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Sample records for cell free system

  1. Translation in cell-free systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simplest, unambiguous identification of a particular mRNA is the identification of its protein product. This can be established by translation of the mRNA of interest in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. Messenger RNA protein product identification is important in the isolation of a particular mRNA species for cDNA cloning and in the identification of positive cDNA clones. The two high-activity translation systems in common use are those prepared from rabbit reticulocytes and from wheat germ. Both systems are easy to prepare, and both are available commercially. Each has advantages and disadvantages over the other and a choice between the two will depend on the type of mRNAs to be translated, the prejudices of experience, and availability. The main disadvantage of the reticulocyte system is that it requires removal of endogenous mRNA. However, this is a relatively simple procedure. The wheat germ system does not require removal of endogenous mRNA and may translate weakly initiating mRNAs more efficiently. However, ionic optima for translation in the wheat germ system are more sensitive to the nature and concentration of mRNA and may need to be determined for each template. The biggest problem with the use of the wheat germ system is its tendency to produce incomplete translation products due to premature termination

  2. Creating a completely "cell-free" system for protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Thomas; Bennett, Anthony M; Hunt, Jeremy M; Bundy, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis is a promising tool to take biotechnology outside of the cell. A cell-free approach provides distinct advantages over in vivo systems including open access to the reaction environment and direct control over all chemical components for facile optimization and synthetic biology integration. Promising applications of cell-free systems include portable diagnostics, biotherapeutics expression, rational protein engineering, and biocatalyst production. The highest yielding and most economical cell-free systems use an extract composed of the soluble component of lysed Escherichia coli. Although E. coli lysis can be highly efficient (>99.999%), one persistent challenge is that the extract remains contaminated with up to millions of cells per mL. In this work, we examine the potential of multiple decontamination strategies to further reduce or eliminate bacteria in cell-free systems. Two strategies, sterile filtration and lyophilization, effectively eliminate contaminating cells while maintaining the systems' protein synthesis capabilities. Lyophilization provides the additional benefit of long-term stability at storage above freezing. Technologies for personalized, portable medicine and diagnostics can be expanded based on these foundational sterilized and completely "cell-free" systems.

  3. Improved cell-free RNA and protein synthesis system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Cell-free RNA and protein synthesis (CFPS is becoming increasingly used for protein production as yields increase and costs decrease. Advances in reconstituted CFPS systems such as the Protein synthesis Using Recombinant Elements (PURE system offer new opportunities to tailor the reactions for specialized applications including in vitro protein evolution, protein microarrays, isotopic labeling, and incorporating unnatural amino acids. In this study, using firefly luciferase synthesis as a reporter system, we improved PURE system productivity up to 5 fold by adding or adjusting a variety of factors that affect transcription and translation, including Elongation factors (EF-Ts, EF-Tu, EF-G, and EF4, ribosome recycling factor (RRF, release factors (RF1, RF2, RF3, chaperones (GroEL/ES, BSA and tRNAs. The work provides a more efficient defined in vitro transcription and translation system and a deeper understanding of the factors that limit the whole system efficiency.

  4. Performance benchmarking of four cell-free protein expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagoski, Dejan; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Mureev, Sergey; Kunert, Anne; Johnston, Wayne; Gambin, Yann; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-02-01

    Over the last half century, a range of cell-free protein expression systems based on pro- and eukaryotic organisms have been developed and have found a range of applications, from structural biology to directed protein evolution. While it is generally accepted that significant differences in performance among systems exist, there is a paucity of systematic experimental studies supporting this notion. Here, we took advantage of the species-independent translation initiation sequence to express and characterize 87 N-terminally GFP-tagged human cytosolic proteins of different sizes in E. coli, wheat germ (WGE), HeLa, and Leishmania-based (LTE) cell-free systems. Using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis, we assessed the expression yields, the fraction of full-length translation product, and aggregation propensity for each of these systems. Our results demonstrate that the E. coli system has the highest expression yields. However, we observe that high expression levels are accompanied by production of truncated species-particularly pronounced in the case of proteins larger than 70 kDa. Furthermore, proteins produced in the E. coli system display high aggregation propensity, with only 10% of tested proteins being produced in predominantly monodispersed form. The WGE system was the most productive among eukaryotic systems tested. Finally, HeLa and LTE show comparable protein yields that are considerably lower than the ones achieved in the E. coli and WGE systems. The protein products produced in the HeLa system display slightly higher integrity, whereas the LTE-produced proteins have the lowest aggregation propensity among the systems analyzed. The high quality of HeLa- and LTE-produced proteins enable their analysis without purification and make them suitable for analysis of multi-domain eukaryotic proteins.

  5. Synthetic biology outside the cell: linking computational tools to cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel D; Villarreal, Fernando D; Wu, Fan; Tan, Cheemeng

    2014-01-01

    As mathematical models become more commonly integrated into the study of biology, a common language for describing biological processes is manifesting. Many tools have emerged for the simulation of in vivo synthetic biological systems, with only a few examples of prominent work done on predicting the dynamics of cell-free synthetic systems. At the same time, experimental biologists have begun to study dynamics of in vitro systems encapsulated by amphiphilic molecules, opening the door for the development of a new generation of biomimetic systems. In this review, we explore both in vivo and in vitro models of biochemical networks with a special focus on tools that could be applied to the construction of cell-free expression systems. We believe that quantitative studies of complex cellular mechanisms and pathways in synthetic systems can yield important insights into what makes cells different from conventional chemical systems. PMID:25538941

  6. Synthetic Biology Outside the Cell: Linking Computational Tools to Cell-Free Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eLewis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As mathematical models become more commonly integrated into the study of biology, a common language for describing biological processes is manifesting. Many tools have emerged for the simulation of in vivo systems, with only a few examples of prominent work done on predicting the dynamics of cell-free systems. At the same time, experimental biologists have begun to study dynamics of in vitro systems encapsulated by amphiphilic molecules, opening the door for the development of a new generation of biomimetic systems. In this review, we explore both in vivo and in vitro models of biochemical networks with a special focus on tools that could be applied to the construction of cell-free expression systems. We believe that quantitative studies of complex cellular mechanisms and pathways in synthetic systems can yield important insights into what makes cells different from conventional chemical systems.

  7. Synthetic biology outside the cell: linking computational tools to cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel D; Villarreal, Fernando D; Wu, Fan; Tan, Cheemeng

    2014-01-01

    As mathematical models become more commonly integrated into the study of biology, a common language for describing biological processes is manifesting. Many tools have emerged for the simulation of in vivo synthetic biological systems, with only a few examples of prominent work done on predicting the dynamics of cell-free synthetic systems. At the same time, experimental biologists have begun to study dynamics of in vitro systems encapsulated by amphiphilic molecules, opening the door for the development of a new generation of biomimetic systems. In this review, we explore both in vivo and in vitro models of biochemical networks with a special focus on tools that could be applied to the construction of cell-free expression systems. We believe that quantitative studies of complex cellular mechanisms and pathways in synthetic systems can yield important insights into what makes cells different from conventional chemical systems.

  8. Overview of cell-free protein synthesis: historic landmarks, commercial systems, and expanding applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shaorong

    2014-10-01

    During the early days of molecular biology, cell-free protein synthesis played an essential role in deciphering the genetic code and contributed to our understanding of translation of protein from messenger RNA. Owing to several decades of major and incremental improvements, modern cell-free systems have achieved higher protein synthesis yields at lower production costs. Commercial cell-free systems are now available from a variety of material sources, ranging from "traditional" E. coli, rabbit reticulocyte lysate, and wheat germ extracts, to recent insect and human cell extracts, to defined systems reconstituted from purified recombinant components. Although each cell-free system has certain advantages and disadvantages, the diversity of the cell-free systems allows in vitro synthesis of a wide range of proteins for a variety of downstream applications. In the post-genomic era, cell-free protein synthesis has rapidly become the preferred approach for high-throughput functional and structural studies of proteins and a versatile tool for in vitro protein evolution and synthetic biology. This unit provides a brief history of cell-free protein synthesis and describes key advances in modern cell-free systems, practical differences between widely used commercial cell-free systems, and applications of this important technology.

  9. Synthetic Biology Outside the Cell: Linking Computational Tools to Cell-Free Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Daniel D.; Villarreal, Fernando D.; Wu, Fan; Tan, Cheemeng

    2014-01-01

    As mathematical models become more commonly integrated into the study of biology, a common language for describing biological processes is manifesting. Many tools have emerged for the simulation of in vivo synthetic biological systems, with only a few examples of prominent work done on predicting the dynamics of cell-free synthetic systems. At the same time, experimental biologists have begun to study dynamics of in vitro systems encapsulated by amphiphilic molecules, opening the door for the...

  10. Antioxidant activity of polyphenolic myricetin in vitro cell-free and cell-based systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Barzegar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myricetin (Myc is one of the most important flavonoids in diet due to its abundance in foods with the highest antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of Myc was studied in cell-free and cell-based systems to evaluate the ROS protection efficiency of Myc. The studies were based on the assessment of reducing power of Myc according to ferric ion reduction and intracellular ROS level measurement by assaying the cellular fluorescence intensity using dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF probe as an indicator for ROS in cells. Moreover, the antitoxic capability of Myc was assessed using MTT method. Data indicated that intracellular ROS are highly toxic and applying low concentration of Myc not only inhibited cellular ROS production but also was accompanying with the protection of cells against the highly toxic and the lethal effects of peroxide compounds. Because of strong correlation between cellular ROS and their cell toxic properties, the higher antioxidant potency of Myc in cell medium resulted in effectively blocking intracellular ROS and protecting cell death. This property is achieved by the help of high polar solubility and cell membrane permeability of Myc.

  11. IRES-mediated translation of membrane proteins and glycoproteins in eukaryotic cell-free systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas K Brödel

    Full Text Available Internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements found in the 5' untranslated region of mRNAs enable translation initiation in a cap-independent manner, thereby representing an alternative to cap-dependent translation in cell-free protein expression systems. However, IRES function is largely species-dependent so their utility in cell-free systems from different species is rather limited. A promising approach to overcome these limitations would be the use of IRESs that are able to recruit components of the translation initiation apparatus from diverse origins. Here, we present a solution to this technical problem and describe the ability of a number of viral IRESs to direct efficient protein expression in different eukaryotic cell-free expression systems. The IRES from the intergenic region (IGR of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV genome was shown to function efficiently in four different cell-free systems based on lysates derived from cultured Sf21, CHO and K562 cells as well as wheat germ. Our results suggest that the CrPV IGR IRES-based expression vector is universally applicable for a broad range of eukaryotic cell lysates. Sf21, CHO and K562 cell-free expression systems are particularly promising platforms for the production of glycoproteins and membrane proteins since they contain endogenous microsomes that facilitate the incorporation of membrane-spanning proteins and the formation of post-translational modifications. We demonstrate the use of the CrPV IGR IRES-based expression vector for the enhanced synthesis of various target proteins including the glycoprotein erythropoietin and the membrane proteins heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor receptor as well as epidermal growth factor receptor in the above mentioned eukaryotic cell-free systems. CrPV IGR IRES-mediated translation will facilitate the development of novel eukaryotic cell-free expression platforms as well as the high-yield synthesis of desired proteins in already established

  12. Cell-Free Protein Synthesis: Pros and Cons of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemella, Anne; Thoring, Lena; Hoffmeister, Christian; Kubick, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    From its start as a small-scale in vitro system to study fundamental translation processes, cell-free protein synthesis quickly rose to become a potent platform for the high-yield production of proteins. In contrast to classical in vivo protein expression, cell-free systems do not need time-consuming cloning steps, and the open nature provides easy manipulation of reaction conditions as well as high-throughput potential. Especially for the synthesis of difficult to express proteins, such as toxic and transmembrane proteins, cell-free systems are of enormous interest. The modification of the genetic code to incorporate non-canonical amino acids into the target protein in particular provides enormous potential in biotechnology and pharmaceutical research and is in the focus of many cell-free projects. Many sophisticated cell-free systems for manifold applications have been established. This review describes the recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis and details the expanding applications in this field.

  13. Mechanism of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription in a cell-free system.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliston, J F; Fawell, S E; Klein-Hitpass, L; Tsai, S. Y.; Tsai, M J; Parker, M G; O'Malley, B W

    1990-01-01

    RNA synthesis was stimulated directly in a cell-free expression system by crude preparations of recombinant mouse estrogen receptor (ER). Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of estrogen response elements (EREs) in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by addition of competitor oligonucleotides containing EREs. Moreover, polyclonal antibodies directed against the DNA-binding region of ER inhibited ER-dependent transcription. In our cell-free expression syste...

  14. Gibberellic acid production by free and immobilized cells in different culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Páramo, Enrique; Molina-Jiménez, Héctor; Brito-Arias, Marco A; Robles-Martínez, Fabián

    2004-01-01

    Gibberellic acid production was studied in different fermentation systems. Free and immobilized cells of Gibberella fujikuroi cultures in shake-flask, stirred and fixed-bed reactors were evaluated for the production of gibberellic acid (GA3). Gibberellic acid production with free cells cultured in a stirred reactor reached 0.206 g/L and a yield of 0.078 g of GA3/g biomass.

