is critical for its expression in human B cells.

  12. Cell Phone’s Functions on Language Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍文忠; 王娜

    2012-01-01

      With the time passing by and development of this society, almost everyone has a cell phone, we may see that cell phone as a new fifth medium after computer, having its own characters and advantages, many learners research the communica⁃tive function of cell phone and some from the technological level. This thesis aims at trying to reveal cultural functions of culture, aiming at improve cell phone’ s learning and culture functions in a more proper way.

  13. A critical role of Rap1b in B-cell trafficking and marginal zone B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Podd, Andrew; Wen, Renren; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; White, Gilbert C; Wang, Demin

    2008-05-01

    B-cell development is orchestrated by complex signaling networks. Rap1 is a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and has 2 isoforms, Rap1a and Rap1b. Although Rap1 has been suggested to have an important role in a variety of cellular processes, no direct evidence demonstrates a role for Rap1 in B-cell biology. In this study, we found that Rap1b was the dominant isoform of Rap1 in B cells. We discovered that Rap1b deficiency in mice barely affected early development of B cells but markedly reduced marginal zone (MZ) B cells in the spleen and mature B cells in peripheral and mucosal lymph nodes. Rap1b-deficient B cells displayed normal survival and proliferation in vivo and in vitro. However, Rap1b-deficient B cells had impaired adhesion and reduced chemotaxis in vitro, and lessened homing to lymph nodes in vivo. Furthermore, we found that Rap1b deficiency had no marked effect on LPS-, BCR-, or SDF-1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and AKT but clearly impaired SDF-1-mediated activation of Pyk-2, a key regulator of SDF-1-mediated B-cell migration. Thus, we have discovered a critical and distinct role of Rap1b in mature B-cell trafficking and development of MZ B cells.

  14. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  15. Improvement of Brain Function through Combined Yogic Intervention, Meditation and Pranayama: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup De

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice of yoga includes static and dynamic postures (asanas, breathing manipulations (pranayama and meditation (dhyana. Yoga is a tool which works in the gross body level to the shuttle mind level. Yoga is a simple and inexpensive health regimen that can be incorporated as an effective adjuvant therapy for the improvement of brain and mental activity. Aim: To review scientific literatures related to yoga practice and brain function. Method: Researchers collected scientific evidences through electronic databases; Pubmed, Embase, Medline, Google Scholar, Google Advance Search, PsycINFO, ROAJ, DOAJR, Web of Science and critically analyzed the entire relevant article according to the nature of this study. Findings:Combined yogic practices improve memory which can influence the academic performance of the students. Meditation practices improve higher level of concentration and consciousness which may reduce the psychic disorder. Pranayama practice may be applied as alternative therapy for reducing stress related diseases Conclusions: Regular yogic practices may improve brain and others neuro cognitive functions.

  16. Functional Imaging of the Foot with Perfusion Angiography in Critical Limb Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [AMC, Dept of Radiology (Netherlands); Koelemay, Mark J. W., E-mail: m.j.koelemaij@amc.uva.nl [AMC, Dept of Vascular Surgery (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A., E-mail: h.a.marquering@amc.uva.nl; Bavel, Ed T. van, E-mail: e.vanbavel@amc.uva.n [AMC, Dept of Biomedical Engineering and Physics (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo report on the first clinical experience with perfusion angiography (PA) of the foot in patients with chronic critical limb ischemia.Materials and MethodsPA is a post-processing software algorithm and no extra digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has to be performed for this analysis. The data used to test the feasibility of PA were obtained from a consecutive group of 89 patients with CLI who were treated with standard below the knee angioplasty and 12 separate patients who were not suitable for endovascular revascularization.ResultsMotion artifacts in the dataset of the DSA made post-procedural analysis impossible in 10 % intervention. In the majority of patients (59/68) PA showed an increase in volume flow in the foot after successful angioplasty of the crural vessels. However, in 9/68 patients no increase was seen after successful angioplasty. With the use of a local administered competitive α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, it is also possible to test and quantify the capillary resistance index which is a parameter for the remaining functionality of the microcirculation in CLI patients.ConclusionPA might be used as a new endpoint for lower limb revascularization and can also be used to test the functionality the microcirculation to identify sub-types of patients with CLI. Clinical evaluation and standardization of PA is mandatory before introduction in daily practice.

  17. Analytical development of the lunisolar disturbing function and the critical inclination secular resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Alessandra; Galeş, Cătălin; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Rosengren, Aaron J.

    2017-03-01

    We provide a detailed derivation of the analytical expansion of the lunar and solar disturbing functions. Although there exist several papers on this topic, many derivations contain mistakes in the final expansion or rather (just) in the proof, thereby necessitating a recasting and correction of the original derivation. In this work, we provide a self-consistent and definite form of the lunisolar expansion. We start with Kaula's expansion of the disturbing function in terms of the equatorial elements of both the perturbed and perturbing bodies. Then we give a detailed proof of Lane's expansion, in which the elements of the Moon are referred to the ecliptic plane. Using this approach the inclination of the Moon becomes nearly constant, while the argument of perihelion, the longitude of the ascending node, and the mean anomaly vary linearly with time. We make a comparison between the different expansions and we profit from such discussion to point out some mistakes in the existing literature, which might compromise the correctness of the results. As an application, we analyze the long-term motion of the highly elliptical and critically-inclined Molniya orbits subject to quadrupolar gravitational interactions. The analytical expansions presented herein are very powerful with respect to dynamical studies based on Cartesian equations, because they quickly allow for a more holistic and intuitively understandable picture of the dynamics.

  18. Syndecans as cell surface receptors: Unique structure equates with functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Youngsil; Chung, Heesung; Jung, Heyjung

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of functions for syndecan cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been proposed over the last decade. Moreover, aberrant syndecan regulation has been found to play a critical role in multiple pathologies, including cancers, as well as wound healing and inflammation...... glycosaminoglycan chains, especially heparan sulfate. This heterodisperse polysaccharide has the potential to interact with many ligands from diverse protein families. Here, we relate the structural features of syndecans to some of their known functions....

  19. An increase in telomere sister chromatid exchange in murine embryonic stem cells possessing critically shortened telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Wu, Jun [ORNL; Gomez, Marla V [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Telomerase deficiency leads to a progressive loss of telomeric DNA that eventually triggers cell apoptosis in human primary cells during prolonged growth in culture. Rare survivors can maintain telomere length through either activation of telomerase or recombination-based telomere lengthening, and thus proliferate indefinitely. We have explored the possibility that telomeres may be maintained through telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE) in murine telomere reverse transcriptase-deficient (mTert -/-) splenocytes and ES cells. Because telomerase deficiency leads to gradual loss of telomeric DNA in mTert -/- splenocytes and ES cells and eventually to chromosomes with telomere signal-free ends (SFEs), we examined these cell types for evidence of sister chromatid exchange at telomeres, and observed an increase in T-SCEs only in a subset of mTert -/- splenocytes or ES cells that possessed multiple SFEs. Furthermore, T-SCEs were more often detected in ES cells than in splenocytes that harbored a similar frequency of SFEs. In mTert heterozygous (mTert +/-) ES cells or splenocytes, which are known to exhibit a decrease in average telomere length but no SFEs, no increase in T-SCE was observed. In addition to T-SCE, other genomic rearrangements (i.e., SCE) were also significantly increased in mTert -/- ES cells possessing critically short telomeres, but not in splenocytes. Our results suggest that animals and cell culture differ in their ability to carry out genomic rearrangements as a means of maintaining telomere integrity when telomeres become critically shortened.

  20. Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 Released by Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Critical for Inhibiting Th17 Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fang; Zhang, Lingyun; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Huiyuan; Lou, Fangzhou; Cai, Wei; Sun, Yang; Gao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong; Wang, Honglin

    2016-03-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Th17 cell differentiation from naïve T cells can be induced in vitro by the cytokines transforming growth factor β1 and interleukin-6. However, it remains unclear whether other regulatory factors control the differentiation of Th17 cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a promising candidate for inhibiting Th17 cell differentiation and autoimmune diseases. Despite the fact that several molecules have been linked to the immunomodulatory function of MSCs, many other key MSC-secreted regulators that are involved in inhibiting Th17 cell polarization are ill-defined. In this study, we demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of skin-derived MSCs (S-MSCs) substantially ameliorated the development of EAE in mice. We found that the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a key mediator in the pathophysiology of MS and EAE, was capable of promoting Th17 cell differentiation. Moreover, under inflammatory conditions, we demonstrated that S-MSCs produced high amounts of soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1), which binds TNF-α and antagonizes its function. Knockdown of sTNFR1 in S-MSCs decreased their inhibitory effect on Th17 cell differentiation ex vivo and in vivo. Thus, our data identified sTNFR1 and its target TNF-α as critical regulators for Th17 cell differentiation, suggesting a previously unrecognized mechanism for MSC therapy in Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  1. Sinorhizobium meliloti CpdR1 is critical for co-ordinating cell cycle progression and the symbiotic chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hajime; De Nisco, Nicole J; Chien, Peter; Simmons, Lyle A; Walker, Graham C

    2009-08-01

    ATP-driven proteolysis plays a major role in regulating the bacterial cell cycle, development and stress responses. In the nitro -fixing symbiosis with host plants, Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes a profound cellular differentiation, including endoreduplication of the ome. The regulatory mechanisms governing the alterations of the S. meliloti cell cycle in planta are largely unknown. Here, we report the characterization of two cpdR homologues, cpdR1 and cpdR2, of S. meliloti that encode single-domain response regulators. In Caulobacter crescentus, CpdR controls the polar localization of the ClpXP protease, thereby mediating the regulated proteolysis of key protein(s), such as CtrA, involved in cell cycle progression. The S. meliloti cpdR1-null mutant can invade the host cytoplasm, however, the intracellular bacteria are unable to differentiate into bacteroids. We show that S. meliloti CpdR1 has a polar localization pattern and a role in ClpX positioning similar to C. crescentus CpdR, suggesting a conserved function of CpdR proteins among alpha-proteobacteria. However, in S. meliloti, free-living cells of the cpdR1-null mutant show a striking morphology of irregular coccoids and aberrant DNA replication. Thus, we demonstrate that CpdR1 mediates the co-ordination of cell cycle events, which are critical for both the free-living cell division and the differentiation required for the chronic intracellular infection.

  2. Omcg1 is critically required for mitosis in rapidly dividing mouse intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Léguillier

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that factors involved in transcription-coupled mRNA processing are important for the maintenance of genome integrity. How these processes are linked and regulated in vivo remains largely unknown. In this study, we addressed in the mouse model the function of Omcg1, which has been shown to participate in co-transcriptional processes, including splicing and transcription-coupled repair. Using inducible mouse models, we found that Omcg1 is most critically required in intestinal progenitors. In absence of OMCG1, proliferating intestinal epithelial cells underwent abnormal mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death. As a consequence, the crypt proliferative compartment of the small intestine was quickly and totally abrogated leading to the rapid death of the mice. Lack of OMCG1 in embryonic stem cells led to a similar cellular phenotype, with multiple mitotic defects and rapid cell death. We showed that mutant intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells exhibited a reduced cell cycle arrest following irradiation, suggesting that mitotic defects may be consecutive to M phase entry with unrepaired DNA damages. These findings unravel a crucial role for pre-mRNA processing in the homeostasis of the small intestine and point to a major role of OMCG1 in the maintenance of genome integrity.

  3. Impaired renal function is associated with greater urinary strong ion differences in critically ill patients with metabolic acidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moviat, M.; Terpstra, A.M.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Urinary excretion of chloride corrects metabolic acidosis, but this may be hampered in patients with impaired renal function. We explored the effects of renal function on acid-base characteristics and urinary strong ion excretion using the Stewart approach in critically ill patients with me

  4. A version of Carleman’s formula summation of the Riemann ζ -function on the critical line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Brydun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A version of Carleman's formula for functions holomorphic in a rectangle is proved. It is applied to the evaluation of the integral of ζ -function logarithm with the summing factor exp(−t along the critical line. This allowed to obtain a new statement equivalent to the Riemann hypothesis.

  5. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress......In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...... for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change...

  6. β-cell dysfunction: Its critical role in prevention andmanagement of type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is characterized by insulinresistance and β-cell dysfunction. Although, in contrastto type 1 diabetes, insulin resistance is assumed to bea major pathophysiological feature of T2DM, T2DMnever develops unless β-cells fail to compensate insulinresistance. Recent studies have revealed that a deficitof β-cell functional mass is an essential componentof the pathophysiology of T2DM, implying that β-celldeficit is a common feature of both type 1 and type 2diabetes. β-cell dysfunction is present at the diagnosisof T2DM and progressively worsens with diseaseduration. β-cell dysfunction is associated with worseningof glycemic control and treatment failure; thus, it isimportant to preserve or recover β-cell functional massin the management of T2DM. Since β-cell regenerativecapacity appears somewhat limited in humans, reducingβ-cell workload appears to be the most effective way topreserve β-cell functional mass to date, underpinningthe importance of lifestyle modification and weight lossfor the treatment and prevention of T2DM. This reviewsummarizes the current knowledge on β-cell functionalmass in T2DM and discusses the treatment strategy forT2DM.

  7. Regulation of NK-cell function by mucins via antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskarin, G; Redzovic, A; Medancic, S Srsen; Rukavina, D

    2010-12-01

    Decidual antigen-presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs) and CD14(+) macrophages, as mediators of the first encounter with fetal antigens, appear to be critically involved in the initiation of primary immune response by regulating innate- and adaptive immunity. Interleukin-15, produced by them, permits the proliferation and differentiation of CD3(-)CD16(-)CD94(+)NKG2A(+)CD56(+bright) decidual NK cells that identify trophoblast cells. These cells are able to kill them after Th1 cytokine overstimulation and by increasing the release of preformed cytotoxic mediators. Thus, the local microenvironment is a potent modulator of antigen-presenting cell functions. Tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and mucine 1 (MUC-1) are glycoproteins secreted by uterine epithelial cells. Our hypothesis is that TAG-72 and MUC-1 are the natural ligands for carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of endocytic mannose receptor (MR or CD206) and DC-specific ICAM non-integrin (DC-SIGN or CD209) expressed on decidual CD14(+) macrophages and CD1a(+) DCs. They might be able to condition antigen-presenting cells to produce distinct profiles of cyto/chemokines with consequential reduction in NK-cell numbers and cytotoxic potential leading to insufficient control over trophoblast growth. This hypothesis could explain the disappearance of MUC-1 beneath the attached embryo during the process of successful implantation when tight regulation of trophoblast invasion is needed. As IL-15 is the earliest and the most important factor in NK-cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, we expected primarily an increase of IL-15 expression in antigen-presenting cells concomitant with the disappearance of mucins and the enhancement in NK cells numbers and of cytotoxic potential after their close contact with early pregnancy decidual antigen-presenting cells. If our hypothesis is correct, it would contribute to the understanding of the role of mucins in the redirection of immune response

  8. Bim/Bcl-2 balance is critical for maintaining naive and memory T cell homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Sara; Tripathi, Pulak; Bourdeau, Tristan; Acero, Luis; Grimes, H. Leighton; Katz, Jonathan D.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Hildeman, David A.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the role of the antiapoptotic molecule Bcl-2 in combating the proapoptotic molecule Bim in control of naive and memory T cell homeostasis using Bcl-2−/− mice that were additionally deficient in one or both alleles of Bim. Naive T cells were significantly decreased in Bim+/−Bcl-2−/− mice, but were largely restored in Bim−/−Bcl-2−/− mice. Similarly, a synthetic Bcl-2 inhibitor killed wild-type, but not Bim−/−, T cells. Further, T cells from Bim+/−Bcl-2−/− mice died rapidly ex vivo and were refractory to cytokine-driven survival in vitro. In vivo, naive CD8+ T cells required Bcl-2 to combat Bim to maintain peripheral survival, whereas naive CD4+ T cells did not. In contrast, Bim+/−Bcl-2−/− mice generated relatively normal numbers of memory T cells after lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Accumulation of memory T cells in Bim+/−Bcl-2−/− mice was likely caused by their increased proliferative renewal because of the lymphopenic environment of the mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role for a balance between Bim and Bcl-2 in controlling homeostasis of naive and memory T cells. PMID:17591857

  9. Mechanisms of T regulatory cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in tolerance to self-antigens and tissue grafts, and suppression of autoimmune reactions. These cells modulate the intensity and quality of immune reactions through attenuation of the cytolytic activities of reactive immune cells. Treg cells operate primarily at the site of inflammation where they modulate the immune reaction through three major mechanisms: a) direct killing of cytotoxic cells through cell-to-cell contact, b) inhibition of cytokine production by cytotoxic cells, in particular interleukin-2, c) direct secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines, in particular TGF-beta and interleukin-10. In addition to differential contributions of these mechanisms under variable inflammatory conditions, mechanistic complexity and diversity evolves from the diverse tasks performed by various Treg cell subsets in different stages of the immune reaction. Here we attempt to integrate the current experimental evidence to delineate the major suppressive pathways of Treg cells.

  10. Critical behaviour and scaling functions of the three-dimensional O(6) model

    CERN Document Server

    Holtmann, S; Schulze, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We numerically investigate the three-dimensional O(6) model on 12^3 to 120^3 lattices within the critical region at zero magnetic field, as well as at finite magnetic field on the critical isotherm and for several fixed couplings in the broken and the symmetric phase. We obtain from the Binder cumulant at vanishing magnetic field the critical coupling J_c=1.42865(3). The universal value of the Binder cumulant at this point is g_r(J_c)=-1.94456(10). At the critical coupling, the critical exponents \\gamma=1.604(6), \\beta=0.425(2) and \

  11. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSalazar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. Dendritic cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors dendritic cells are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence dendritic cells behaviour through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarise current understanding of how allergens are recognised by dendritic cells and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitisation and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signalling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitisation hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases.

  12. Near-critical fluctuations and cytoskeleton-assisted phase separation lead to subdiffusion in cell membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrig, Jens; Schwille, Petra

    2010-01-01

    We address the relationship between membrane microheterogeneity and anomalous subdiffusion in cell membranes by carrying out Monte Carlo simulations of two-component lipid membranes. We find that near-critical fluctuations in the membrane lead to transient subdiffusion, while membrane-cytoskeleton interaction strongly affects phase separation, enhances subdiffusion, and eventually leads to hop diffusion of lipids. Thus, we present a minimum realistic model for membrane rafts showing the features of both microscopic phase separation and subdiffusion.

  13. SIRT1 Overexpression Maintains Cell Phenotype and Function of Endothelial Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Jen, Michele; Perrin, Louisiane; Wertheim, Jason A; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that are differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be used in establishing disease models for personalized drug discovery or developing patient-specific vascularized tissues or organoids. However, a number of technical challenges are often associated with iPSC-ECs in culture, including instability of the endothelial phenotype and limited cell proliferative capacity over time. Early senescence is believed to be the primary mechanism underlying these limitations. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase involved in the regulation of cell senescence, redox state, and inflammatory status. We hypothesize that overexpression of the SIRT1 gene in iPSC-ECs will maintain EC phenotype, function, and proliferative capacity by overcoming early cell senescence. SIRT1 gene was packaged into a lentiviral vector (LV-SIRT1) and transduced into iPSC-ECs at passage 4. Beginning with passage 5, iPSC-ECs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology, whereas iPSC-ECs overexpressing SIRT1 maintained EC cobblestone morphology. SIRT1 overexpressing iPSC-ECs also exhibited a higher percentage of canonical markers of endothelia (LV-SIRT1 61.8% CD31(+) vs. LV-empty 31.7% CD31(+), P cell lifespan, overcoming critical hurdles associated with the use of iPSC-ECs in translational research.

  14. Large Scale-Invariant Fluctuations in Normal Blood Cell Counts A sign of criticality?

    CERN Document Server

    Perazzo, C A; Chialvo, D R; Willshaw, P; Perazzo, Carlos A.; Fernandez, Elmer A.; Chialvo, Dante R.; Willshaw, Peter

    2000-01-01

    All types of blood cells are formed by differentiation from a small self-maintaining population of pluri-potential stem cells in the bone marrow. Despite abundant information on the molecular aspects of division, differentiation, commitment and maturation of these cells, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of the system as a whole, and how it works to maintain this complex ``ecology'' in the observed normal ranges throughout life. Here we report unexpected large, scale-free, fluctuations detected from the first long-term analysis of the day-to-day variability of a healthy animal's blood cell counts measured over one thousand days. This scale-invariance cannot be accounted for by current theoretical models, and resembles some of the scenarios described for self-organized criticality.

  15. Critical parameters in the MCF-7 cell proliferation bioassay (E-Screen)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Høj; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2002-01-01

    The MCF-7 cell proliferation bioassay has grown in popularity as a rapid test for detecting potentially oestrogenic compounds. Several MCF-7 cell sublines with different sensitivities to oestrogens are currently used, with maximal proliferation responses ranging from two- to 10-fold above those...... of hormone-free controls. In the highly responsive MCF-7 BUS cell line, we evaluated critical assay parameters for test performance, including growth conditions, initial seeding densities and differences in growth stimulation in medium containing human serum or fetal calf serum as well as appropriate...... solvents for oestrogen-mimicking compounds. Modifications significantly reduced the labour-intensive steps and overall assay costs without affecting the sensitivity of the assay. Using this optimized test regimen, the responsiveness of treated MCF-7 BUS cells was consistently increased up to 11-fold over...

  16. Adjuvant-enhanced CD4 T Cell Responses are Critical to Durable Vaccine Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A.O. Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based vaccines offer a safer alternative to live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines but have limited immunogenicity. The identification of adjuvants that augment immunogenicity, specifically in a manner that is durable and antigen-specific, is therefore critical for advanced development. In this study, we use the filovirus virus-like particle (VLP as a model protein-based vaccine in order to evaluate the impact of four candidate vaccine adjuvants on enhancing long term protection from Ebola virus challenge. Adjuvants tested include poly-ICLC (Hiltonol, MPLA, CpG 2395, and alhydrogel. We compared and contrasted antibody responses, neutralizing antibody responses, effector T cell responses, and T follicular helper (Tfh cell frequencies with each adjuvant's impact on durable protection. We demonstrate that in this system, the most effective adjuvant elicits a Th1-skewed antibody response and strong CD4 T cell responses, including an increase in Tfh frequency. Using immune-deficient animals and adoptive transfer of serum and cells from vaccinated animals into naïve animals, we further demonstrate that serum and CD4 T cells play a critical role in conferring protection within effective vaccination regimens. These studies inform on the requirements of long term immune protection, which can potentially be used to guide screening of clinical-grade adjuvants for vaccine clinical development.

  17. Critical role of constitutive type I interferon response in bronchial epithelial cell to influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C-Y Hsu

    Full Text Available Innate antiviral responses in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs provide the first line of defense against respiratory viral infection and the effectiveness of this response is critically dependent on the type I interferons (IFNs. However the importance of the antiviral responses in BECs during influenza infection is not well understood. We profiled the innate immune response to infection with H3N2 and H5N1 virus using Calu-3 cells and primary BECs to model proximal airway cells. The susceptibility of BECs to influenza infection was not solely dependent on the sialic acid-bearing glycoprotein, and antiviral responses that occurred after viral endocytosis was more important in limiting viral replication. The early antiviral response and apoptosis correlated with the ability to limit viral replication. Both viruses reduced RIG-I associated antiviral responses and subsequent induction of IFN-β. However it was found that there was constitutive release of IFN-β by BECs and this was critical in inducing late antiviral signaling via type I IFN receptors, and was crucial in limiting viral infection. This study characterizes anti-influenza virus responses in airway epithelial cells and shows that constitutive IFN-β release plays a more important role in initiating protective late IFN-stimulated responses during human influenza infection in bronchial epithelial cells.

  18. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  19. RHBDL2 Is a Critical Membrane Protease for Anoikis Resistance in Human Malignant Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lin Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anoikis resistance allows metastatic tumor cells to survive in a homeless environment. Activation of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling is one of the key mechanisms for metastatic tumor cells to resist anoikis, yet the regulation mechanisms of homeless-triggered EGFR activation in metastatic tumor cells remain unclear. Rhomboid-like-2 (RHBDL2, an evolutionally conserved intramembrane serine protease, can cleave the EGF ligand and thus trigger EGFR activation. Herein, we demonstrated that RHBDL2 overexpression in human epithelial cells resulted in promotion of cell proliferation, reduction of cell adhesion, and suppression of anoikis. During long-term suspension cultures, increased RHBDL2 was only detected in aggressive tumor cell lines. Treatment with the rhomboid protease inhibitor or RHBDL2 shRNA increased cleaved caspase 3, a marker of apoptosis. Finally, inhibition of EGFR activation increased the cleaved caspase 3 and attenuated the detachment-induced focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the first time that RHBDL2 is a critical molecule in anoikis resistance of malignant epithelial cells, possibly through the EGFR-mediated signaling. Our study demonstrates RHBDL2 as a new therapeutic target for cancer metastasis.

  20. Root border cells and secretions as critical elements in plant host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hawes, Martha

    2013-08-01

    Border cells and border-like cells are released from the root tip as individual cells and small aggregates, or as a group of attached cells. These are viable components of the root system that play a key role in controlling root interaction with living microbes of the rhizosphere. As their separation from root tip proceeds, the cells synthesize and secrete a hydrated mucilage that contains polysaccharides, secondary metabolites, antimicrobial proteins and extracellular DNA (exDNA). This exDNA-based matrix seems to function in root defense in a way similar to that of recently characterized neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in mammalian cells. This review discusses the role of the cells and secreted compounds in the protection of root tip against microbial infections.

  1. Murine Wee1 Plays a Critical Role in Cell Cycle Regulation and Pre-Implantation Stages of Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Tominaga, Cuiling Li, Rui-Hong Wang, Chu-Xia Deng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Wee1 kinase regulates the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint by phosphorylating and inactivating the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1. Loss of Wee1 in many systems, including yeast and drosophila, leads to premature mitotic entry. However, the developmental role of Wee1 in mammals remains unclear. In this study, we established Wee1 knockout mice by gene targeting. We found that Wee-/- embryos were defective in the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint induced by γ-irradiation and died of apoptosis before embryonic (E day 3.5. To study the function of Wee1 further, we have developed MEF cells in which Wee1 is disrupted by a tamoxifen inducible Cre-LoxP approach. We found that acute deletion of Wee1 resulted in profound growth defects and cell death. Wee1 deficient cells displayed chromosome aneuploidy and DNA damage as revealed by γ-H2AX foci formation and Chk2 activation. Further studies revealed a conserved mechanism of Wee1 in regulating mitotic entry and the G2/M checkpoint compared with other lower organisms. These data provide in vivo evidence that mammalian Wee1 plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity and is essential for embryonic survival at the pre-implantation stage of mouse development.

  2. A look inside the mechanistic black box: Are red blood cells the critical effectors of RRx-001 cytotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales, Pedro; Scicinski, Jan; Reid, Tony; Kuypers, Frans; Larkin, Sandra; Fens, Marcel; Oronsky, Arnold; Oronsky, Bryan

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of epi-immunotherapeutic anticancer agent RRx-001 in cancer has been validated with preclinical and clinical studies, since RRx-001 has successfully completed a phase 1 trial and multiple single-agent and combination phase 2 trials with preliminary evidence of promising activity are underway. Previous experimental work has implicated diverse anticancer mechanisms such as oxidative stress, ATP and NADPH depletion, anti-angiogenesis and epigenetic modulation in the overall antitumor effect of RRx-001. The hypothesis of this study was that the RRx-001 red blood cells are the essential and de facto intermediaries responsible for the reprograming of tumor behavior via transfer of their intracellular and membrane contents. To test this hypothesis, and thereby resolve the "black box" incompleteness in the continuity of the mechanism, the fate of red blood cells incubated with RRx-001 was explored in vitro and in vivo both in healthy animals and in tumor-bearing mice. The collective results establish that RRx-001-derivatized red blood cells are the critical "missing links" to explain the specificity and anticancer activity of RRx-001, including its immunomodulatory effects on tumor-associated macrophages. These experimental results delineate a novel erythrocyte-based mechanism without precedent in the annals of oncology and open the door to rational combination strategies with RRx-001 both in cancer therapy and beyond, particularly in disease states that affect red blood cell and vascular function such as malaria, leishmaniasis, sickle-cell disease and hemorrhagic shock.

  3. Predicting critical temperatures of iron(II) spin crossover materials: density functional theory plus U approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yachao

    2014-12-07

    A first-principles study of critical temperatures (T(c)) of spin crossover (SCO) materials requires accurate description of the strongly correlated 3d electrons as well as much computational effort. This task is still a challenge for the widely used local density or generalized gradient approximations (LDA/GGA) and hybrid functionals. One remedy, termed density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) approach, introduces a Hubbard U term to deal with the localized electrons at marginal computational cost, while treats the delocalized electrons with LDA/GGA. Here, we employ the DFT+U approach to investigate the T(c) of a pair of iron(II) SCO molecular crystals (α and β phase), where identical constituent molecules are packed in different ways. We first calculate the adiabatic high spin-low spin energy splitting ΔE(HL) and molecular vibrational frequencies in both spin states, then obtain the temperature dependent enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH and ΔS), and finally extract T(c) by exploiting the ΔH/T - T and ΔS - T relationships. The results are in agreement with experiment. Analysis of geometries and electronic structures shows that the local ligand field in the α phase is slightly weakened by the H-bondings involving the ligand atoms and the specific crystal packing style. We find that this effect is largely responsible for the difference in T(c) of the two phases. This study shows the applicability of the DFT+U approach for predicting T(c) of SCO materials, and provides a clear insight into the subtle influence of the crystal packing effects on SCO behavior.