  15. Atomic force microscopy observation on nuclear reassembly in a cell-free system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ning; CHEN Zhongcai; ZHANG Zhaohui; ZHU Xing; ZHAI Zhonghe; TANG Xiaowei

    2003-01-01

    Cell-free system is interesting and useful for studying nuclear assembly in mitosis. Atomic force micro- scopy (AFM), which is a simple way for imaging fixed reassemble nuclei with high resolution, has not been used in the cell-free system. In this paper, we put forward an air-drying sample preparation for AFM. Using AFM, we observed nuclear reassembly process within 100 nm resolution ina cell-free system. As a result, we found that the images were artifact-free, and with higher resolution compared with fluorescent optical microscope images. Furthermore, the morphology of membrane vesicles was obtained clearly, and a dynamic change of morphology during the vesicles' approaching to nuclear envelope was also observed, which is enlightened to understand the mechanism of nuclear envelope assembly.

  16. Spatial Organization of Cytokinesis Signaling Reconstituted in a Cell-Free System*

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Phuong A.; Groen, Aaron C.; Loose, Martin; Ishihara, Keisuke; Wühr, Martin; Field, Christine M.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    During animal cell division, the cleavage furrow is positioned by microtubules that signal to the actin cortex at the cell midplane. We developed a cell-free system to recapitulate cytokinesis signaling using cytoplasmic extract from Xenopus eggs. Microtubules grew out as asters from artificial centrosomes and met to organize antiparallel overlap zones. These zones blocked interpenetration of neighboring asters and recruited cytokinesis midzone proteins including the Chromosoma...

  17. Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Takayoshi [NMR Pipeline Methodology Team, RIKEN Systems and Structural Biology Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Cell-Free Technology Application Laboratory, RIKEN Innovation Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Watanabe, Satoru [NMR Pipeline Methodology Team, RIKEN Systems and Structural Biology Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Kigawa, Takanori, E-mail: kigawa@riken.jp [NMR Pipeline Methodology Team, RIKEN Systems and Structural Biology Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Cell-Free Technology Application Laboratory, RIKEN Innovation Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins is proposed. ► Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. ► DsbC catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds. ► Milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled BPTI and lysozyme C were obtained. ► Synthesized proteins were both catalytically functional and properly folded. -- Abstract: Many important therapeutic targets are secreted proteins with multiple disulfide bonds, such as antibodies, cytokines, hormones, and proteases. The preparation of these proteins for structural and functional analyses using cell-based expression systems still suffers from several issues, such as inefficiency, low yield, and difficulty in stable-isotope labeling. The cell-free (or in vitro) protein synthesis system has become a useful protein production method. The openness of the cell-free system allows direct control of the reaction environment to promote protein folding, making it well suited for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins. In this study, we developed the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate-based cell-free synthesis system for disulfide-containing proteins, which can produce sufficient amounts of functional proteins for NMR analyses. Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. In addition, disulfide isomerase, DsbC, catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds during the protein synthesis reaction. We successfully synthesized milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled higher eukaryotic proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and human lysozyme C (LYZ). The NMR spectra and functional analyses indicated that the synthesized proteins are both catalytically functional and properly folded. Thus, the cell-free system is useful for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins for structural and functional analyses.

  18. Characterization of Ethanol Production from Xylose and Xylitol by a Cell-Free Pachysolen tannophilus System

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jie; Taylor, Kenneth B.

    1993-01-01

    Whole cells and a cell extract of Pachysolen tannophilus converted xylose to xylitol, ethanol, and CO2. The whole-cell system converted xylitol slowly to CO2 and little ethanol was produced, whereas the cell-free system converted xylitol quantitatively to ethanol (1.64 mol of ethanol per mol of xylitol) and CO2. The supernatant solution from high-speed centrifugation (100,000 × g) of the extract converted xylose to ethanol, but did not metabolize xylitol unless a membrane fraction and oxygen ...

  19. Innovative production of bio-cellulose using a cell-free system derived from a single cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Shaukat; Kim, Yeji; Park, Joong Kon

    2015-11-01

    The current study was intended to produce bio-cellulose through a cell-free system developed by disrupting Gluconacetobacter hansenii PJK through bead-beating. Microscopic analysis indicated the complete disruption of cells (2.6 × 10(7) cells/mL) in 20 min that added 95.12 μg/mL protein, 1.63 mM ATP, and 1.11 mM NADH into the medium. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry linear trap quadrupole (LC-MS/MS LTQ) Orbitrap analysis of cell-lysate confirmed the presence of all key enzymes for bio-cellulose synthesis. Under static conditions at 30 °C, microbial and cell-free systems produced 3.78 and 3.72 g/L cellulose, corresponding to 39.62 and 57.68% yield, respectively after 15 days. The improved yield based on consumed glucose indicated the superiority of cell-free system. Based on current findings and literature, we hypothesized a synthetic pathway for bio-cellulose synthesis in the cell-free system. This approach can overcome some limitations of cellulose-producing cells and offers a wider scope for synthesizing cellulose composites with bactericidal elements through in situ synthesizing approaches. PMID:26256351

  20. Comparison of defined culture systems for feeder cell free propagation of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Akopian, Veronika; Andrews, Peter W.; Beil, Stephen; Benvenisty, Nissim; Brehm, Jennifer; Christie, Megan; Ford, Angela; Fox, Victoria; Gokhale, Paul J; Healy, Lyn; Holm, Frida; Hovatta, Outi; Knowles, Barbara B; Ludwig, Tenneille E; Ronald D G McKay

    2010-01-01

    There are many reports of defined culture systems for the propagation of human embryonic stem cells in the absence of feeder cell support, but no previous study has undertaken a multi-laboratory comparison of these diverse methodologies. In this study, five separate laboratories, each with experience in human embryonic stem cell culture, used a panel of ten embryonic stem cell lines (including WA09 as an index cell line common to all laboratories) to assess eight cell culture methods, with pr...

  1. Circulating cell free DNA as a predictor of systemic lupus erythematosus severity and monitoring of therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Olfat M. Hendy; Tawfik Abdel Motalib; Mona A. El Shafie; Fatma A. Khalaf; Sobhy E. Kotb; Aziza Khalil; Salwa R. Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most heterogeneous chronic autoimmune disease; it is characterized by the presence of auto reactive B and T cells, responsible for the aberrant production of a broad and heterogeneous group of autoantibodies. Recent studies using various detection methods have demonstrated the elevations of circulating DNA in SLE patients. Aim of the study: The current study aimed to measure cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) in SLE patients as a potential tool to ...

  2. Preliminary study on preparation of E.coli cell-free system for protein expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the new era of "Omics",the traditional techniques of protein expression in vivo can not come up with the exponential increase of genetic information.The cellfree protein synthesis system provides a new strategy of protein expression with advantages of rapid,convenient and high-throughput expression.The preparation of cell extracts,the optimization of substrate concentrations and the energy regeneration system are the key factors for the successful construction of cell-free protein expression system.In this work,the cell extract was prepared from RNase I- defective strain E.coli A19.The cell growth phase,the pressure for cell disruption and the storage condition of cell extracts were optimized.Meanwhile,the optimal substrate concentrations and the energy regeneration system were selected.Under the optimized conditions,the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene was expressed in the E.coli cell-free system with high expression level (Ca.154 μg/mL) which was 29 times higher than the expression level before optimization.

  3. A Continuous-Exchange Cell-Free Protein Synthesis System Based on Extracts from Cultured Insect Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Marlitt Stech; Quast, Robert B.; Rita Sachse; Corina Schulze; Wüstenhagen, Doreen A.; Stefan Kubick

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a novel technique for the synthesis of complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins by using a continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells. Our approach consists of two basic elements: First, protein synthesis is performed in insect cell lysates which harbor endogenous microsomal vesicles, enabling a translocation of de novo synthesized target proteins into the lumen of the insect vesicles or, in the case ...

  4. Absence of regulation of tumor cholesterogenesis in cell-free synthesizing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In tumors, cholesterol synthesis de novo is deregulated relative to normal tissues. But no previous study has demonstrated the decontrol of tumor cholesterogenesis with cell-free cytosolic systems. They have utilized a lipid synthesizing, post-mitochondrial supernatant system (PMS), with 14C-citrate as substrate, to characterize the cholesterogenic pathway in Morris Hepatoma 3924A and normal rat liver. The rate of cholesterogenesis in the hepatoma PMS was 6-fold higher than that in the liver system on a per cell basis. The ratio of sterol-to-fatty acid synthesis was also significantly greater in the tumor versus the liver PMS. The authors determined the steady-state carbon flux through the early intermediates of the lipogenic pathways. Whereas the liver system displayed a metabolic crossover point at the HMG-CoA reductase reaction, the hepatoma system showed no evidence of control at this rate-limiting site of sterol synthesis. Furthermore, acetyl-CoA formation from added citrate (via ATP-citrate lyase) exhibited rates of 42% and 88% in excess of that required for lipidogenesis by liver and tumor PMS systems, respectively. Clearly, a cell-free PMS system from tumor tissue displays the property of deregulated lipidogenesis, especially cholesterol biosynthesis. The authors suggest that deregulated and continuously operating cholesterogenesis would provide for an increased level of a mevalonate-derived sterol pathway intermediate proposed as a trigger for DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in tumors

  5. A cell-free transcription system for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hethke, C; Geerling, A C; Hausner, W.; de Vos, W.M.; Thomm, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe here the establishment of a cell-free transcription system for the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using the cloned glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) gene as template. The in vitro system that operated up to a temperature of 85 degrees C initiated transcription 23 bp downstream of a TATA box located 45 bp upstream of the translational start codon of gdh mRNA, at the same site as in Pyrococcus cells. Mutational analyses revealed that this TATA box is essential for in vit...

  6. In vitro Fab display: a cell-free system for IgG discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ryan L; Matsumoto, Marissa L; Yin, Gang; Cai, Qi; Fung, Juan Jose; Stephenson, Heather; Gill, Avinash; You, Monica; Lin, Shwu-Hwa; Wang, Willie D; Masikat, Mary Rose; Li, Xiaofan; Penta, Kalyani; Steiner, Alex R; Baliga, Ramesh; Murray, Christopher J; Thanos, Christopher D; Hallam, Trevor J; Sato, Aaron K

    2014-04-01

    Selection technologies such as ribosome display enable the rapid discovery of novel antibody fragments entirely in vitro. It has been assumed that the open nature of the cell-free reactions used in these technologies limits selections to single-chain protein fragments. We present a simple approach for the selection of multi-chain proteins, such as antibody Fab fragments, using ribosome display. Specifically, we show that a two-chain trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab domain can be displayed in a format which tethers either the heavy or light chain to the ribosome while retaining functional antigen binding. Then, we constructed synthetic Fab HC and LC libraries and performed test selections against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The Fab selection output was reformatted into full-length immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) and directly expressed at high levels in an optimized cell-free system for immediate screening, purification and characterization. Several novel IgGs were identified using this cell-free platform that bind to purified CEA, CEA positive cells and VEGF.

  7. Nicotiana ovule extracts in duce nuclear reconstitution of demembranated Xenopus sperm in cell-free system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    s Nicotiana tabaccum ovule extracts induced nuclear reconstitution of demembranated Xenopus leavis sperm in a ceil-free system. Demembranated Xenopus sperm began to swell after 15 rmin of incubation with Nicotiana ovulde extracts. Accompanying the process of incubation,Xenopus sperm decondensed and their shapes changed gradually from long and ellipse to round. The completely decondensed chromatin was surrounded with membrane structure, which was a mixture envelope of a double membrane and a single membrane. Nucleosome assembly was verified by means of micrococcal nuclease digestion to reconstituted nuclei and DNA electrophoresis. Nicotiana ovule extracts supplied one more experimental model and system.The new system could promote powerfully the research on mechanisms of cell division and cell cycle regulation.

  8. Replication independent formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA in mammalian cell-free system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Cohen

    Full Text Available Extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA is a pool of circular double stranded DNA molecules found in all eukaryotic cells and composed of repeated chromosomal sequences. It was proposed to be involved in genomic instability, aging and alternative telomere lengthening. Our study presents novel mammalian cell-free system for eccDNA generation. Using purified protein extract we show that eccDNA formation does not involve de-novo DNA synthesis suggesting that eccDNA is generated through excision of chromosomal sequences. This process is carried out by sequence-independent enzymes as human protein extract can produce mouse-specific eccDNA from high molecular weight mouse DNA, and vice versa. EccDNA production does not depend on ATP, requires residual amounts of Mg(2+ and is enhanced by double strand DNA breaks.

  9. Experiment and mathematical modeling of gene expression dynamics in a cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stögbauer, Tobias; Windhager, Lukas; Zimmer, Ralf; Rädler, Joachim O

    2012-05-01

    Cell-free in vitro expression is increasingly important for high-throughput expression screening, high yield protein production and synthetic biology applications. Yet its potential for quantitative investigation of gene expression and regulatory circuits is limited by the availability of data on composition, kinetic rate constants and standardized computational tools for modeling. Here we report on calibration measurements and mathematical modeling of a reconstituted in vitro expression system. We measured a series of GFP expression and mRNA transcription time courses under various initial conditions and established the translation step as the bottle neck of in vitro protein synthesis. Cell-free translation was observed to expire after 3 h independent of initial template DNA concentration. We developed a minimalistic rate equation model and optimized its parameters by performing a concurrent fit to measured time courses. The model predicts the dependence of protein yield not only on template DNA concentration, but also on experimental timing and hence is a valuable tool to optimize yield strategies. PMID:22481223

  10. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into nephron progenitor cells in a serum and feeder free system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Kidney disease is emerging as a critical medical problem worldwide. Because of limited treatment options for the damaged kidney, stem cell treatment is becoming an alternative therapeutic approach. Of many possible human stem cell sources, pluripotent stem cells are most attractive due to their self-renewal and pluripotent capacity. However, little is known about the derivation of renal lineage cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. In this study, we developed a novel protocol for differentiation of nephron progenitor cells (NPCs from hPSCs in a serum- and feeder-free system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed step-wise protocols for differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells toward primitive streak, intermediate mesoderm and NPCs by recapitulating normal nephrogenesis. Expression of key marker genes was examined by RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Each experiment was independently performed three times to confirm its reproducibility. RESULTS: After modification of culture period and concentration of exogenous factors, hPSCs can differentiate into NPCs that markedly express specific marker genes such as SIX2, GDNF, HOXD11, WT1 and CITED1 in addition to OSR1, PAX2, SALL1 and EYA1. Moreover, NPCs possess the potential of bidirectional differentiation into both renal tubular epithelial cells and glomerular podocytes in defined culture conditions. In particular, approximately 70% of SYN-positive cells were obtained from hPSC-derived NPCs after podocytes induction. NPCs can also form in vitro tubule-like structures in three dimensional culture systems. CONCLUSIONS: Our novel protocol for hPSCs differentiation into NPCs can be useful for producing alternative sources of cell replacement therapy and disease modeling for human kidney diseases.

  11. A cell-free system for DNA repair synthesis using purified enzymes from the Novikoff hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikoff DNA polymerase-β and Novikoff DNase V have been used in a cell-free DNA excision repair system for UV-irradiated substrates to determine their DNA repair capabilities. The repair system was shown to depend upon UV-irradiated DNA, incision by phage T4 UV-endonuclease, excision by DNase V and synthesis by DNA polymerase-β; ligation was not included. Highly purified calf thymus DNA was UV-irradiated at 500-750 J/m2 and incised by T4 UV-endonuclease. The repair system was used to follow the purification of DNase V and DNA polymerase-β. For increased specificity, the parameters of UV-irradiation, incision, excision and synthesis were confirmed on highly supercoiled, covalently closed, phage PM2 DNA. Optimal DNA and Mg2+ concentrations were determined for the repair assay, which was shown to be linear with respect to time. Excision of the 3'-apyrimidinic site and the 5'-pyrimidine dimer by bidirectional DNase V, presumed to occur from the above experiments, was studied more thoroughly using lightly UV-irradiated [3H]poly(dT)poly (dA), labeled in both the base and the sugar, and incised with T4 UV-endonuclease

  12. Characterization of a cell-free protein synthesizing system isolated from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, L.E.; Harper, A.E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have characterized a cell-free preparation from rat brain that can initiate translation of endogenous mRNAs in vitro and maintain protein synthesis for at least 90 minutes at an optimum temperature of 37C. The essential component of this system is a postmitochondrial supernate (PMS) obtained by centrifuging a whole brain homogenate at 10,000 x g for 10 minutes at 4C. In the presence of phosphocreatine (PC), ATP and GTP there is active incorporation of (TVS)methionine into trichloroacetic acid precipitable protein. Incorporation is sensitive to the concentrations of PC, magnesium and potassium ions and spermidine and is inhibited 50-60% in the presence of 7-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate, a specific inhibitor of polypeptide chain initiation. The proteolysis of brain protein that occurs when the system is incubated for more than 60 min. can be minimized by adding bovine serum albumin. The addition of 3.0 mM 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate a non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP, blocks incorporation entirely. The phosphocreatine requirement for maintaining an optimum endogenous concentration of GTP is lowered from 10.0 mM to 5.0 mM in the presence of 2.0 mM NADPH. The system that initiates protein synthesis in vitro can be used to study changes in brain protein synthesis as a result of various treatments, and the mechanisms underlying such changes.

  13. A validated system for ligation-free USER™ -based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Hansen, Bjarne Gram;

    The development in the field of mammalian cell factories require fast and high-throughput methods, this means a high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. For optimization of protein expression by genetic engineering and for allowing metabolic engineering in mammalian cells, a new...... versatile expression vector system was developed. This vector system applies the ligation-free uracilexcision cloning technique to construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple parts and with maximum flexibility....

  14. Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP using In Vitro translation cell free system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohamadipoor

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background and the purpose of the study: One of the major concerns about recombinant protein production is its possible toxicity for the organism. Purification of the recombinant protein is another challenge in this respect. Recently In Vitro translation cell free system that provides a coupled transcription-translation reaction for protein synthesis to overcome the above mentioned problems has been emerged. The aim of this study was expression of GFP as a marker for gene expression and protein in In Vitro translation system. Methods: pIVEX2.3-GFP plasmid was cloned to E. coli   and the plasmid DNA extracted. In Vitro translation was performed with RTS 100 E. coli Hy kit according to manufacture's instructions. Expression of recombinant fusion protein, His- GFP, was determined by SDS-PAGE, ELISA and western blot analysis. Results: Expected size of recombinant protein was detected in SDS-PAGE and further confirmed by western blot analysis and ELISA. Major conclusion: Results showed that In Vitro translation is suitable for expression of recombinant protein and fusion of the recombinant protein with His-tag facilitates the purification.

  15. Comparison of cells free in coelomic and water-vascular system of sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Qi, Rui-rong; Wang, Yi-nan; Ye, Shi-gen; Qiao, Guo; Li, Hua

    2013-11-01

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus possesses a variety of cells populating in both the coelomic (cells in the coelomic are called coelomocytes) and water-vascular system. In this study, we compared cells in these two systems of A. japonicus on total cell number, cell types and surface antigens through monoclonal antibodies against coelomocytes. The results demonstrated that the cell types observed in coelomic also could be found in water-vascular system, but the total cell number and percentages of each type were different. The total number of coelomocytes was 2-3 times of that in water-vascular system. Lymphoid cells were numerically dominant in coelomic system, while spherulocytes with pseudopods in water-vascular system. Results of indirect immunofluorescence assay technique showed that both coelomocytes and cells in water-vascular system could be recognized by the corresponding MAbs, and the distribution of its positive signals was not different. In conclusion, cell types and surface antigens in coelomic and water-vascular system were same, but the total cell number and percentages of each type were different. And further researches are needed on whether there are differences in functions of the different composition.

  16. Establishment of feeder-free culture system for human induced pluripotent stem cell on DAS nanocrystalline graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunah; Nam, Donggyu; Choi, Jae-Kyung; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Zaehres, Holm; Lee, Taehee; Park, Chan Young; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Schöler, Hans R.; Kim, Jeong Beom

    2016-02-01

    The maintenance of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) under xeno-free condition requires the use of human feeder cells or extracellular matrix (ECM) coating. However, human-derived sources may cause human pathogen contamination by viral or non-viral agents to the patients. Here we demonstrate feeder-free and xeno-free culture system for hPSC expansion using diffusion assisted synthesis-grown nanocrystalline graphene (DAS-NG), a synthetic non-biological nanomaterial which completely rule out the concern of human pathogen contamination. DAS-NG exhibited advanced biocompatibilities including surface nanoroughness, oxygen containing functional groups and hydrophilicity. hPSC cultured on DAS-NG could maintain pluripotency in vitro and in vivo, and especially cell adhesion-related gene expression profile was comparable to those of cultured on feeders, while hPSC cultured without DAS-NG differentiated spontaneously with high expression of somatic cell-enriched adhesion genes. This feeder-free and xeno-free culture method using DAS-NG will facilitate the generation of clinical-grade hPSC.

  17. Wheat germ cell-free expression system as a pathway to improve protein yield and solubility for the SSGCID pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of 44 protein targets was used to test expression in the wheat germ cell-free system, the vast majority of which were expressed and soluble in this system; further increases in solubility were achieved by addition of the NVoy polymer. Recombinant expression of proteins of interest in Escherichia coli is an important tool in the determination of protein structure. However, lack of expression and insolubility remain significant challenges to the expression and crystallization of these proteins. The SSGCID program uses a wheat germ cell-free expression system as a rescue pathway for proteins that are either not expressed or insoluble when produced in E. coli. Testing indicates that the system is a valuable tool for these protein targets. Further increases in solubility were obtained by the addition of the NVoy polymer reagent to the reaction mixture. These data indicate that this eukaryotic cell-free expression system has a high success rate and that the addition of specific reagents can increase the yield of soluble protein

  18. Heterotrophic nature of the cell-free protein-synthesizing system from the strict chemolithotroph, Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, K; Umbreit, W W

    1974-02-01

    A cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from the strict chemolithotroph, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, was similar to that of heterotrophs. The poly-U directed system had a temperature optimum of 37 C, but in the presence of spermidine (3 mM) the optimum shifted to 45 C. Although growth of the chemolithotroph occurs only in acid conditions, the pH optimum for the cell-free system was pH 7.2. The endogenous-directed activity in the presence or absence of spermidine was maximal at pH 7.8. Spermidine had a stimulatory effect; however, this effect was dependent on the magnesium and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) concentrations. At low Tris concentrations (10 mM), spermidine (3 to 5 mM) could completely replace magnesium. When the Tris concentration was increased (50 mM), spermidine could not replace magnesium. Supernatant and ribosomal fractions from T. thiooxidans were exchanged with those of Bacillus thuringiensis and Escherichia coli, and the ribosomal fraction from the chemolithotroph gave good to moderate stimulation when exchanged with the supernatant from the heterotrophs. On the other hand, the supernatant from T. thiooxidans gave good stimulation when mixed with ribosomes from B. thuringiensis but poor activity with ribosomes from E. coli. Both supernatant and ribosomal fractions prepared from stationary phase extracts of T. thiooxidans were inactive in the cell-free system.

  19. Cotranslational disassembly of flock house virus in a cell-free system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiscox, J A; Ball, L A

    1997-01-01

    Intact, purified particles of the nodaviruses flock house virus and nodamura virus that were either transfected into cells that were resistant to infection or introduced into in vitro translation systems directed the synthesis of viral proteins. We infer that direct interaction of these nodavirus particles with cytoplasmic components mediated virion disassembly that resulted in release of the viral RNA.

  20. Responding to chromosomal breakage during M-phase: insights from a cell-free system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanzo Vincenzo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA double strand breaks (DSBs activate ATM and ATR dependent checkpoints that prevent the onset of mitosis. However, how cells react to DSBs occurring when they are already in mitosis is poorly understood. The Xenopus egg extract has been utilized to study cell cycle progression and DNA damage checkpoints. Recently this system has been successfully used to uncover an ATM and ATR dependent checkpoint affecting centrosome driven spindle assembly. These studies have led to the identification of XCEP63 as major target of this pathway. XCEP63 is a coiled-coil rich protein localized at centrosome essential for proper spindle assembly. ATM and ATR directly phosphorylate XCEP63 on serine 560 inducing its delocalization from centrosome, which in turn delays spindle assembly. This pathway might contribute to regulate DNA repair or mitotic cell survival in the presence of chromosome breakage.