  4. A critical analysis of the UV Luminosity Function at redshift~7 from deep WFC3 data

    CERN Document Server

    Grazian, A; Koekemoer, A M; Fontana, A; Pentericci, L; Testa, V; Boutsia, K; Giallongo, E; Giavalisco, M; Santini, P

    2010-01-01

    The study of the Luminosity Function (LF) of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z=7 is important for ascertaining their role in the reionization of the Universe. We perform a detailed and critical analysis of the statistical and systematic errors in the z~7 LF determination: we have assembled a large sample of candidate LBGs at z~7 from different surveys, spanning a large variety of areas and depths. In particular, we have combined data from the deep (J<27.4) and ultradeep (J<29.2) surveys recently acquired with the new WFC3 NIR camera on HST, over the GOODS-ERS and the HUDF fields, with ground based surveys in wide and shallow areas from VLT and Subaru. We have used public ACS images in the z-band to select z-dropout galaxies, and other public data both in the blue (BVI) and in the red bands to reject possible low-redshift interlopers. We have compared our results with extensive simulations to quantify the observational effects of our selection criteria as well as the effects of photometric scatter, color ...

  5. Modeling the critical safety functions status tree of a NPP using FPGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Marcos Santana; Oliveira, Mauro Vitor de; Jaime, Guilherme Dutra Gonzaga; Almeida, Jose Carlos Soares de; Augusto, Silas Cordeiro, E-mail: msantana@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.br, E-mail: gdjaime@ien.gov.br, E-mail: jcsa@ien.gov.br, E-mail: silas@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) based systems and equipment are beginning to appear in new plants I and C applications, as well as in retrofits for operating plants, in particular for safety applications due to their capability to face the systems obsolescence since they are circuit independent. The circuits implemented can be portable to different FPGAs architectures. Moreover, they reduce complexity for regulatory approval as compared to conventional microprocessor-based systems. Critical safety function (CSF) is the most significant design concept for prioritize operator actions for NPP based on the potential threat to the three barriers (fuel cladding, primary coolant system boundary, and containment) and allows the operator to respond to these threats prior to event diagnosis. CSF has a hierarchical information structure that organizes the system variables affecting the plant safety in terms of goal-means relations. This paper describes the application of FPGA in the implementation of the CSFs status tree logic for a Westinghouse 3-loops NPP simulator. (author)

  6. Modeling lower critical solution temperature behavior of associating polymer brushes with classical density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-07

    We study the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of associating polymer brushes (i.e., poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) using classical density functional theory. Without using any empirical or temperature-dependent parameters, we find the phase transition of polymer brushes from extended to collapsed structure with increasing temperature, indicating the LCST behavior of polymer brushes. The LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes is attributed to the interplay of hydrogen bonding interactions and Lennard-Jones attractions in the system. The effect of grafting density and molecular weight on the phase behavior of associating polymer brushes has been also investigated. We find no LCST behavior at low grafting density or molecular weight. Moreover, increasing grafting density decreases the LCST and swelling ratio of polymer brushes. Similarly, increasing molecular weight decreases the LCST but increases the swelling ratio. At very high grafting density, a partial collapsed structure appears near the LCST. Qualitatively consistent with experiments, our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes.

  7. Impact of genomic damage and ageing on stem cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrens, A.; Deursen, J.M. van; Rudolph, K.L.; Schumacher, B.

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of stem cell function contributes to the progressive deterioration of tissue maintenance and repair with ageing. Evidence is mounting that age-dependent accumulation of DNA damage in both stem cells and cells that comprise the stem cell microenvironment are partly responsible for stem cel

  8. Monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal liver share common differentiation pathways and homeostatic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchenko, Olena; Di Stefano, Antonio; Geoerger, Birgit; Hamidi, Sofiane; Opolon, Paule; Robert, Thomas; Routhier, Mélanie; El-Benna, Jamel; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Boukour, Siham; Lescure, Bernadette; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise

    2011-03-17

    The early emergence of macrophages and their large pattern of tissue distribution during development suggest that they may play a critical role in the initial steps of embryogenesis. In the present study, we show that monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and from fetal liver follow a differentiation pathway different to that of adult cells, leading to specific functions. Embryonic and fetal monocytic cells differentiated from a CD14(low)CD16(-) precursor to form CD14(high)CD16(+) cells without producing the CD14(high)CD16(-) cell population that predominates in adult peripheral blood. Both demonstrated an enhanced expression of genes encoding tissue-degrading enzymes, chemokines, and scavenger receptors, as was previously reported for M2 macrophages. Compared with adult blood monocytes, embryonic and fetal monocytic cells secreted high amounts of proteins acting on tissue remodeling and angiogenesis, and most of them expressed the Tie2 receptor. Furthermore, they promoted vascular remodeling in xenotransplanted human tumors. These findings suggest that the regulation of human fetal and embryonic monocytic cell differentiation leads to the generation of cells endowed mainly with anti-inflammatory and remodeling functions. Trophic and immunosuppressive functions of M2-polarized macrophages link fetus and tumor development, and hESCs offer a valuable experimental model for in vitro studies of mechanisms sustaining these processes.

  9. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  10. Age of red blood cells and mortality in the critically ill

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pettila, Ville

    2011-04-15

    Abstract Introduction In critically ill patients, it is uncertain whether exposure to older red blood cells (RBCs) may contribute to mortality. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between the age of RBCs and outcome in a large unselected cohort of critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. We hypothesized that exposure to even a single unit of older RBCs may be associated with an increased risk of death. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in 47 ICUs during a 5-week period between August 2008 and September 2008. We included 757 critically ill adult patients receiving at least one unit of RBCs. To test our hypothesis we compared hospital mortality according to quartiles of exposure to maximum age of RBCs without and with adjustment for possible confounding factors. Results Compared with other quartiles (mean maximum red cell age 22.7 days; mortality 121\\/568 (21.3%)), patients treated with exposure to the lowest quartile of oldest RBCs (mean maximum red cell age 7.7 days; hospital mortality 25\\/189 (13.2%)) had an unadjusted absolute risk reduction in hospital mortality of 8.1% (95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 14.0%). After adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, other blood component transfusions, number of RBC transfusions, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac surgery, the odds ratio for hospital mortality for patients exposed to the older three quartiles compared with the lowest quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 3.77). Conclusions In critically ill patients, in Australia and New Zealand, exposure to older RBCs is independently associated with an increased risk of death.

  11. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  12. Differing Requirements for MALT1 Function in Peripheral B Cell Survival and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peishan; Zhu, Zilu; Hachmann, Janna; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Salvesen, Guy; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, formation of the germinal center (GC) is essential for the generation of high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. The canonical NF-κB pathway has been implicated in the initiation of GC reaction, and defects in this pathway have been linked to immune deficiencies. The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in regulating NF-κB activation upon triggering of Ag receptors. Although previous studies have reported that MALT1 deficiency abrogates the GC response, the relative contribution of B cells and T cells to the defective phenotype remains unclear. We used chimeric mouse models to demonstrate that MALT1 function is required in B cells for GC formation. This role is restricted to BCR signaling where MALT1 is critical for B cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, the proapoptotic signal transmitted in the absence of MALT1 is dominant to the prosurvival effects of T cell-derived stimuli. In addition to GC B cell differentiation, MALT1 is required for plasma cell differentiation, but not mitogenic responses. Lastly, we show that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 can partially rescue the GC phenotype in MALT1-deficient animals by prolonging the lifespan of BCR-activated B cells, but plasma cell differentiation and Ab production remain defective. Thus, our data uncover previously unappreciated aspects of MALT1 function in B cells and highlight its importance in humoral immunity.

  13. Androgen Receptor Coactivator ARID4B Is Required for the Function of Sertoli Cells in Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ray-Chang; Zeng, Yang; Pan, I-Wen; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Defects in spermatogenesis, a process that produces spermatozoa inside seminiferous tubules of the testis, result in male infertility. Spermatogenic progression is highly dependent on a microenvironment provided by Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells and epithelium of seminiferous tubules. However, genes that regulate such an important activity of Sertoli cells are poorly understood. Here, we found that AT-rich interactive domain 4B (ARID4B), is essential for the function of Sertoli cells to regulate spermatogenesis. Specifically, we generated Sertoli cell-specific Arid4b knockout (Arid4bSCKO) mice, and showed that the Arid4bSCKO male mice were completely infertile with impaired testis development and significantly reduced testis size. Importantly, severe structural defects accompanied by loss of germ cells and Sertoli cell-only phenotype were found in many seminiferous tubules of the Arid4bSCKO testes. In addition, maturation of Sertoli cells was significantly delayed in the Arid4bSCKO mice, associated with delayed onset of spermatogenesis. Spermatogenic progression was also defective, showing an arrest at the round spermatid stage in the Arid4bSCKO testes. Interestingly, we showed that ARID4B functions as a "coactivator" of androgen receptor and is required for optimal transcriptional activation of reproductive homeobox 5, an androgen receptor target gene specifically expressed in Sertoli cells and critical for spermatogenesis. Together, our study identified ARID4B to be a key regulator of Sertoli cell function important for male germ cell development.

  14. A vibrating membrane bioreactor operated at supra- and sub-critical flux: Influence of extracellular polymeric substances from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren Prip; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2007-01-01

    A vibrating membrane bioreactor, in which the fouling problems are reduced by vibrating a hollow fiber membrane module, has been tested in constant flux microfiltration above (supra-critical) and below (sub-critical) an experimentally determined critical flux. Suspensions of bakers yeast cells were...... chosen as filtration medium (dry weight 4 g/l). The influence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the yeast cells is evaluated by UV absorbance measurements of the bulk supernatant during filtration. The critical flux seems to be an interval or a relative value rather than an absolute value...

  15. RIG-I Signaling Is Critical for Efficient Polyfunctional T Cell Responses during Influenza Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheswaran Kandasamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I is an innate RNA sensor that recognizes the influenza A virus (IAV RNA genome and activates antiviral host responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIG-I signaling plays a crucial role in restricting IAV tropism and regulating host immune responses. Mice deficient in the RIG-I-MAVS pathway show defects in migratory dendritic cell (DC activation, viral antigen presentation, and priming of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses during IAV infection. These defects result in decreased frequency of polyfunctional effector T cells and lowered protection against heterologous IAV challenge. In addition, our data show that RIG-I activation is essential for protecting epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells from IAV infection. These diverse effects of RIG-I signaling are likely imparted by the actions of type I interferon (IFN, as addition of exogenous type I IFN is sufficient to overcome the defects in antigen presentation by RIG-I deficient BMDC. Moreover, the in vivo T cell defects in RIG-I deficient mice can be overcome by the activation of MDA5 -MAVS via poly I:C treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RIG-I signaling through MAVS is critical for determining the quality of polyfunctional T cell responses against IAV and for providing protection against subsequent infection from heterologous or novel pandemic IAV strains.

  16. RIG-I Signaling Is Critical for Efficient Polyfunctional T Cell Responses during Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Suryawanshi, Amol; Tundup, Smanla; Perez, Jasmine T.; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) is an innate RNA sensor that recognizes the influenza A virus (IAV) RNA genome and activates antiviral host responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIG-I signaling plays a crucial role in restricting IAV tropism and regulating host immune responses. Mice deficient in the RIG-I-MAVS pathway show defects in migratory dendritic cell (DC) activation, viral antigen presentation, and priming of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses during IAV infection. These defects result in decreased frequency of polyfunctional effector T cells and lowered protection against heterologous IAV challenge. In addition, our data show that RIG-I activation is essential for protecting epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells from IAV infection. These diverse effects of RIG-I signaling are likely imparted by the actions of type I interferon (IFN), as addition of exogenous type I IFN is sufficient to overcome the defects in antigen presentation by RIG-I deficient BMDC. Moreover, the in vivo T cell defects in RIG-I deficient mice can be overcome by the activation of MDA5 –MAVS via poly I:C treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RIG-I signaling through MAVS is critical for determining the quality of polyfunctional T cell responses against IAV and for providing protection against subsequent infection from heterologous or novel pandemic IAV strains. PMID:27438481

  17. Long-term stem cell labeling by collagen-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Cai, Rong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of grafted stem cells is crucial to assess the efficiency, effectiveness and safety of such stem cell-based therapies. In this regard, a reliable and cytocompatible labeling method for stem cells is critically needed. In this study, the collagen-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (Col-SWCNTs) were used as imaging probes for labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and the inherent Raman scattering of SWCNTs was used to image the SWCNT-labeled cells. The results showed that the Col-SWCNTs exhibit efficient cellular internalization by hMSCs without affecting their proliferation and differentiation. The prolonged dwell time of Col-SWCNTs in cells ensured the long-term labeling for up to 2 weeks. This work reveals the potential of Col-SWCNTs as probes for long-term stem cell labeling.

  18. Critical protein GAPDH and its regulator y mechanisms in cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Ying Zhang; Fan Zhang; Chao-Qun Hong; Armando E Giuliano; Xiao-Jiang Cui; Guang-Ji Zhou; Guo-Jun Zhang; Yu-Kun Cui

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), initially identified as a glycolytic enzyme and considered as a housekeeping gene, is widely used as an internal control in experiments on proteins, mRNA, and DNA. However, emerging evidence indicates that GAPDH is implicated in diverse functions independent of its role in energy metabolism;the expression status of GAPDH is also deregulated in various cancer cells. One of the most common effects of GAPDH is its inconsistent role in the determination of cancer cell fate. Furthermore, studies have described GAPDH as a regulator of cell death;other studies have suggested that GAPDH participates in tumor progression and serves as a new therapeutic target. However, related regulatory mechanisms of its numerous cellular functions and deregulated expression levels remain unclear. GAPDH is tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, which are involved in the regulation of diverse GAPDH functions. Several cancer-related factors, such as insulin, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), p53, nitric oxide (NO), and acetylated histone, not only modulate GAPDH gene expression but also affect protein functions via common pathways. Moreover, posttranslational modiifcations (PTMs) occurring in GAPDH in cancer cells result in new activities unrelated to the original glycolytic function of GAPDH. In this review, recent ifndings related to GAPDH transcriptional regulation and PTMs are summarized. Mechanisms and pathways involved in GAPDH regulation and its different roles in cancer cells are also described.

  19. Association of nucleated red blood cells with mortality in critically ill dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Dörfelt, R; Hamacher, L; Wess, G

    2014-11-22

    The occurrence of nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) in the peripheral blood of critically ill human patients is associated with increased mortality. In dogs, the presence of NRBCs in peripheral blood has been used as a sensitive and specific marker of complications and outcome associated with heatstroke. However, no study has investigated their prevalence in critically ill dogs. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of NRBCs in the peripheral blood, and to evaluate their occurrence as a prognostic factor in critically ill dogs. One hundred and one dogs were prospectively included; the presence of NRBCs was studied on a daily basis from the time of admission until day 3 in the intensive care unit (or less if discharged or death occurred earlier). Dogs fulfilled at least two systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria and suffered from various diseases. Survival was defined as being alive 28 days postdischarge from hospital. In 42 dogs, NRBCs were detected at least once; 59 patients were NRBC negative. Mortality was significantly higher in NRBC-positive than NRBC-negative patients (54.8 v 30.5 per cent) (P=0.014). However, this association was not present when anaemic dogs were excluded from the analysis. Detection of NRBCs in the peripheral blood may be an indicator for regenerative anaemia and may have potential for use as a prognostic tool or in addition to established scoring systems in critically ill dogs.

  20. The Critical Role of Membrane Cholesterol in Salmonella-Induced Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chen Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It was previously observed that plasma membrane cholesterol plays a critical role in the Salmonella-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K-dependent anti-inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. The PI3K/Akt pathway is associated with autophagy which has emerged as a critical mechanism of host defense against several intracellular bacterial pathogens. Plasma membrane contributes directly to the formation of early Atg16L1-positive autophagosome precursors. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of plasma membrane cholesterol on the Salmonella-induced autophagy in IECs. By using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD, it was demonstrated that disruption of membrane cholesterol by MBCD enhanced NOD2 and Atg16L1 proteins expression in membrane, and autophagic LC3II proteins expression and LC3 punctae in Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells, which was counteracted by Atg16L1 siRNA. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2 siRNA enhanced the Salmonella-induced activation of Akt in Caco-2 cells. However, inhibitors of Akt or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK had no significant effect on Salmonella-induced autophagy Beclin 1 or LC3 proteins expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that cholesterol accumulation in the plasma membrane at the entry site of Salmonella results in the formation of Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV and decreased autophagy. Our results offer mechanistic insights on the critical role of membrane cholesterol in the pathogenesis of Salmonella infection in intestinal epithelial cells and the therapeutic potential of its antagonists.

  1. The Effect of Criticism on Functional Brain Connectivity and Associations with Neuroticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servaas, Michelle Nadine; Riese, Harriette; Renken, Remco Jan; Marsman, Jan-Bernard Cornelis; Lambregs, Johan; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Neuroticism is a robust personality trait that constitutes a risk factor for psychopathology, especially anxiety disorders and depression. High neurotic individuals tend to be more self-critical and are overly sensitive to criticism by others. Hence, we used a novel resting-state paradigm to investi

  2. Soil processes and functions in critical zone observatories: hypotheses and experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banwart, S.; Bernasconi, S.M.; Bloem, J.; Blum, W.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Gaans, van P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2011-01-01

    European Union policy on soil threats and soil protection has prioritized new research to address global soil threats. This research draws on the methodology of Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) to focus a critical mass of international, multidisciplinary expertise at specific field sites. These CZ

  3. Monkeypox virus infection of rhesus macaques induces massive expansion of natural killer cells but suppresses natural killer cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation, followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8 of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques.

  4. MFG-E8 Is Critical for Embryonic Stem Cell-Mediated T Cell Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecules and mechanisms pertinent to the low immunogenicity of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a vital mediator in this phenomenon and directly suppresses T cell immune responses. MFG-E8 is enriched in undifferentiated ESCs but diminished in differentiated ESCs. Upregulation of MFG-E8 in ESCs increases the successful engraftment of both undifferentiated and differentiated ESCs across major histocompatibility complex barriers. MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation/proliferation and inhibits Th1, Th2, and Th17 subpopulations while increasing regulatory T cell subsets. Neutralizing MFG-E8 substantially abrogates these effects, whereas addition of recombinant MFG-E8 to differentiated ESCs restores immunosuppression. Furthermore, we provide the evidence that MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation and regulates T cell polarization by inhibiting PKCθ phosphorylation through the α3/5βV integrin receptor. Our findings offer an approach to facilitate transplantation acceptance.

  5. Critical roles for lipomannan and lipoarabinomannan in cell wall integrity of mycobacteria and pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Ato, Manabu; Hamasaki, Maho; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Murakami, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Taroh; Morita, Yasu S

    2013-02-19

    Lipomannan (LM) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM) are mycobacterial glycolipids containing a long mannose polymer. While they are implicated in immune modulations, the significance of LM and LAM as structural components of the mycobacterial cell wall remains unknown. We have previously reported that a branch-forming mannosyltransferase plays a critical role in controlling the sizes of LM and LAM and that deletion or overexpression of this enzyme results in gross changes in LM/LAM structures. Here, we show that such changes in LM/LAM structures have a significant impact on the cell wall integrity of mycobacteria. In Mycobacterium smegmatis, structural defects in LM and LAM resulted in loss of acid-fast staining, increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics, and faster killing by THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, equivalent Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants became more sensitive to β-lactams, and one mutant showed attenuated virulence in mice. Our results revealed previously unknown structural roles for LM and LAM and further demonstrated that they are important for the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE Tuberculosis (TB) is a global burden, affecting millions of people worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a causative agent of TB, and understanding the biology of M. tuberculosis is essential for tackling this devastating disease. The cell wall of M. tuberculosis is highly impermeable and plays a protective role in establishing infection. Among the cell wall components, LM and LAM are major glycolipids found in all Mycobacterium species, show various immunomodulatory activities, and have been thought to play roles in TB pathogenesis. However, the roles of LM and LAM as integral parts of the cell wall structure have not been elucidated. Here we show that LM and LAM play critical roles in the integrity of mycobacterial cell wall and the pathogenesis of TB. These findings will now allow us to seek the possibility that the LM/LAM biosynthetic pathway is a

  6. Casimir amplitudes and capillary condensation of near-critical fluids between parallel plates: renormalized local functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2012-03-21

    We investigate the critical behavior of a near-critical fluid confined between two parallel plates in contact with a reservoir by calculating the order parameter profile and the Casimir amplitudes (for the force density and for the grand potential). Our results are applicable to one-component fluids and binary mixtures. We assume that the walls absorb one of the fluid components selectively for binary mixtures. We propose a renormalized local functional theory accounting for the fluctuation effects. Analysis is performed in the plane of the temperature T and the order parameter in the reservoir ψ(∞). Our theory is universal if the physical quantities are scaled appropriately. If the component favored by the walls is slightly poor in the reservoir, there appears a line of first-order phase transition of capillary condensation outside the bulk coexistence curve. The excess adsorption changes discontinuously between condensed and noncondensed states at the transition. With increasing T, the transition line ends at a capillary critical point T=T(c) (ca) slightly lower than the bulk critical temperature T(c) for the upper critical solution temperature. The Casimir amplitudes are larger than their critical point values by 10-100 times at off-critical compositions near the capillary condensation line.

  7. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  8. PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of p107 plays a critical role in chondrocyte cell cycle arrest by FGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Kolupaeva

    Full Text Available FGF signaling inhibits chondrocyte proliferation, a cell type-specific response that is the basis for several genetic skeletal disorders caused by activating FGFR mutations. This phenomenon requires the function of the p107 and p130 members of the Rb protein family, and p107 dephosphorylation is one of the earliest distinguishing events in FGF-induced growth arrest. To determine whether p107 dephoshorylation played a critical role in the chondrocyte response to FGF, we sought to counteract this process by overexpressing in RCS chondrocytes the cyclin D1/cdk4 kinase complex. CyclinD/cdk4-expressing RCS cells became resistant to FGF-induced p107 dephosphorylation and growth arrest, and maintained significantly high levels of cyclin E/cdk2 activity and of phosphorylated p130 at later times of FGF treatment. We explored the involvement of a phosphatase in p107 dephosphorylation. Expression of the SV40 small T-Ag, which inhibits the activity of the PP2A phosphatase, or knockdown of the expression of the PP2A catalytic subunit by RNA interference prevented p107 dephosphorylation and FGF-induced growth arrest of RCS cells. Furthermore, an association between p107 and PP2A was induced by FGF treatment. Our data show that p107 dephosphorylation is a key event in FGF-induced cell cycle arrest and indicate that in chondrocytes FGF activates the PP2A phosphatase to promote p107 dephosphorylation.

  9. Entropic equation of state and scaling functions near the critical point in uncorrelated scale-free networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ferber, C; Folk, R; Holovatch, Yu; Kenna, R; Palchykov, V

    2011-06-01

    We analyze the entropic equation of state for a many-particle interacting system in a scale-free network. The analysis is performed in terms of scaling functions, which are of fundamental interest in the theory of critical phenomena and have previously been theoretically and experimentally explored in the context of various magnetic, fluid, and superconducting systems in two and three dimensions. Here, we obtain general scaling functions for the entropy, the constant-field heat capacity, and the isothermal magnetocaloric coefficient near the critical point in uncorrelated scale-free networks, where the node-degree distribution exponent λ appears to be a global variable and plays a crucial role, similar to the dimensionality d for systems on lattices. This extends the principle of universality to systems on scale-free networks and allows quantification of the impact of fluctuations in the network structure on critical behavior.

  10. N-Acetylglucosamine Functions in Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Konopka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc is well known for the important structural roles that it plays at the cell surface. It is a key component of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, fungal cell wall chitin, and the extracellular matrix of animal cells. Interestingly, recent studies have also identified new roles for GlcNAc in cell signaling. For example, GlcNAc stimulates the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to undergo changes in morphogenesis and expression of virulence genes. Pathogenic E. coli responds to GlcNAc by altering the expression of fimbriae and CURLI fibers that promote biofilm formation and GlcNAc stimulates soil bacteria to undergo changes in morphogenesis and production of antibiotics. Studies with animal cells have revealed that GlcNAc influences cell signaling through the posttranslational modification of proteins by glycosylation. O-linked attachment of GlcNAc to Ser and Thr residues regulates a variety of intracellular proteins, including transcription factors such as NFκB, c-myc, and p53. In addition, the specificity of Notch family receptors for different ligands is altered by GlcNAc attachment to fucose residues in the extracellular domain. GlcNAc also impacts signal transduction by altering the degree of branching of N-linked glycans, which influences cell surface signaling proteins. These emerging roles of GlcNAc as an activator and mediator of cellular signaling in fungi, animals, and bacteria will be the focus of this paper.

  11. Supporting Critical Literacy in High School English by Using Systemic Functional Linguistics to Analyze Fantasy, Canonical, and Nonfiction Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    While important work has been done on assessing classroom texts and investigating classroom discourse, there is little research on teachers doing systemic functional linguistics (SFL) with students for critical ends, especially in the high school arena. This article discusses how instructional use of SFL analytic resources in subject English…

  12. Identification and Ranking of Critical Success Factors of Knowledge Management Using Fuzzy Quality Function Deployment Approach: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohaghar

    2014-02-01

    Based on the information accessible for the researchers, this is one of the first works which evaluates the key factors of successful knowledge management through fuzzy quality function deployment approach. It is expected that the proposed method would represent appropriate tools for enterprises which have decided to implement knowledge management because it prioritizes the critical success factors based on the knowledge management outcomes.

  13. Adhesion functions in cell sorting by mechanically coupling the cortices of adhering cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Berthoumieux, Hélène; Krens, Simon Frederik Gabriel; Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank; Paluch, Ewa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-10-12

    Differential cell adhesion and cortex tension are thought to drive cell sorting by controlling cell-cell contact formation. Here, we show that cell adhesion and cortex tension have different mechanical functions in controlling progenitor cell-cell contact formation and sorting during zebrafish gastrulation. Cortex tension controls cell-cell contact expansion by modulating interfacial tension at the contact. By contrast, adhesion has little direct function in contact expansion, but instead is needed to mechanically couple the cortices of adhering cells at their contacts, allowing cortex tension to control contact expansion. The coupling function of adhesion is mediated by E-cadherin and limited by the mechanical anchoring of E-cadherin to the cortex. Thus, cell adhesion provides the mechanical scaffold for cell cortex tension to drive cell sorting during gastrulation.

  14. Critical Parameters of the In Vitro Method of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hortells

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification (VC is primarily studied using cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the use of very different protocols and extreme conditions can provide findings unrelated to VC. In this work we aimed to determine the critical experimental parameters that affect calcification in vitro and to determine the relevance to calcification in vivo.Rat VSMC calcification in vitro was studied using different concentrations of fetal calf serum, calcium, and phosphate, in different types of culture media, and using various volumes and rates of change. The bicarbonate content of the media critically affected pH and resulted in supersaturation, depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and Pi. Such supersaturation is a consequence of the high dependence of bicarbonate buffers on CO2 vapor pressure and bicarbonate concentration at pHs above 7.40. Such buffer systems cause considerable pH variations as a result of minor experimental changes. The variations are more critical for DMEM and are negligible when the bicarbonate concentration is reduced to ¼. Particle nucleation and growth were observed by dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Using 2mM Pi, particles of ~200nm were observed at 24 hours in MEM and at 1 hour in DMEM. These nuclei grew over time, were deposited in the cells, and caused osteogene expression or cell death, depending on the precipitation rate. TEM observations showed that the initial precipitate was amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP, which converts into hydroxyapatite over time. In blood, the scenario is different, because supersaturation is avoided by a tightly controlled pH of 7.4, which prevents the formation of PO43--containing ACP.The precipitation of ACP in vitro is unrelated to VC in vivo. The model needs to be refined through controlled pH and the use of additional procalcifying agents other than Pi in order to reproduce calcium phosphate deposition in vivo.

  15. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R; Smith, Charles E; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S

    2015-10-30

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca(2+) yet the mechanisms mediating Ca(2+) dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca(2+) influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools followed by Ca(2+) entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca(2+) uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca(2+) release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca(2+)]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca(2+) entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca(2+) uptake in enamel formation.

  16. Mechanisms behind functional avidity maturation in T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak, Martin; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    During an immune response antigen-primed B-cells increase their antigen responsiveness by affinity maturation mediated by somatic hypermutation of the genes encoding the antigen-specific B-cell receptor (BCR) and by selection of higher-affinity B cell clones. Unlike the BCR, the T-cell receptor...... (TCR) cannot undergo affinity maturation. Nevertheless, antigen-primed T cells significantly increase their antigen responsiveness compared to antigen-inexperienced (naïve) T cells in a process called functional avidity maturation. This paper covers studies that describe differences in T-cell antigen...... responsiveness during T-cell differentiation along with examples of the mechanisms behind functional avidity maturation in T cells....

  17. Surface functionalization of nanobiomaterials for application in stem cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Deepti; Ramasamy, Keerthana; Leena, Maria; Jiménez, Constanza; Campos, Javier; Ibarra, Paula; Haidar, Ziyad S; Ramalingam, Murugan

    2016-05-01

    Stem cell-based approaches offer great application potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine owing to their ability of sensing the microenvironment and respond accordingly (dynamic behavior). Recently, the combination of nanobiomaterials with stem cells has paved a great way for further exploration. Nanobiomaterials with engineered surfaces could mimic the native microenvironment to which the seeded stem cells could adhere and migrate. Surface functionalized nanobiomaterial-based scaffolds could then be used to regulate or control the cellular functions to culture stem cells and regenerate damaged tissues or organs. Therefore, controlling the interactions between nanobiomaterials and stem cells is a critical factor. However, surface functionalization or modification techniques has provided an alternative approach for tailoring the nanobiomaterials surface in accordance to the physiological surrounding of a living cells; thereby, enhancing the structural and functional properties of the engineered tissues and organs. Currently, there are a variety of methods and technologies available to modify the surface of biomaterials according to the specific cell or tissue properties to be regenerated. This review highlights the trends in surface modification techniques for nanobiomaterials and the biological relevance in stem cell-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:554-567, 2016.

  18. Critical appraisal of some factors pertinent to the functional designs of the gas exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, John N

    2017-03-01

    Respiration acquires O2 from the external fluid milieu and eliminates CO2 back into the same. Gas exchangers evolved under certain immutable physicochemical laws upon which their elemental functional design is hardwired. Adaptive changes have occurred within the constraints set by such laws to satisfy metabolic needs for O2, environmental conditions, respiratory medium utilized, lifestyle pursued and phylogenetic level of development: correlation between structure and function exists. After the inaugural simple cell membrane, as body size and structural complexity increased, respiratory organs formed by evagination or invagination: the gills developed by the former process and the lungs by the latter. Conservation of water on land was the main driver for invagination of the lungs. In gills, respiratory surface area increases by stratified arrangement of the structural components while in lungs it occurs by internal subdivision. The minuscule terminal respiratory units of lungs are stabilized by surfactant. In gas exchangers, respiratory fluid media are transported by convection over long distances, a process that requires energy. However, movement of respiratory gases across tissue barriers occurs by simple passive diffusion. Short distances and large surface areas are needed for diffusion to occur efficiently. Certain properties, e.g., diffusion of gases through the tissue barrier, stabilization of the respiratory units by surfactant and a thin tripartite tissue barrier, have been conserved during the evolution of the gas exchangers. In biology, such rare features are called Bauplans, blueprints or frozen cores. That several of them (Bauplans) exist in gas exchangers almost certainly indicates the importance of respiration to life.

  19. Partially redundant enhancers cooperatively maintain Mammalian pomc expression above a critical functional threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Daniel D; de Souza, Flavio S J; Nasif, Sofia; Yamashita, Miho; López-Leal, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Meece, Kana; Sampath, Harini; Mercer, Aaron J; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J

    2015-02-01

    Cell-specific expression of many genes is conveyed by multiple enhancers, with each individual enhancer controlling a particular expression domain. In contrast, multiple enhancers drive similar expression patterns of some genes involved in embryonic development, suggesting regulatory redundancy. Work in Drosophila has indicated that functionally overlapping enhancers canalize development by buffering gene expression against environmental and genetic disturbances. However, little is known about regulatory redundancy in vertebrates and in genes mainly expressed during adulthood. Here we study nPE1 and nPE2, two phylogenetically conserved mammalian enhancers that drive expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) to the same set of hypothalamic neurons. The simultaneous deletion of both enhancers abolished Pomc expression at all ages and induced a profound metabolic dysfunction including early-onset extreme obesity. Targeted inactivation of either nPE1 or nPE2 led to very low levels of Pomc expression during early embryonic development indicating that both enhancers function synergistically. In adult mice, however, Pomc expression is controlled additively by both enhancers, with nPE1 being responsible for ∼80% and nPE2 for ∼20% of Pomc transcription. Consequently, nPE1 knockout mice exhibit mild obesity whereas nPE2-deficient mice maintain a normal body weight. These results suggest that nPE2-driven Pomc expression is compensated by nPE1 at later stages of development, essentially rescuing the earlier phenotype of nPE2 deficiency. Together, these results reveal that cooperative interactions between the enhancers confer robustness of Pomc expression against gene regulatory disturbances and preclude deleterious metabolic phenotypes caused by Pomc deficiency in adulthood. Thus, our study demonstrates that enhancer redundancy can be used by genes that control adult physiology in mammals and underlines the potential significance of regulatory sequence mutations in

  20. Critical study of the method of calculating virgin rock stresses from measurement results of the CSIR triaxial strain cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreede, F. A.

    1981-05-01

    The manual of instructions for the user of the CSIR triaxial rock stress measuring equipment is critically examined. It is shown that the values of the rock stresses can be obtained from the strain gauge records by means of explicit formulae, which makes the manual's computer program obsolete. Furthermore statistical methods are proposed to check for faulty data and inhomogeneity in rock properties and virgin stress. The possibility of non-elastic behavior of the rock during the test is also checked. A new computer program based on the explicit functions and including the check calculations is presented. It is much more efficient than the one in the manual since it does not require computer sub-routines, allowing it to be used directly on any modern computer. The output of the new program is in a format suitable for direct inclusion in the report of an investigation using strain cell results.

  1. Molecular structure and biological function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the core component of replication complex in eukaryote.As a processive factor of DNA polymerase delta, PCNA coordinates the replication process by interacting with various replication proteins. PCNA appears to play an essential role in many cell events, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, through the coordination or organization of different partners. PCNA is an essential factor in cell proliferation, and has clinical significance in tumor research. In this article we review the functional structure of PCNA, which acts as a function switch in different cell events.

  2. A general functional response of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated killing of target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2014-04-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data.

  3. Integrative modeling of small artery structure and function uncovers critical parameters for diameter regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed VanBavel

    Full Text Available Organ perfusion is regulated by vasoactivity and structural adaptation of small arteries and arterioles. These resistance vessels are sensitive to pressure, flow and a range of vasoactive stimuli. Several strongly interacting control loops exist. As an example, the myogenic response to a change of pressure influences the endothelial shear stress, thereby altering the contribution of shear-dependent dilation to the vascular tone. In addition, acute responses change the stimulus for structural adaptation and vice versa. Such control loops are able to maintain resistance vessels in a functional and stable state, characterized by regulated wall stress, shear stress, matched active and passive biomechanics and presence of vascular reserve. In this modeling study, four adaptation processes are identified that together with biomechanical properties effectuate such integrated regulation: control of tone, smooth muscle cell length adaptation, eutrophic matrix rearrangement and trophic responses. Their combined action maintains arteries in their optimal state, ready to cope with new challenges, allowing continuous long-term vasoregulation. The exclusion of any of these processes results in a poorly regulated state and in some cases instability of vascular structure.

  4. Natural killer cells in obesity: impaired function and increased susceptibility to the effects of cigarette smoke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Donal

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obese individuals who smoke have a 14 year reduction in life expectancy. Both obesity and smoking are independently associated with increased risk of malignancy. Natural killer cells (NK) are critical mediators of anti-tumour immunity and are compromised in obese patients and smokers. We examined whether NK cell function was differentially affected by cigarette smoke in obese and lean subjects. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clinical data and blood were collected from 40 severely obese subjects (BMI>40 kg\\/m(2)) and 20 lean healthy subjects. NK cell levels and function were assessed using flow cytometry and cytotoxicity assays. The effect of cigarette smoke on NK cell ability to kill K562 tumour cells was assessed in the presence or absence of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin. NK cell levels were significantly decreased in obese subjects compared to lean controls (7.6 vs 16.6%, p = 0.0008). NK function was also significantly compromised in obese patients (30% +\\/- 13% vs 42% +\\/-12%, p = 0.04). Cigarette smoke inhibited NK cell ability to kill tumour cell lines (p<0.0001). NK cells from obese subjects were even more susceptible to the inhibitory effects of smoke compared to lean subjects (33% vs 28%, p = 0.01). Cigarette smoke prevented NK cell activation, as well as perforin and interferon-gamma secretion upon tumour challenge. Adiponectin but not leptin partially reversed the effects of smoke on NK cell function in both obese (p = 0.002) and lean controls (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Obese subjects have impaired NK cell activity that is more susceptible to the detrimental effects of cigarette smoke compared to lean subjects. This may play a role in the increase of cancer and infection seen in this population. Adiponectin is capable of restoring NK cell activity and may have therapeutic potential for immunity in obese subjects and smokers.

  5. Natural killer cells in obesity: impaired function and increased susceptibility to the effects of cigarette smoke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Donal

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Obese individuals who smoke have a 14 year reduction in life expectancy. Both obesity and smoking are independently associated with increased risk of malignancy. Natural killer cells (NK) are critical mediators of anti-tumour immunity and are compromised in obese patients and smokers. We examined whether NK cell function was differentially affected by cigarette smoke in obese and lean subjects. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clinical data and blood were collected from 40 severely obese subjects (BMI>40 kg\\/m(2)) and 20 lean healthy subjects. NK cell levels and function were assessed using flow cytometry and cytotoxicity assays. The effect of cigarette smoke on NK cell ability to kill K562 tumour cells was assessed in the presence or absence of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin. NK cell levels were significantly decreased in obese subjects compared to lean controls (7.6 vs 16.6%, p = 0.0008). NK function was also significantly compromised in obese patients (30% +\\/- 13% vs 42% +\\/-12%, p = 0.04). Cigarette smoke inhibited NK cell ability to kill tumour cell lines (p<0.0001). NK cells from obese subjects were even more susceptible to the inhibitory effects of smoke compared to lean subjects (33% vs 28%, p = 0.01). Cigarette smoke prevented NK cell activation, as well as perforin and interferon-gamma secretion upon tumour challenge. Adiponectin but not leptin partially reversed the effects of smoke on NK cell function in both obese (p = 0.002) and lean controls (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Obese subjects have impaired NK cell activity that is more susceptible to the detrimental effects of cigarette smoke compared to lean subjects. This may play a role in the increase of cancer and infection seen in this population. Adiponectin is capable of restoring NK cell activity and may have therapeutic potential for immunity in obese subjects and smokers.

  6. Materials challenges toward proton-conducting oxide fuel cells: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    The increasing world population and the need to improve quality of life for a large percentage of human beings are the driving forces for the search for sustainable energy production systems, alternative to fossil fuel combustion. Among the various types of alternative energy production technologies, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at intermediate temperatures (400-700 °C) show the advantage of possible use both for stationary and mobile energy production. To reach the goal of reducing the SOFC operating temperature, proton-conducting oxides are gaining wide interest as electrolyte materials. This critical review provides a broad overview of the most recent progresses obtained tailoring the properties of proton-conducting oxides for fuel cell applications, analyzing and comparing the different strategies proposed to match high-proton conductivity with good chemical stability (170 references).

  7. An interpretation of the symbolic function of Water Myth and itsmanifestations in Firdowsi’s Shahname based on mythological criticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    قائمی قائمی

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mythological or archetypical criticism is an interdisciplinary approach which analyzes the literary text based on the findings of such sciences like psychology, anthropology, history of religion and history of civilization. In the present paper, the writers have studied the function of the aqueous archetype image in the myth of creation and the resulting mysteries in the context of mythological doctrines centered around Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh (Epic of Kings. Water myth, as one of the four contradictory elements forming the mythological material world, has assumed certain roles and is a common phenomenon in the world myths and Shahnameh. The symbolic functions of the water myth have been divided into three parts: 1. In different human cultures, the aqueous myth is a symbol of the beginning of material creation and life cycle in the universe. This function is symbolized in the primal creation of the world out of water and its symbolic end in it. 2. Water Myth is the main symbol of eternity and continuity of material life. This function is symbolized in the "life-sustaining water" and "the healing water". 3. The third function of Water Myth is manifested in the myth of passage through water (water test and symbolic washing by it (baptism myth; this is used as a test for the human catharsis, passage from a former stage into a new, exalted stage symbolized as the archetype of death and rebirth. Keywords: Water Myth, Four Elements, Mythological Criticism (Archetypical criticism, Archetype, Jung, Shahnameh

  8. RNA-Seq Analysis of Sulfur-Deprived Chlamydomonas Cells Reveals Aspects of Acclimation Critical for Cell Survival[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ballester, David; Casero, David; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome was characterized from nutrient-replete and sulfur-depleted wild-type and snrk2.1 mutant cells. This mutant is null for the regulatory Ser-Thr kinase SNRK2.1, which is required for acclimation of the alga to sulfur deprivation. The transcriptome analyses used microarray hybridization and RNA-seq technology. Quantitative RT-PCR evaluation of the results obtained by these techniques showed that RNA-seq reports a larger dynamic range of expression levels than do microarray hybridizations. Transcripts responsive to sulfur deprivation included those encoding proteins involved in sulfur acquisition and assimilation, synthesis of sulfur-containing metabolites, Cys degradation, and sulfur recycling. Furthermore, we noted potential modifications of cellular structures during sulfur deprivation, including the cell wall and complexes associated with the photosynthetic apparatus. Moreover, the data suggest that sulfur-deprived cells accumulate proteins with fewer sulfur-containing amino acids. Most of the sulfur deprivation responses are controlled by the SNRK2.1 protein kinase. The snrk2.1 mutant exhibits a set of unique responses during both sulfur-replete and sulfur-depleted conditions that are not observed in wild-type cells; the inability of this mutant to acclimate to S deprivation probably leads to elevated levels of singlet oxygen and severe oxidative stress, which ultimately causes cell death. The transcriptome results for wild-type and mutant cells strongly suggest the occurrence of massive changes in cellular physiology and metabolism as cells become depleted for sulfur and reveal aspects of acclimation that are likely critical for cell survival. PMID:20587772

  9. Functional neutrophils from human ES cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Colin L; Malech, Harry L.

    2009-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Yokoyama and colleagues demonstrate in vitro differentiation of hESCs into mature neutrophils with functional capabilities (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, microbicidal oxidase activity, and bacterial killing) approaching or equal to that of normal peripheral blood neutrophils.

  10. A systems view of epigenetic networks regulating pancreas development and β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruiyu; Carrano, Andrea C; Sander, Maike

    2015-01-01

    The development of the pancreas and determination of endocrine cell fate are controlled by a highly complex interplay of signaling events and transcriptional networks. It is now known that an interconnected epigenetic program is also required to drive these processes. Recent studies using genome-wide approaches have implicated epigenetic regulators, such as DNA and histone-modifying enzymes and noncoding RNAs, to play critical roles in pancreas development and the maintenance of cell identity and function. Furthermore, genome-wide analyses have implicated epigenetic changes as a casual factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes. In the future, genomic approaches to further our understanding of the role of epigenetics in endocrine cell development and function will be useful for devising strategies to produce or manipulate β-cells for therapies of diabetes.

  11. Pocket proteins critically regulate cell cycle exit of the trabecular myocardium and the ventricular conduction system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Park

    2013-07-01

    During development, the ventricular conduction system (VCS arises from the trabecular or spongy myocardium. VCS and trabecular myocytes proliferate at a significantly slower rate than compact zone myocardial cells, establishing a transmural cell cycle gradient. The molecular determinants of VCS/trabecular myocyte cell cycle arrest are not known. Given the importance of pocket proteins (Rb, p107 and p130 in mediating G0/G1 arrest in many cell types, we examined the role of this gene family in regulating cell cycle exit of the trabecular myocardium and ventricular conduction system. Using a combinatorial knockout strategy, we found that graded loss of pocket proteins results in a spectrum of heart and lung defects. p107/p130 double knockout (dKO hearts manifest dysregulated proliferation within the compact myocardium and trabecular bases, while the remaining trabecular region cell cycle exits normally. Consequently, dKO hearts exhibit defective cardiac compaction, septal hyperplasia and biventricular outflow tract obstruction, while the VCS appears relatively normal. Loss of all three pocket proteins (3KO is necessary to completely disrupt the transmural cell cycle gradient. 3KO hearts exhibit massive overgrowth of the trabecular myocardium and ventricular conduction system, which leads to fetal heart failure and death. Hearts carrying a single pocket protein allele are able to maintain the transmural cell cycle gradient. These results demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of trabecular and conduction myocytes to pocket protein function during ventricular chamber development.

  12. A critical role for CD8 T cells in a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Crystal Y; Huang, Dan; Wang, Richard C; Shen, Ling; Zeng, Gucheng; Yao, Shuyun; Shen, Yun; Halliday, Lisa; Fortman, Jeff; McAllister, Milton; Estep, Jim; Hunt, Robert; Vasconcelos, Daphne; Du, George; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman L; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-04-01

    The role of CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity in humans remains unknown, and studies of CD8 T cell-mediated protection against tuberculosis in mice have yielded controversial results. Unlike mice, humans and nonhuman primates share a number of important features of the immune system that relate directly to the specificity and functions of CD8 T cells, such as the expression of group 1 CD1 proteins that are capable of presenting Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipids antigens and the cytotoxic/bactericidal protein granulysin. Employing a more relevant nonhuman primate model of human tuberculosis, we examined the contribution of BCG- or M. tuberculosis-elicited CD8 T cells to vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis. CD8 depletion compromised BCG vaccine-induced immune control of M. tuberculosis replication in the vaccinated rhesus macaques. Depletion of CD8 T cells in BCG-vaccinated rhesus macaques led to a significant decrease in the vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis. Consistently, depletion of CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques that had been previously infected with M. tuberculosis and cured by antibiotic therapy also resulted in a loss of anti-tuberculosis immunity upon M. tuberculosis re-infection. The current study demonstrates a major role for CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity, and supports the view that CD8 T cells should be included in strategies for development of new tuberculosis vaccines and immunotherapeutics.

  13. A critical role for CD8 T cells in a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Y Chen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity in humans remains unknown, and studies of CD8 T cell-mediated protection against tuberculosis in mice have yielded controversial results. Unlike mice, humans and nonhuman primates share a number of important features of the immune system that relate directly to the specificity and functions of CD8 T cells, such as the expression of group 1 CD1 proteins that are capable of presenting Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipids antigens and the cytotoxic/bactericidal protein granulysin. Employing a more relevant nonhuman primate model of human tuberculosis, we examined the contribution of BCG- or M. tuberculosis-elicited CD8 T cells to vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis. CD8 depletion compromised BCG vaccine-induced immune control of M. tuberculosis replication in the vaccinated rhesus macaques. Depletion of CD8 T cells in BCG-vaccinated rhesus macaques led to a significant decrease in the vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis. Consistently, depletion of CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques that had been previously infected with M. tuberculosis and cured by antibiotic therapy also resulted in a loss of anti-tuberculosis immunity upon M. tuberculosis re-infection. The current study demonstrates a major role for CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity, and supports the view that CD8 T cells should be included in strategies for development of new tuberculosis vaccines and immunotherapeutics.

  14. Regulatory T cell expressed MyD88 is critical for prolongation of allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Christopher M; Reichenbach, Dawn K; Kim, Beom Seok; Misra, Aditya; Blazar, Bruce R; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-08-01

    MyD88 signaling directly promotes T-cell survival and is required for optimal T-cell responses to pathogens. To examine the role of T-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals in transplantation, we studied mice with targeted T-cell-specific MyD88 deletion. Contrary to expectations, we found that these mice were relatively resistant to prolongation of graft survival with anti-CD154 plus rapamycin in a class II-mismatched system. To specifically examine the role of MyD88 in Tregs, we created a Treg-specific MyD88-deficient mouse. Transplant studies in these animals replicated the findings observed with a global T-cell MyD88 knockout. Surprisingly, given the role of MyD88 in conventional T-cell survival, we found no defect in the survival of MyD88-deficient Tregs in vitro or in the transplant recipients and also observed intact cell homing and expression of Treg effector molecules. MyD88-deficient Tregs also fail to protect allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients from chronic graft-versus-host disease, confirming the observations of defective regulation seen in a solid organ transplant system. Together, our data define MyD88 as having a divergent requirement for cell survival in non-Tregs and Tregs, and a yet-to-be defined survival-independent requirement for Treg function during the response to alloantigen.

  15. Hypoxia-induced lysyl oxidase is a critical mediator of bone marrow cell recruitment to form the premetastatic niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Janine T; Bennewith, Kevin L; Cox, Thomas R; Lang, Georgina; Bird, Demelza; Koong, Albert; Le, Quynh-Thu; Giaccia, Amato J

    2009-01-06

    Tumor cell metastasis is facilitated by "premetastatic niches" formed in destination organs by invading bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs). Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is critical for premetastatic niche formation. LOX secreted by hypoxic breast tumor cells accumulates at premetastatic sites, crosslinks collagen IV in the basement membrane, and is essential for CD11b+ myeloid cell recruitment. CD11b+ cells adhere to crosslinked collagen IV and produce matrix metalloproteinase-2, which cleaves collagen, enhancing the invasion and recruitment of BMDCs and metastasizing tumor cells. LOX inhibition prevents CD11b+ cell recruitment and metastatic growth. CD11b+ cells and LOX also colocalize in biopsies of human metastases. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for LOX in premetastatic niche formation and support targeting LOX for the treatment and prevention of metastatic disease.

  16. Stem cells: shibboleths of development, part II: Toward a functional definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Graham C; Anastassova-Kristeva, Marlene; Eisenberg, Leonard M; Rao, Mahendra S; Williams, Marc A; Sanberg, Paul R; English, Denis

    2005-10-01

    Our previous discourse on stem cell characteristics led to the conclusion that the qualities deemed essential for a cell to be considered a "stem cell" are neither firmly established nor universally accepted, and this we accept as editorial policy. In that study, self-renewal, asymmetric division, phenotypic markers, and other attributes touted as being indicative of cells being stem cells were critically questioned as fundamental to the definition of a stem cell, leading us to seek a functional definition instead. Here, we offer further considerations, and elaborate on the characteristics that diverse investigators feel are essential for a cell to function as a stem cell, either in development or body maintenance. We hope that this discourse will promote further reflection, culminating with a definition that is widely accepted and universally applicable. We confess this goal has not been reached, neither here nor elsewhere. The outstanding goal of understanding what stem cells are, a prerequisite of characterizing what stem cells do and how they do it, is still outstanding.

  17. Designing pinhole vacancies in graphene towards functionalization: Effects on critical buckling load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantzinos, S. K.; Markolefas, S.; Giannopoulos, G. I.; Katsareas, D. E.; Anifantis, N. K.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of size and placement of pinhole-type atom vacancies on Euler's critical load on free-standing, monolayer graphene, is investigated. The graphene is modeled by a structural spring-based finite element approach, in which every interatomic interaction is approached as a linear spring. The geometry of graphene and the pinhole size lead to the assembly of the stiffness matrix of the nanostructure. Definition of the boundary conditions of the problem leads to the solution of the eigenvalue problem and consequently to the critical buckling load. Comparison to results found in the literature illustrates the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Parametric analysis regarding the placement and size of the pinhole-type vacancy, as well as the graphene geometry, depicts the effects on critical buckling load. Non-linear regression analysis leads to empirical-analytical equations for predicting the buckling behavior of graphene, with engineered pinhole-type atom vacancies.

  18. Multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Gary R.

    1994-08-01

    The ability to quantitate physiological parameters in single living cells using fluorescence spectroscopic imaging has expanded our understanding of many cell regulatory processes. Previous studies have focussed on the measurement of single parameters, such as the concentration of calcium, and more recently two parameters, such as calcium and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging. The complexity of the interrelationships among cell biochemical reactions suggests a need to extend the measurement scheme to several parameters. Expansion of the number of parameters involves several complexities associated with fluorescent probe selection and instrumentation design as well as the processing and management of the data. A system has been assembled which provides maximum flexibility in multiparameter fluorescence imaging measurements. The system provides multiple combinations of excitation, dichroic mirror, and emission wavelengths. It has automatic acquisition of any number of parameters. The number of parameters is primarily limited by the selection of fluorescent probes with nonoverlapping spectra. We demonstrate the utility of the system by the coordinated monitoring of stimulated changes in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging coupled with a conventional transmitted light image of single smooth muscle cells. The results demonstrate coordinated changes in some instances but uncoordinated changes in others.

  19. Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaster Robert

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in the diseased organ. PSCs are vitamin A-storing, fibroblast-like cells with close morphological and biochemical similarities to hepatic stellate cells (also known as Ito-cells. In response to profibrogenic mediators such as various cytokines, PSCs undergo an activation process that involves proliferation, exhibition of a myofibroblastic phenotype and enhanced production of ECM proteins. The intracellular mediators of activation signals, and their antagonists, are only partially known so far. Recent data suggest an important role of enzymes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family in PSC activation. On the other hand, ligands of the nuclear receptor PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ stimulate maintenance of a quiescent PSC phenotype. In the future, targeting regulators of the PSC activation process might become a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic fibrosis.

  20. Understanding effects of TCO work function on the performance of organic solar cells by numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Aqing; Shao, Qingyi; Ji, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    The influences of work function of transparent conducting oxides (TCO) on the per-formance of organic solar cells, including open circuit voltage, conversion efficiency and fill factor, has been simulated. It is obtained that for non-Ohmic contact the open circuit voltage and conversion efficiency increase monotonically with the TCO work function but keep constant for Ohmic contact. Fill factor decreases and increases with the electrode work function when the electrode work function is below and above a critical value (4.2 eV for TCO and 4.5 eV for back-contact), respectively. The results of this simulation are significant in the choice of TCO contacts to optimize organic planar heterojunction solar cells.

  1. Mast cells are critical for protection against peptic ulcers induced by the NSAID piroxicam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Hampton

    Full Text Available Many commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs also cause gastrointestinal toxicity, including the development of life-threatening peptic ulcers. We report that mast cell-deficient mice have an extremely high incidence of severe peptic ulceration when exposed to the NSAID piroxicam. This enhanced ulcer susceptibility can be reversed by reconstitution with mast cells. Furthermore, wild type mice treated with diphenhydramine hydrochloride, a commonly used antihistamine that blocks histamine H1 receptors, develop a similarly high incidence of peptic ulcers following piroxicam exposure. The protective effect of mast cells is independent of TNF, blockade of H2 receptors, or acid secretion. These data indicate a critical role for mast cells and the histamine that they produce in prevention and/or repair of piroxicam-induced gastric mucosal injury. Additional studies will be required to determine whether this represents a NSAID class effect that can be exploited to develop novel therapeutic strategies to limit the incidence of NSAID-induced side effects in humans.

  2. Evidence for a critical role of gene occlusion in cell fate restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jedidiah Gaetz; Wei-Hua Yu; Andy Peng Xiang; Bruce T Lahn; Kayla L Clift; Croydon J Fernandes; Frank Fuxiang Mao; Jae Hyun Lee; Li Zhang; Samuel W Baker; Timothy J Looney; Kara M Foshay

    2012-01-01

    The progressive restriction of cell fate during lineage differentiation is a poorly understood phenomenon despite its ubiquity in multicellular organisms.We recently used a cell fusion assay to define a mode of epigenetic silencing that we termed "occlusion",wherein affected genes are silenced by cis-acting chromatin mechanisms irrespective of whether trans-acting transcriptional activators are present.We hypothesized that occlusion of lineage-inappropriate genes could contribute to cell fate restriction.Here,we test this hypothesis by introducing bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs),which are devoid of chromatin modifications necessary for occlusion,into mouse fibroblasts.We found that BAC transgenes corresponding to occluded endogenous genes are expressed in most eases,whereas BAC transgenes corresponding to silent but non-occluded endogenous genes are not expressed.This indicates that the cellular milieu in trans supports the expression of most occluded genes in fibroblasts,and that the silent state of these genes is solely the consequence of occlusion in cis.For the BAC corresponding to the occluded myogenic master regulator Myf5,expression of the Myf5 transgene on the BAC triggered fibroblasts to acquire a muscle-like phenotype.These results provide compelling evidence for a critical role of gene occlusion in cell fate restriction.

  3. The Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic Domain Lysine Cluster Is Critical for Varicella-Zoster Virus Cell-Cell Fusion Regulation and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan L

    2017-01-01

    The conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL are essential for herpesvirus entry and cell-cell fusion induced syncytium formation, a characteristic of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathology in skin and sensory ganglia. VZV syncytium formation, which has been implicated in the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia, is regulated by the cytoplasmic domains of gB (gBcyt) via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) and gH (gHcyt). A lysine cluster (K894, K897, K898, and K900) in the VZV gBcyt was identified by sequence alignment to be conserved among alphaherpesviruses, suggesting a functional role. Alanine and arginine substitutions were used to determine if the positive charge and susceptibility to posttranslational modifications of these lysines contributed to gB/gH-gL cell-cell fusion. Critically, the positive charge of the lysine residues was necessary for fusion regulation, as alanine substitutions induced a 440% increase in fusion compared to that of the wild-type gBcyt while arginine substitutions had wild-type-like fusion levels in an in vitro gB/gH-gL cell fusion assay. Consistent with these results, the alanine substitutions in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytium formation, reduced VZV titers (-1.5 log10), and smaller plaques than with the parental Oka (pOka) strain. In contrast, arginine substitutions resulted in syncytia with only 2-fold more nuclei, a -0.5-log10 reduction in titers, and pOka-like plaques. VZV mutants with both an ITIM mutation and either alanine or arginine substitutions had reduced titers and small plaques but differed in syncytium morphology. Thus, effective VZV propagation is dependent on cell-cell fusion regulation by the conserved gBcyt lysine cluster, in addition to the gBcyt ITIM and the gHcyt.