  1. Antioxidant properties of 4-methylcoumarins in in vitro cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Giuseppa; Trombetta, Domenico; Singh Brajendra, K; Prasad Ashok, K; Parmar Virinder, S; Naccari, Clara; Mancari, Ferdinando; Saija, Antonina; Cristani, Mariateresa; Firuzi, Omidreza; Saso, Luciano

    2010-09-01

    4-methylcoumarins that possess two hydroxyl groups ortho to each other in the benzenoid ring have shown to have excellent antioxidant and radical-scavenging properties in different experimental models. Furthermore, they cannot be metabolized by the liver P450 monoxygenases and thus cannot form 3,4-coumarin epoxides, which are believed to be mutagenic. Herein, we present a study on the structure activity relationship of eight synthetic 4-methylcoumarins, carried out by employing a series of different chemical cell-free tests. These compounds were tested by means of three assays involving one redox reaction with the oxidant (DPPH assay, ABTS.+ assay and FRAP). Other assays were employed to evaluate the antioxidant properties of the coumarins under investigation against NO, O2.- and HClO, which are some of the major reactive oxygen and nitrogen species causing damage in the human body. Finally, we have measured the protective capacity of these coumarins against the oxidative damage in a simple biomimetic model of phospholipid membranes. Our results confirm the good antioxidant activity of the 7,8-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarins. In general, their activity is not significantly affected by the introduction of an ethoxycarbonylmethyl or an ethoxycarbonylethyl moiety at the C3 position. A discrete antioxidant activity is retained also by the 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins, although they are less efficient than the corresponding 7,8-dihydroxy compounds. Furthermore, as demonstrated in the brine shrimp toxicity test, none of the tested coumarins significantly affect the larvae viability. Two of the 4-methylcoumarins (7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin and 7,8-dihydroxy-3-ethoxycarbonylethyl-4-methylcoumarin), very interestingly, showed strong scavenging activities against the superoxide anion and were also very effective in protecting the lipid bilayer against peroxidation. On the basis of these findings, these 4-methylcoumarins may be considered as potential therapeutic candidates

  2. A xenogeneic-free bioreactor system for the clinical-scale expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco; Campbell, Andrew; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Andrade, Pedro Z; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Wen, Yuan; Boucher, Shayne; Vemuri, Mohan C; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2014-06-01

    The large cell doses (>1 × 10(6)  cells/kg) used in clinical trials with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) will require an efficient production process. Moreover, monitoring and control of MSC ex-vivo expansion is critical to provide a safe and reliable cell product. Bioprocess engineering approaches, such as bioreactor technology, offer the adequate tools to develop and optimize a cost-effective culture system for the rapid expansion of human MSC for cellular therapy. Herein, a xenogeneic (xeno)-free microcarrier-based culture system was successfully established for bone marrow (BM) MSC and adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cell (ASC) cultivation using a 1L-scale controlled stirred-tank bioreactor, allowing the production of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(8) and (4.5 ± 0.2) × 10(7) cells for BM MSC and ASC, respectively, after 7 days. Additionally, the effect of different percent air saturation values (%Airsat ) and feeding regime on the proliferation and metabolism of BM MSC was evaluated. No significant differences in cell growth and metabolic patterns were observed under 20% and 9%Airsat . Also, the three different feeding regimes studied-(i) 25% daily medium renewal, (ii) 25% medium renewal every 2 days, and (iii) fed-batch addition of concentrated nutrients and growth factors every 2 days-yielded similar cell numbers, and only slight metabolic differences were observed. Moreover, the immunophenotype (positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105 and negative for CD31, CD80 and HLA-DR) and multilineage differentiative potential of expanded cells were not affected upon bioreactor culture. These results demonstrated the feasibility of expanding human MSC from different sources in a clinically relevant expansion configuration in a controlled microcarrier-based stirred culture system under xeno-free conditions. The further optimization of this bioreactor culture system will represent a crucial step towards an efficient GMP-compliant clinical-scale MSC

  3. On Orbit Immuno-Based, Label-Free, White Blood Cell Counting System with MicroElectroMechanical Sensor (MEMS) Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on-orbit immuno-based label-free white blood cell counting system using...

  4. On Orbit Immuno-Based, Label-Free, White Blood Cell Counting System with MicroElectroMechanical Sensor (MEMS) Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and our partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on orbit immuno-based, label-free, white blood cell counting system for...

  5. Laser-assisted blastocyst dissection and subsequent cultivation of embryonic stem cells in a serum/cell free culture system: applications and preliminary results in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills Eric

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate embryonic stem cell (ESC harvesting methods with an emphasis on derivation of ESC lines without feeder cells or sera. Using a murine model, laser-assisted blastocyst dissection was performed and compared to conventional immunosurgery to assess a novel laser application for inner cell mass (ICM isolation. Methods Intact blastocysts or isolated ICMs generated in a standard mouse strain were plated in medium with or without serum to compare ESC harvesting efficiency. ESC derivation was also undertaken in a feeder cell-free culture system. Results Although ICM growth and dissociation was comparable irrespective of the media components, an enhanced ESC harvest was observed in our serum-free medium (p Conclusion Achieving successful techniques for human ESC research is fundamentally dependent on preliminary work using experimental animals. In this study, all experimentally developed ESC lines manifested similar features to ESCs obtained from intact blastocysts in standard culture. Cell/sera free murine ESC harvest and propagation are feasible procedures for an embryology laboratory and await refinements for translation to human medical research.

  6. Complementation of the xeroderma pigmentosum DNA repair synthesis defect with Escherichia coli UvrABC proteins in a cell-free system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, J; Grossman, L; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed cell-free system was used to study DNA repair synthesis carried out by extracts from human cell lines in vitro. Extracts from a normal human lymphoid cell line and from cell lines established from individuals with hereditary dysplastic nevus syndrome perform damage-dependent repair synthesis in plasmid DNA treated with cis- or trans-diamminedichloro-platinum(II) or irradiated with ultraviolet light. Cell extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum origin (complementation groups A, C, ...

  7. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Oxidative Stress in Guinea Pig after Systemic Exposure to Modified Cell-Free Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Omer I.; Buehler, Paul W.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Systemic exposure to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) or its breakdown products after hemolysis or with the use of Hb-based oxygen therapeutics may alter the function and integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Using a guinea pig exchange transfusion model, we investigated the effect of a polymerized cell-free Hb (HbG) on the expression of endothelial tight junction proteins (zonula occludens 1, claudin-5, and occludin), astrocyte activation, IgG extravasation, heme oxygenase (HO), iron deposition, oxidative end products (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Reduced zonula occludens 1 expression was observed after HbG transfusion as evidenced by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Claudin-5 distribution was altered in small- to medium-sized vessels. However, total expression of claudin-5 and occludin remained unchanged except for a notable increase in occludin 72 hours after HbG transfusion. HbG-transfused animals also showed increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and IgG extravasation after 72 hours. Increased HO activity and HO-1 expression with prominent enhancement of HO-1 immunoreactivity in CD163-expressing perivascular cells and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were also observed. Consistent with oxidative stress, HbG increased iron deposition, 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine immunoreactivity, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Systemic exposure to an extracellular Hb triggers blood-brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress, which may have important implications for the use of Hb-based therapeutics and may provide indirect insight on the central nervous system vasculopathies associated with excessive hemolysis. PMID:21356382

  8. Rapidly characterizing the fast dynamics of RNA genetic circuitry with cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Chappell, James; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Sun, Zachary Z; Kim, Jongmin; Singhal, Vipul; Spring, Kevin J; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Fall, Christopher P; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-05-15

    RNA regulators are emerging as powerful tools to engineer synthetic genetic networks or rewire existing ones. A potential strength of RNA networks is that they may be able to propagate signals on time scales that are set by the fast degradation rates of RNAs. However, a current bottleneck to verifying this potential is the slow design-build-test cycle of evaluating these networks in vivo. Here, we adapt an Escherichia coli-based cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) system for rapidly prototyping RNA networks. We used this system to measure the response time of an RNA transcription cascade to be approximately five minutes per step of the cascade. We also show that this response time can be adjusted with temperature and regulator threshold tuning. Finally, we use TX-TL to prototype a new RNA network, an RNA single input module, and show that this network temporally stages the expression of two genes in vivo.

  9. Cell-free translation systems prepared from starfish oocytes faithfully reflect in vivo activity; mRNA and initiation factors stimulate supernatants from immature oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Z.; Hille, M B

    1990-01-01

    Meiotic maturation stimulates a change in the translation of stored mRNAs: mRNAs encoding proteins needed for growth of oocytes are translated before meiotic maturation, whereas those encoding proteins required for cleavage are translated after meiotic maturation. Studies of translational regulation during meiotic maturation have been limited by the lack of translationally active cell-free supernatants. Starfish oocytes are ideal for preparing cell-free translation systems because experimenta...

  10. [Preparation of Transmembrane Fragments Growth Hormone Receptor GHR in a Cell-Free Expression System for Structural Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharova, O V; Kuzmichev, P K; Urban, A S; Goncharuk, S A; Bocharov, E V; Arsenyev, A S

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone somatotropin and its membrane receptor GHR, belonging to a superfamily of the type I receptors possessing tyrosine kinase activity, are involved in the intercellular signal transduction cascade and regulate a number of important physiological and pathological processes in humans. Binding with somatotropin triggers a transition of GHR between two alternative dimer states, resulting in an allosteric activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase in the cell cytoplasm. Transmembrane domain of GHR directly involved in this complex conformational transition. It has presumably two dimerization interfaces corresponding to the "unliganded" and the active state of GHR. In order to study the molecular basis of biochemical signal transduction mechanism across the cell membrane, we have developed an efficient cell-free production system of a TM fragment of GHR, which contains its TM domain flanked by functionally important juxtamembrane regions (GHRtm residues 254-298). The developed system allows to obtain -1 mg per 1 ml of reaction mixture of 13C- and 15N-isotope-labeled protein for structural and dynamic studies of the GHR TM domain dimerization in the membrane-mimicking medium by high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27125024

  11. Initiation of V(D)J recombination in a cell-free system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.F. McBlane; D.A. Ramsden; M.J. Sadokfsky; J.E. Hesse (Joanne); M. Gellert

    1995-01-01

    textabstractCells performing V(D)J recombination make specific cuts in DNA at recombination signal sequences. Here, we show that nuclear extracts of pre-B cell lines carry out this specific cleavage. The products of cleavage are the same as found previously in thymocytes: full-leng

  12. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Employing Heteropolyacids as Redox Mediators for Oxygen Reduction Reactions: Pt-Free Cathode Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshiaki; Morikawa, Eri; Nakada, Shintaro; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-07-20

    In this study, the heteropolyacids of H3+xPVxMO12-xO40 (x = 0, 2, and 3) were applied as redox mediators for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, of which the cathode is free from the usage of noble metals such as Pt/C. In this system, the electrochemical reduction of heteropolyacid over the carbon cathode and the subsequent reoxidation of the partially reduced heteropolyacid by exposure to the dissolved oxygen in the regenerator are important processes for continuous power generation. Thus, the redox properties of catholytes containing these heteropolyacids were investigated in detail. The substitution quantity of V in the heteropolyacid affected the onset reduction potential as well as the reduction current density, resulting in a difference in cell performance. The chemical composition of heteropolyacid also had a significant impact on the reoxidation property. Among the three compounds, H6PV3Mo9O40 was the most suitable redox mediator. Furthermore, the pH of the catholyte was found to be the crucial factor in determining the reoxidation rate of partially reduced heteropolyacid as well as cell performance. PMID:27348019

  13. Development of feeder-free culture systems for generation of ckit+sca1+ progenitors from mouse iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Fernandez, Irina; Roy, Krishnendu

    2011-09-01

    Patient-specific therapeutic cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may bypass the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells and avoid potential immunological reactions associated with allogenic transplantation. It is critical, for the ultimate clinical applicability of iPS cell-derived therapies, to establish feeder-free cultures that ensure efficient differentiation of iPS cells into therapeutic progenitors. It is also necessary to understand if iPS cell-derived progenitors differ from those derived from ES cells. In this study, we compared the efficiency of three different feeder-free cultures for differentiating mouse iPS cells into ckit+sca1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and compared how differentiation and functionality varies between ES and iPS cells. Our results indicated that both iPS and ES cells can be efficiently differentiated into HPCs in suspension cultures supplemented with secretion factors from mouse bone marrow stromal cells (OP9-DL1 conditioned medium). The functionality of these cells was demonstrated by differentiation into CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs). Both ES and iPS-derived DCs expressed activation molecules (CD86, CD80) in response to LPS stimulation and stimulated T cell proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Extensive quantitative RT-PCR studies were used to study the differences in gene expression profiles of ckit+sca1+ cells generated from the various culture systems as well as differences between ES-derived and iPS-derived cells. We conclude that a feeder-free system using stromal conditioned medium can efficiently generate HPCs as well as functional DCs from iPS cells and the generated cells have similar gene expression profile as those from ES cells. PMID:21188655

  14. Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks by a cell-free system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks of DNA was studied in vitro using an exonuclease purified from mouse ascites sarcoma (SR-C3H/He) cells. X-ray-dose-dependent unscheduled DNA synthesis was primed by the exonuclease. Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in pUC19 plasmid DNA was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis after incubating the damaged DNA with the exonuclease, DNA polymerase (Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I or DNA polymerase β purified from SR-C3H/He cells), four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, ATP and DNA ligase (T4 DNA ligase or DNA ligase I purified from calf thymus). The present results suggested that the exonuclease is involved in the initiation of repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in removing 3' ends of X-ray-damaged DNA. (author)

  15. Nitrogen mustard inhibits transcription and translation in a cell free system.

    OpenAIRE

    Masta, A; Gray, P J; D. R. Phillips

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard and its derivatives such as cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil and melphalan are widely used anti-cancer agents, despite their non-specific reaction mechanism. In this study, the effect of alkylation by nitrogen mustard of DNA and RNA (coding for a single protein) was investigated using both a translation system and a coupled transcription/translation system. When alkylated DNA was used as the template for coupled transcription and translation, a single translation product corres...

  16. Preparative scale production and functional reconstitution of a human aquaglyceroporin (AQP3) using a cell free expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Lucks, Annika; Gena, Patrizia; Frascaria, Daniele; Altamura, Nicola; Svelto, Maria; Beitz, Eric; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2013-06-25

    Understanding the selectivity of aquaporin (AQP) membrane channels and exploiting their biotechnological potential will require structural and functional studies of wild type and modified proteins; however, expression systems have not previously yielded AQPs in the necessary milligrams quantities. Cell free (CF) systems have emerged in recent years as fast, efficient and versatile technologies for the production of high quality membrane proteins. Here, we establish a convenient method to synthesize large amounts of functional human aquaglyceroporin 3 protein (AQP3), an AQP of physiological relevance conducting glycerol and some small neutral solutes besides water. Milligram amounts of AQP3 were produced as a histidine-tagged protein (hAQP3-6His) in an Escherichia coli extract-based CF system in the presence of the non-ionic detergent Brij-98. The recombinant AQP3 was purified by affinity chromatography, incorporated into liposomes and evaluated functionally by stopped-flow light scattering. Correct protein folding was indicated by the high glycerol and water permeability exhibited by the hAQP3-6His proteoliposomes as compared to empty control liposomes. Functionality of hAQP3-6His was further confirmed by the strong inhibition of the glycerol and water permeability by phloretin and HgCl2, respectively, two blockers of AQP3. Fast and convenient CF production of functional AQP3 may serve as basis for further structural/functional assessment of aquaglyceroporins and help boosting the AQP-based biomimetic technologies. PMID:23541697

  17. A cell-free system for studying a priming factor involved in repair of bleomycin-damaged DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki,Shuji

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple cell-free system for studying a priming factor involved in the repair of bleomycin-damaged DNA was established. The template-primer used for the repair DNA synthesis was prepared by treating the closed circular, superhelical form of pUC19 plasmid DNA with 2.2 microM bleomycin and 20 microM ferrous ions. Single-strand breaks were introduced into pUC19 DNA by the bleomycin treatment, and the DNA was consequently converted largely into the open circular form. A system for repair of this bleomycin-damaged DNA was constructed with a priming factor, DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase beta or Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I, ATP, T4 DNA ligase and four deoxynucleoside triphosphates. After incubation, the conformation of the DNA was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The open circular DNA was largely converted to the closed circular DNA, indicating that the single-strand breaks of DNA were repaired. When the priming factor was omitted, DNA repair did not occur. The present system seemed to be applicable to the study of priming factors involved in the repair of DNA with single-strand breaks caused not only by bleomycin but also by ionizing radiation or active oxygen.

  18. A defined, feeder-free, serum-free system to generate in vitro hematopoietic progenitors and differentiated blood cells from hESCs and hiPSCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Salvagiotto

    Full Text Available Human ESC and iPSC are an attractive source of cells of high quantity and purity to be used to elucidate early human development processes, for drug discovery, and in clinical cell therapy applications. To efficiently differentiate pluripotent cells into a pure population of hematopoietic progenitors we have developed a new 2-dimensional, defined and highly efficient protocol that avoids the use of feeder cells, serum or embryoid body formation. Here we showed that a single matrix protein in combination with growth factors and a hypoxic environment is sufficient to generate from pluripotent cells hematopoietic progenitors capable of differentiating further in mature cell types of different lineages of the blood system. We tested the differentiation method using hESCs and 9 iPSC lines generated from different tissues. These data indicate the robustness of the protocol providing a valuable tool for the generation of clinical-grade hematopoietic cells from pluripotent cells.

  19. Prenylation of a Rab1B mutant with altered GTPase activity is impaired in cell-free systems but not in intact mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A L; Sheridan, K M; Erdman, R A; Maltese, W A

    1996-09-15

    Previous studies have reached differing conclusions as to whether or not guanine-nucleotide-dependent conformational changes affect the ability of Rab proteins to undergo post-translational modification by Rab:geranylgeranyltransferase (Rab-GGTase). We now show that the ability of a Rab1B mutant [Q67L (Gln-67-->Leu)] with reduced intrinsic GTPase activity to undergo geranylgeranylation in cell-free assays depends on the guanine nucleotide composition of the system. When GTP is the predominant nucleotide in the assay, Rab1BQ67L is a poor substrate. However, when GDP is present and GTP is omitted, prenylation of the Q67L mutant is comparable with that of the wild-type (WT) protein. These studies, coupled with the poor prenylation of Rab1BWT in the presence of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogue guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, support the notion that Rab-GGTase prefers substrates in the GDP conformation. When the abilities of Rab1BQ67L and Rab1BWT to undergo prenylation were compared by metabolic labelling of transiently expressed proteins in cultured human 293 cells, we did not observe a decline in prenylation of the mutant protein as predicted on the basis of the cell-free assays. Moreover, the Q67L mutant was comparable with the wild-type Rab1B in its ability to associate with co-expressed Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors in 293 cells. These findings raise the possibility that unidentified proteins present in intact cells may compensate for the reduced intrinsic GTPase activity of the Q67L mutant, allowing a significant proportion of the nascent Rab1BQ67L to assume a GDP conformation. The differential prenylation of Rab1BQ67L in cell-free systems versus intact cells underscores the importance of evaluating the post-translational modification of specific Rab mutants in vivo, where poorly characterized regulatory proteins may have a significant effect on GTPase activity or nucleotide exchange rates.

  20. An immunomodulator from Tinospora cordifolia with antioxidant activity in cell-free systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veena R Desai; J P Kamat; K B Sainis

    2002-12-01

    Several plant products are known to exhibit immense medicinal value against human diseases. Our earlier studies showed that dry stem crude extract (DSCE) of Tinospora cordifolia contained a polyclonal B cell mitogen, G1-4A. DSCE as well as G1-4A also enhanced immune response in mice. In order to explore the possibility of using G1-4A/PPI (partially purified immunomodulator) to modulate radiation induced immunosuppression, the antioxidant effect of PPI from this plant was examined against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), generated by photosensitization/peroxynitrite. Levels of lipid peroxidation products, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in liver/spleen homogenate from mouse were monitored. Photosensitization induced significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in liver. The activities of SOD and catalase were reduced considerably. PPI, present during photosensitisation, prevented lipid peroxidation and restored the activities of both the enzymes. Likewise, oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite was inhibited by PPI. The degradation of proteins due to photosensitization as assessed by SDS-PAGE was effectively reduced by simultaneous treatment with PPI during photosensitization. Selective inhibitors of ROS like mannitol, SOD, sodium azide and antioxidants, GSH and vitamin C brought about significant inhibition of formation of TBARS suggesting possible involvement of O$_2^{-\\bullet}$,${}^{\\bullet}$OH and 1O2. Photosensitization in deuterated buffer enhanced formation of TBARS thus indicating generation of 1O2. Thus, the action of PPI may be against oxidative damage through Type I and II photosensitization mechanisms. Therefore, the immunomodulator from Tinospora cordifolia may also be beneficial as an antioxidant.

  1. Roll-coating fabrication of flexible organic solar cells: comparison of fullerene and fullerene-free systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Kuan; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Lin, Yuze;

    2016-01-01

    Flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) based on a blend of low-bandgap polymer donor PTB7-TH and nonfullerene small molecule acceptor IEIC were fabricated via a roll-coating process under ambient atmosphere. Both an indium tin oxide (ITO)-free substrate and a flexible ITO substrate were employed...

  2. Use of a cell-free system to determine UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and N-acetylmannosamine kinase activities in human hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Susan E; Ciccone, Carla; Lalor, Molly; Orvisky, Eduard; Klootwijk, Riko; Savelkoul, Paul J; Dalakas, Marinos C; Krasnewich, Donna M; Gahl, William A; Huizing, Marjan

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder associated with mutations in uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) 2-epimerase (GNE)/N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) kinase (MNK), the bifunctional and rate-limiting enzyme of sialic acid biosynthesis. We developed individual GNE and MNK enzymatic assays and determined reduced activities in cultured fibroblasts of patients, with HIBM harboring missense mutations in either or both the GNE and MNK enzymatic domains. To assess the effects of individual mutations on enzyme activity, normal and mutated GNE/MNK enzymatic domains were synthesized in a cell-free in vitro transcription-translation system and subjected to the GNE and MNK enzymatic assays. This cell-free system was validated for both GNE and MNK activities, and it revealed that mutations in one enzymatic domain (in GNE, G135V, V216A, and R246W; in MNK, A631V, M712T) affected not only that domain's enzyme activity, but also the activity of the other domain. Moreover, studies of the residual enzyme activity associated with specific mutations revealed a discrepancy between the fibroblasts and the cell-free systems. Fibroblasts exhibited higher residual activities of both GNE and MNK than the cell-free system. These findings add complexity to the tightly regulated system of sialic acid biosynthesis. This cell-free approach can be applied to other glycosylation pathway enzymes that are difficult to evaluate in whole cells because their substrate specificities overlap with those of ancillary enzymes.

  3. Structural and physico-mechanical characterization of bio-cellulose produced by a cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Shaukat; Kim, Yeji; Park, Joong Kon

    2016-01-20

    This study was aimed to characterize the structural and physico-mechanical properties of bio-cellulose produced through cell-free system. Fourier transform-infrared spectrum illustrated exact matching of structural peaks with microbial cellulose, used as reference. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that fibrils of bio-cellulose were thicker and more compact than microbial cellulose. The specific positions of peaks in the X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra indicated that bio-cellulose possessed cellulose II polymorphic structure. Bio-cellulose presented superior physico-mechanical properties than microbial cellulose. The water holding capacity of bio-cellulose and microbial cellulose were found to be 188.6 ± 5.41 and 167.4 ± 4.32 times their dry-weights, respectively. Tensile strengths and degradation temperature of bio-cellulose were 17.63 MPa and 352 °C, respectively compared to 14.71 MPa and 327 °C of microbial cellulose. Overall, the results indicated successful synthesis and superior properties of bio-cellulose that advocate its effectiveness for various applications.

  4. Cell-free Protein Synthesis in an Autoinduction System for NMR Studies of Protein-Protein Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free protein synthesis systems provide facile access to proteins in a nascent state that enables formation of soluble, native protein-protein complexes even if one of the protein components is prone to self-aggregation and precipitation. Combined with selective isotope-labeling, this allows the rapid analysis of protein-protein interactions with few 15N-HSQC spectra. The concept is demonstrated with binary and ternary complexes between the χ, ψ and γ subunits of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III: nascent, selectively 15N-labeled ψ produced in the presence of χ resulted in a soluble, correctly folded χ-ψ complex, whereas ψ alone precipitated irrespective of whether γ was present or not. The 15N-HSQC spectra showed that the N-terminal segment of ψ is mobile in the χ-ψ complex, yet important for its binding to γ. The sample preparation was greatly enhanced by an autoinduction strategy, where the T7 RNA polymerase needed for transcription of a gene in a T7-promoter vector was produced in situ

  5. Cell-free Protein Synthesis in an Autoinduction System for NMR Studies of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Jergic, Slobodan; Crowther, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, Phillip R. [Australian National University, Research School of Chemistry (Australia); Wijffels, Gene [Queensland Bioscience Precinct, CSIRO Livestock Industries (Australia); Otting, Gottfried; Dixon, Nicholas A. [Australian National University, Research School of Chemistry (Australia)], E-mail: dixon@rsc.anu.edu.au

    2005-07-15

    Cell-free protein synthesis systems provide facile access to proteins in a nascent state that enables formation of soluble, native protein-protein complexes even if one of the protein components is prone to self-aggregation and precipitation. Combined with selective isotope-labeling, this allows the rapid analysis of protein-protein interactions with few {sup 15}N-HSQC spectra. The concept is demonstrated with binary and ternary complexes between the {chi}, {psi} and {gamma} subunits of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III: nascent, selectively {sup 15}N-labeled {psi} produced in the presence of {chi} resulted in a soluble, correctly folded {chi}-{psi} complex, whereas {psi} alone precipitated irrespective of whether {gamma} was present or not. The {sup 15}N-HSQC spectra showed that the N-terminal segment of {psi} is mobile in the {chi}-{psi} complex, yet important for its binding to {gamma}. The sample preparation was greatly enhanced by an autoinduction strategy, where the T7 RNA polymerase needed for transcription of a gene in a T7-promoter vector was produced in situ.

  6. Enhanced functional expression of aquaporin Z via fusion of in situ cleavable leader peptides in Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Lian, Jiazhang; Kai, Lei; Huang, Lei; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan

    2014-02-01

    Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) is a water channel protein from Escherichia coli and has attracted many attentions to develop the biomimetic water filtration technology. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) system, one of the most complex multi-enzymatic systems, has the ability of producing the integral membrane protein in vitro. To enhance the synthesis of AqpZ in E. coli cell-free system, several natural leader peptides were respectively fused at the N-terminus and were verified to enhance the expression level significantly. Moreover, the supplementation of detergents or liposome could activate leader peptidase from the cell-free extract and provide hydrophobic environment for proper folding of AqpZ. Thus, the release of mature AqpZ via the in situ removal of leader peptide was achieved, with a specific water transport activity of (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10⁻¹⁴ cm³ s⁻¹ monomer⁻¹. Using this in situ removable leader peptide strategy, the transcription-translation, leader sequence cleavage and membrane protein folding were integrated into a simple process in the cell-free system, providing a convenient approach to enhance the expression of target proteins, especially those membrane proteins difficult to achieve.

  7. Bleomycin-induced DNA synthesis in a cell-free system using a permeable mouse sarcoma cell Extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki,Shuji

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate factors involved in excision repair DNA synthesis, a soluble extract was prepared from permeable mouse sarcoma (SR-C3H/He cells by homogenization and ultracentrifugation. DNA synthesis measured by using native calf thymus DNA as the template-primer and the extract as the polymerase source showed low activity. The DNA synthesis was enhanced more than ten-fold by the addition of an appropriate concentration of bleomycin, a radiomimetic DNA-damaging drug. Using selective inhibitors of DNA polymerases, it was shown that the DNA polymerase involved in the bleomycin-induced DNA synthesis was DNA polymerase beta. In addition to DNA polymerase beta, an exonuclease which converts bleomycin-damaged DNA into suitable template-primers for repair DNA synthesis appeared to be present in the permeable cell extract.