  4. A critical role of CXCR2 PDZ-mediated interactions in endothelial progenitor cell homing and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning Hou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contribute to neovessel formation in response to growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. Chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its cognate ligands are reported to mediate EPC recruitment and angiogenesis. CXCR2 possesses a consensus PSD-95/DlgA/ZO-1 (PDZ motif which has been reported to modulate cellular signaling and functions. Here we examined the potential role of the PDZ motif in CXCR2-mediated EPC motility and angiogenesis. We observed that exogenous CXCR2 C-tail significantly inhibited in vitro EPC migratory responses and angiogenic activities, as well as in vivo EPC angiogenesis. However, the CXCR2 C-tail that lacks the PDZ motif (ΔTTL did not cause any significant changes of these functions in EPCs. In addition, using biochemical assays, we demonstrated that the PDZ scaffold protein NHERF1 specifically interacted with CXCR2 and its downstream effector, PLC-β3, in EPCs. This suggests that NHERF1 might cluster CXCR2 and its relevant signaling molecules into a macromolecular signaling complex modulating EPC cellular functions. Taken together, our data revealed a critical role of a PDZ-based CXCR2 macromolecular complex in EPC homing and angiogenesis, suggesting that targeting this complex might be a novel and effective strategy to treat angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

  5. Corpus linguistics, systemic functional grammar and literary meaning: a critical analysis of harry potter and the philosopher’s stone Corpus linguistics, systemic functional grammar and literary meaning: a critical analysis of harry potter and the philosopher’s stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Goatly

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The research reported in this paper has two aims. First, to show how corpus linguistics, using word frequency and concordance data, which is then analysed according to transitivity systems of systemic functional grammar (SFG, can be useful to the enterprise of critical linguistics. Second, to investigate to what extent this critical corpus linguistics (CCL gives a valid representation of the meanings and ideologies of a literary text. The hypothesis tested is that semiotic models of communication, in this case of popular children’s literature, with their emphasis on the encoding and decoding of meanings, lend themselves to a corpus linguistics approach. But that, in fact, these mutually reinforcing approaches (SFG and CCL with their reliance on what is encoded as text cannot entirely succeed in accounting for how literature, in particular, is understood and interpreted, and how ideology works within it and behind it. For a richer critical discourse analysis we need a pragmatic account, for example an analysis of presupposition, inference and propositional attitude. The issues here will be discussed in the light of recent debate between Michael Stubbs and Henry Widdowson on the strengths and limitations of corpus linguistics in critical discourse analysis. The research reported in this paper has two aims. First, to show how corpus linguistics, using word frequency and concordance data, which is then analysed according to transitivity systems of systemic functional grammar (SFG, can be useful to the enterprise of critical linguistics. Second, to investigate to what extent this critical corpus linguistics (CCL gives a valid representation of the meanings and ideologies of a literary text. The hypothesis tested is that semiotic models of communication, in this case of popular children’s literature, with their emphasis on the encoding and decoding of meanings, lend themselves to a corpus linguistics approach. But that, in fact, these

  6. Maximum diastolic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes depends critically on I(Kr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Michael Xavier; Di Diego, José M; Goodrow, Robert J; Wu, Yuesheng; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Nesterenko, Vladislav V; Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Urrutia, Janire; Desai, Mayurika; Treat, Jacqueline A; Sachinidis, Agapios; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP) from spontaneously beating clusters (BC) micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C) and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21) or BaCl(2) (n = 22). Patch-clamp techniques were used to record I(Kr) and I(K1) from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C). Spontaneous cycle length (CL) and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21) increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (pKr) in all (11/11). Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of I(K1) in the majority of cells, but robust expression of I(Kr.) In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd). The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on I(Kr) due to the absence of I(K1). Thus, efforts should be directed at producing more specialized and mature hiPSC-CM for future therapeutic applications.

  7. Live cell imaging to understand monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell function in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Ley, Klaus

    2016-06-27

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for understanding the function of cells in healthy and diseased tissues. It provides a window into dynamic processes that cannot be studied by other techniques. This review will cover the benefits and limitations of various techniques for labeling and imaging myeloid cells, with a special focus on imaging cells in atherosclerotic arteries. Although intravital imaging is a powerful tool for understanding cell function, it alone does not provide a complete picture of the cell. Other techniques, such as flow cytometry and transcriptomics, must be combined with intravital imaging to fully understand a cell's phenotype, lineage, and function.

  8. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome and Leydig cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Ulla Nordström; Jørgensen, Niels; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    originating in early foetal life. TDS comprises various aspects of impaired gonadal development and function, including testicular cancer. A growing body of evidence, including animal models and research in human beings, points to lifestyle factors and endocrine disrupters as risk factors for TDS. We present...

  9. The vitamin d receptor and T cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; Levring, Trine B; Geisler, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    ultimately to increase their chance of survival. Immune modulatory therapies that enhance VDR expression and activity are therefore considered in the clinic today to a greater extent. As T cells are of great importance for both protective immunity and development of inflammatory diseases a variety of studies...... have been engaged investigating the impact of VDR expression in T cells and found that VDR expression and activity plays an important role in both T cell development, differentiation and effector function. In this review we will analyze current knowledge of VDR regulation and function in T cells...

  10. Endocrine disruptors and Leydig cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svechnikov, K; Izzo, G; Landreh, L; Weisser, J; Söder, O

    2010-01-01

    During the past decades, a large body of information concerning the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on animals and humans has been accumulated. EDCs are of synthetic or natural origin and certain groups are known to disrupt the action of androgens and to impair the development of the male reproductive tract and external genitalia. The present overview describes the effects of the different classes of EDCs, such as pesticides, phthalates, dioxins, and phytoestrogens, including newly synthesized resveratrol analogs on steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. The potential impact of these compounds on androgen production by Leydig cells during fetal development and in the adult age is discussed. In addition, the possible role of EDCs in connection with the increasing frequency of abnormalities in reproductive development in animals and humans is discussed.

  11. [Structure and function of fungal cell wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Naohito

    2008-12-01

    Cell wall glycans of fungi/yeasts are reviewed. Fungi/yeasts produce various kinds of polysaccharides. As part of the cell wall they are interlinked with other components forming a huge network. The insolubility and complex with multiple components makes the research very tough. Studies on beta-glucan have been performed from various views, such as chemistry, conformation, solubility, tissue distribution and metabolism, biological activity, clinical application, receptor, biosynthesis, and antibody. Studies on mannan focus on immunotoxicity, such as anaphylactoid reaction and coronary arteritis induction. alpha-glucan, chitin, and capsular polysaccharide were also mentioned in relation to structure and genes. Compared with human and animal polysaccharides, fungi/yeasts polysaccharides have very characteristic properties.

  12. Visceral adipose inflammation in obesity is associated with critical alterations in tregulatory cell numbers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Deiuliis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of insulin resistance (IR in mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by progressive accumulation of inflammatory macrophages and subpopulations of T cells in the visceral adipose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs may play a critical role in modulating tissue inflammation via their interactions with both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms. We hypothesized that an imbalance in Tregs is a critical determinant of adipose inflammation and investigated the role of Tregs in IR/obesity through coordinated studies in mice and humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Foxp3-green fluorescent protein (GFP "knock-in" mice were randomized to a high-fat diet intervention for a duration of 12 weeks to induce DIO/IR. Morbidly obese humans without overt type 2 DM (n = 13 and lean controls (n = 7 were recruited prospectively for assessment of visceral adipose inflammation. DIO resulted in increased CD3(+CD4(+, and CD3(+CD8(+ cells in visceral adipose with a striking decrease in visceral adipose Tregs. Treg numbers in visceral adipose inversely correlated with CD11b(+CD11c(+ adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Splenic Treg numbers were increased with up-regulation of homing receptors CXCR3 and CCR7 and marker of activation CD44. In-vitro differentiation assays showed an inhibition of Treg differentiation in response to conditioned media from inflammatory macrophages. Human visceral adipose in morbid obesity was characterized by an increase in CD11c(+ ATMs and a decrease in foxp3 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our experiments indicate that obesity in mice and humans results in adipose Treg depletion. These changes appear to occur via reduced local differentiation rather than impaired homing. Our findings implicate a role for Tregs as determinants of adipose inflammation.

  13. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines.

  14. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  15. Functional Overload Enhances Satellite Cell Properties in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Fujimaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle represents a plentiful and accessible source of adult stem cells. Skeletal-muscle-derived stem cells, termed satellite cells, play essential roles in postnatal growth, maintenance, repair, and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Although it is well known that the number of satellite cells increases following physical exercise, functional alterations in satellite cells such as proliferative capacity and differentiation efficiency following exercise and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that functional overload, which is widely used to model resistance exercise, causes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and converts satellite cells from quiescent state to activated state. Our analysis showed that functional overload induces the expression of MyoD in satellite cells and enhances the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of these cells. The changes in satellite cell properties coincided with the inactivation of Notch signaling and the activation of Wnt signaling and likely involve modulation by transcription factors of the Sox family. These results indicate the effects of resistance exercise on the regulation of satellite cells and provide insight into the molecular mechanism of satellite cell activation following physical exercise.

  16. Generation of functionally competent and durable engineered blood vessels from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Rekha; Daheron, Laurence; Liao, Shan; Vardam, Trupti; Kamoun, Walid S; Batista, Ana; Buecker, Christa; Schäfer, Richard; Han, Xiaoxing; Au, Patrick; Scadden, David T; Duda, Dan G; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2013-07-30

    Efficient generation of competent vasculogenic cells is a critical challenge of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell-based regenerative medicine. Biologically relevant systems to assess functionality of the engineered vessels in vivo are equally important for such development. Here, we report a unique approach for the derivation of endothelial precursor cells from hiPS cells using a triple combination of selection markers--CD34, neuropilin 1, and human kinase insert domain-containing receptor--and an efficient 2D culture system for hiPS cell-derived endothelial precursor cell expansion. With these methods, we successfully generated endothelial cells (ECs) from hiPS cells obtained from healthy donors and formed stable functional blood vessels in vivo, lasting for 280 d in mice. In addition, we developed an approach to generate mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) from hiPS cells in parallel. Moreover, we successfully generated functional blood vessels in vivo using these ECs and MPCs derived from the same hiPS cell line. These data provide proof of the principle that autologous hiPS cell-derived vascular precursors can be used for in vivo applications, once safety and immunological issues of hiPS-based cellular therapy have been resolved. Additionally, the durability of hiPS-derived blood vessels in vivo demonstrates a potential translation of this approach in long-term vascularization for tissue engineering and treatment of vascular diseases. Of note, we have also successfully generated ECs and MPCs from type 1 diabetic patient-derived hiPS cell lines and use them to generate blood vessels in vivo, which is an important milestone toward clinical translation of this approach.

  17. A Critical Role for CD8 T Cells in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The role of CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity in humans remains unknown, and studies of CD8 T cell–mediated protection against tuberculosis in mice have yielded controversial results. Unlike mice, humans and nonhuman primates share a number of important features of the immune system that relate directly to the specificity and functions of CD8 T cells, such as the expression of group 1 CD1 proteins that are capable of presenting Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipids antigens and the cytoto...

  18. Pretreatment with TCDD exacerbates liver injury from Concanavalin A: critical role for NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Aaron M; Roth, Robert A; Ganey, Patricia E

    2013-11-01

    For many liver diseases, including viral and autoimmune hepatitis, immune cells play an important role in the development and progression of liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) administration to rodents has been used as a model of immune-mediated liver injury resembling human autoimmune hepatitis. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to alter the development of immune-mediated diseases. Mice pretreated with TCDD developed exacerbated liver injury in response to administration of a mild dose (6 mg/kg) of Con A. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates Con A-induced liver injury by enhancing the activation and recruitment of accessory cell types including neutrophils, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. Mice were treated with 0, 0.3, 3, or 30 μg/kg TCDD and 4 days later with Con A or saline. TCDD pretreatment with doses of 3 and 30 μg/kg significantly increased liver injury from Con A administration. The plasma concentrations of neutrophil chemokines were significantly increased in TCDD-pretreated mice after Con A administration. NKT cell-deficient (CD1d KO) mice were used to examine whether NKT cells were required for TCDD/Con A-induced liver injury. CD1d KO mice were completely protected from liver injury induced by treatment with Con A alone, whereas the injury from TCDD/Con A treatment was reduced but not eliminated. However, T-cell deficient (RAG1 KO) mice were protected from liver injury induced by Con A irrespective of pretreatment with TCDD. TCDD/Con A treatment increased the percentage of NK cells expressing the activation marker CD69. Depletion of NK cells prior to treatment resulted in significant reductions in plasma interferon-γ and liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD exacerbated the immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A, and our findings suggest that NK cells play a critical role in this response.

  19. Defective TFH Cell Function and Increased TFR Cells Contribute to Defective Antibody Production in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Peter T; Tan, Catherine L; Freeman, Gordon J; Haigis, Marcia; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2015-07-14

    Defective antibody production in aging is broadly attributed to immunosenescence. However, the precise immunological mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the ratio of inhibitory T follicular regulatory (TFR) cells to stimulatory T follicular helper (TFH) cells in aged mice. Aged TFH and TFR cells are phenotypically distinct from those in young mice, exhibiting increased programmed cell death protein-1 expression but decreased ICOS expression. Aged TFH cells exhibit defective antigen-specific responses, and programmed cell death protein-ligand 1 blockade can partially rescue TFH cell function. In contrast, young and aged TFR cells have similar suppressive capacity on a per-cell basis in vitro and in vivo. Together, these studies reveal mechanisms contributing to defective humoral immunity in aging: an increase in suppressive TFR cells combined with impaired function of aged TFH cells results in reduced T-cell-dependent antibody responses in aged mice.

  20. Defective TFH Cell Function and Increased TFR Cells Contribute to Defective Antibody Production in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Sage

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Defective antibody production in aging is broadly attributed to immunosenescence. However, the precise immunological mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the ratio of inhibitory T follicular regulatory (TFR cells to stimulatory T follicular helper (TFH cells in aged mice. Aged TFH and TFR cells are phenotypically distinct from those in young mice, exhibiting increased programmed cell death protein-1 expression but decreased ICOS expression. Aged TFH cells exhibit defective antigen-specific responses, and programmed cell death protein-ligand 1 blockade can partially rescue TFH cell function. In contrast, young and aged TFR cells have similar suppressive capacity on a per-cell basis in vitro and in vivo. Together, these studies reveal mechanisms contributing to defective humoral immunity in aging: an increase in suppressive TFR cells combined with impaired function of aged TFH cells results in reduced T-cell-dependent antibody responses in aged mice.

  1. Temperature dependent dielectric function and the E0 critical points of hexagonal GaN from 30 to 690 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Jung Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex dielectric function ɛ and the E0 excitonic and band-edge critical-point structures of hexagonal GaN are reported for temperatures from 30 to 690 K and energies from 0.74 to 6.42 eV, obtained by rotating-compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry on a 1.9 μm thick GaN film deposited on a c-plane (0001 sapphire substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct inversion and B-splines in a multilayer-structure calculation were used to extract the optical properties of the film from the measured pseudodielectric function ⟨ɛ⟩. At low temperature sharp E0 excitonic and critical-point interband transitions are separately observed. Their temperature dependences were determined by fitting the data to the empirical Varshni relation and the phenomenological expression that contains the Bose-Einstein statistical factor.

  2. Modulation of immune cell functions by the E3 ligase CBL-b

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    Christina eLutz-Nicoladoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of immunological tolerance is a critical hallmark of the immune system. Several signaling checkpoints necessary to balance activating and inhibitory input to immune cells have been described so far, among which the E3 ligase Cbl-b appears to be a central player. Cbl-b is expressed in all leukocyte subsets and regulates several signaling pathways in T cells, NK cells, B cells and different types of myeloid cells. In most cases Cbl-b negatively regulates activation signals through antigen or pattern recognition receptors and co-stimulatory molecules. In line with this function, cblb-deficient immune cells display lower activation thresholds and cblb knockout mice spontaneously develop autoimmunity and are highly susceptible to experimental autoimmunity. Interestingly, genetic association studies link cblb-polymorphisms with autoimmunity also in humans. Vice versa, the increased activation potential of cblb-deficient cells renders them more potent to fight against malignancies or infections. Accordingly, several reports have shown that cblb knockout mice reject tumors, which mainly depends on cytotoxic T and NK cells. Thus targeting Cbl-b may be an interesting strategy to enhance anti-cancer immunity. In this review we summarize the findings on the molecular function of Cbl-b in different cell types and illustrate the potential of Cbl-b as target for immunomodulatory therapies.

  3. Modulation of Vascular Cell Function by Bim Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Morrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim−/− mice. Bim−/− endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim−/− endothelial cells with Bim−/− pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  4. Modulation of vascular cell function by bim expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Margaret E; Palenski, Tammy L; Jamali, Nasim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim(-/-)) mice. Bim(-/-) endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim(-/-) endothelial cells with Bim(-/-) pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  5. Distinct molecular signature of human skin Langerhans cells denotes critical differences in cutaneous dendritic cell immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Marta E; Thirdborough, Stephen M; Ung, Chuin Y; Elliott, Tim; Healy, Eugene; Freeman, Tom C; Ardern-Jones, Michael R

    2014-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) residing in the epidermis. Despite their high potential to activate T lymphocytes, current understanding of human LC biology is limited. Genome-wide comparison of the transcriptional profiles of human skin migratory CD1a+ LCs and CD11c+ dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) demonstrated significant differences between these "dendritic cell (DC)" types, including preferential expression of 625 genes (Pmolecular networks activated after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) confirmed the unique molecular signature of LCs. Although LCs conformed to the phenotype of professional APC, inflammatory signaling activated primarily genes associated with cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activation (e.g., CYB561 and MRPS35), cell membrane re-organization, and antigen acquisition and degradation (CAV1 and PSMD14; P<0.05-P<0.0001). Conversely, TNF-α induced classical activation in DDCs with early downregulation of surface receptors (mannose receptor-1 (MRC1) and C-type lectins), and subsequent upregulation of cytokines, chemokines (IL1a, IL1b, and CCL18), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP3, and MMP9; P<0.05-P<0.0001). Functional interference of caveolin abrogated LCs superior ability to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T lymphocytes, highlighting the importance of these networks to biological function. Taken together, these observations support the idea of distinct biological roles of cutaneous DC types.

  6. Functional identification of islet cell types by electrophysiological fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Vergari, Elisa; Kellard, Joely A.; Rodriguez, Blanca; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Rorsman, Patrik

    2017-01-01

    The α-, β- and δ-cells of the pancreatic islet exhibit different electrophysiological features. We used a large dataset of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cells in intact mouse islets (N = 288 recordings) to investigate whether it is possible to reliably identify cell type (α, β or δ) based on their electrophysiological characteristics. We quantified 15 electrophysiological variables in each recorded cell. Individually, none of the variables could reliably distinguish the cell types. We therefore constructed a logistic regression model that included all quantified variables, to determine whether they could together identify cell type. The model identified cell type with 94% accuracy. This model was applied to a dataset of cells recorded from hyperglycaemic βV59M mice; it correctly identified cell type in all cells and was able to distinguish cells that co-expressed insulin and glucagon. Based on this revised functional identification, we were able to improve conductance-based models of the electrical activity in α-cells and generate a model of δ-cell electrical activity. These new models could faithfully emulate α- and δ-cell electrical activity recorded experimentally. PMID:28275121

  7. Murine Herc6 Plays a Critical Role in Protein ISGylation In Vivo and Has an ISGylation-Independent Function in Seminal Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Kei-ichiro; Hishiki, Takayuki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Cheng, Chuyi; Yan, Ming; Fan, Jun-Bao; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Zhang, Dong-Er; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2015-05-01

    ISG15 conjugation (ISGylation) to proteins is a multistep process involving interferon (IFN)-inducible UBE1L (E1), UbcH8 (E2), and ISG15 E3 ligases (E3s). Studies performed over the past several years have shown that ISGylation plays a pivotal role in the host antiviral response against certain viruses. Recent in vitro studies revealed that human Herc5 and mouse Herc6 are major ISG15 E3 ligases, respectively. However, the global function of Herc5/6 proteins in vivo still remains unclear. Here, we report generation and initial characterization of Herc6 knockout mice. Substantial reductions of ISGylation were observed in Herc6-deficient cells after polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid double-stranded RNA injection of mice or IFN treatment of cells. On the other hand, Herc6-deficient cells and wild-type (WT) cells had similar responses to IFN stimulation, Sendai virus (Z strain) infection, and vesicular stomatitis virus infection. These results indicate that Herc6 does not play a critical role in antiviral defense of these viral infections in mice. Interestingly, male Herc6-deficient mice showed seminal vesicle hypertrophy. No such problem was detected in WT and ISG15 activating enzyme Ube1L-deficient mice. These results suggest that in addition to promoting protein ISGylation, Herc6 has a novel and protein ISGylation-independent function in the male reproductive system.

  8. Four hour creatinine clearance is better than plasma creatinine for monitoring renal function in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pickering, John W.; Frampton, Christopher M; Walker, Robert J; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Endre, Zoltán H

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis is based on an increase in plasma creatinine, which is a slowly changing surrogate of decreased glomerular filtration rate. We investigated whether serial creatinine clearance, a direct measure of the glomerular filtration rate, provided more timely and accurate information on renal function than serial plasma creatinine in critically ill patients. Methods Serial plasma creatinine and 4-hour creatinine clearance were measured 12-hourly for 24 h...

  9. Transfusion of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells is not a risk factor for nosocomial infections in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Judith; van Heerde, Marc; Markhorst, Dick G.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Transfusion of red blood cells is increasingly linked with adverse outcomes in critically ill children. We tested the hypothesis that leukocyte-depleted red blood cell transfusions were independently associated with increased development of bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated p

  10. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays a critical role in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. In this study, submicromolar methylselenol was generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and both colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to...

  11. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie A.S. Corsa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells support hepatocyte function in engineered liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshie; Yagi, Hiroshi; Inomata, Kenta; Matsubara, Kentaro; Hibi, Taizo; Abe, Yuta; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that organ decellularization is a promising approach to facilitate the clinical application of regenerative therapy by providing a platform for organ engineering. This unique strategy uses native matrices to act as a reservoir for the functional cells which may show therapeutic potential when implanted into the body. Appropriate cell sources for artificial livers have been debated for some time. The desired cell type in artificial livers is primary hepatocytes, but in addition, other supportive cells may facilitate this stem cell technology. In this context, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is an option meeting the criteria for therapeutic organ engineering. Ideally, supportive cells are required to (1) reduce the hepatic cell mass needed in an engineered liver by enhancing hepatocyte function, (2) modulate hepatic regeneration in a paracrine fashion or by direct contact, and (3) enhance the preservability of parenchymal cells during storage. Here, we describe enhanced hepatic function achieved using a strategy of sequential infusion of cells and illustrate the advantages of co-cultivating bone marrow-derived MSCs with primary hepatocytes in the engineered whole-liver scaffold. These co-recellularized liver scaffolds colonized by MSCs and hepatocytes were transplanted into live animals. After blood flow was established, we show that expression of adhesion molecules and proangiogenic factors was upregulated in the graft.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  15. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Lee, Mi-Ra [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kyu-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Chul; Jung, Jae Hung [Department of Urology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Seung-Kuy, E-mail: skcha@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, and Nuclear Receptor Research Consortium, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Minseob, E-mail: eomm@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca{sup 2+} regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) is a major Ca{sup 2+} entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration.

  16. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and functio...

  17. Altered Function in CD8+ T Cells following Paramyxovirus Infection of the Respiratory Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter M.; Arimilli, Subhashini; Palmer, Ellen M.; Parks, Griffith D.; Alexander-Miller, Martha A.

    2005-01-01

    For many respiratory pathogens, CD8+ T cells have been shown to play a critical role in clearance. However, there are still many unanswered questions with regard to the factors that promote the most efficacious immune response and the potential for immunoregulation of effector cells at the local site of infection. We have used infection of the respiratory tract with the model paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) to study CD8+ T-cell responses in the lung. For the present study, we report that over time a population of nonresponsive, virus-specific CD8+ T cells emerged in the lung, culminating in a lack of function in ∼85% of cells specific for the immunodominant epitope from the viral matrix (M) protein by day 40 postinfection. Concurrent with the induction of nonresponsiveness, virus-specific cells that retained function at later times postinfection exhibited an increased requirement for CD8 engagement. This change was coupled with a nearly complete loss of functional phosphoprotein-specific cells, a response previously shown to be almost exclusively CD8 independent. These studies add to the growing evidence for immune dysregulation following viral infection of the respiratory tract. PMID:15731228

  18. HIV Latency-Reversing Agents Have Diverse Effects on Natural Killer Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Carolina; Spivak, Adam M.; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Checkley, Mary Ann; Barker, Edward; Karn, Jonathan; Planelles, Vicente; Margolis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to clear persistent HIV infection and achieve a durable therapy-free remission of HIV disease, extensive pre-clinical studies and early pilot clinical trials are underway to develop and test agents that can reverse latent HIV infection and present viral antigen to the immune system for clearance. It is, therefore, critical to understand the impact of latency-reversing agents (LRAs) on the function of immune effectors needed to clear infected cells. We assessed the impact of LRAs on the function of natural killer (NK) cells, the main effector cells of the innate immune system. We studied the effects of three histone deacetylase inhibitors [SAHA or vorinostat (VOR), romidepsin, and panobinostat (PNB)] and two protein kinase C agonists [prostratin (PROST) and ingenol] on the antiviral activity, cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, phenotype, and viability of primary NK cells. We found that ex vivo exposure to VOR had minimal impact on all parameters assessed, while PNB caused a decrease in NK cell viability, antiviral activity, and cytotoxicity. PROST caused non-specific NK cell activation and, interestingly, improved antiviral activity. Overall, we found that LRAs can alter the function and fate of NK cells, and these effects must be carefully considered as strategies are developed to clear persistent HIV infection.

  19. HIV Latency Reversing Agents have diverse effects on Natural Killer Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garrido

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to clear persistent HIV infection, and achieve a durable therapy-free remission of HIV disease, extensive pre-clinical studies and early pilot clinical trials are underway to develop and test agents that can reverse latent HIV infection and present viral antigen to the immune system for clearance. It is therefore critical to understand the impact of latency reversing agents (LRAs on the function of immune effectors needed to clear infected cells. We assessed the impact of LRAs on the function of natural killer (NK cells, the main effector cells of the innate immune system. We studied the effects of three histone deacetylase inhibitors (SAHA or vorinostat, romidepsin and panobinostat and two protein kinase C (PKC agonists (prostratin and ingenol on the antiviral activity, cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, phenotype and viability of primary NK cells. We found that ex vivo exposure to vorinostat had minimal impact on all parameters assessed, while panobinostat caused a decrease in NK cell viability, antiviral activity and cytotoxicity. Prostratin caused NK cell activation and interestingly, improved antiviral activity. Overall, we found that LRAs can alter the function and fate of NK cells, and these effects must be carefully considered as strategies are developed to clear persistent HIV infection.

  20. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome and Leydig cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, U.N.; Jorgensen, N.; Rajpert-De, Meyts E.

    2008-01-01

    originating in early foetal life. TDS comprises various aspects of impaired gonadal development and function, including testicular cancer. A growing body of evidence, including animal models and research in human beings, points to lifestyle factors and endocrine disrupters as risk factors for TDS. We present......Fertility among human beings appear to be on the decline in many Western countries, and part of the explanation may be decreasing male fecundity. A hypothesis has been put forward that decreasing semen quality may be associated with a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), a spectrum of disorders...

  1. Non-critical string theory formulation of microtubule dynamics and quantum aspects of brain function

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1995-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) networks, subneural paracrystalline cytosceletal structures, seem to play a fundamental role in the neurons. We cast here the complicated MT dynamics in the form of a 1+1-dimensional non-critical string theory, thus enabling us to provide a consistent quantum treatment of MTs, including enviromental {\\em friction} effects. We suggest, thus, that the MTs are the microsites, in the brain, for the emergence of stable, macroscopic quantum coherent states, identifiable with the {\\em preconscious states}. Quantum space-time effects, as described by non-critical string theory, trigger then an {\\em organized collapse} of the coherent states down to a specific or {\\em conscious state}. The whole process we estimate to take {\\cal O}(1\\,{\\rm sec}), in excellent agreement with a plethora of experimental/observational findings. The {\\em microscopic arrow of time}, endemic in non-critical string theory, and apparent here in the self-collapse process, provides a satisfactory and simple resolution to the age...

  2. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  3. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  4. Human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic cells maintain core epigenetic machinery of the polycomb group/Trithorax Group complexes distinctly from functional adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerch, Angelique; Lee, Jung Bok; Graham, Monica; Guezguez, Borhane; Bhatia, Mickie

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have a number of potential utilities, including the modeling of hematological disorders in vitro, whereas the use for cell replacement therapies has proved to be a loftier goal. This is due to the failure of differentiated hematopoietic cells, derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), to functionally recapitulate the in vivo properties of bona fide adult hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). To better understand the limitations of differentiation programming at the molecular level, we have utilized differential gene expression analysis of highly purified cells that are enriched for hematopoietic repopulating activity across embryonic, fetal, and adult human samples, including in vivo explants of human HSPCs 8-weeks post-transplantation. We reveal that hESC-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells (eHPCs) fail to express critical transcription factors which are known to govern self-renewal and myeloid/lymphoid development and instead retain the expression of Polycomb Group (PcG) and Trithorax Group (TrxG) factors which are more prevalent in embryonic cell types that include EZH1 and ASH1L, respectively. These molecular profiles indicate that the differential expression of the core epigenetic machinery comprising PcGs/TrxGs in eHPCs may serve as previously unexplored molecular targets that direct hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs toward functional HSPCs in humans.

  5. Cytoskeletal actin networks in motile cells are critically self-organized systems synchronized by mechanical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, Luca; Laio, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent; Shahapure, Rajesh; DeSimone, Antonio

    2011-08-23

    Growing networks of actin fibers are able to organize into compact, stiff two-dimensional structures inside lamellipodia of crawling cells. We put forward the hypothesis that the growing actin network is a critically self-organized system, in which long-range mechanical stresses arising from the interaction with the plasma membrane provide the selective pressure leading to organization. We show that a simple model based only on this principle reproduces the stochastic nature of lamellipodia protrusion (growth periods alternating with fast retractions) and several of the features observed in experiments: a growth velocity initially insensitive to the external force; the capability of the network to organize its orientation; a load-history-dependent growth velocity. Our model predicts that the spectrum of the time series of the height of a growing lamellipodium decays with the inverse of the frequency. This behavior is a well-known signature of self-organized criticality and is confirmed by unique optical tweezer measurements performed in vivo on neuronal growth cones.

  6. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

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    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  7. Clinical Study on Therapy of Clearing Hallow Viscera in Treating Critical Patients with Gastro-enteric Function Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Sheng-lan; LI Dao-ben

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical effect of therapy of clearing hallow viscera in treating critical patients with gastro-enteric function disorder (GEFD). Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out The recovery rate, recovery time of gastro-enteric function, incidence rate and fatality rate of multiple organdysfunction syndrome (MODS), as well as the level of plasma endotoxin (ET) before and after treatment between the two groups were compared. Results: Comparison between the two groups in gastro-enteric function recovery rate (81.3% vs 45.8%), functional disorder sustaining time in patients who got recovered (1.2 ±0.3 daysvs4.0±1.1 days), incidence rate (29. 17% vs52.08%) and fatality rate (28.57% vs56.00%)of MODS all showed significant difference ( P<0.05 or P<0.01 ). The plasma level of ET after treatment in the treated group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Therapy of clearing hallow viscera has a good effect in treating critical patients with gastro-enteric function disorder, and could reduce the incidence and fatality of MODS.

  8. Lysyl oxidase plays a critical role in endothelial cell stimulation to drive tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ann-Marie; Bird, Demelza; Welti, Jonathan C; Gourlaouen, Morgane; Lang, Georgina; Murray, Graeme I; Reynolds, Andrew R; Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-15

    Identification of key molecules that drive angiogenesis is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of solid tumor progression. Using multiple models of colorectal cancer, we show that activity of the extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) is essential for stimulating endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We show that LOX activates Akt through platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) stimulation, resulting in increased VEGF expression. LOX-driven angiogenesis can be abrogated through targeting LOX directly or using inhibitors of PDGFRβ, Akt, and VEGF signaling. Furthermore, we show that LOX is clinically correlated with VEGF expression and blood vessel formation in 515 colorectal cancer patient samples. Finally, we validate our findings in a breast cancer model, showing the universality of these observations. Taken together, our findings have broad clinical and therapeutic implications for a wide variety of solid tumor types.

  9. Lysyl oxidase plays a critical role in endothelial cell stimulation to drive tumor angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ann-Marie; Bird, Demelza; Welti, Jonathan C.; Gourlaouen, Morgane; Lang, Georgina; Murray, Graeme I.; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of key molecules that drive angiogenesis is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of solid tumor progression. Using multiple models of colorectal cancer, we show that activity of the extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) is essential for stimulating endothelial cells in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo. We show LOX activates Akt through platelet derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) stimulation, resulting in increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. LOX-driven angiogenesis can be abrogated through targeting LOX directly, or using inhibitors of PDGFRβ, Akt and VEGF signaling. Furthermore, we show that LOX is clinically correlated with VEGF expression and blood vessel formation in 515 colorectal cancer patient samples. Finally, we validate our findings in a breast cancer model, demonstrating the universality of these observations. Taken together, our findings have broad clinical and therapeutic implications for a wide variety of solid tumor types. PMID:23188504

  10. Adult neural stem cells-Functional potential and therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; ZHU Jianhong

    2004-01-01

    The adult brain has been thought traditionally as a structure with a very limited regenerative capacity. It is now evident that neurogenesis in adult mammalian brain is a prevailing phenomenon. Neural stem cells with the ability to self-renew, differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes reside in some regions of the adult brain. Adult neurogenesis can be stimulated by many physiological factors including pregnancy. More strikingly, newborn neurons in hippocampus integrally function with local neurons, thus neural stem cells might play important roles in memory and learning function. It seems that neural stem cells could transdifferentiate into other tissues, such as blood cells and muscles. Although there are some impediments in this field, some attempts have been made to employ adult neural stem cells in the cell replacement therapy for traumatic and ischemic brain injuries.

  11. The selection and function of cell type-specific enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sven; Romanoski, Casey E; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K

    2015-03-01

    The human body contains several hundred cell types, all of which share the same genome. In metazoans, much of the regulatory code that drives cell type-specific gene expression is located in distal elements called enhancers. Although mammalian genomes contain millions of potential enhancers, only a small subset of them is active in a given cell type. Cell type-specific enhancer selection involves the binding of lineage-determining transcription factors that prime enhancers. Signal-dependent transcription factors bind to primed enhancers, which enables these broadly expressed factors to regulate gene expression in a cell type-specific manner. The expression of genes that specify cell type identity and function is associated with densely spaced clusters of active enhancers known as super-enhancers. The functions of enhancers and super-enhancers are influenced by, and affect, higher-order genomic organization.

  12. Functional Properties of Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Weick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-derived neurons from various source materials present unique model systems to examine the fundamental properties of central nervous system (CNS development as well as the molecular underpinnings of disease phenotypes. In order to more accurately assess potential therapies for neurological disorders, multiple strategies have been employed in recent years to produce neuronal populations that accurately represent in vivo regional and transmitter phenotypes. These include new technologies such as direct conversion of somatic cell types into neurons and glia which may accelerate maturation and retain genetic hallmarks of aging. In addition, novel forms of genetic manipulations have brought human stem cells nearly on par with those of rodent with respect to gene targeting. For neurons of the CNS, the ultimate phenotypic characterization lies with their ability to recapitulate functional properties such as passive and active membrane characteristics, synaptic activity, and plasticity. These features critically depend on the coordinated expression and localization of hundreds of ion channels and receptors, as well as scaffolding and signaling molecules. In this review I will highlight the current state of knowledge regarding functional properties of human stem cell-derived neurons, with a primary focus on pluripotent stem cells. While significant advances have been made, critical hurdles must be overcome in order for this technology to support progression toward clinical applications.

  13. Smooth muscle cells largely develop independently of functional hemogenic endothelium

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    Monika Stefanska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cells represent a major component of the cardiovascular system. In vitro studies have shown that FLK1+ cells derived from embryonic stem (ES cells can differentiate into both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. These FLK1+ cells also contain a mesodermal precursor, the hemangioblast, able to produce endothelial, blood and smooth muscle cells. The generation of blood precursors from the hemangioblast was recently shown to occur through a transient cell population of specialised endothelium, a hemogenic endothelium. To date, the lineage relationship between this cell population and smooth muscle cell progenitors has not been investigated. In this study, we generated a reporter ES cell line in which expression of the fluorescent protein H2B-VENUS is driven by the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA regulatory sequences. We demonstrated that this reporter cell line efficiently trace smooth muscle development during ES cell differentiation. Although some smooth muscle cells are associated with broad endothelial development, we established that smooth muscle cells are mostly generated independently from a specialised functional hemogenic endothelium. This study provides new and important insights into hematopoietic and vascular development, which may help in driving further progress towards the development of bioengineered vascular grafts for regenerative medicine.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Human Dendritic Cell Development, Survival and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) with a dual function in the immune system. On the one hand, these specialized leukocytes are equipped to alert the immune system to invading pathogens or other danger signals. On the other, DC can promote tolerogenic re

  15. Identification of critical residues of linear B cell epitope on Goodpasture autoantigen.

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    Xiao-yu Jia

    Full Text Available The autoantigen of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease has been identified as the non-collagenous domain 1 of α3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IVNC1. Our previous study revealed a peptide on α3(IVNC1 as a major linear epitope for B cells and potentially nephrogenic, designated as P14 (α3129-150. This peptide has also been proven to be the epitope of auto-reactive T cells in anti-GBM patients. This study was aimed to further characterize the critical motif of P14.16 patients with anti-GBM disease and positive anti-P14 antibodies were enrolled. A set of truncated and alanine substituted peptides derived from P14 were synthesized. Circulating antibodies against the peptides were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.We found that all sera with anti-P14 antibodies reacted with the 13-mer sequence in the C-terminus of P14 (P14c exclusively. The level of antibodies against P14 was highly correlated with the level of antibodies against P14c (r=0.970, P<0.001. P14c was the core immunogenic region and the amino acid sequence (ISLWKGFSFIMFT was highly hydrophobic. Each amino acid residue in P14c was sequentially replaced by alanine. Three residues of glycine142, phenylalanine143, and phenylalanine145 were identified crucial for antibody binding based on the remarkable decline (P<0.001 of antibody reaction after each residue replacement.We defined GFxF (α3142, 143,145 as the critical motif of P14. It may provide some clues for understanding the etiology of anti-GBM disease.

  16. Neural progenitor cells regulate microglia functions and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Kira I; Andres, Robert H; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Bieri, Gregor; Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; He, Yingbo; Guzman, Raphael; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2012-11-01

    We found mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to have a secretory protein profile distinct from other brain cells and to modulate microglial activation, proliferation and phagocytosis. NPC-derived vascular endothelial growth factor was necessary and sufficient to exert at least some of these effects in mice. Thus, neural precursor cells may not only be shaped by microglia, but also regulate microglia functions and activity.

  17. SIRT1 is a critical regulator of K562 cell growth, survival, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mark T; DeLuca, Teresa A; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Yi, Minchang; Mrksich, Milan; Miller, William M

    2016-05-15

    Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACi) has emerged as a promising approach in the treatment of many types of cancer, including leukemias. Among the HDACs, Class III HDACs, also known as sirtuins (SIRTs), are unique in that their function is directly related to the cell's metabolic state through their dependency on the co-factor NAD(+). In this study, we examined the relation between SIRTs and the growth, survival, and differentiation of K562 erythroleukemia cells. Using a mass spectrometry approach we previously developed, we show that SIRT expression and deacetylase activity in these cells changes greatly with differentiation state (undifferentiated vs. megakaryocytic differentiation vs. erythroid differentiation). Moreover, SIRT1 is crucially involved in regulating the differentiation state. Overexpression of wildtype (but not deacetylase mutant) SIRT1 resulted in upregulation of glycophorin A, ~2-fold increase in the mRNA levels of α, γ, ε, and ζ-globins, and spontaneous hemoglobinization. Hemin-induced differentiation was also enhanced by (and depended on) higher SIRT1 levels. Since K562 cells are bipotent, we also investigated whether SIRT1 modulation affected their ability to undergo megakaryocytic (MK) differentiation. SIRT1 was required for commitment to the MK lineage and subsequent maturation, but was not directly involved in polyploidization of either K562 cells or an already-MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11. The observed blockage in commitment to the MK lineage was associated with a dramatic decrease in the formation of autophagic vacuoles, which was previously shown to be required for K562 cell MK commitment. Autophagy-associated conversion of the protein LC3-I to LC3-II was greatly enhanced by overexpression of wildtype SIRT1, further suggesting a functional connection between SIRT1, autophagy, and MK differentiation. Based on its clear effects on autophagy, we also examined the effect of SIRT1 modulation on stress responses. Consistent

  18. Critical role of PI3K signaling for NF-kappaB-dependent survival in a subset of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloo, Bernhard; Nagel, Daniel; Pfeifer, Matthias; Grau, Michael; Düwel, Michael; Vincendeau, Michelle; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Peter; Lenz, Georg; Krappmann, Daniel

    2011-01-04

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents a very aggressive human lymphoma entity. Constitutive NF-κB activation caused by chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is common feature of many ABC DLBCL cells; however, the pathways linking BCR signaling to the NF-κB prosurvival network are largely unknown. Here we report that constitutive activity of PI3K and the downstream kinase PDK1 are essential for the viability of two ABC DLBCL cell lines that carry mutations in the BCR proximal signaling adaptor CD79B. In these cells, PI3K inhibition reduces NF-κB activity and decreases the expression of NF-κB target genes. Furthermore, PI3K and PDK1 are required for maintaining MALT1 protease activity, which promotes survival of the affected ABC DLBCL cells. These results demonstrate a critical function of PI3K-PDK1 signaling upstream of MALT1 protease and NF-κB in distinct ABC DLBCL cells and provide a rationale for the pharmacologic use of PI3K inhibitors in DLBCL therapy.

  19. A critical function for transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin 23 and proinflammatory cytokines in driving and modulating human T(H)-17 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Elisabetta; Servant, Nicolas; Zollinger, Raphaël; Bogiatzi, Sofia I; Hupé, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Soumelis, Vassili

    2008-06-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing T helper 17 cells (T(H)-17 cells) have been described as a T helper cell subset distinct from T helper type 1 (T(H)1) and T(H)2 cells, with specific functions in antimicrobial defense and autoimmunity. The factors driving human T(H)-17 differentiation remain controversial. Using a systematic approach combining experimental and computational methods, we show here that transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin 23 (IL-23) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta and IL-6) were all essential for human T(H)-17 differentiation. However, individual T(H)-17 cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-17, IL-21, IL-22 and IL-6, as well as the global T(H)-17 cytokine profile, were differentially modulated by T(H)-17-promoting cytokines. Transforming growth factor-beta was critical, and its absence induced a shift from a T(H)-17 profile to a T(H)1-like profile. Our results shed new light on the regulation of human T(H)-17 differentiation and provide a framework for the global analysis of T helper responses.

  20. Functional transcriptomics of a migrating cell in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Erich M; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-10-02

    In both metazoan development and metastatic cancer, migrating cells must carry out a detailed, complex program of sensing cues, binding substrates, and moving their cytoskeletons. The linker cell in Caenorhabditis elegans males undergoes a stereotyped migration that guides gonad organogenesis, occurs with precise timing, and requires the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-67. To better understand how this occurs, we performed RNA-seq of individually staged and dissected linker cells, comparing transcriptomes from linker cells of third-stage (L3) larvae, fourth-stage (L4) larvae, and nhr-67-RNAi-treated L4 larvae. We observed expression of 8,000-10,000 genes in the linker cell, 22-25% of which were up- or down-regulated 20-fold during development by NHR-67. Of genes that we tested by RNAi, 22% (45 of 204) were required for normal shape and migration, suggesting that many NHR-67-dependent, linker cell-enriched genes play roles in this migration. One unexpected class of genes up-regulated by NHR-67 was tandem pore potassium channels, which are required for normal linker-cell migration. We also found phenotypes for genes with human orthologs but no previously described migratory function. Our results provide an extensive catalog of genes that act in a migrating cell, identify unique molecular functions involved in nematode cell migration, and suggest similar functions in humans.

  1. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors A critical review of functional MRI studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xiao; Dongfeng Huang; Bryan O'Young

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area after treadmill training. These findings suggest that treadmill training likely improves ischemic stroke patients' lower limb functions and gait performance and promotes stroke recovery by changing patients' brain plasticity; meanwhile, the novel treadmill training methods can better training effects.

  2. The adapter protein ADAP is required for selected dendritic cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togni Mauro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytosolic adaptor protein ADAP (adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein is expressed by T cells, natural killer cells, myeloid cells and platelets. ADAP is involved in T-cell-receptor-mediated inside-out signaling, which leads to integrin activation, adhesion and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about the role of ADAP in myeloid cells. In the present study, we analyzed the function of ADAP in bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs from ADAP-deficient mice. Results ADAP-deficient BMDCs showed almost normal levels of antigen uptake, adhesion, maturation, migration from the periphery to the draining lymph nodes, antigen-specific T-cell activation, and production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-∝. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the activation of signaling pathways after lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation are not affected by the loss of ADAP. In contrast, ADAP-deficient BMDCs showed defects in CD11c-mediated cellular responses, with significantly diminished production of IL-6, TNF-∝ and IL-10. Actin polymerization was enhanced after CD11c integrin stimulation. Conclusions In summary, we propose that the adapter molecule ADAP is critical for selected CD11c integrin-mediated functions of dendritic cells.

  3. Impact of MAPK Pathway Activation in BRAF(V600) Melanoma on T Cell and Dendritic Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Patrick A; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2013-10-28

    Constitutive upregulation of the MAPK pathway by a BRAF(V600) mutation occurs in about half of melanomas. This leads to increased oncogenic properties such as tumor cell invasion, metastatic potential, and resistance to apoptosis. Blockade of the MAPK pathway with highly specific kinase inhibitors induces unprecedented tumor response rates in patients with advanced BRAF(V600) mutant melanoma. Immune checkpoint blockade with monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programed death-1/PD-L1 has also demonstrated striking anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced melanoma. Tumor responses are likely limited by multiple additional layers of immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. There is emerging preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that MAPK inhibition has a beneficial effect on the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for combined immunotherapy and MAPK pathway inhibition in melanoma. The T cell response has been the main focus in the studies reported to date. Since dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the induction of tumor-specific T cell responses, the impact of MAPK pathway activation in melanoma on DC function is critical for the melanoma directed immune response. BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells modulate DCs through the MAPK pathway because its blockade in melanoma cells can reverse suppression of DC function. As both MEK/BRAF inhibition and immune checkpoint blockade have recently taken center stage in the treatment of melanoma, a deeper understanding of how MAPK pathway inhibition affects the tumor immune response is needed.

  4. Suppression of PGC-1α is critical for reprogramming oxidative metabolism in renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGory, Edward L.; Wu, Colleen; Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Ding, Chien-Kuang Cornelia; Chi, Jen-Tsan; von Eyben, Rie; Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Long believed to be a byproduct of malignant transformation, reprogramming of cellular metabolism is now recognized as a driving force in tumorigenesis. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) frequent activation of HIF-signaling induces a metabolic switch that promotes tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate that PGC-1α, a central regulator of energy metabolism, is suppressed in VHL-deficient ccRCC by a HIF/Dec1-dependent mechanism. In VHL wild type cells, PGC-1α suppression leads to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor Tfam and impaired mitochondrial respiration. Conversely, PGC-1α expression in VHL-deficient cells restores mitochondrial function and induces oxidative stress. ccRCC cells expressing PGC-1α exhibit impaired tumor growth and enhanced sensitivity to cytotoxic therapies. In patients, low levels of PGC-1α expression are associated with poor outcome. These studies demonstrate that suppression of PGC-1α recapitulates key metabolic phenotypes of ccRCC and highlight the potential of targeting PGC-1α expression as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of ccRCC. PMID:26119730

  5. Suppression of PGC-1α Is Critical for Reprogramming Oxidative Metabolism in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. LaGory

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Long believed to be a byproduct of malignant transformation, reprogramming of cellular metabolism is now recognized as a driving force in tumorigenesis. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, frequent activation of HIF signaling induces a metabolic switch that promotes tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1α, a central regulator of energy metabolism, is suppressed in VHL-deficient ccRCC by a HIF/Dec1-dependent mechanism. In VHL wild-type cells, PGC-1α suppression leads to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor Tfam and impaired mitochondrial respiration. Conversely, PGC-1α expression in VHL-deficient cells restores mitochondrial function and induces oxidative stress. ccRCC cells expressing PGC-1α exhibit impaired tumor growth and enhanced sensitivity to cytotoxic therapies. In patients, low levels of PGC-1α expression are associated with poor outcome. These studies demonstrate that suppression of PGC-1α recapitulates key metabolic phenotypes of ccRCC and highlight the potential of targeting PGC-1α expression as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of ccRCC.

  6. Targeted Gene Deletion Demonstrates that Cell Adhesion MoleculeICAM-4 is Critical for Erythroblastic Island Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gloria; Lo, Annie; Short, Sarah A.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Spring, Frances; Parsons, Stephen F.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2006-02-15

    Erythroid progenitors differentiate in erythroblastic islands, bone marrow niches composed of erythroblasts surrounding a central macrophage. Evidence suggests that within islands adhesive interactions regulate erythropoiesis and apoptosis. We are exploring whether erythroid intercellular adhesion molecule-4 (ICAM-4), animmunoglobulin superfamily member, participates in island formation. Earlier, we identified alpha V integrins as ICAM-4 counter receptors. Since macrophages express alpha V, ICAM-4 potentially mediates island attachments. To test this, we generated ICAM-4 knockout mice and developed quantitative, live cell techniques for harvesting intact islands and for reforming islands in vitro. We observed a 47 percent decrease in islands reconstituted from ICAM-4 null marrow compared to wild type. We also found a striking decrease in islands formed in vivo in knockout mice. Further, peptides that block ICAM-4 alpha V adhesion produced a 53-57 percent decrease in reconstituted islands, strongly suggesting that ICAM-4 binding to macrophage alpha V functions in island integrity. Importantly, we documented that alpha V integrin is expressed in macrophages isolated from erythro blastic islands. Collectively, these data provide convincing evidence that ICAM-4 is critical in erythroblastic island formation via ICAM-4/alpha V adhesion and also demonstrate that the novel experimental strategies we developed will be valuable in exploring molecular mechanisms of erythroblastic island formation and their functional role in regulating erythropoiesis.

  7. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, Siva A; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-05

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature's most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax-thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remodeling of the cytoskeleton. To understand this intricate coupling between mechanical properties, mechanical function and force-induced biochemical signaling requires tools that are capable of both controlling and manipulating the cell microenvironment and measuring the resulting mechanical response. In this review, the power of microfluidics as a functional tool for research in cell mechanics is highlighted. In particular, current literature is discussed to show that microfluidics powered by soft lithographic techniques offers the following capabilities that are of significance for understanding the mechanical behavior of cells: (i) Microfluidics enables the creation of in vitro models of physiological environments in which cell mechanics can be probed. (ii) Microfluidics is an excellent means to deliver physical cues that affect cell mechanics, such as cell shape, fluid flow, substrate topography, and stiffness. (iii) Microfluidics can also expose cells to chemical cues, such as growth factors and drugs, which alter their mechanical behavior. Moreover, these chemical cues can be delivered either at the whole cell or subcellular level. (iv) Microfluidic devices offer the possibility of measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of cells in a high throughput fashion. (v) Finally, microfluidic methods provide exquisite control over drop size, generation, and manipulation. As a result, droplets are being increasingly used to control the physicochemical environment of cells and as biomimetic analogs of living cells. These powerful attributes of microfluidics should further stimulate novel means of investigating the link between physicochemical cues and the biomechanical

  8. Melatonin signaling in T cells: Functions and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Gang; Chen, Shuai; Yin, Jie; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Reiter, Russel J; Yin, Yulong

    2017-04-01

    Melatonin affects a variety of physiological processes including circadian rhythms, cellular redox status, and immune function. Importantly, melatonin significantly influences T-cell-mediated immune responses, which are crucial to protect mammals against cancers and infections, but are associated with pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. This review focuses on our current understanding of the significance of melatonin in T-cell biology and the beneficial effects of melatonin in T-cell response-based diseases. In addition to expressing both membrane and nuclear receptors for melatonin, T cells have the four enzymes required for the synthesis of melatonin and produce high levels of melatonin. Meanwhile, melatonin is highly effective in modulating T-cell activation and differentiation, especially for Th17 and Treg cells, and also memory T cells. Mechanistically, the influence of melatonin in T-cell biology is associated with membrane and nuclear receptors as well as receptor-independent pathways, for example, via calcineurin. Several cell signaling pathways, including ERK1/2-C/EBPα, are involved in the regulatory roles of melatonin in T-cell biology. Through modulation in T-cell responses, melatonin exerts beneficial effects in various inflammatory diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. These findings highlight the importance of melatonin signaling in T-cell fate determination, and T cell-based immune pathologies.

  9. Salivary gland NK cells are phenotypically and functionally unique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlowe S Tessmer

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells and CD8(+ T cells play vital roles in containing and eliminating systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV. However, CMV has a tropism for the salivary gland acinar epithelial cells and persists in this organ for several weeks after primary infection. Here we characterize a distinct NK cell population that resides in the salivary gland, uncommon to any described to date, expressing both mature and immature NK cell markers. Using RORγt reporter mice and nude mice, we also show that the salivary gland NK cells are not lymphoid tissue inducer NK-like cells and are not thymic derived. During the course of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection, we found that salivary gland NK cells detect the infection and acquire activation markers, but have limited capacity to produce IFN-γ and degranulate. Salivary gland NK cell effector functions are not regulated by iNKT or T(reg cells, which are mostly absent in the salivary gland. Additionally, we demonstrate that peripheral NK cells are not recruited to this organ even after the systemic infection has been controlled. Altogether, these results indicate that viral persistence and latency in the salivary glands may be due in part to the presence of unfit NK cells and the lack of recruitment of peripheral NK cells.

  10. Salivary gland NK cells are phenotypically and functionally unique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessmer, Marlowe S; Reilly, Emma C; Brossay, Laurent

    2011-01-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells play vital roles in containing and eliminating systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV). However, CMV has a tropism for the salivary gland acinar epithelial cells and persists in this organ for several weeks after primary infection. Here we characterize a distinct NK cell population that resides in the salivary gland, uncommon to any described to date, expressing both mature and immature NK cell markers. Using RORγt reporter mice and nude mice, we also show that the salivary gland NK cells are not lymphoid tissue inducer NK-like cells and are not thymic derived. During the course of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, we found that salivary gland NK cells detect the infection and acquire activation markers, but have limited capacity to produce IFN-γ and degranulate. Salivary gland NK cell effector functions are not regulated by iNKT or T(reg) cells, which are mostly absent in the salivary gland. Additionally, we demonstrate that peripheral NK cells are not recruited to this organ even after the systemic infection has been controlled. Altogether, these results indicate that viral persistence and latency in the salivary glands may be due in part to the presence of unfit NK cells and the lack of recruitment of peripheral NK cells.

  11. SIRT1 Overexpression Maintains Cell Phenotype and Function of Endothelial Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Jen, Michele; Perrin, Louisiane; Wertheim, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that are differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be used in establishing disease models for personalized drug discovery or developing patient-specific vascularized tissues or organoids. However, a number of technical challenges are often associated with iPSC-ECs in culture, including instability of the endothelial phenotype and limited cell proliferative capacity over time. Early senescence is believed to be the primary mechanism underlying these limitations. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is an NAD+-dependent deacetylase involved in the regulation of cell senescence, redox state, and inflammatory status. We hypothesize that overexpression of the SIRT1 gene in iPSC-ECs will maintain EC phenotype, function, and proliferative capacity by overcoming early cell senescence. SIRT1 gene was packaged into a lentiviral vector (LV-SIRT1) and transduced into iPSC-ECs at passage 4. Beginning with passage 5, iPSC-ECs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology, whereas iPSC-ECs overexpressing SIRT1 maintained EC cobblestone morphology. SIRT1 overexpressing iPSC-ECs also exhibited a higher percentage of canonical markers of endothelia (LV-SIRT1 61.8% CD31+ vs. LV-empty 31.7% CD31+, P < 0.001; LV-SIRT1 46.3% CD144+ vs. LV-empty 20.5% CD144+, P < 0.02), with a higher nitric oxide synthesis, lower β-galactosidase production indicating decreased senescence (3.4% for LV-SIRT1 vs. 38.6% for LV-empty, P < 0.001), enhanced angiogenesis, increased deacetylation activity, and higher proliferation rate. SIRT1 overexpressing iPSC-ECs continued to proliferate through passage 9 with high purity of EC-like characteristics, while iPSC-ECs without SIRT1 overexpression became senescent after passage 5. Taken together, SIRT1 overexpression in iPSC-ECs maintains EC phenotype, improves EC function, and extends cell lifespan, overcoming critical hurdles associated with the use of iPSC-ECs in translational research. PMID:26413932

  12. Thermoresponsive Polymers with Lower Critical Solution Temperature- or Upper Critical Solution Temperature-Type Phase Behaviour Do Not Induce Toxicity to Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuejia; Zhu, Mengxiang; Gong, Yu; Tang, Haoyu; Li, Juan; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Thermoresponsive polymers have gained extensive attention as biomedical materials especially for targeted drug delivery systems. We have recently developed water-soluble polypeptide-based thermoresponsive polymers that exhibit lower critical solution temperature (LCST)- or upper critical solution temperature (UCST)-type phase behaviours. In this study, the toxicity of these polymers to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated to assess the safety and biocompatibility. Up to 100 μg/ml, thermoresponsive polymers did not induce cytotoxicity to HUVECs, showing as unaltered mitochondrial viability assessed as cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and membrane integrity assessed as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Inflammatory response, assessed as the release of chemokine-soluble monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (sMCP-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) as well as cytokine IL-6, was not significantly affected by the polymers. In addition, 1 μM thapsigargin (TG), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, significantly decreased mitochondrial viability, but did not affect membrane integrity or inflammatory response. The presence of thermoresponsive polymers with LCST-type phase behaviour did not further affect the effects of TG. In conclusion, the thermoresponsive polymers used in this study are not toxic to endothelial cells and therefore could be further considered as safe materials for biomedical applications.