  8. Peptide Biosynthesis with Stable Isotope Labeling from a Cell-free Expression System for Targeted Proteomics with Absolute Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Feng; Zi, Jin; Wang, Quanhui; Lou, Xiaomin; Sun, Haidan; Lin, Liang; Hou, Guixue; Rao, Weiqiao; Yin, Changcheng; Wu, Lin; Li, Shuwei; Liu, Siqi

    2016-08-01

    Because of its specificity and sensitivity, targeted proteomics using mass spectrometry for multiple reaction monitoring is a powerful tool to detect and quantify pre-selected peptides from a complex background and facilitates the absolute quantification of peptides using isotope-labeled forms as internal standards. How to generate isotope-labeled peptides remains an urgent challenge for accurately quantitative targeted proteomics on a large scale. Herein, we propose that isotope-labeled peptides fused with a quantitative tag could be synthesized through an expression system in vitro, and the homemade peptides could be enriched by magnetic beads with tag-affinity and globally quantified based on the corresponding multiple reaction monitoring signals provided by the fused tag. An Escherichia coli cell-free protein expression system, protein synthesis using recombinant elements, was adopted for the synthesis of isotope-labeled peptides fused with Strep-tag. Through a series of optimizations, we enabled efficient expression of the labeled peptides such that, after Strep-Tactin affinity enrichment, the peptide yield was acceptable in scale for quantification, and the peptides could be completely digested by trypsin to release the Strep-tag for quantification. Moreover, these recombinant peptides could be employed in the same way as synthetic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring applications and are likely more economical and useful in a laboratory for the scale of targeted proteomics. As an application, we synthesized four isotope-labeled glutathione S-transferase (GST) peptides and added them to mouse sera pre-treated with GST affinity resin as internal standards. A quantitative assay of the synthesized GST peptides confirmed the absolute GST quantification in mouse sera to be measurable and reproducible. PMID:27234506

  9. Functional expression of a single-chain antibody to ErbB-2 in plants and cell-free systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benevolo Maria

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant signaling by ErbB-2 (HER 2, Neu, a member of the human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF receptor family, is associated with an aggressive clinical behaviour of carcinomas, particularly breast tumors. Antibodies targeting the ErbB-2 pathway are a preferred therapeutic option for patients with advanced breast cancer, but a worldwide deficit in the manufacturing capacities of mammalian cell bioreactors is foreseen. Methods Herein, we describe a multi-platform approach for the production of recombinant Single chain Fragments of antibody variable regions (ScFvs to ErbB-2 that involves their functional expression in (a bacteria, (b transient as well as stable transgenic tobacco plants, and (c a newly developed cell-free transcription-translation system. Results An ScFv (ScFv800E6 was selected by cloning immunoglobulin sequences from murine hybridomas, and was expressed and fully functional in all the expression platforms, thereby representing the first ScFv to ErbB-2 produced in hosts other than bacteria and yeast. ScFv800E6 was optimized with respect to redox synthesis conditions. Different tags were introduced flanking the ScFv800E6 backbone, with and without spacer arms, including a novel Strep II tag that outperforms conventional streptavidin-based detection systems. ScFv800E6 was resistant to standard chemical radiolabeling procedures (i.e. Chloramine T, displayed a binding ability extremely similar to that of the parental monovalent Fab' fragment, as well as a flow cytometry performance and an equilibrium binding affinity (Ka approximately 2 × 108 M-1 only slightly lower than those of the parental bivalent antibody, suggesting that its binding site is conserved as compared to that of the parental antibody molecule. ScFv800E6 was found to be compatible with routine reagents for immunohistochemical staining. Conclusion ScFv800E6 is a useful reagent for in vitro biochemical and immunodiagnostic applications in oncology

  10. Highly Efficient In Vitro Production of Bovine Blastocyst in Cell-Free Sequential Synthetic Oviductal Fluid vs. TCM199 Vero Cell Co-Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Morteza Hosseini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to establish a cell-free sequential culture system that cansupport high levels of in vitro embryo development and blastocyst formation from bovine zygotes.To this end, this investigation was carried out to evaluate the effects of glucose, serum and EDTAon bovine zygote in vitro development.Materials and Methods: Bovine presumptive zygotes were derived from oocytes matured, andfertilized in vitro and cultured in synthetic oviductal fluid sequential medium in a two-steps manner;SOF 1 for the first 3 days and SOF 2 for the second 5-6 days of in vitro embryo development. Inorder to evaluate the effect of different modifications of the basic medium on embryo development,glucose was added to the second phase (SOF A, serum was added to the first phase (SOF C andEDTA alone (SOF D or in combination with serum (SOF E was added into the first phase of invitro embryo culture. The results of each composition were compared with each other and with theresults of embryo development in TCM199 vero cell co-culture system.Results: Glucose addition to the second phase of embryo culture, improved the developmentalcompetency; however, the differences were not significant. Serum addition to the first phase ofembryo culture, significantly improved the developmental competency of embryos beyond thecleavage stage, compared to all the treatment and TCM199 co-culture groups. EDTA supplementationof culture medium, either alone or in combination with serum, significantly inhibits the embryodevelopment beyond the morula stage.Conclusion: The results indicated that culture of bovine presumptive zygotes in two steps cell-freeculture system, can support embryo development, and addition of serum throughout the culture andglucose to the second step significantly increased overall developmental competency compared toTCM199 co-culture system.

  11. Quantitation of protein expression in a cell-free system: Efficient detection of yields and {sup 19}F NMR to identify folded protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neerathilingam, Muniasamy [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Greene, Lesley H. [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry, Chemistry Research Laboratory (United Kingdom); Colebrooke, Simon A.; Campbell, Iain D.; Staunton, David [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)], E-mail: staunton@bioch.ox.ac.uk

    2005-01-15

    We have developed an efficient and novel filter assay method, involving radioactive labelling and imaging, to quantify the expression of soluble proteins from a cell-free translation system. Here this method is combined with the conformational sensitivity of {sup 19}F NMR to monitor the folded state of the expressed protein. This report describes the optimisation of 6-fluorotryptophan incorporation in a His-tagged human serum retinol-binding protein (RBP), a disulphide bonded {beta}-barrel protein. Appropriate reagent concentrations for producing fluorine labelled RBP in a cell-free translation system are described. It is shown that {sup 19}F NMR is a suitable method for monitoring the production of correctly folded protein from a high-throughput expression system.

  12. Scaling up ITO-Free solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Coenen, E.W.C.; Zimmermann, B.; Slooff, L.H.; Verhees, W.J.H.; Veenstra, S.C.; Kroon, J.M.; Jørgensen, M.; Krebs, F.C.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide-free (ITO-free) polymer solar cells with composite electrodes containing current-collecting grids and a semitransparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductor are demonstrated. The up-scaling of the length of the solar cell from 1 to 6 cm and th

  13. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  14. Micro reactor integrated μ-PEM fuel cell system: a feed connector and flow field free approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system level microreactor concept for hydrogen generation with Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4) is demonstrated. The uniqueness of the system is the transport and distribution feature of fuel (hydrogen) to the anode of the fuel cell without any external feed connectors and flow fields. The approach here is to use palladium film instead of feed connectors and the flow fields; palladium's property to adsorb and desorb the hydrogen at ambient and elevated condition. The proof of concept is demonstrated with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based complete system integration which includes microreactor, palladium transport layer and the self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The hydrolysis of NaBH4 was carried out in the presence of platinum supported by nickel (NiPt). The prototype functionality is tested with NaBH4 chemical hydride. The characterization of the integrated palladium layer and fuel cell is tested with constant and switching load. The presented integrated fuel cell is observed to have a maximum power output and current of 60 mW and 280 mA respectively

  15. Nonhomologous DNA End Joining in Cell-Free Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Among various DNA damages, double-strand breaks (DSBs are considered as most deleterious, as they may lead to chromosomal rearrangements and cancer when unrepaired. Nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ is one of the major DSB repair pathways in higher organisms. A large number of studies on NHEJ are based on in vitro systems using cell-free extracts. In this paper, we summarize the studies on NHEJ performed by various groups in different cell-free repair systems.

  16. π-Conjugated Donor-Acceptor Systems as Metal-Free Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakeeruddin S. M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available High extinction coefficients and easily tunable spectral properties of π- conjugated donor-acceptor dyes are of superior advantage for the design of new metalfree organic sensitizers for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy on the femtosecond and nanosecond time scales provided deep insights into the dependence of charge carrier dynamics in fully organic dye/TiO2 systems on i the donor-acceptor distance, ii the π-conjugation length, and iii the coupling to TiO2 by different anchoring groups. Importantly, the observed differences in charge transfer dynamics justify the variations of photovoltaic performances of the dyes as applied in solar cell devices. This leads to the conclusion that the photoconversion efficiencies strongly depend on a delicate interplay between the dyes’ building blocks, i.e. the donor, the π-conjugated spacer and the anchor/acceptor moieties, and may easily be tuned by molecular design.

  17. Label-Free Biosensors for Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Label-free biosensors for studying cell biology have finally come of age. Recent developments have advanced the biosensors from low throughput and high maintenance research tools to high throughput and low maintenance screening platforms. In parallel, the biosensors have evolved from an analytical tool solely for molecular interaction analysis to powerful platforms for studying cell biology at the whole cell level. This paper presents historical development, detection principles, and applications in cell biology of label-free biosensors. Future perspectives are also discussed.

  18. The emerging age of cell-free synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Thomas; Wilding, Kristen M; Hunt, Jeremy M; Bennett, Anthony M; Bundy, Bradley C

    2014-08-25

    The engineering of and mastery over biological parts has catalyzed the emergence of synthetic biology. This field has grown exponentially in the past decade. As increasingly more applications of synthetic biology are pursued, more challenges are encountered, such as delivering genetic material into cells and optimizing genetic circuits in vivo. An in vitro or cell-free approach to synthetic biology simplifies and avoids many of the pitfalls of in vivo synthetic biology. In this review, we describe some of the innate features that make cell-free systems compelling platforms for synthetic biology and discuss emerging improvements of cell-free technologies. We also select and highlight recent and emerging applications of cell-free synthetic biology.

  19. xCELLigence system for real-time label-free monitoring of growth and viability of cell lines from hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Gutierrez, Antonio; Muñoz-Capó, Saúl; Navarro-Palou, María; Ros, Teresa; Amat, Juan Carlos; Lopez, Bernardo; Marcus, Toni F; Fueyo, Laura; Suquia, Angela G; Gines, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Ramos, Rafael; Besalduch, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The xCELLigence system is a new technological approach that allows the real-time cell analysis of adherent tumor cells. To date, xCELLigence has not been able to monitor the growth or cytotoxicity of nonadherent cells derived from hematological malignancies. The basis of its technology relies on the use of culture plates with gold microelectrodes located in their base. We have adapted the methodology described by others to xCELLigence, based on the pre-coating of the cell culture surface with specific substrates, some of which are known to facilitate cell adhesion in the extracellular matrix. Pre-coating of the culture plates with fibronectin, compared to laminin, collagen, or gelatin, significantly induced the adhesion of most of the leukemia/lymphoma cells assayed (Jurkat, L1236, KMH2, and K562). With a fibronectin substrate, nonadherent cells deposited in a monolayer configuration, and consequently, the cell growth and viability were robustly monitored. We further demonstrate the feasibility of xCELLigence for the real-time monitoring of the cytotoxic properties of several antineoplastic agents. In order to validate this technology, the data obtained through real-time cell analysis was compared with that obtained from using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. This provides an excellent label-free tool for the screening of drug efficacy in nonadherent cells and discriminates optimal time points for further molecular analysis of cellular events associated with treatments, reducing both time and costs. PMID:24959085

  20. Development of a xeno-free autologous culture system for endothelial progenitor cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hwan Moon

    Full Text Available Despite promising preclinical outcomes in animal models, a number of challenges remain for human clinical use. In particular, expanding a large number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in vitro in the absence of animal-derived products is the most critical hurdle remaining to be overcome to ensure the safety and efficiency of human therapy. To develop in vitro culture conditions for EPCs derived from human cord blood (hCB-EPCs, we isolated extracts (UCE and collagen (UC-collagen from umbilical cord tissue to replace their animal-derived counterparts. UC-collagen and UCE efficiently supported the attachment and proliferation of hCB-EPCs in a manner comparable to that of animal-derived collagen in the conventional culture system. Our developed autologous culture system maintained the typical characteristics of hCB-EPCs, as represented by the expression of EPC-associated surface markers. In addition, the therapeutic potential of hCB-EPCs was confirmed when the transplantation of hCB-EPCs cultured in this autologous culture system promoted limb salvage in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and was shown to contribute to attenuating muscle degeneration and fibrosis. We suggest that the umbilical cord represents a source for autologous biomaterials for the in vitro culture of hCB-EPCs. The main characteristics and therapeutic potential of hCB-EPCs were not compromised in developed autologous culture system. The absence of animal-derived products in our newly developed in vitro culture removes concerns associated with secondary contamination. Thus, we hope that this culture system accelerates the realization of therapeutic applications of autologous hCB-EPCs for human vascular diseases.