  13. CRITICAL FACTORS IN OUTSOURCING OF ACCOUNTING FUNCTIONS IN MALAYSIAN SMALL MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES (SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magiswary Dorasamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenges that business face in sustaining competitive advantage in the corporate world have become a major concern. Businesses are adopting cutting-edge technologies and best practices to cope with rapid, global changes. Various business functions are being reengineered for this purpose. Accounting functions play an important role in helping businesses to maintain competitive advantage. However, some small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs face problems handling fundamental accounting functions. This is predominantly because of their lack of expertise; accounting functions require not only knowledge of generally accepted accounting rules or tax regulations but also the expertise needed to apply the rules in a given business environment (Everaert, Sarens and Rommel, 2006. This paper offers some insight on the outsourcing of accounting functions as there is paucity of data in this area in the context of Malaysia. Essentially, it presents empirical evidence regarding Malaysian SMEs' accounting outsourcing practices. A survey of SMEs was conducted to identify the overall outsourcing landscape as it relates to accounting and third-party organisations. The factors that contribute to the decision to outsource accounting functions are analysed. The study reveals a significant relationship between outsourcing accounting functions and two contributing factors, risks and operation management.

  14. Systematic identification of regulatory proteins critical for T-cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolbinger Frank

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activation of T cells, mediated by the T-cell receptor (TCR, activates a battery of specific membrane-associated, cytosolic and nuclear proteins. Identifying the signaling proteins downstream of TCR activation will help us to understand the regulation of immune responses and will contribute to developing therapeutic agents that target immune regulation. Results In an effort to identify novel signaling molecules specific for T-cell activation we undertook a large-scale dominant effector genetic screen using retroviral technology. We cloned and characterized 33 distinct genes from over 2,800 clones obtained in a screen of 7 × 108 Jurkat T cells on the basis of a reduction in TCR-activation-induced CD69 expression after expressing retrovirally derived cDNA libraries. We identified known signaling molecules such as Lck, ZAP70, Syk, PLCγ1 and SHP-1 (PTP1C as truncation mutants with dominant-negative or constitutively active functions. We also discovered molecules not previously known to have functions in this pathway, including a novel protein with a RING domain (found in a class of ubiquitin ligases; we call this protein TRAC-1, transmembrane molecules (EDG1, IL-10Rα and integrin α2, cytoplasmic enzymes and adaptors (PAK2, A-Raf-1, TCPTP, Grb7, SH2-B and GG2-1, and cytoskeletal molecules (moesin and vimentin. Furthermore, using truncated Lck, PLCγ1, EDG1 and PAK2 mutants as examples, we showed that these dominant immune-regulatory molecules interfere with IL-2 production in human primary lymphocytes. Conclusions This study identified important signal regulators in T-cell activation. It also demonstrated a highly efficient strategy for discovering many components of signal transduction pathways and validating them in physiological settings.

  15. DNA methylation functions as a critical regulator of Kir4.1 expression during CNS development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaobi, Sinifunanya E; Lin, Erica; Peramsetty, Sasank R; Olsen, Michelle L

    2014-03-01

    Kir4.1, a glial-specific K+ channel, is critical for normal CNS development. Studies using both global and glial-specific knockout of Kir4.1 reveal abnormal CNS development with the loss of the channel. Specifically, Kir4.1 knockout animals are characterized by ataxia, severe hypomyelination, and early postnatal death. Additionally, Kir4.1 has emerged as a key player in several CNS diseases. Notably, decreased Kir4.1 protein expression occurs in several human CNS pathologies including CNS ischemic injury, spinal cord injury, epilepsy, ALS, and Alzheimer's disease. Despite the emerging significance of Kir4.1 in normal and pathological conditions, its mechanisms of regulation are unknown. Here, we report the first epigenetic regulation of a K+ channel in the CNS. Robust developmental upregulation of Kir4.1 expression in rats is coincident with reductions in DNA methylation of the Kir4.1 gene, KCNJ10. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals a dynamic interaction between KCNJ10 and DNA methyltransferase 1 during development. Finally, demethylation of the KCNJ10 promoter is necessary for transcription. These findings indicate DNA methylation is a key regulator of Kir4.1 transcription. Given the essential role of Kir4.1 in normal CNS development, understanding the regulation of this K+ channel is critical to understanding normal glial biology.

  16. Osmotic stress affects functional properties of human melanoma cell lines

    CERN Document Server

    La Porta, Caterina A M; Pasini, Maria; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; Amar, Martine Ben

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of microenvironment in cancer growth and metastasis is a key issue for cancer research. Here, we study the effect of osmotic pressure on the functional properties of primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. In particular, we experimentally quantify individual cell motility and transmigration capability. We then perform a circular scratch assay to study how a cancer cell front invades an empty space. Our results show that primary melanoma cells are sensitive to a low osmotic pressure, while metastatic cells are less. To better understand the experimental results, we introduce and study a continuous model for the dynamics of a cell layer and a stochastic discrete model for cell proliferation and diffusion. The two models capture essential features of the experimental results and allow to make predictions for a wide range of experimentally measurable parameters.

  17. Derivation and Utilization of Functional CD8(+) Dendritic Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigni, Matteo; Ashok, Devika; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2016-01-01

    It is notoriously difficult to obtain large quantities of non-activated dendritic cells ex vivo. For this reason, we produced and characterized a mouse model expressing the large T oncogene under the CD11c promoter (Mushi mice), in which CD8α(+) dendritic cells transform after 4 months. We derived a variety of stable cell lines from these primary lines. These cell lines reproducibly share with freshly isolated dendritic cells most surface markers, mRNA and protein expression, and all tested biological functions. Cell lines can be derived from various strains and knockout mice and can be easily transduced with lentiviruses. In this article, we describe the derivation, culture, and lentiviral transduction of these dendritic cell lines.

  18. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  19. Human embryonic stem cells differentiate into functional renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Karl M; Tasnim, Farah; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Annegret; Ni, Ming; Gao, Shujun; Gopalan, Began; Zink, Daniele; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-04-01

    Renal cells are used in basic research, disease models, tissue engineering, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. In order to provide a reliable source of human renal cells, we developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into renal epithelial cells. The differentiated stem cells expressed markers characteristic of renal proximal tubular cells and their precursors, whereas markers of other renal cell types were not expressed or expressed at low levels. Marker expression patterns of these differentiated stem cells and in vitro cultivated primary human renal proximal tubular cells were comparable. The differentiated stem cells showed morphological and functional characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells, and generated tubular structures in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the differentiated stem cells contributed in organ cultures for the formation of simple epithelia in the kidney cortex. Bioreactor experiments showed that these cells retained their functional characteristics under conditions as applied in bioartificial kidneys. Thus, our results show that human embryonic stem cells can differentiate into renal proximal tubular-like cells. Our approach would provide a source for human renal proximal tubular cells that are not affected by problems associated with immortalized cell lines or primary cells.

  20. On critical points for noncoercive functionals and subharmonic solutions of some Hamiltonian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Schmitt

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with existence results about subharmonic solutions of some Hamiltonian systems. The existence of such solutions is established using a variational approach and results about minima of noncoercive functionals.

  1. Critical Jostling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippin Barr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Games can serve a critical function in many different ways, from serious games about real world subjects to self-reflexive commentaries on the nature of games themselves. In this essay we discuss critical possibilities stemming from the area of critical design, and more specifically Carl DiSalvo’s adversarial design and its concept of reconfiguring the remainder. To illustrate such an approach, we present the design and outcomes of two games, Jostle Bastard and Jostle Parent. We show how the games specifically engage with two previous games, Hotline Miami and Octodad: Dadliest Catch, reconfiguring elements of those games to create interactive critical experiences and extensions of the source material. Through the presentation of specific design concerns and decisions, we provide a grounded illustration of a particular critical function of videogames and hope to highlight this form as another valuable approach in the larger area of videogame criticism.

  2. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  3. Characterization and functionality of proliferative human Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Kitty; Trivedi, Alpa; Cheng, C Yan; Cherbavaz, Diana B; Dazin, Paul F; Huynh, Ai Lam Thu; Mitchell, James B; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; John, Constance M

    2011-01-01

    It has long been thought that mammalian Sertoli cells are terminally differentiated and nondividing postpuberty. For most previous in vitro studies immature rodent testes have been the source of Sertoli cells and these have shown little proliferative ability when cultured. We have isolated and characterized Sertoli cells from human cadaveric testes from seven donors ranging from 12 to 36 years of age. The cells proliferated readily in vitro under the optimized conditions used with a doubling time of approximately 4 days. Nuclear 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation confirmed that dividing cells represented the majority of the population. Classical Sertoli cell ultrastructural features, lipid droplet accumulation, and immunoexpression of GATA-4, Sox9, and the FSH receptor (FSHr) were observed by electron and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Flow cytometry revealed the expression of GATA-4 and Sox9 by more than 99% of the cells, and abundant expression of a number of markers indicative of multipotent mesenchymal cells. Low detection of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity after passaging showed that few peritubular myoid cells were present. GATA-4 and SOX9 expression were confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), along with expression of stem cell factor (SCF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4). Tight junctions were formed by Sertoli cells plated on transwell inserts coated with fibronectin as revealed by increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and polarized secretion of the immunoregulatory protein, galectin-1. These primary Sertoli cell populations could be expanded dramatically in vitro and could be cryopreserved. The results show that functional human Sertoli cells can be propagated in vitro from testicular cells isolated from adult testis. The proliferative human Sertoli cells should have important applications in studying infertility

  4. Heme oxygenase-1, a critical arbitrator of cell death pathways in lung injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Danielle; Lin, Ling; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2009-07-01

    Increases in cell death by programmed (i.e., apoptosis, autophagy) or nonprogrammed mechanisms (i.e., necrosis) occur during tissue injury and may contribute to the etiology of several pulmonary or vascular disease states. The low-molecular-weight stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in various models of lung and vascular injury by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, and cell proliferation. HO-1 serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. The transcriptional induction of HO-1 occurs in response to multiple forms of chemical and physical cellular stress. The cytoprotective functions of HO-1 may be attributed to heme turnover, as well as to beneficial properties of its enzymatic reaction products: biliverdin-IXalpha, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 or CO inhibits stress-induced extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. A variety of signaling molecules have been implicated in the cytoprotection conferred by HO-1/CO, including autophagic proteins, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and others. Enhanced HO-1 expression or the pharmacological application of HO end-products affords protection in preclinical models of tissue injury, including experimental and transplant-associated ischemia/reperfusion injury, promising potential future therapeutic applications.

  5. Adhesion and host cell modulation: critical pathogenicity determinants of Bartonella henselae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempf Volkhard AJ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bartonella henselae, the agent of cat scratch disease and the vasculoproliferative disorders bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis, contains to date two groups of described pathogenicity factors: adhesins and type IV secretion systems. Bartonella adhesin A (BadA, the Trw system and possibly filamentous hemagglutinin act as promiscous or specific adhesins, whereas the virulence locus (VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system modulates a variety of host cell functions. BadA mediates bacterial adherence to endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins and triggers the induction of angiogenic gene programming. The VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system is responsible for, e.g., inhibition of host cell apoptosis, bacterial persistence in erythrocytes, and endothelial sprouting. The Trw-conjugation system of Bartonella spp. mediates host-specific adherence to erythrocytes. Filamentous hemagglutinins represent additional potential pathogenicity factors which are not yet characterized. The exact molecular functions of these pathogenicity factors and their contribution to an orchestral interplay need to be analyzed to understand B. henselae pathogenicity in detail.

  6. Adhesion and host cell modulation: critical pathogenicity determinants of Bartonella henselae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Bettina; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2011-04-13

    Bartonella henselae, the agent of cat scratch disease and the vasculoproliferative disorders bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis, contains to date two groups of described pathogenicity factors: adhesins and type IV secretion systems. Bartonella adhesin A (BadA), the Trw system and possibly filamentous hemagglutinin act as promiscous or specific adhesins, whereas the virulence locus (Vir)B/VirD4 type IV secretion system modulates a variety of host cell functions. BadA mediates bacterial adherence to endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins and triggers the induction of angiogenic gene programming. The VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system is responsible for, e.g., inhibition of host cell apoptosis, bacterial persistence in erythrocytes, and endothelial sprouting. The Trw-conjugation system of Bartonella spp. mediates host-specific adherence to erythrocytes. Filamentous hemagglutinins represent additional potential pathogenicity factors which are not yet characterized. The exact molecular functions of these pathogenicity factors and their contribution to an orchestral interplay need to be analyzed to understand B. henselae pathogenicity in detail.

  7. Evolutionary cell biology: functional insight from "endless forms most beautiful".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Elisabeth; Zerr, Kelly; Tsaousis, Anastasios; Dorrell, Richard G; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-12-15

    In animal and fungal model organisms, the complexities of cell biology have been analyzed in exquisite detail and much is known about how these organisms function at the cellular level. However, the model organisms cell biologists generally use include only a tiny fraction of the true diversity of eukaryotic cellular forms. The divergent cellular processes observed in these more distant lineages are still largely unknown in the general scientific community. Despite the relative obscurity of these organisms, comparative studies of them across eukaryotic diversity have had profound implications for our understanding of fundamental cell biology in all species and have revealed the evolution and origins of previously observed cellular processes. In this Perspective, we will discuss the complexity of cell biology found across the eukaryotic tree, and three specific examples of where studies of divergent cell biology have altered our understanding of key functional aspects of mitochondria, plastids, and membrane trafficking.

  8. Expression and function of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Kenji; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kubo, Terufumi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akari; Nakazawa, Emiri; Saka, Eri; Ragnarsson, Charlotte; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Inoda, Satoko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Takasu, Hideo; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Yasoshima, Takahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Invasion into the matrix is one of hallmarks of malignant diseases and is the first step for tumor metastasis. Thus, analysis of the molecular mechanisms of invasion is essential to overcome tumor cell invasion. In the present study, we screened for colon carcinoma-specific genes using a cDNA microarray database of colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon tissues, and we found that fermitin family member-1 (FERMT1) is overexpressed in colon carcinoma cells. FRRMT1, FERMT2 and FERMT3 expression was investigated in colon carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that only FERMT1 had cancer cell-specific expression. Protein expression of FERMT1 was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. To address the molecular functions of FERMT genes in colon carcinoma cells, we established FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. FERMT1-overexpressing cells exhibited greater invasive ability than did FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, FERMT1-, FERMT2- and FERMT3-overexpressing cells exhibited enhancement of cell growth. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FERMT1 is expressed specifically in colon carcinoma cells, and has roles in matrix invasion and cell growth. These findings indicate that FERMT1 is a potential molecular target for cancer therapy.

  9. Functional adaptation to oxidative stress by memory T cells: an analysis of the role in the cardiovascular disease process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Matata, Bashir M

    2008-11-21

    T cells participate in combating infection and critically determine the outcomes in any given disease process. Impaired immune response occurs in a number disease processes such as in cancer and atherosclerosis although the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. This article gives an up-to-date review of T cells development and functional adaptation to pathophysiological stimuli and participation in the cardiovascular disease process. In addition, we have discussed the signaling pathways controlled by the microenvironment that determine T cells function and resultant type of immune response. We have also discussed in detail how oxidative stress is a key component of the micro environmental interaction.

  10. Loop A Is Critical for the Functional Interaction of Two Beta vulgaris PIP Aquaporins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Rosi, Pablo; Sigaut, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; Alleva, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Research done in the last years strongly support the hypothesis that PIP aquaporin can form heterooligomeric assemblies, specially combining PIP2 monomers with PIP1 monomers. Nevertheless, the structural elements involved in the ruling of homo versus heterooligomeric organization are not completely elucidated. In this work we unveil some features of monomer-monomer interaction in Beta vulgaris PIP aquaporins. Our results show that while BvPIP2;2 is able to interact with BvPIP1;1, BvPIP2;1 shows no functional interaction. The lack of functional interaction between BvPIP2;1 and BvPIP1;1 was further corroborated by dose-response curves of water permeability due to aquaporin activity exposed to different acidic conditions. We also found that BvPIP2;1 is unable to translocate BvPIP1;1-ECFP from an intracellular position to the plasma membrane when co-expressed, as BvPIP2;2 does. Moreover we postulate that the first extracellular loop (loop A) of BvPIP2;1, could be relevant for the functional interaction with BvPIP1;1. Thus, we investigate BvPIP2;1 loop A at an atomic level by Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) and by direct mutagenesis. We found that, within the tetramer, each loop A presents a dissimilar behavior. Besides, BvPIP2;1 loop A mutants restore functional interaction with BvPIP1;1. This work is a contribution to unravel how PIP2 and PIP1 interact to form functional heterooligomeric assemblies. We postulate that BvPIP2;1 loop A is relevant for the lack of functional interaction with BvPIP1;1 and that the monomer composition of PIP assemblies determines their functional properties. PMID:23483963

  11. Safety critical systems handbook a straightforward guide to functional safety : IEC 61508 (2010 edition) and related standards

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, David J

    2010-01-01

    Electrical, electronic and programmable electronic systems increasingly carry out safety functions to guard workers and the public against injury or death and the environment against pollution. The international functional safety standard IEC 61508 was revised in 2010, and this is the first comprehensive guide available to the revised standard. As functional safety is applicable to many industries, this book will have a wide readership beyond the chemical and process sector, including oil and gas, power generation, nuclear, aircraft, and automotive industries, plus project, instrumentation, design, and control engineers. * The only comprehensive guide to IEC 61508, updated to cover the 2010 amendments, that will ensure engineers are compliant with the latest process safety systems design and operation standards* Helps readers understand the process required to apply safety critical systems standards* Real-world approach helps users to interpret the standard, with case studies and best practice design examples...

  12. CD103+ Conventional Dendritic Cells Are Critical for TLR7/9-Dependent Host Defense against Histoplasma capsulatum, an Endemic Fungal Pathogen of Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Van Prooyen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune cells shape the host response to microbial pathogens. Here we elucidate critical differences in the molecular response of macrophages vs. dendritic cells (DCs to Histoplasma capsulatum, an intracellular fungal pathogen of humans. It has long been known that macrophages are permissive for Histoplasma growth and succumb to infection, whereas DCs restrict fungal growth and survive infection. We used murine macrophages and DCs to identify host pathways that influence fungal proliferation and host-cell viability. Transcriptional profiling experiments revealed that DCs produced a strong Type I interferon (IFN-I response to infection with Histoplasma yeasts. Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 (TLR7/9, which recognize nucleic acids, were required for IFN-I production and restriction of fungal growth in DCs, but mutation of TLR7/9 had no effect on the outcome of macrophage infection. Moreover, TLR7/9 were essential for the ability of infected DCs to elicit production of the critical cytokine IFNγ from primed CD4+ T cells in vitro, indicating the role of this pathway in T cell activation. In a mouse model of infection, TLR7/9 were required for optimal production of IFN-I and IFNγ, host survival, and restriction of cerebral fungal burden. These data demonstrate the critical role of this pathway in eliciting an appropriate adaptive immune response in the host. Finally, although other fungal pathogens have been shown to elicit IFN-I in mouse models, the specific host cell responsible for producing IFN-I has not been elucidated. We found that CD103+ conventional DCs were the major producer of IFN-I in the lungs of wild-type mice infected with Histoplasma. Mice deficient in this DC subtype displayed reduced IFN-I production in vivo. These data reveal a previously unknown role for CD103+ conventional DCs and uncover the pivotal function of these cells in modulating the host immune response to endemic fungi.

  13. Immune regulation of osteoclast function in postmenopausal osteoporosis: a critical interdisciplinary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Renqing

    2012-01-01

    Extensive studies on cross talk between immune and skeletal systems in autoimmune diseases give rise to a new discipline of 'osteoimmunology', which explores the molecular regulation of osteoclasts by immune system. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is recognized as a cytokine driven disease, but the mechanism that how estrogen deficiency interplaying with cytokines to stimulate bone loss remains to be elucidated. Although the effect of individual cytokines on osteoclast formation is well characterized, the major challenge is to fit a multitude of redundant pathways and cytokines into a systemic model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This review presents current findings and hypothesis to explain estrogen deficiency-stimulated bone loss in a critical interdisciplinary perspective. To better understand the interaction between osteoclasts and immune system in postmenopausal osteoporosis, many of the lessons have been explored in animal models.

  14. Immune Regulation of Osteoclast Function in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: A Critical Interdisciplinary Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renqing Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies on cross talk between immune and skeletal systems in autoimmune diseases give rise to a new discipline of 'osteoimmunolgy', which explores the molecular regulation of osteoclasts by immune system. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is recognized as a cytokine driven disease, but the mechanism that how estrogen deficiency interplaying with cytokines to stimulate bone loss remains to be elucidated. Although the effect of individual cytokines on osteoclast formation is well characterized, the major challenge is to fit a multitude of redundant pathways and cytokines into a systemic model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This review presents current findings and hypothesis to explain estrogen deficiency-stimulated bone loss in a critical interdisciplinary perspective. To better understand the interaction between osteoclasts and immune system in postmenopausal osteoporosis, many of the lessons have been explored in animal models.

  15. Does Mindfulness Enhance Critical Thinking? Evidence for the Mediating Effects of Executive Functioning in the Relationship between Mindfulness and Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, Chris; Bunting, Brendan; Hogan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness originated in the Buddhist tradition as a way of cultivating clarity of thought. Despite the fact that this behavior is best captured using critical thinking (CT) assessments, no studies have examined the effects of mindfulness on CT or the mechanisms underlying any such possible relationship. Even so, mindfulness has been suggested as being beneficial for CT in higher education. CT is recognized as an important higher-order cognitive process which involves the ability to analyze and evaluate evidence and arguments. Such non-automatic, reflective responses generally require the engagement of executive functioning (EF) which includes updating, inhibition, and shifting of representations in working memory. Based on research showing that mindfulness enhances aspects of EF and certain higher-order cognitive processes, we hypothesized that individuals higher in facets of dispositional mindfulness would demonstrate greater CT performance, and that this relationship would be mediated by EF. Cross-sectional assessment of these constructs in a sample of 178 university students was achieved using the observing and non-reactivity sub-scales of the Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire, a battery of EF tasks and the Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment. Our hypotheses were tested by constructing a multiple meditation model which was analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. Evidence was found for inhibition mediating the relationships between both observing and non-reactivity and CT in different ways. Indirect-only (or full) mediation was demonstrated for the relationship between observing, inhibition, and CT. Competitive mediation was demonstrated for the relationship between non-reactivity, inhibition, and CT. This suggests additional mediators of the relationship between non-reactivity and CT which are not accounted for in this model and have a negative effect on CT in addition to the positive effect mediated by inhibition. These findings are discussed in the

  16. C-terminus glycans with critical functional role in the maturation of secretory glycoproteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cioaca

    Full Text Available The N-glycans of membrane glycoproteins are mainly exposed to the extracellular space. Human tyrosinase is a transmembrane glycoprotein with six or seven bulky N-glycans exposed towards the lumen of subcellular organelles. The central active site region of human tyrosinase is modeled here within less than 2.5 Å accuracy starting from Streptomyces castaneoglobisporus tyrosinase. The model accounts for the last five C-terminus glycosylation sites of which four are occupied and indicates that these cluster in two pairs--one in close vicinity to the active site and the other on the opposite side. We have analyzed and compared the roles of all tyrosinase N-glycans during tyrosinase processing with a special focus on the proximal to the active site N-glycans, s6:N337 and s7:N371, versus s3:N161 and s4:N230 which decorate the opposite side of the domain. To this end, we have constructed mutants of human tyrosinase in which its seven N-glycosylation sites were deleted. Ablation of the s6:N337 and s7:N371 sites arrests the post-translational productive folding process resulting in terminally misfolded mutants subjected to degradation through the mannosidase driven ERAD pathway. In contrast, single mutants of the other five N-glycans located either opposite to the active site or into the N-terminus Cys1 extension of tyrosinase are temperature-sensitive mutants and recover enzymatic activity at the permissive temperature of 31°C. Sites s3 and s4 display selective calreticulin binding properties. The C-terminus sites s7 and s6 are critical for the endoplasmic reticulum retention and intracellular disposal. Results herein suggest that individual N-glycan location is critical for the stability, regional folding control and secretion of human tyrosinase and explains some tyrosinase gene missense mutations associated with oculocutaneous albinism type I.

  17. Maximum diastolic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes depends critically on I(Kr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Xavier Doss

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP from spontaneously beating clusters (BC micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21 or BaCl(2 (n = 22. Patch-clamp techniques were used to record I(Kr and I(K1 from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C. Spontaneous cycle length (CL and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21 increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (p<0.001 and generated early afterdepolarizations in 8/21 preparations. In 13/21 BC, E-4031 rapidly depolarized the clusters leading to inexcitability. BaCl(2, at concentrations that selectively block I(K1 (50-100 µM, failed to depolarize the majority of clusters (13/22. Patch-clamp experiments revealed very low or negligible I(K1 in 53% (20/38 of the cells studied, but presence of I(Kr in all (11/11. Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of I(K1 in the majority of cells, but robust expression of I(Kr. In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd. The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on I(Kr due to the absence of

  18. Impaired physical function, loss of muscle mass and assessment of biomechanical properties in critical ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum

    2012-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment....... A plausible contributor to the accentuated catabolic drive in ICU patients is a synergistic response to inflammation and inactivity leading to loss of muscle mass. As these entities are predominantly present in the early phase of ICU stay, interventions employed during this time frame may exhibit the greatest...... potential to counteract loss of muscle mass. Despite the obvious clinical significance of muscle atrophy for the functional impairment observed in ICU survivors, no preventive therapies have been identified as yet. The overall aim of the present dissertation is to characterize aspects of physical function...

  19. CRTC2 is required for β-cell function and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Chandra E; Fu, Accalia; Reeks, Courtney; Screaton, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Previous work in insulinoma cell lines has established that calcineurin plays a critical role in the activation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (Creb), a key transcription factor required for β-cell function and survival, by dephosphorylating the Creb coactivator Creb-regulated transcription coactivator (Crtc)2 at 2 regulatory sites, Ser171 and Ser275. Here, we report that Crtc2 is essential both for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and cell survival in the β-cell. Endogenous Crtc2 activation is achieved via increasing glucose levels to the physiological feeding range, indicating that Crtc2 is a sensor that couples ambient glucose concentrations to Creb activity in the β-cell. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporin A and tacrolimus that target the protein phosphatase calcineurin are commonly administered after organ transplantation. Chronic use is associated with reduced insulin secretion and new onset diabetes, suggestive of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Importantly, we show that overexpression of a Crtc2 mutant rendered constitutively active by introduction of nonphosphorylatable alanine residues at Ser171 and Ser275 permits Creb target gene activation under conditions when calcineurin is inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that promoting Crtc2-Creb activity is required for β-cell function and proliferation and promoting this pathway could ameliorate symptoms of new onset diabetes after transplantation.

  20. Role of liver functions on liver cell mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata,Tameyuki

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The control mechanism of mitosis in the regenerating rat liver was studied in relation to the cell functions. Partial hepatec· tomy induces a series of changes prior to the initiation of mitosis, i. e. decrease in serum glucose and albumin levels, loss of glycogen from liver cells, and increased lipid mobilization to liver cells. Massive supplies of glucose and fructose suppressed significantly hepatocellu. lar mitosis with suppression of lipid accumulation and preservation of glycogen in the liver cells and of blood sugar level. Homologous serum administration also suppressed the rate of liver cell mitosis after hepatectomy preventing the decrease in serum albumin level, but did not suppress the lipid accumulation in the liver. Starvation, which would relieve the liver cell from the work of detoxication of intesti. nal toxic products, did not show any suppressive effect on the mitotic rate of liver cells after partial hepatectomy in single animals. But starvation induced severe hypoglycemia, moderate hypoalbuminemia and loss of glycogen content in the liver. These changes in metabo. lism by starvation and partial hepatectomy were suppressed by con· jugating the animals with nonhepatectomized fed.partners by aortic anastomosis, and mitosis was suppressed in the residual liver of the fasting animals in this parabiosis. The results indicate that all the major functions of parenchymal live cells tested, sugar metabolism, serum albumin production, and detoxication, are closely related to the control of liver cell mitosis. Accumulation of lipids in the liver remnant after partial hepatectomy is thought to be for the compensa. tion of reduced glycogen storage and not concerned directly with the liver cell mitosis. Discussion was made briefly on the humoral factor and portal blood factor in relation to excess load of functions on resi. dual liver cells.

  1. Ras proteins have multiple functions in vegetative cells of Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG⁻ cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetative cells by comparing the vegetative cell properties of rasG⁻, rasC⁻, and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells. In addition, since RasD, a protein not normally found in vegetative cells, is expressed in vegetative rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells and appears to partially compensate for the absence of RasG, we have also examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasD by comparing the properties of rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells with those of the mutant cells expressing higher levels of RasD. The results of these two lines of investigation show that RasD is capable of totally substituting for RasG for cytokinesis and growth in suspension, whereas RasC is without effect. In contrast, for chemotaxis to folate, RasC is capable of partially substituting for RasG, but RasD is totally without effect. Finally, neither RasC nor RasD is able to substitute for the role that RasG plays in regulating actin distribution and random motility. These specificity studies therefore delineate three distinct and none-overlapping functions for RasG in vegetative cells.