  1. Production of eukaryotic cell-free lysate from Leishmania tarentolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Wayne A; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the production and application of a eukaryotic cell-free expression system based on Leishmania tarentolae. This single-celled flagellate allows straightforward and inexpensive cultivation in flasks or bioreactors. Unlike many other Leishmania species, it is nonpathogenic to humans and does not require special laboratory precautions. An additional reason it is a convenient source organism for cell-free lysate production is that all endogenous protein expression can be suppressed by a single antisense oligonucleotide targeting splice leader sequence on the 5'-end of all protein coding RNAs. We describe simple procedures for cell disruption and lysate processing starting from bioreactor culture. We also describe introduction of genetic information via vectors containing species-independent translation initiation sites (SITS). We consider that such an inexpensive eukaryotic cell-free production system has many advantages when expressing multi-subunit proteins or difficult to express proteins. PMID:24395406

  2. Nod2-Nodosome in a Cell-Free System: Implications in Pathogenesis and Drug Discovery for Blau Syndrome and Early-Onset Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Iwasaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (Nod 2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, which recognizes muramyl dipeptide (N-Acetylmuramyl-L-Alanyl-D-Isoglutamine: MDP, a bacterial peptidoglycan component, and makes a NF-κB-activating complex called nodosome with adaptor protein RICK (RIP2/RIPK2. Nod2 mutants are associated with the autoinflammatory diseases, Blau syndrome (BS/early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS. For drug discovery of BS/EOS, we tried to develop Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system. FLAG-tagged RICK, biotinylated-Nod2, and BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants were synthesized, and proximity signals between FLAG-tagged and biotinylated proteins were detected by amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA. Upon incubation with MDP, the ALPHA signal of interaction between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ALPHA signal of interaction between RICK and the BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants was more significantly increased than Nod2-WT. Notably, the ALPHA signal between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased upon incubation with MDP, but not when incubated with the same concentrations, L-alanine, D-isoglutamic acid, or the MDP-D-isoform. Thus, we successfully developed Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system reflecting its function in vivo, and it can be useful for screening Nod2-nodosome-targeted therapeutic molecules for BS/EOS and granulomatous inflammatory diseases.

  3. Scaling Up ITO-free solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galagan, Yulia; Coenen, Erica W. C.; Zimmermann, Birger;

    2014-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide-free (ITO-free) polymer solar cells with composite electrodes containing current-collecting grids and a semitransparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductor are demonstrated. The up-scaling of the length of the solar cell from 1 to 6 cm...... and the effect of the grid line resistance are explored for a series of devices. Laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping is used for quality control of the devices. A theoretical modeling study is presented that enables the identification of the most rational cell dimension for the grids with different...... resistances. The performance of ITO-free organic solar cells with different dimensions and different electrode resistances are evaluated for different light intensities. The current generation and electric potential distribution are found to not be uniformly distributed in large-area devices at simulated 1...

  4. Cell-free metabolic engineering: Biomanufacturing beyond the cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, QM; Karim, AS; Jewett, MC

    2014-10-15

    Industrial biotechnology and microbial metabolic engineering are poised to help meet the growing demand for sustainable, low-cost commodity chemicals and natural products, yet the fraction of biochemicals amenable to commercial production remains limited. Common problems afflicting the current state-of-the-art include low volumetric productivities, build-up of toxic intermediates or products, and byproduct losses via competing pathways. To overcome these limitations, cell-free metabolic engineering (CFME) is expanding the scope of the traditional bioengineering model by using in vitro ensembles of catalytic proteins prepared from purified enzymes or crude lysates of cells for the production of target products. In recent years, the unprecedented level of control and freedom of design, relative to in vivo systems, has inspired the development of engineering foundations for cell-free systems. These efforts have led to activation of long enzymatic pathways (>8 enzymes), near theoretical conversion yields, productivities greater than 100 mg L-1 h(-1), reaction scales of >100 L, and new directions in protein purification, spatial organization, and enzyme stability. In the coming years, CFME will offer exciting opportunities to: (i) debug and optimize biosynthetic pathways; (ii) carry out design-build-test iterations without re-engineering organisms; and (iii) perform molecular transformations when bioconversion yields, productivities, or cellular toxicity limit commercial feasibility.

  5. Label-Free Biosensors for Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ye Fang

    2011-01-01

    Label-free biosensors for studying cell biology have finally come of age. Recent developments have advanced the biosensors from low throughput and high maintenance research tools to high throughput and low maintenance screening platforms. In parallel, the biosensors have evolved from an analytical tool solely for molecular interaction analysis to powerful platforms for studying cell biology at the whole cell level. This paper presents historical development, detection principles, and applicat...

  6. Branched DNA-based Alu quantitative assay for cell-free plasma DNA levels in patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yan-Qiang; Liang, Dong-Yu; Lou, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhen-huan; Zhang, Lu-rong

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA (cf-DNA) can be detected by various of laboratory techniques. We described a branched DNA-based Alu assay for measuring cf-DNA in septic patients. Compared to healthy controls and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients, serum cf-DNA levels were significantly higher in septic patients (1426.54 ± 863.79 vs 692.02 ± 703.06 and 69.66 ± 24.66 ng/mL). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA for normal vs sepsis and SIRS vs sepsis were 0.955 (0.884-1.025), and 0.856 (0.749-0.929), respectively. There was a positive correlation between cf-DNA and interleukin 6 or procalcitonin or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II. The cf-DNA concentration was higher in intensive care unit nonsurviving patients compared to surviving patients (2183.33 ± 615.26 vs 972.46 ± 648.36 ng/mL; P DNA-based Alu assays are feasible and useful to quantify serum cf-DNA levels. Increased cf-DNA levels in septic patients might complement C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in a multiple marker format. Cell-free circulating DNA might be a new marker in discrimination of sepsis and SIRS.

  7. xCELLigence system for real-time label-free monitoring of growth and viability of cell lines from hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Serra J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jordi Martinez-Serra,1 Antonio Gutierrez,1 Saúl Muñoz-Capó,1 María Navarro-Palou,1 Teresa Ros,1 Juan Carlos Amat,1 Bernardo Lopez,1 Toni F Marcus,1 Laura Fueyo,2 Angela G Suquia,2 Jordi Gines,3 Francisco Rubio,1 Rafael Ramos,4 Joan Besalduch11Department of Hematology, 2Department of Clinical Analysis, 3Department of Pharmacy, 4Department of Pathology, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands, SpainAbstract: The xCELLigence system is a new technological approach that allows the real-time cell analysis of adherent tumor cells. To date, xCELLigence has not been able to monitor the growth or cytotoxicity of nonadherent cells derived from hematological malignancies. The basis of its technology relies on the use of culture plates with gold microelectrodes located in their base. We have adapted the methodology described by others to xCELLigence, based on the pre-coating of the cell culture surface with specific substrates, some of which are known to facilitate cell adhesion in the extracellular matrix. Pre-coating of the culture plates with fibronectin, compared to laminin, collagen, or gelatin, significantly induced the adhesion of most of the leukemia/lymphoma cells assayed (Jurkat, L1236, KMH2, and K562. With a fibronectin substrate, nonadherent cells deposited in a monolayer configuration, and consequently, the cell growth and viability were robustly monitored. We further demonstrate the feasibility of xCELLigence for the real-time monitoring of the cytotoxic properties of several antineoplastic agents. In order to validate this technology, the data obtained through real-time cell analysis was compared with that obtained from using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. This provides an excellent label-free tool for the screening of drug efficacy in nonadherent cells and discriminates optimal time points for further molecular analysis of cellular events associated with treatments

  8. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  9. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  10. Linear DNA for rapid prototyping of synthetic biological circuits in an Escherichia coli based TX-TL cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zachary Z; Yeung, Enoch; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M

    2014-06-20

    Accelerating the pace of synthetic biology experiments requires new approaches for rapid prototyping of circuits from individual DNA regulatory elements. However, current testing standards require days to weeks due to cloning and in vivo transformation. In this work, we first characterized methods to protect linear DNA strands from exonuclease degradation in an Escherichia coli based transcription-translation cell-free system (TX-TL), as well as mechanisms of degradation. This enabled the use of linear DNA PCR products in TX-TL. We then compared expression levels and binding dynamics of different promoters on linear DNA and plasmid DNA. We also demonstrated assembly technology to rapidly build circuits entirely in vitro from separate parts. Using this strategy, we prototyped a four component genetic switch in under 8 h entirely in vitro. Rapid in vitro assembly has future applications for prototyping multiple component circuits if combined with predictive computational models.

  11. Properties of the ribonucleic acid bacteriophage ZIK-1 coat protein and its synthesis in an Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J W

    1972-07-01

    The coat protein subunit of the RNA bacteriophage ZIK/1 has a molecular weight of 12100 and does not contain histidine, methionine and cysteine. The amino acid composition of the coat protein is different from that of other RNA bacteriophage coat proteins. Bacteriophage ZIK/1 belongs to a class of RNA bacteriophages distinct from the f2 type, which lack histidine in their coat proteins, and the Qbeta type, which lack histidine and methionine. Bacteriophage ZIK/1 RNA is an efficient template in the Escherichia coli cell-free system producing coat protein as the major product and a number of non-coat proteins. This result is similar to that obtained with RNA from f2-type bacteriophages. It is probable that the genomes of RNA bacteriophages are structurally similar and that differences between the types of RNA bacteriophage arise from minor differences in RNA sequence.

  12. Calcium fluxes across the plasma membrane of Commelina communis L. assayed in a cell-free system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inside-out fraction of plasma membrane-rich vesicles prepared from leaves of Commelina communis L. by aqueous two-phase partitioning was loaded with 45Ca2+ through the action of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase. Results suggest the presence of a Ca2+ channel in the plasma membrane of C. communis. The channel is obtained in a Ca2+-inactivated state after preparation and Ca2+-loading of the vesicles. The inactivation is removed by TFP [trifluoperazine] or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], presumably due to the Ca2+-mobilizing effect of these compounds. The activated Ca2+ channel is La3+ sensitive and, in the cell, would allow for passage of Ca2+ into the cell. The possibility that TFP or W-7 act independent of CM, or through CM tightly associated with the plasma membrane, is discussed

  13. Development of a Piggybac based direct reprogramming system for derivation of integration free induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Matias, Dino Emanuel Santos

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSc) have great potential for applications in regenerative medicine, disease modeling and basic research. Several methods have been developed for their derivation. The original method of Takahashi and Yamanaka involved the use of retroviral vectors which result in insertional mutagenesis, presence in the genome of potential oncogenes and effects of residual transgene expression on differentiation bias of each particular iPSc line. Other methods have been devel...

  14. Functional expression of a single-chain antibody to ErbB-2 in plants and cell-free systems

    OpenAIRE

    Benevolo Maria; Natali Pier; Martayan Aline; Fraioli Rocco; Tornambé Andrea; Sperandei Maria; Di Donato Monica; Novelli Flavia; Pietraforte Immacolata; Lombardi Alessio; Galeffi Patrizia; Mottolese Marcella; Ylera Francisco; Cantale Cristina; Giacomini Patrizio

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Aberrant signaling by ErbB-2 (HER 2, Neu), a member of the human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) receptor family, is associated with an aggressive clinical behaviour of carcinomas, particularly breast tumors. Antibodies targeting the ErbB-2 pathway are a preferred therapeutic option for patients with advanced breast cancer, but a worldwide deficit in the manufacturing capacities of mammalian cell bioreactors is foreseen. Methods Herein, we describe a multi-platform approach ...

  15. Item versus System Learning: Explaining Free Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Provides an explanation for the existence of free variation in learner language. Argues that interlanguage is best conceptualized as sets of loose lexical networks that are gradually reorganized into a system or systems. Free variation arises when learners add items to those they have already acquired and before they analyze these items and…

  16. Cell-Free Synthesis Meets Antibody Production: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlitt Stech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered antibodies are key players in therapy, diagnostics and research. In addition to full size immunoglobulin gamma (IgG molecules, smaller formats of recombinant antibodies, such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv and antigen binding fragments (Fab, have emerged as promising alternatives since they possess different advantageous properties. Cell-based production technologies of antibodies and antibody fragments are well-established, allowing researchers to design and manufacture highly specific molecular recognition tools. However, as these technologies are accompanied by the drawbacks of being rather time-consuming and cost-intensive, efficient and powerful cell-free protein synthesis systems have been developed over the last decade as alternatives. So far, prokaryotic cell-free systems have been the focus of interest. Recently, eukaryotic in vitro translation systems have enriched the antibody production pipeline, as these systems are able to mimic the natural pathway of antibody synthesis in eukaryotic cells. This review aims to overview and summarize the advances made in the production of antibodies and antibody fragments in cell-free systems.

  17. Cell-Free Fetal DNA and Cell-Free Total DNA Levels in Spontaneous Abortion with Fetal Chromosomal Aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Hyae Lim; Min Hyoung Kim; You Jung Han; Da Eun Lee; So Yeon Park; Jung Yeol Han; Moon Young Kim; Hyun Mee Ryu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA) with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy....