  2. Critical roles of mTOR Complex 1 and 2 for T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialong; Lin, Xingguang; Pan, Yun; Wang, Jinli; Chen, Pengcheng; Huang, Hongxiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-09-30

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play critical roles for germinal center responses and effective humoral immunity. We report here that mTOR in CD4 T cells is essential for Tfh differentiation. In Mtor(f/f)-Cd4Cre mice, both constitutive and inducible Tfh differentiation is severely impaired, leading to defective germinal center B cell formation and antibody production. Moreover, both mTORC1 and mTORC2 contribute to Tfh and GC B cell development but may do so via distinct mechanisms. mTORC1 mainly promotes CD4 T cell proliferation to reach the cell divisions necessary for Tfh differentiation, while Rictor/mTORC2 regulates Tfh differentiation by promoting Akt activation and TCF1 expression without grossly influencing T cell proliferation. Together, our results reveal crucial but distinct roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in CD4 T cells during Tfh differentiation and germinal center responses.

  3. Effects of Interactive Function Forms in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiao-Wei; ZHOU Li-Ming; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2003-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-fire mechanism, we introduce a kind of coupled map lattice system to investigate scale-invariance behavior in the activity of model neural populations. We let the parameter β, which together with α represents the interactive strength between neurons, have different function forms, and we find the function forms and their parameters are very important to our model's avalanche dynamical behaviors, especially to the emergence of different avalanche behaviors in different areas of our system.

  4. Effects of Interactive Function Forms in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOXiao-Wei; ZHOULi-Ming; CHENTian-Lun

    2003-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-fire mechanism, we introduce a kind of coupled map lattice system to investigate scale-invariance behavior in the activity of model neural populations. We let the parameter β, which together with α represents the interactive strength between neurons, have different function forms, and we find the function forms and their parameters are very important to our model''s avalanche dynamical behaviors, especially to the emergence of different avalanche behaviors in different areas of our system.

  5. Structure and function of endosomes in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contento, Anthony L; Bassham, Diane C

    2012-08-01

    Endosomes are a heterogeneous collection of organelles that function in the sorting and delivery of internalized material from the cell surface and the transport of materials from the Golgi to the lysosome or vacuole. Plant endosomes have some unique features, with an organization distinct from that of yeast or animal cells. Two clearly defined endosomal compartments have been studied in plant cells, the trans-Golgi network (equivalent to the early endosome) and the multivesicular body (equivalent to the late endosome), with additional endosome types (recycling endosome, late prevacuolar compartment) also a possibility. A model has been proposed in which the trans-Golgi network matures into a multivesicular body, which then fuses with the vacuole to release its cargo. In addition to basic trafficking functions, endosomes in plant cells are known to function in maintenance of cell polarity by polar localization of hormone transporters and in signaling pathways after internalization of ligand-bound receptors. These signaling functions are exemplified by the BRI1 brassinosteroid hormone receptor and by receptors for pathogen elicitors that activate defense responses. After endocytosis of these receptors from the plasma membrane, endosomes act as a signaling platform, thus playing an essential role in plant growth, development and defense responses. Here we describe the key features of plant endosomes and their differences from those of other organisms and discuss the role of these organelles in cell polarity and signaling pathways.

  6. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  7. Cell viability and functionality of probiotic bacteria in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eVinderola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, according to the definition adopted by the World Health Organization in 2002, are live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host. Recent studies show that the same probiotic strain produced and/or preserved under different storage conditions, may present different responses regarding their susceptibility to the adverse conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, its capacity to adhere to the intestinal epithelium, or its immunomodulating capacity, being the functionality affected without changes in cell viability. This could imply that the control of cell viability is not always enough to guarantee the functionality (probiotic capacity of a strain. Therefore, a new challenge arises for food technologists and microbiologists when it comes to designing and monitoring probiotic food: to be able to monitor the cell functionality a probiotic microorganism along all the stages the strain goes through from the moment it is produced and included into the food vehicle until to the moment of consumption. Conventional methodological tools or others still to be developed must be used. The application of cell membrane functionality markers, the use of tests of resistence to intestinal barriers, the study of surface properties and the application of in vivo models comes together as complementary tools to assess the actual capacity of a probiotic into a specific food to exert functional effects regardless the number of viable cells present at the moment of consumption.

  8. Differential expression and function of CD27 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells expressing ZAP-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, Sandrine T; Hou, Sen; Pauls, Samantha D; Johnston, James B; Gibson, Spencer B; Marshall, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy driven by abberant B cell signaling and survival. Leukemic B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood and the lymphoid organs where contact with stromal cells and T cells provide critical survival signals. Clinical severity of CLL is associated with several prognostic markers including expression of the kinase ZAP-70. ZAP-70 expression enhances signaling via the B cell antigen receptor and is associated with increased cell adhesion and migration capacity. Here we report that ZAP-70-positive CLL patients display significantly higher expression of the TNF superfamily receptor and memory marker CD27 than do ZAP-70 negative patients. CD27 expression by CLL was acutely elevated upon BCR cross-linking, or upon ectopic expression of ZAP-70. CD27 expression correlated with functional capacity to adhere to stromal cells and antibody blockade of CD27 impaired CLL binding to stroma. These results provide the first evidence for differential expression of CD27 among CLL prognostic groups, suggest a role for ZAP-70 dependent signaling in CD27 induction and implicate CD27 in cell-cell interactions with the lymphoid tissue microenvironment.

  9. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    ). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially......Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and function...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents...

  10. Tyrosine 129 of the murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein is critical for M2 function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya S Rangaswamy

    Full Text Available A common strategy shared by all known gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish a latent infection in lymphocytes--predominantly in B cells. In immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients or AIDS patients, gammaherpesvirus infections can lead to the development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoid malignancies. The human gamma-herpesviruses, EBV and KSHV, encode proteins that are capable of modulating the host immune signaling machinery, thereby subverting host immune responses. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection of laboratory strains of mice has proven to be useful small-animal model that shares important pathogenic strategies with the human gamma-herpesviruses. The MHV68 M2 protein is known to manipulate B cell signaling and, dependent on route and dose of virus inoculation, plays a role in both the establishment of latency and virus reactivation. M2 contains two tyrosines that are targets for phosphorylation, and have been shown to interact with the B cell signaling machinery. Here we describe in vitro and in vivo studies of M2 mutants which reveals that while both tyrosines Y120 and Y129 are required for M2 induction of IL-10 expression from primary murine B cells in vitro, only Y129 is critical for reactivation from latency and plasma cell differentiation in vivo.

  11. Tyrosine 129 of the murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein is critical for M2 function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; O'Flaherty, Brigid M; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    A common strategy shared by all known gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish a latent infection in lymphocytes--predominantly in B cells. In immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients or AIDS patients, gammaherpesvirus infections can lead to the development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoid malignancies. The human gamma-herpesviruses, EBV and KSHV, encode proteins that are capable of modulating the host immune signaling machinery, thereby subverting host immune responses. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection of laboratory strains of mice has proven to be useful small-animal model that shares important pathogenic strategies with the human gamma-herpesviruses. The MHV68 M2 protein is known to manipulate B cell signaling and, dependent on route and dose of virus inoculation, plays a role in both the establishment of latency and virus reactivation. M2 contains two tyrosines that are targets for phosphorylation, and have been shown to interact with the B cell signaling machinery. Here we describe in vitro and in vivo studies of M2 mutants which reveals that while both tyrosines Y120 and Y129 are required for M2 induction of IL-10 expression from primary murine B cells in vitro, only Y129 is critical for reactivation from latency and plasma cell differentiation in vivo.

  12. Altered effector function of peripheral cytotoxic cells in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corne Jonathan M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is mounting evidence that perforin and granzymes are important mediators in the lung destruction seen in COPD. We investigated the characteristics of the three main perforin and granzyme containing peripheral cells, namely CD8+ T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK; CD56+CD3- cells and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated and cell numbers and intracellular granzyme B and perforin were analysed by flow cytometry. Immunomagnetically selected CD8+ T lymphocytes, NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells were used in an LDH release assay to determine cytotoxicity and cytotoxic mechanisms were investigated by blocking perforin and granzyme B with relevant antibodies. Results The proportion of peripheral blood NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in smokers with COPD (COPD subjects was significantly lower (0.6% than in healthy smokers (smokers (2.8%, p +CD3- cells from COPD subjects were significantly less cytotoxic than in smokers (16.8% vs 51.9% specific lysis, p +CD3+ cells (16.7% vs 52.4% specific lysis, p +CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells from smokers and HNS. Conclusion In this study, we show that the relative numbers of peripheral blood NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in COPD subjects are reduced and that their cytotoxic effector function is defective.

  13. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  14. Serotonin of mast cell origin contributes to hippocampal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Dailey, Christopher A; Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Rodriquez, Elizabeth; Son, Nguyen Hong; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Silver, Rae

    2012-08-01

    In the central nervous system, serotonin, an important neurotransmitter and trophic factor, is synthesized by both mast cells and neurons. Mast cells, like other immune cells, are born in the bone marrow and migrate to many tissues. We show that they are resident in the mouse brain throughout development and adulthood. Measurements based on capillary electrophoresis with native fluorescence detection indicate that a significant contribution of serotonin to the hippocampal milieu is associated with mast cell activation. Compared with their littermates, mast cell-deficient C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice have profound deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory and in hippocampal neurogenesis. These deficits are associated with a reduction in cell proliferation and in immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, but not in the subventricular zone - a neurogenic niche lacking mast cells. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, reverses the deficit in hippocampal neurogenesis in mast cell-deficient mice. In summary, the present study demonstrates that mast cells are a source of serotonin, that mast cell-deficient C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice have disrupted hippocampus-dependent behavior and neurogenesis, and that elevating serotonin in these mice, by treatment with fluoxetine, reverses these deficits. We conclude that mast cells contribute to behavioral and physiological functions of the hippocampus and note that they play a physiological role in neuroimmune interactions, even in the absence of inflammatory responses.

  15. Overexpression of neurofilament H disrupts normal cell structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Smith, George M.; Li, Ping; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Studying exogenously expressed tagged proteins in live cells has become a standard technique for evaluating protein distribution and function. Typically, expression levels of experimentally introduced proteins are not regulated, and high levels are often preferred to facilitate detection. However, overexpression of many proteins leads to mislocalization and pathologies. Therefore, for normative studies, moderate levels of expression may be more suitable. To understand better the dynamics of intermediate filament formation, transport, and stability in a healthy, living cell, we inserted neurofilament heavy chain (NFH)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs in adenoviral vectors with tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoters. This system allows for turning on or off the synthesis of NFH-GFP at a selected time, for a defined period, in a dose-dependent manner. We used this inducible system for live cell imaging of changes in filament structure and cell shape, motility, and transport associated with increasing NFH-GFP expression. Cells with low to intermediate levels of NFH-GFP were structurally and functionally similar to neighboring, nonexpressing cells. In contrast, overexpression led to pathological alterations in both filament organization and cell function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Impairment of T cell function in parasitic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammals subverted as hosts by protozoan parasites, the latter and/or the agonists they release are detected and processed by sensors displayed by many distinct immune cell lineages, in a tissue(s-dependent context. Focusing on the T lymphocyte lineage, we review our present understanding on its transient or durable functional impairment over the course of the developmental program of the intracellular parasites Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi in their mammalian hosts. Strategies employed by protozoa to down-regulate T lymphocyte function may act at the initial moment of naïve T cell priming, rendering T cells anergic or unresponsive throughout infection, or later, exhausting T cells due to antigen persistence. Furthermore, by exploiting host feedback mechanisms aimed at maintaining immune homeostasis, parasites can enhance T cell apoptosis. We will discuss how infections with prominent intracellular protozoan parasites lead to a general down-regulation of T cell function through T cell anergy and exhaustion, accompanied by apoptosis, and ultimately allowing pathogen persistence.

  17. Variant B cell receptor isotype functions differ in hairy cell leukemia with mutated BRAF and IGHV genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Weston-Bell

    Full Text Available A functional B-cell receptor (BCR is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg isotypes on individual tumor cells (mult-HCL, to raise questions as to their functional relevance. Typical mult-HCL also displays a mutated BRAF V(600E lesion. Since wild type BRAF is a primary conduit for transducing normal BCR signals, as revealed by deletion modelling studies, it is as yet not apparent if mutated BRAF alters BCR signal transduction in mult-HCL. To address these questions, we examined BCR signalling in mult-HCL cases uniformly displaying mutated BRAF and IGHV genes. Two apparent functional sets were delineated by IgD co-expression. In sIgD(+ve mult-HCL, IgD mediated persistent Ca(2+ flux, also evident via >1 sIgH isotype, linked to increased ERK activation and BCR endocytosis. In sIgD(-ve mult-HCL however, BCR-mediated signals and downstream effects were restricted to a single sIgH isotype, with sIgM notably dysfunctional and remaining immobilised on the cell surface. These observations reveal discordance between expression and function of individual isotypes in mult-HCL. In dual sIgL expressing cases, only a single sIgL was fully functional. We examined effects of anti-BCR stimuli on mult-HCL survival ex-vivo. Significantly, all functional non-IgD isotypes increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation but triggered apoptosis of tumor cells, in both subsets. IgD stimuli, in marked contrast retained tumor viability. Despite mutant BRAF, BCR signals augment ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but isotype dictates functional downstream outcomes. In mult-HCL, sIgD retains a potential to transduce BCR signals for tumor survival in-vivo. The BCR in mult-HCL emerges as subject to complex regulation, with apparent conflicting signalling by individual isotypes when co

  18. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and the Cognitive Assessment of Prefrontal Executive Functions: A Critical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhus, Erika; Barcelo, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    For over four decades the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) has been one of the most distinctive tests of prefrontal function. Clinical research and recent brain imaging have brought into question the validity and specificity of this test as a marker of frontal dysfunction. Clinical studies with neurological patients have confirmed that, in its…

  19. Novel immunomodulatory effects of adiponectin on dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Julia Yuen Shan; Li, Daxu; Ho, Derek; Peng, Jiao; Xu, Aimin; Lamb, Jonathan; Chen, Yan; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang

    2011-05-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory properties. Although it has been reported that ADN can inhibit the immunostimulatory function of monocytes and macrophages, little is known of its effect on dendritic cells (DC). Recent data suggest that ADN can regulate immune responses. DCs are uniquely specialised antigen presenting cells that play a central role in the initiation of immunity and tolerance. In this study, we have investigated the immuno- modulatory effects of ADN on DC functions. We found that ADN has only moderate effect on the differentiation of murine bone marrow (BM) derived DCs but altered the phenotype of DCs. The expression of major histocompatibilty complex class II (MHCII), CD80 and CD86 on ADN conditioned DCs (ADN-DCs) was lower than that on untreated cells. The production of IL-12p40 was also suppressed in ADN-DCs. Interestingly, ADN treated DCs showed an increase in the expression of the inhibitory molecule, programmed death-1 ligand (PDL-1) compared to untreated cells. In vitro co-culture of ADN-DCs with allogeneic T cells led to a decrease in T cell proliferation and reduction of IL-2 production. Concomitant with that, a higher percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was detected in co-cultures of T cells and ADN-DCs. Blocking PD-1/PDL-1 pathway could partially restore T cell function. These findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effect of ADN on immune responses could be at least partially be mediated by its ability to alter DC function. The PD-1/PDL-1 pathway and the enhancement of Treg expansion are implicated in the immunomodulatory mechanisms.

  20. A critical survey of biomineralization control, mechanisms, functions and material properties

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides a comprehensive and up-to-date approach on biomineralization. The topical focus of the book lies on the question of how matrix proteins and cells catalyze and regulate mineralization in organisms. Recent advances in the understanding of biomineralization help to better understand biomaterials, in particular their mechanical properties. The target audience primarily comprises practitioners and research experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  1. Planar Cell Polarity Pathway in Kidney Development and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Rocque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionarily conserved planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathway controls tissue polarity within the plane orthogonal to the apical-basal axis. PCP was originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster where it is required for the establishment of a uniform pattern of cell structures and appendages. In vertebrates, including mammals, the PCP pathway has been adapted to control various morphogenetic processes that are critical for tissue and organ development. These include convergent extension (crucial for neural tube closure and cochlear duct development and oriented cell division (needed for tubular elongation, ciliary tilting that enables directional fluid flow, and other processes. Recently, strong evidence has emerged to implicate the PCP pathway in vertebrate kidney development. In this review, we will describe the experimental data revealing the role of PCP signaling in nephrogenesis and kidney disease.

  2. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice.

  3. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Form Functional Thyroid Follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The molecular events that lead to human thyroid cell speciation remain incompletely characterized. It has been shown that overexpression of the regulatory transcription factors Pax8 and Nkx2-1 (ttf-1) directs murine embryonic stem (mES) cells to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells by initiating a transcriptional regulatory network. Such cells subsequently organized into three-dimensional follicular structures in the presence of extracellular matrix. In the current study, human embryonic stem (hES) cells were studied with the aim of recapitulating this scenario and producing functional human thyroid cell lines. Methods: Reporter gene tagged pEZ-lentiviral vectors were used to express human PAX8-eGFP and NKX2-1-mCherry in the H9 hES cell line followed by differentiation into thyroid cells directed by Activin A and thyrotropin (TSH). Results: Both transcription factors were expressed efficiently in hES cells expressing either PAX8, NKX2-1, or in combination in the hES cells, which had low endogenous expression of these transcription factors. Further differentiation of the double transfected cells showed the expression of thyroid-specific genes, including thyroglobulin (TG), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), and the TSH receptor (TSHR) as assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Most notably, the Activin/TSH-induced differentiation approach resulted in thyroid follicle formation and abundant TG protein expression within the follicular lumens. On stimulation with TSH, these hES-derived follicles were also capable of dose-dependent cAMP generation and radioiodine uptake, indicating functional thyroid epithelial cells. Conclusion: The induced expression of PAX8 and NKX2-1 in hES cells was followed by differentiation into thyroid epithelial cells and their commitment to form functional three-dimensional neo-follicular structures. The data provide proof of principal that hES cells can be

  4. Type 1 Interferons Induce Changes in Core Metabolism that Are Critical for Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duojiao; Sanin, David E; Everts, Bart; Chen, Qiongyu; Qiu, Jing; Buck, Michael D; Patterson, Annette; Smith, Amber M; Chang, Chih-Hao; Liu, Zhiping; Artyomov, Maxim N; Pearce, Erika L; Cella, Marina; Pearce, Edward J

    2016-06-21

    Greater understanding of the complex host responses induced by type 1 interferon (IFN) cytokines could allow new therapeutic approaches for diseases in which these cytokines are implicated. We found that in response to the Toll-like receptor-9 agonist CpGA, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) produced type 1 IFNs, which, through an autocrine type 1 IFN receptor-dependent pathway, induced changes in cellular metabolism characterized by increased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Direct inhibition of FAO and of pathways that support this process, such as fatty acid synthesis, prevented full pDC activation. Type 1 IFNs also induced increased FAO and OXPHOS in non-hematopoietic cells and were found to be responsible for increased FAO and OXPHOS in virus-infected cells. Increased FAO and OXPHOS in response to type 1 IFNs was regulated by PPARα. Our findings reveal FAO, OXPHOS and PPARα as potential targets to therapeutically modulate downstream effects of type 1 IFNs.

  5. A functional genomic analysis of cell morphology using RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones MR

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diversity of metazoan cell shapes is influenced by the dynamic cytoskeletal network. With the advent of RNA-interference (RNAi technology, it is now possible to screen systematically for genes controlling specific cell-biological processes, including those required to generate distinct morphologies. Results We adapted existing RNAi technology in Drosophila cell culture for use in high-throughput screens to enable a comprehensive genetic dissection of cell morphogenesis. To identify genes responsible for the characteristic shape of two morphologically distinct cell lines, we performed RNAi screens in each line with a set of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs targeting 994 predicted cell shape regulators. Using automated fluorescence microscopy to visualize actin filaments, microtubules and DNA, we detected morphological phenotypes for 160 genes, one-third of which have not been previously characterized in vivo. Genes with similar phenotypes corresponded to known components of pathways controlling cytoskeletal organization and cell shape, leading us to propose similar functions for previously uncharacterized genes. Furthermore, we were able to uncover genes acting within a specific pathway using a co-RNAi screen to identify dsRNA suppressors of a cell shape change induced by Pten dsRNA. Conclusions Using RNAi, we identified genes that influence cytoskeletal organization and morphology in two distinct cell types. Some genes exhibited similar RNAi phenotypes in both cell types, while others appeared to have cell-type-specific functions, in part reflecting the different mechanisms used to generate a round or a flat cell morphology.

  6. A critical appraisal of ibrutinib in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker DL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available David L Tucker, Simon A Rule Department of Haematology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK Abstract: Although chemo-immunotherapy remains at the forefront of first-line treatment for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, small molecules, such as ibrutinib, are beginning to play a significant role, particularly in patients with multiply relapsed or chemotherapy-refractory disease and where toxicity is an overriding concern. Ibrutinib is a first-in-class, oral inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, which functions by irreversible inhibition of the downstream signaling pathway of the B-cell receptor, which normally promotes cell survival and proliferation. Early clinical trials have demonstrated excellent tolerability and a modest side-effect profile even in elderly and multiply pretreated patient cohorts. Although the majority of disease responses tend to be partial, efficacy data have also been encouraging with more than two-thirds of patients with CLL and MCL demonstrating a durable response, even in the high-risk disease setting. Resistance mechanisms are only partially understood and appear to be multifactorial, including the binding site mutation C481S, and escape through other common cell-signaling pathways. This article appraises the currently available data on safety and efficacy from clinical trials of ibrutinib in the management of MCL and CLL, both as a single agent and in combination with other therapies, and considers how this drug is likely to be used in future clinical practice. Keywords: ibrutinib, mantle cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, lymphoproliferative disorders

  7. Abnormal red cell structure and function in neuroacanthocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith C A Cluitmans

    Full Text Available Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN belongs to a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as neuroacanthocytosis (NA. This genetically heterogeneous group of diseases is characterized by degeneration of neurons in the basal ganglia and by the presence of deformed red blood cells with thorny protrusions, acanthocytes, in the circulation.The goal of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant red cell morphology and the corresponding functional consequences. This could shed light on the etiology of the neurodegeneration.We performed a qualitative and semi-quantitative morphological, immunofluorescent, biochemical and functional analysis of the red cells of several patients with PKAN and, for the first time, of the red cells of their family members.We show that the blood of patients with PKAN contains not only variable numbers of acanthocytes, but also a wide range of other misshapen red cells. Immunofluorescent and immunoblot analyses suggest an altered membrane organization, rather than quantitative changes in protein expression. Strikingly, these changes are not limited to the red blood cells of PKAN patients, but are also present in the red cells of heterozygous carriers without neurological problems. Furthermore, changes are not only present in acanthocytes, but also in other red cells, including discocytes. The patients' cells, however, are more fragile, as observed in a spleen-mimicking device.These morphological, molecular and functional characteristics of red cells in patients with PKAN and their family members offer new tools for diagnosis and present a window into the pathophysiology of neuroacanthocytosis.

  8. Biogenesis and function of T cell-derived exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Alonso

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins and nucleic acids confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes.

  9. On the critical behaviour of the 2-point function in scalar field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-09-01

    By the use of a Mellin representation of Feynman integrals, a convergent asymptotic expansion for generic Feynman amplitudes for any set of invariants going to zero or to {infinity}, may be obtained. In the case of scalar field theories in Euclidean metric, we use this expansion to analyse the behaviour of the two-point function for small values of the mass parameter, for fixed external momentum. (author)

  10. Test systems to study the structure and function of uncoupling protein 1: a critical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena eHirschberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT in healthy adult humans has renewed interest in the biology of this organ. BAT is capable of distributing nutrient energy in the form of heat allowing small mammals to efficiently defend their body temperature when acutely exposed to the cold. On the other hand BAT might be a target for the treatment of obesity and related diseases, as its pharmacological activation could allow release of excess energy stored in white adipose tissue depots. Energy dissipation in BAT depends on the activity of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1, therefore a BAT-based obesity therapy requires a detailed understanding of structure and function of UCP1. Although UCP1 has been in the focus of research since its discovery, central questions concerning its mechanistic function and regulation are not yet resolved. They have been addressed in native mitochondria but also in several test systems, which are generally used to lower inter-experimental variability and to simplify analysis conditions. Different test systems have contributed to our current knowledge about UCP1 but of course all of them have certain limitations. We here provide an overview about research on UCP1 structure and function in test systems. So far, these have nearly exclusively been employed to study rodent and not human UCP1. Considering that the amino acid sequence of mouse and human UCP1 is only 79% identical, it will be essential to test whether the human version has a similarly high catalytic activity, allowing a relevant amount of energy dissipation in human BAT. Besides the issue of comparable mechanistic function a sufficiently high expression level of human UCP1 is a further prerequisite for anti-obesity therapeutic potential. Treatments which induce BAT hyperplasia and UCP1 expression in humans might therefore be equally important to discover as mere activators of the thermogenic process.

  11. Functional role of autophagy-mediated proteome remodeling in cell survival signaling and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Robin; Khor, Sinan; Hackett, Sean R; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Perlman, David H; White, Eileen

    2014-09-18

    Ras-driven cancer cells upregulate basal autophagy that degrades and recycles intracellular proteins and organelles. Autophagy-mediated proteome degradation provides free amino acids to support metabolism and macromolecular synthesis, which confers a survival advantage in starvation and promotes tumorigenesis. While the degradation of isolated protein substrates by autophagy has been implicated in controlling cellular function, the extent and specificity by which autophagy remodels the cellular proteome and the underlying functional consequences were unknown. Here we compared the global proteome of autophagy-functional and -deficient Ras-driven cancer cells, finding that autophagy affects the majority of the proteome yet is highly selective. While levels of vesicle trafficking proteins important for autophagy are preserved during starvation-induced autophagy, deleterious inflammatory response pathway components are eliminated even under basal conditions, preventing cytokine-induced paracrine cell death. This reveals the global, functional impact of autophagy-mediated proteome remodeling on cell survival and identifies critical autophagy substrates that mediate this process.

  12. Surface-micromachined microfiltration membranes for efficient isolation and functional immunophenotyping of subpopulations of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqiang; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Oh, Boram; Lam, Raymond H W; Fan, Rong; Cornell, Timothy T; Shanley, Thomas P; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fu, Jianping

    2013-07-01

    An accurate measurement of the immune status in patients with immune system disorders is critical in evaluating the stage of diseases and tailoring drug treatments. The functional cellular immunity test is a promising method to establish the diagnosis of immune dysfunctions. The conventional functional cellular immunity test involves measurements of the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines when stimulated ex vivo. However, this "bulk" assay measures the overall reactivity of a population of lymphocytes and monocytes, making it difficult to pinpoint the phenotype or real identity of the reactive immune cells involved. In this research, we develop a large surface micromachined poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfiltration membrane (PMM) with high porosity, which is integrated in a microfluidic microfiltration platform. Using the PMM with functionalized microbeads conjugated with antibodies against specific cell surface proteins, we demonstrated rapid, efficient and high-throughput on-chip isolation, enrichment, and stimulation of subpopulations of immune cells from blood specimens. Furthermore, the PMM-integrated microfiltration platform, coupled with a no-wash homogeneous chemiluminescence assay ("AlphaLISA"), enables us to demonstrate rapid and sensitive on-chip immunophenotyping assays for subpopulations of immune cells isolated directly from minute quantities of blood samples.

  13. [Critical role of peptidic toxins in the functional and structural analysis of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Ménez, André; Servent, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Animal toxins which interact on various receptors and channels have been often used in the studies of the functional roles of these targets. Nicotinic toxins have been purified from snake and cone venoms and are characterized by high affinity and various selectivity of interactions on the different nicotinic receptors subtypes. Since 30 years they have been used as molecular probes to identify, localize and purify these receptors. Furthermore, they have played a crucial role in the better understanding of their functional properties and have been useful in their structural studies. These peptidic toxins could be chemically synthetized or recombinantly expressed and nonnatural residues could be introduced in their sequences in order to delineate their functional interaction sites. The structural modelisation of toxin-nAChR interaction allows us to understand the antagonistic property of these toxins and open the way to the design of engineered ligands with predetermined specificity, useful as pharmacological tools or therapeutic agents in the numerous diseases involving this receptor family.

  14. Plant organelle proteomics: collaborating for optimal cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Bourguignon, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Ferro, Myriam; Jaquinod, Michel; Alexiou, Konstantinos G; Chardot, Thierry; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Jolivet, Pascale; Doonan, John H; Rakwal, Randeep

    2011-01-01

    Organelle proteomics describes the study of proteins present in organelle at a particular instance during the whole period of their life cycle in a cell. Organelles are specialized membrane bound structures within a cell that function by interacting with cytosolic and luminal soluble proteins making the protein composition of each organelle dynamic. Depending on organism, the total number of organelles within a cell varies, indicating their evolution with respect to protein number and function. For example, one of the striking differences between plant and animal cells is the plastids in plants. Organelles have their own proteins, and few organelles like mitochondria and chloroplast have their own genome to synthesize proteins for specific function and also require nuclear-encoded proteins. Enormous work has been performed on animal organelle proteomics. However, plant organelle proteomics has seen limited work mainly due to: (i) inter-plant and inter-tissue complexity, (ii) difficulties in isolation of subcellular compartments, and (iii) their enrichment and purity. Despite these concerns, the field of organelle proteomics is growing in plants, such as Arabidopsis, rice and maize. The available data are beginning to help better understand organelles and their distinct and/or overlapping functions in different plant tissues, organs or cell types, and more importantly, how protein components of organelles behave during development and with surrounding environments. Studies on organelles have provided a few good reviews, but none of them are comprehensive. Here, we present a comprehensive review on plant organelle proteomics starting from the significance of organelle in cells, to organelle isolation, to protein identification and to biology and beyond. To put together such a systematic, in-depth review and to translate acquired knowledge in a proper and adequate form, we join minds to provide discussion and viewpoints on the collaborative nature of organelles in

  15. Neuron-NG2 Cell Synapses: Novel Functions for Regulating NG2 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Kun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells are a population of CNS cells that are distinct from neurons, mature oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. These cells can be identified by their NG2 proteoglycan expression. NG2 cells have a highly branched morphology, with abundant processes radiating from the cell body, and express a complex set of voltage-gated channels, AMPA/kainate, and GABA receptors. Neurons notably form classical and nonclassical synapses with NG2 cells, which have varied characteristics and functions. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses could fine-tune NG2 cell activities, including the NG2 cell cycle, differentiation, migration, and myelination, and may be a novel potential therapeutic target for NG2 cell-related diseases, such as hypoxia-ischemia injury and periventricular leukomalacia. Furthermore, neuron-NG2 cell synapses may be correlated with the plasticity of CNS in adulthood with the synaptic contacts passing onto their progenies during proliferation, and synaptic contacts decrease rapidly upon NG2 cell differentiation. In this review, we highlight the characteristics of classical and nonclassical neuron-NG2 cell synapses, the potential functions, and the fate of synaptic contacts during proliferation and differentiation, with the emphasis on the regulation of the NG2 cell cycle by neuron-NG2 cell synapses and their potential underlying mechanisms.

  16. Critical role of SAP in progression and reactivation but not maintenance of T cell-dependent humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-03-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is a small adaptor molecule mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. SAP plays a critical role in the initiation of T cell-dependent B cell responses leading to germinal center reaction, the production of high-affinity antibodies, and B cell memory. However, whether SAP has a role in these responses beyond their initiation is not known. It is important to address this matter not only for mechanistic reasons but also because blockade of the SAP pathway is being contemplated as a means to treat autoimmune diseases in humans. Using an inducibly SAP deficient mouse, we found that SAP was required not only for the initiation but also for the progression of primary T cell-driven B cell responses to haptens. It was also necessary for the reactivation of T cell-dependent B cell immunity during secondary immune responses. These activities consistently correlated with the requirement of SAP for full expression of the lineage commitment factor Bcl-6 in follicular T helper (T(FH)) cells. However, once memory B cells and long-lived antibody-secreting cells were established, SAP became dispensable for maintaining T cell-dependent B cell responses. Thus, SAP is pivotal for nearly all phases, but not for maintenance, of T cell-driven B cell humoral immunity. These findings may have implications for the treatment of immune disorders by targeting the SAP pathway.

  17. Angular Emission Function of a City and Skyglow Modeling: A Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio

    2016-12-01

    The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is a common approach to solving the transfer of electromagnetic energy in heterogeneous disperse media, such as atmospheric environment. One-dimensional RTE is a linear boundary value problem that is well suited to plane-parallel atmosphere with no diffuse intensity entering the top of the atmosphere. In nighttime regime, the ground-based light sources illuminate the atmosphere at its bottom interface. However, the light-pollution models conventionally use radiant intensity function rather than radiance. This might potentially result in a number of misconceptions. We focused on similarities and fundamental differences between both functions and clarified distinct consequences for the modeling of skyglow from finite-sized and semi-infinite light-emitting flat surfaces. Minimum requirements to be fulfilled by a City Emission Function (CEF) are formulated to ensure a successful solution of standard and inverse problems. It has been shown that the horizon radiance of a flat surface emitting in accordance with Garstang’s function (GEF) would exceed any limit, meaning that the GEF is not an appropriate tool to model skyglow from distant sources. We developed two alternative CEFs to remedy this problem through correction of direct upward emissions; the most important strengths of the modified CEFs are detailed in this paper. Numerical experiments on sky luminance under well-posed and ill-posed boundary conditions were made for two extreme uplight fractions (F) and for three discrete distances from the city edge. The errors induced by replacing radiance with radiant intensity function in the RTE are generally low (15%-30%) if F is as large as 0.15, but alteration of the luminance may range over 1-3 orders of magnitude if F approaches zero. In the latter case, the error margin can increase by a factor of 10-100 or even 1000, even if the angular structure of luminance patterns suffers only weak changes. This is why such a shift in

  18. Critical function of Bmx/Etk in ischemia-mediated arteriogenesis and angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Bmx/Etk non-receptor tyrosine protein kinase has been implicated in endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro. However, the role of Bmx in vivo is not known. Bmx is highly induced in the vasculature of ischemic hind limbs. We used both mice with a genetic deletion of Bmx (Bmx-KO mice) and transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of Bmx under the endothelial Tie-2 enhancer/promoter (Bmx-SK-Tg mice) to study the role of Bmx in ischemia-mediated arteriogenesis/angioge...

  19. Alternative mitochondrial functions in cell physiopathology: beyond ATP production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowaltowski A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mitochondria are the main site for ATP generation within most tissues. However, mitochondria also participate in a surprising number of alternative activities, including intracellular Ca2+ regulation, thermogenesis and the control of apoptosis. In addition, mitochondria are the main cellular generators of reactive oxygen species, and may trigger necrotic cell death under conditions of oxidative stress. This review concentrates on these alternative mitochondrial functions, and their role in cell physiopathology.

  20. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukowski RM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ronald M BukowskiCleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus, and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α. The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients

  1. Reducing bone cancer cell functions using selenium nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzoff, Michelle; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Cancer recurrence at the site of tumor resection remains a major threat to patient survival despite modern cancer therapeutic advances. Osteosarcoma, in particular, is a very aggressive primary bone cancer that commonly recurs after surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapeutic treatment. The objective of the present in vitro study was to develop a material that could decrease bone cancer cell recurrence while promoting healthy bone cell functions. Selenium is a natural part of our diet which has shown promise for reducing cancer cell functions, inhibiting bacteria, and promoting healthy cells functions, yet, it has not been widely explored for osteosarcoma applications. For this purpose, due to their increased surface area, selenium nanoparticles (SeNP) were precipitated on a very common orthopedic tissue engineering material, poly-l-lactic acid (or PLLA). Selenium-coated PLLA materials were shown to selectively decrease long-term osteosarcoma cell density while promoting healthy, noncancerous, osteoblast functions (for example, up to two times more alkaline phosphatase activity on selenium coated compared to osteoblasts grown on typical tissue culture plates), suggesting they should be further studied for replacing tumorous bone tissue with healthy bone tissue. Importantly, results of this study were achieved without the use of chemotherapeutics or pharmaceutical agents, which have negative side effects.

  2. Regulation of hematopoietic cell function by inhibitory immunoglobulin G receptors and their inositol lipid phosphatase effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Carol T; Rice, Jeffrey S; Ott, Vanessa L; Cambier, John C

    2008-08-01

    Numerous autoimmune and inflammatory disorders stem from the dysregulation of hematopoietic cell activation. The activity of inositol lipid and protein tyrosine phosphatases, and the receptors that recruit them, is critical for prevention of these disorders. Balanced signaling by inhibitory and activating receptors is now recognized to be an important factor in tuning cell function and inflammatory potential. In this review, we provide an overview of current knowledge of membrane proximal events in signaling by inhibitory/regulatory receptors focusing on structural and functional characteristics of receptors and their effectors Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 and SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase-1. We review use of new strategies to identify novel regulatory receptors and effectors. Finally, we discuss complementary actions of paired inhibitory and activating receptors, using Fc gammaRIIA and Fc gammaRIIB regulation human basophil activation as a prototype.

  3. Sertoli cell only syndrome: Status of sertoli cell maturation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background of the study: Mature and functional Sertoli cells are essential for the survival of germ cells in testes. In Sertoli cell only syndrome (SCOS, there is no germ cells. Then, question arises whether absence of germ cells in SCOS secondary to Sertoli cells immaturity or mal function. Sertoli cells maturational and functional status is unclear in SCOS. This study investigated status of maturation and function of Sertoli cells in patients with SCOS. Materials and Methods: The present study was comprised of 37 cases of SCOS and 50 normal control males. Detailed clinical examination and investigation were carried out as per pre-determined proforma. Semen analysis, hormonal analysis (FSH, LH, testosterone, etc., and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of testes (bilateral were performed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with XY probes was carried out in addition to conventional chromosome analysis to find out chromosomal abnormalities, in particular sex chromosome aneuploidy, including mosaicism. Yq microdeletion status was also investigated. The anti-mullerian hormone (AMH, inhibin B, and seminal lactate were estimated by ELISA methods. Results: The study did not find any case of high AMH. About 78% cases had low inhibin B, and 60% had low AMH. FSH was high in about 78% cases. Low level of lactate was found in 49% cases. There was one case of high level of inhibin B. There were 6 (16.2% cases of chromosomal abnormality (2 mosaic Klinefelter and 4 Klinefelter syndrome and 4 (10.8% cases of Yq microdeletion. Conclusion: We conclude that Sertoli cell immaturity does not play any role in SCOS (no case of high AMH. It seems, in majority cases, Sertoli cells are functionally- and/or numerically-deficient (low inhibin B, AMH and lactate. However, in about 22% cases, Sertoli cell function and/or number remains normal (normal inhibin B, AMH. Inhibin B and FSH seems best predictor/marker of Sertoli cell function.

  4. Critical role of exogenous nitric oxide in ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Tatsuya Maruhashi

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling pathway has been shown to mediate various cellular functions including cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, apoptosis, and contraction, all of which may be involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO is well known to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect, whereas the exogenous NO-mediated cardiovascular effect still remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous NO on ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.VSMCs migration was evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber assay. ROCK activities were measured by Western blot analysis in murine and human VSMCs and aorta of mice treated with or without angiotensin II (Ang II and/or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor.Co-treatment with SNP inhibited the Ang II-induced cell migration and increases in ROCK activity in murine and human VSMCs. Similarly, the increased ROCK activity 2 weeks after Ang II infusion in the mouse aorta was substantially inhibited by subcutaneous injection of SNP.These findings suggest that administration of exogenous NO can inhibit ROCK activity in VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.

  5. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

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    Ramakrishna Kommagani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR, is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC. However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1 transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing

  6. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  7. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Júnior

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (TREG cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163. In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  8. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a new ''cells as drugs'' paradigm. Efficacy and critical aspects in cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Girolamo, Laura; Lucarelli, Enrico; Alessandri, Giulio; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Biagi, Ettore; Brini, Anna Teresa; D'Amico, Giovanna; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrero, Ivana; Locatelli, Franco; Maccario, Rita; Marazzi, Mario; Parolini, Ornella; Pessina, Augusto; Torre, Maria Luisa; Italian Mesenchymal Stem Cell Group

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were first isolated more than 50 years ago from the bone marrow. Currently MSCs may also be isolated from several alternative sources and they have been used in more than a hundred clinical trials worldwide to treat a wide variety of diseases. The MSCs mechanism of action is undefined and currently under investigation. For in vivo purposes MSCs must be produced in compliance with good manufacturing practices and this has stimulated research on MSCs characterization and safety. The objective of this review is to describe recent developments regarding MSCs properties, physiological effects, delivery, clinical applications and possible side effects.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells: A New "Cells as Drugs" Paradigm. Efficacy and Critical Aspects in Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Girolamo, Laura; Lucarelli, Enrico; Alessandri, Giulio; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Biagi, Ettore; Brini, Anna Teresa; D’Amico, Giovanna; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrero, Ivana; Locatelli, Franco; Maccario, Rita; Marazzi, Mario; Parolini, Ornella; Pessina, Augusto; Torre, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were first isolated more than 50 years ago from the bone marrow. Currently MSCs may also be isolated from several alternative sources and they have been used in more than a hundred clinical trials worldwide to treat a wide variety of diseases. The MSCs mechanism of action is undefined and currently under investigation. For in vivo purposes MSCs must be produced in compliance with good manufacturing practices and this has stimulated research on MSCs characterization and safety. The objective of this review is to describe recent developments regarding MSCs properties, physiological effects, delivery, clinical applications and possible side effects. PMID:23278600

  10. Poly-ε-caprolactone Coated and Functionalized Porous Titanium and Magnesium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Critically Sized Bone Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Roland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For healing of critically sized bone defects, biocompatible and angiogenesis supporting implants are favorable. Murine osteoblasts showed equal proliferation behavior on the polymers poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL and poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate/poly-(4-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB/P(4HB. As vitality was significantly better for PCL, it was chosen as a suitable coating material for further experiments. Titanium implants with 600 µm pore size were evaluated and found to be a good implant material for bone, as primary osteoblasts showed a vitality and proliferation onto the implants comparable to well bottom (WB. Pure porous titanium implants and PCL coated porous titanium implants were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI with Green fluorescent protein (GFP-osteoblasts. Cell count and cell covered area did not differ between the implants after seven days. To improve ingrowth of blood vessels into porous implants, proangiogenic factors like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 were incorporated into PCL coated, porous titanium and magnesium implants. An angiogenesis assay was performed to establish an in vitro method for evaluating the impact of metallic implants on angiogenesis to reduce and refine animal experiments in future. Incorporated concentrations of proangiogenic factors were probably too low, as they did not lead to any effect. Magnesium implants did not yield evaluable results, as they led to pH increase and subsequent cell death.

  11. Functions of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins in Stem Cell Potency and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess huge importance in developmental biology, disease modelling, cell replacement therapy, and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine because they have the remarkable potential for self-renewal and to differentiate into almost all the cell types in the human body. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell potency and differentiation is essential and critical for extensive application. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs are modular proteins consisting of RNA-binding motifs and auxiliary domains characterized by extensive and divergent functions in nucleic acid metabolism. Multiple roles of hnRNPs in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation enable them to be effective gene expression regulators. More recent findings show that hnRNP proteins are crucial factors implicated in maintenance of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency and cell differentiation. The hnRNPs interact with certain sequences in target gene promoter regions to initiate transcription. In addition, they recognize 3′UTR or 5′UTR of specific gene mRNA forming mRNP complex to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Both of these regulatory pathways lead to modulation of gene expression that is associated with stem cell proliferation, cell cycle control, pluripotency, and committed differentiation.

  12. A CRITICAL REVIEW OF STATUS AND FUNCTIONS OF ART EDUCATION IN MODERN EDUCATION AND SOLUTIONAL PROPOPALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ertuğ YAVUZ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is stressed that modern art education should be approached by determining planned, programmed, logical, and completely scientific methods. The functions and the status of art education is also examined in details in this essay. It is emphasized that education has a significant influence on individual behavioral variations and on society with its all components for forming national agreement, mutual support, sympathy, cooperation and unity. Art education’s responsibility of creating modern, dynamic, complete, rationalistic and new ideas in addition to its contemporary existence as an education of pleasure and impression is also stressed.

  13. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vanapalli, Siva A.; Duits, Michel H.G.; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-01

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature’s most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax—thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remodeling of the cytoskeleton. To understand this intricate coupling between mechanical properties, mechanical function and force-induced biochemical signaling requires tools that are capable of both c...

  14. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha D Pauls

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunogloblulin isotype switch, germinal center responses and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  15. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  16. Shp2 Plays a Critical Role in IL-6-Induced EMT in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhiyong; Ji, Wei; Tian, Ran; Zhang, Fei; Niu, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    Accumulative evidence demonstrates that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 functions as a powerful tumor promoter in many types of cancers. Abnormal expression of Shp2 has been implicated in many human malignancies. Overexpression of Shp2 in cancer tissues is correlated with cancer metastasis, resistance to targeted therapy, and poor prognosis. The well-known function of Shp2 is its positive role in regulating cellular signaling initiated by growth factors and cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6). Several recent studies have shown that Shp2 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), triggered by growth factors. However, whether Shp2 is involved in IL-6-signaling-promoted breast cancer EMT and progression, remains undefined. In this study, we showed that exogenous and endogenous IL-6 can enhance breast cancer invasion and migration, through the promotion of EMT. IL-6 also induces the activation of Erk1/2 and the phosphorylation of Shp2. Knockdown of Shp2 attenuated the IL-6-induced downregulation of E-cadherin, as well as IL-6-promoted cell migration and invasion. Moreover, by using Shp2 phosphatase mutants, phosphor-tyrosine mimicking, and deficiency mutants, we provided evidence that the phosphatase activity of Shp2 and its tyrosine phosphorylation, are necessary for the IL-6-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Our findings uncover an important function that links Shp2 to IL-6-promoted breast cancer progression. PMID:28208810

  17. Stem cell-derived hepatocytes for functional liver replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eChrist

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternate cell source to substitute for primary hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation because of their multiple differentiation potential and nearly unlimited availability. They may differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and maintain specific hepatocyte functions also after transplantation into the regenerating livers of mice or rats both under injury and non-injury conditions. Depending on the underlying liver disease their mode of action is either to replace the diseased liver tissue or to support liver regeneration through their anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic as well as their pro-proliferative action.

  18. Lipid-laden dendritic cells fail to function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip C Calder

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dendritic cells(DCs)are professional antigen-acquiring,-processing and-presenting cells[1-4].As such,DCs form the key link between the innate and acquired immune responses playing a role in host defence and in immune tolerance[1-4].Accordingly,defects in the ability of DCs to function can lead to increased susceptibility to infection,loss of tolerance,autoimmunity and tumour growth[1-4].Sub-classes of DCs are defined and discriminated by the expression of different cell surface markers.

  19. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules.

  20. Functional cell types in taste buds have distinct longevities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Perea-Martinez

    Full Text Available Taste buds are clusters of polarized sensory cells embedded in stratified oral epithelium. In adult mammals, taste buds turn over continuously and are replenished through the birth of new cells in the basal layer of the surrounding non-sensory epithelium. The half-life of cells in mammalian taste buds has been estimated as 8-12 days on average. Yet, earlier studies did not address whether the now well-defined functional taste bud cell types all exhibit the same lifetime. We employed a recently developed thymidine analog, 5-ethynil-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU to re-evaluate the incorporation of newly born cells into circumvallate taste buds of adult mice. By combining EdU-labeling with immunostaining for selected markers, we tracked the differentiation and lifespan of the constituent cell types of taste buds. EdU was primarily incorporated into basal extragemmal cells, the principal source for replenishing taste bud cells. Undifferentiated EdU-labeled cells began migrating into circumvallate taste buds within 1 day of their birth. Type II (Receptor taste cells began to differentiate from EdU-labeled precursors beginning 2 days after birth and then were eliminated with a half-life of 8 days. Type III (Presynaptic taste cells began differentiating after a delay of 3 days after EdU-labeling, and they survived much longer, with a half-life of 22 days. We also scored taste bud cells that belong to neither Type II nor Type III, a heterogeneous group that includes mostly Type I cells, and also undifferentiated or immature cells. A non-linear decay fit described these cells as two sub-populations with half-lives of 8 and 24 days respectively. Our data suggest that many post-mitotic cells may remain quiescent within taste buds before differentiating into mature taste cells. A small number of slow-cycling cells may also exist within the perimeter of the taste bud. Based on their incidence, we hypothesize that these may be progenitors for Type III cells.

  1. NK cell subgroups, phenotype and functions after autologous stem cell transplantation

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    Benedikt eJacobs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High-dose chemotherapy with consecutive autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT is a well-established treatment option for patients suffering from malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Natural killer (NK cells are an important part of the immune surveillance, and their cell number after autoSCT is predictive for progression-free and overall survival. To improve knowledge about the role of NK cells after autoSCT, we investigated different NK cell subgroups, their phenotypes and their functions in patients treated with autoSCT. Directly after leukocyte regeneration (>1000 leukocytes/μl following autoSCT, CD56++ NK cells were the major NK cell subset. Surprisingly, these cells showed unusually high surface expression levels of CD57 and KIR compared to expression levels before or at later time points after autoSCT. Moreover, these NK cells strongly up-regulated KIR2DL2/3 and KIR3DL1, whereas KIR2DL1 remained constant, indicating that this cell population arose from more immature NK cells instead of from activated mature ones. Remarkably, NK cells were already able to degranulate and produce IFN-γ and MIP-1β upon tumor interaction early after leukocyte regeneration.In conclusion, we describe an unusual up-regulation of CD57 and KIRs on CD56++ NK cells shortly after autoSCT. Importantly, these NK cells were functionally competent upon tumor interaction at this early time point.

  2. DNA-Damage-Induced Type I Interferon Promotes Senescence and Inhibits Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujing Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Expression of type I interferons (IFNs can be induced by DNA-damaging agents, but the mechanisms and significance of this regulation are not completely understood. We found that the transcription factor IRF3, activated in an ATM-IKKα/β-dependent manner, stimulates cell-autonomous IFN-β expression in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. Cells and tissues with accumulating DNA damage produce endogenous IFN-β and stimulate IFN signaling in vitro and in vivo. In turn, IFN acts to amplify DNA-damage responses, activate the p53 pathway, promote senescence, and inhibit stem cell function in response to telomere shortening. Inactivation of the IFN pathway abrogates the development of diverse progeric phenotypes and extends the lifespan of Terc knockout mice. These data identify DNA-damage-response-induced IFN signaling as a critical mechanism that links accumulating DNA damage with senescence and premature aging.

  3. Transfusion of platelets, but not of red blood cells, is independently associated with nosocomial infections in the critically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engele, Leo J.; Straat, Marleen; van Rooijen, Ingeborg H M; de Vooght, Karen M K; Cremer, Olaf L.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D J; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with nosocomial infection in the critically ill patients. However, this association may be confounded by length of stay, as prolonged intensive care unit (ICU stay) increases both risk of infection and risk of transfusion. Also, it is

  4. Efficient generation of functional dopaminergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swistowski, Andrzej; Peng, Jun; Liu, Qiuyue; Mali, Prashant; Rao, Mahendra S; Cheng, Linzhao; Zeng, Xianmin

    2010-10-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) reprogrammed from somatic cells represent a promising unlimited cell source for generating patient-specific cells for biomedical research and personalized medicine. As a first step, critical to clinical applications, we attempted to develop defined culture conditions to expand and differentiate human iPSCs into functional progeny such as dopaminergic neurons for treating or modeling Parkinson's disease (PD). We used a completely defined (xeno-free) system that we previously developed for efficient generation of authentic dopaminergic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and applied it to iPSCs. First, we adapted two human iPSC lines derived from different somatic cell types for the defined expansion medium and showed that the iPSCs grew similarly as hESCs in the same medium regarding pluripotency and genomic stability. Second, by using these two independent adapted iPSC lines, we showed that the process of differentiation into committed neural stem cells (NSCs) and subsequently into dopaminergic neurons was also similar to hESCs. Importantly, iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons were functional as they survived and improved behavioral deficits in 6-hydroxydopamine-leasioned rats after transplantation. In addition, iPSC-derived NSCs and neurons could be efficiently transduced by a baculoviral vector delivering episomal DNA for future gene function study and disease modeling using iPSCs. We also performed genome-wide microarray comparisons between iPSCs and hESCs, and we derived NSC and dopaminergic neurons. Our data revealed overall similarity and visible differences at a molecular level. Efficient generation of functional dopaminergic neurons under defined conditions will facilitate research and applications using PD patient-specific iPSCs.

  5. New developments in goblet cell mucus secretion and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, G M H; Johansson, M E V; Gustafsson, J K; Bergström, J H; Hansson, G C

    2015-07-01

    Goblet cells and their main secretory product, mucus, have long been poorly appreciated; however, recent discoveries have changed this and placed these cells at the center stage of our understanding of mucosal biology and the immunology of the intestinal tract. The mucus system differs substantially between the small and large intestine, although it is built around MUC2 mucin polymers in both cases. Furthermore, that goblet cells and the regulation of their secretion also differ between these two parts of the intestine is of fundamental importance for a better understanding of mucosal immunology. There are several types of goblet cell that can be delineated based on their location and function. The surface colonic goblet cells secrete continuously to maintain the inner mucus layer, whereas goblet cells of the colonic and small intestinal crypts secrete upon stimulation, for example, after endocytosis or in response to acetyl choline. However, despite much progress in recent years, our understanding of goblet cell function and regulation is still in its infancy.

  6. The critical power function is dependent on the duration of the predictive exercise tests chosen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D; Jenkins, D G; Howard, A

    1998-02-01

    The linear relationship between work accomplished (W(lim)) and time to exhaustion (t(lim)) can be described by the equation: W(lim) = a + CP x t(lim). Critical power (CP) is the slope of this line and is thought to represent a maximum rate of ATP synthesis without exhaustion, presumably an inherent characteristic of the aerobic energy system. The present investigation determined whether the choice of predictive tests would elicit significant differences in the estimated CP. Ten female physical education students completed, in random order and on consecutive days, five all-out predictive tests at preselected constant-power outputs. Predictive tests were performed on an electrically-braked cycle ergometer and power loadings were individually chosen so as to induce fatigue within approximately 1-10 mins. CP was derived by fitting the linear W(lim)-t(lim) regression and calculated three ways: 1) using the first, third and fifth W(lim)-t(lim) coordinates (I135), 2) using coordinates from the three highest power outputs (I123; mean t(lim) = 68-193 s) and 3) using coordinates from the lowest power outputs (I345; mean t(lim) = 193-485 s). Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that CPI123 (201.0+/-37.9W) > CPI135 (176.1+/-27.6W) > CPI345 (164.0+/-22.8W) (P<0.05). When the three sets of data were used to fit the hyperbolic Power-t(lim) regression, statistically significant differences between each CP were also found (P<0.05). The shorter the predictive trials, the greater the slope of the W(lim)-t(lim) regression; possibly because of the greater influence of 'aerobic inertia' on these trials. This may explain why CP has failed to represent a maximal, sustainable work rate. The present findings suggest that if CP is to represent the highest power output that an individual can maintain "for a very long time without fatigue" then CP should be calculated over a range of predictive tests in which the influence of aerobic inertia is minimised.

  7. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  8. Lung function after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Larsen Bang, Cæcilie; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in pulmonary function (PF) has been reported in up to 85% of pediatric patients during the first year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our understanding of the etiology for this decrease in lung function is, however, sparse. The aim of this study was to describe PF...... experienced a decline in lung function of more than 10% during the first 3 to 9 months after HSCT. The decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide were strongly associated with acute graft...

  9. The critical role of the tumor microenvironment in shaping natural killer cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eBaginska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence has been gathered over the last 10 years showing that the tumor microenvironment (TME is not simply a passive recipient of immune cells, but an active participant in the establishment of immunosuppressive conditions. It is now well documented that hypoxia, within the TME, affects the functions of immune effectors including natural killer (NK cells by multiple overlapping mechanisms. Indeed, each cell in the TME, irrespective of its transformation status, has the capacity to adapt to the hostile TME and produce immune modulatory signals or mediators affecting the function of immune cells either directly or through the stimulation of other cells present in the tumor site. This observation has led to intense research efforts focused mainly on tumor-derived factors. Notably, it has become increasingly clear that tumor cells secrete a number of environmental factors such as cytokines, growth factors, exosomes, and microRNAs impacting the immune cell response. Moreover, tumor cells in hostile microenvironments may activate their own intrinsic resistance mechanisms, such as autophagy, to escape the effective immune response. Such adaptive mechanisms may also include the ability of tumor cells to modify their metabolism and release several metabolites to impair the function of immune cells. In this review, we summarize the different mechanisms involved in the TME that affect the anti-tumor immune function of NK cells.

  10. Matrigel improves functional properties of primary human salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Ola M; Zeitouni, Anthony; Gologan, Olga; Tran, Simon D

    2011-05-01

    Currently, there is no effective treatment available to patients with irreversible loss of functional salivary acini caused by Sjogren's syndrome or after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. A tissue-engineered artificial salivary gland would help these patients. The graft cells for this device must establish tight junctions in addition to being of fluid-secretory nature. This study analyzed a graft source from human salivary glands (huSG) cultured on Matrigel. Cells were obtained from parotid and submandibular glands, expanded in vitro, and then plated on either Matrigel-coated (2 mg/mL) or uncoated culture dish. Immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and transepithelial electrical resistance were employed. On Matrigel, huSG cells adopted an acinar phenotype by forming three-dimensional acinar-like units (within 24 h of plating) as well as a monolayer of cells. On uncoated surfaces (plastic), huSG cells only formed monolayers of ductal cells. Both types of culture conditions allowed huSG cells to express tight junction proteins (claudin-1, -2, -3, -4; occludin; JAM-A; and ZO-1) and adequate transepithelial electrical resistance. Importantly, 99% of huSG cells on Matrigel expressed α-amylase and the water channel protein Aquaporin-5, as compared to cells on plastic. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed an acinar phenotype with many secretory granules. Matrigel increased the secretion of α-amylase two to five folds into the media, downregulated certain salivary genes, and regulated the translation of acinar proteins. This three-dimensional in vitro serum-free cell culture method allows the organization and differentiation of huSG cells into salivary cells with an acinar phenotype.

  11. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  12. Sexual function 1-year after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noerskov, K H; Schjødt, I; Syrjala, K L

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with short and long-term toxicities that can result in alterations in sexual functioning. The aims of this prospective evaluation were to determine: (1) associations between HSCT and increased sexual dysfunction...