  18. Cell-free protein expression based on extracts from CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brödel, Andreas K; Sonnabend, Andrei; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression systems are widely used in biotechnology and medicine for the efficient and economic production of therapeutic proteins. Today, cultivated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the market dominating mammalian cell-line for the production of complex therapeutic proteins. Despite this outstanding potential of CHO cells, no high-yield cell-free system based on translationally active lysates from these cells has been reported so far. To date, CHO cell extracts have only been used as a foundational research tool for understanding mRNA translation (Lodish et al., 1974; McDowell et al., 1972). In the present study, we address this fact by establishing a novel cell-free protein expression system based on extracts from cultured CHO cells. Lysate preparation, adaptation of in vitro reaction conditions and the construction of particular expression vectors are considered for high-yield protein production. A specific in vitro expression vector, which includes an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from the intergenic region (IGR) of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has been constructed in order to obtain optimal performance. The IGR IRES is supposed to bind directly to the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit thereby bypassing the process of translation initiation, which is often a major bottleneck in cell-free systems. The combination of expression vector and optimized CHO cell extracts enables the production of approximately 50 µg/mL active firefly luciferase within 4 h. The batch-type cell-free coupled transcription-translation system has the potential to perform post-translational modifications, as shown by the glycosylation of erythropoietin. Accordingly, the system contains translocationally active endogenous microsomes, enabling the co-translational incorporation of membrane proteins into biological membranes. Hence, the presented in vitro translation system is a powerful tool for the fast and convenient optimization of expression constructs, the

  19. Residue-specific Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids into Model Proteins Using an Escherichia coli Cell-free Transcription-translation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worst, Emanuel G; Exner, Matthias P; De Simone, Alessandro; Schenkelberger, Marc; Noireaux, Vincent; Budisa, Nediljko; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    The canonical set of amino acids leads to an exceptionally wide range of protein functionality. Nevertheless, the set of residues still imposes limitations on potential protein applications. The incorporation of noncanonical amino acids can enlarge this scope. There are two complementary approaches for the incorporation of noncanonical amino acids. For site-specific incorporation, in addition to the endogenous canonical translational machineries, an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase-tRNA pair must be provided that does not interact with the canonical ones. Consequently, a codon that is not assigned to a canonical amino acid, usually a stop codon, is also required. This genetic code expansion enables the incorporation of a noncanonical amino acid at a single, given site within the protein. The here presented work describes residue-specific incorporation where the genetic code is reassigned within the endogenous translational system. The translation machinery accepts the noncanonical amino acid as a surrogate to incorporate it at canonically prescribed locations, i.e., all occurrences of a canonical amino acid in the protein are replaced by the noncanonical one. The incorporation of noncanonical amino acids can change the protein structure, causing considerably modified physical and chemical properties. Noncanonical amino acid analogs often act as cell growth inhibitors for expression hosts since they modify endogenous proteins, limiting in vivo protein production. In vivo incorporation of toxic noncanonical amino acids into proteins remains particularly challenging. Here, a cell-free approach for a complete replacement of L-arginine by the noncanonical amino acid L-canavanine is presented. It circumvents the inherent difficulties of in vivo expression. Additionally, a protocol to prepare target proteins for mass spectral analysis is included. It is shown that L-lysine can be replaced by L-hydroxy-lysine, albeit with lower efficiency. In principle, any

  20. Progress in Electrolyte-Free Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzheng eLu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC represents a clean electrochemical energy conversion technology with characteristics of high conversion efficiency and low emissions. It is one of the most important new energy technologies in the future. However, the manufacture of SOFCs based on the structure of anode/electrolyte/cathode is complicated and time-consuming. Thus, the cost for the entire fabrication and technology is too high to be affordable and challenges still hinder commercialization. Recently, a novel type of Electrolyte -free fuel cell (EFFC with single component was invented which could be the potential candidate for the next generation of advanced fuel cells. This paper briefly introduces the EFFC, working principle, performance and advantages with updated research progress. A number of key R&D issues about EFFCs have been addressed and future opportunities and challenges are discussed.

  1. Enhanced cell-free protein expression by fusion with immunoglobulin Cκ domain

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Elizabeth; Liu, Hong; Khan, Farid; Taussig, Michael J; He, Mingyue

    2006-01-01

    While cell-free systems are increasingly used for protein expression in structural and functional studies, several proteins are difficult to express or expressed only at low levels in cell-free lysates. Here, we report that fusion of the human immunoglobulin κ light chain constant domain (Cκ) at the C terminus of four representative proteins dramatically improved their production in the Escherichia coli S30 system, suggesting that enhancement of cell-free protein expression by Cκ fusion will ...

  2. Corrosion free phosphoric acid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Maynard K.

    1990-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell with an electrolyte fuel system which supplies electrolyte via a wick disposed adjacent a cathode to an absorbent matrix which transports the electrolyte to portions of the cathode and an anode which overlaps the cathode on all sides to prevent corrosion within the cell.

  3. Hetero subunit interaction and RNA recognition of yeast tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase synthesized in a wheat germ cell-free translation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneyoshi, Yuki; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Tomikawa, Chie; Toyooka, Takashi; Ochi, Anna; Masaoka, Takashi; Endo, Yaeta; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Yeast tRNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase contains two protein subunits (Trm8 and Trm82). The enzyme catalyzes a methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N(7) atom of guanine at position 46 in tRNA. We deviced synthesis of active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer in a wheat germ cell-free translation system. When Trm8 or Trm82 mRNA were used for a synthesis, Trm8 or Trm82 protein could be synthesized. Upon mixing the synthesized Trm8 and Trm82 proteins, no active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer was produced. Active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer was only synthesized under conditions, in which both Trm8 and Trm82 mRNAs were co-translated. To address the RNA recognition mechanism of the Trm8-Trm82 complex, we investigated methyl acceptance activities of eight truncated yeast tRNA(Phe) transcripts. In this meeting, we demonstrate that yeast Trm8-Trm82 has stricter recognition requirements for the tRNA molecule as compared to the bacterial enzyme, TrmB.

  4. Pyrrhocoricin, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide derived from insect, inhibits the translation process in the cell-free Escherichia coli protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Kondo, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Shun; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that pyrrhocoricin, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide (PrAMP), killed sensitive species in a dose-dependent manner by specifically binding to DnaK. Here, on the basis of the finding that DnaK-deficient Escherichia coli strains are susceptible to PrAMPs, we used pyrrhocoricin to investigate internal targets other than DnaK. Using conventional antibiotics (bleomycin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin) that have known modes of action, first, we validated the availability of an assay using a cell-free rapid translation system (RTS), which is an in vitro protein synthesis system based on E. coli lysate, for evaluating inhibition of protein synthesis. We found that, similarly to bleomycin and streptomycin, pyrrhocoricin inhibited GFP synthesis in RTS in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, blockage of transcription and translation steps in RTS was individually estimated using RT-PCR after gene expression to determine mRNA products and using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the amounts of GFP expressed from purified mRNA, respectively. The results demonstrated that this inhibition of GFP synthesis by pyrrhocoricin did not occur at the transcription step but rather at the translation step, in a manner similar to that of GFP synthesis by streptomycin, an inhibitor of the translation step by causing misreading of tRNA. These results suggest that RTS is a powerful assay system for determining if antimicrobial peptides inhibit protein synthesis and its transcription and/or translation steps. This is the first study to have shown that pyrrhocoricin inhibited protein synthesis by specifically repressing the translation step. PMID:26472128

  5. Insights to the effects of free cells on community structure of attached cells and chalcopyrite bioleaching during different stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2016-01-01

    The effects of free cells on community structure of attached cells and chalcopyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus sp. during different stages were investigated. The attached cells of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans owned the community advantage from 14thd to the end of bioprocess in the normal system. The community structure of attached cells was greatly influenced in the free cells-deficient systems. Compared to A. thiooxidans, the attached cells community of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans had a higher dependence on its free cells. Meanwhile, the analysis of key biochemical parameters revealed that the effects of free cells on chalcopyrite bioleaching in different stages were diverse, ranging from 32.8% to 64.3%. The bioleaching contribution of free cells of A. ferrooxidans in the stationary stage (8-14thd) was higher than those of A. thiooxidans, while the situation was gradually reversed in the jarosite passivation inhibited stage (26-40thd). These results may be useful in guiding chalcopyrite bioleaching.

  6. Insights to the effects of free cells on community structure of attached cells and chalcopyrite bioleaching during different stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2016-01-01

    The effects of free cells on community structure of attached cells and chalcopyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus sp. during different stages were investigated. The attached cells of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans owned the community advantage from 14thd to the end of bioprocess in the normal system. The community structure of attached cells was greatly influenced in the free cells-deficient systems. Compared to A. thiooxidans, the attached cells community of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans had a higher dependence on its free cells. Meanwhile, the analysis of key biochemical parameters revealed that the effects of free cells on chalcopyrite bioleaching in different stages were diverse, ranging from 32.8% to 64.3%. The bioleaching contribution of free cells of A. ferrooxidans in the stationary stage (8-14thd) was higher than those of A. thiooxidans, while the situation was gradually reversed in the jarosite passivation inhibited stage (26-40thd). These results may be useful in guiding chalcopyrite bioleaching. PMID:26492170

  7. Scale-free dynamics of somatic adaptability in immune system

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Shiro

    2009-01-01

    The long-time dynamics of somatic adaptability in immune system is simulated by a simple physical model. The immune system described by the model exhibits a scale free behavior as is observed in living systems. The balance between the positive and negative feedbacks of the model leads to a robust immune system where the positive one corresponds to the formation of memory cells and the negative one to immunosuppression. Also the immunosenescence of the system is discussed based on the time-dependence of the epigenetic landscape of the adaptive immune cells in the shape space.

  8. Plasmid-free T7-based Escherichia coli expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striedner, Gerald; Pfaffenzeller, Irene; Markus, Luchner; Nemecek, Sabine; Grabherr, Reingard; Bayer, Karl

    2010-03-01

    In order to release host cells from plasmid-mediated increases in metabolic load and high gene dosages, we developed a plasmid-free, T7-based E. coli expression system in which the target gene is site-specifically integrated into the genome of the host. With this system, plasmid-loss, a source of instability for conventional expression systems, was eliminated. At the same time, system leakiness, a challenging problem with recombinant systems, was minimized. The efficiency of the T7 RNA polymerase compensates for low gene dosage and provides high rates of recombinant gene expression without fatal consequences to host metabolism. Relative to conventional pET systems, this system permits improved process stability and increases the host cell's capacity for recombinant gene expression, resulting in higher product yields. The stability of the plasmid-free system was proven in chemostat cultivation for 40 generations in a non-induced and for 10 generations in a fully induced state. For this reason plasmid-free systems benefit the development of continuous production processes with E. coli. However, time and effort of the more complex cloning procedure have to be considered in relation to the advantages of plasmid-free systems in upstream-processing. PMID:19891007

  9. Cell-free translation of bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Purchio, A F; Larson, R.; Torborg, L L; Collett, M S

    1984-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA was translated in a reticulocyte cell-free protein synthesizing system. The purified, 8.2-kilobase, virus-specific RNA species was unable to serve an an efficient message unless it was denatured immediately before translation. In this case, several polypeptides, ranging in molecular weight from 50,000 to 150,000 and most of which were immunoprecipitated by bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific antiserum, were synthesized in vitro. When polyribosomes were used to...

  10. On-Orbit, Immuno-Based, Label-Free White Blood Cell Counting System with Microelectromechanical Sensor Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Aurora Flight Sciences, in partnership with Draper Laboratory, has developed a miniaturized system to count white blood cells in microgravity environments. The system uses MEMS technology to simultaneously count total white blood cells, the five white blood cell differential subgroups, and various lymphocyte subtypes. The OILWBCS-MEMS detection technology works by immobilizing an array of white blood cell-specific antibodies on small, gold-coated membranes. When blood flows across the membranes, specific cells' surface protein antigens bind to their corresponding antibodies. This binding can be measured and correlated to cell counts. In Phase I, the partners demonstrated surface chemistry sensitivity and specificity for total white blood cells and two lymphocyte subtypes. In Phase II, a functional prototype demonstrated end-to-end operation. This rugged, miniaturized device requires minimal blood sample preparation and will be useful for both space flight and terrestrial applications.

  11. The study of responses to 'model' DNA breaks induced by restriction endonucleases in cells and cell-free systems: achievements and difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of restriction endonucleases (RE) as a means of implicating DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) in cellular responses is reviewed. The introduction of RE into cells leads to many of the responses known to be characteristic of radiation damage -cell killing, chromosomal aberration, oncogenic transformation, gene mutation and amplification. Additionally, radiosensitive cell lines are hypersensitive to RE, including those from the human disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. However, quantitation of response and comparisons of the effectiveness of different RE are difficult, partly because of unknown activity and lifetime of RE in the cell. Re-induced dsb have also been used to reveal molecular mechanisms of repair and misrepair at specific sites in DNA. Dsb have been implicated in recombination processes including those leading to illegitimate rejoining (formation of deletions and rearrangements) at short sequence features in DNA. Also model dsb act as a signal to activate other cellular processes, which may influence or indirectly cause some responses, including cell death. In these signalling responses the detailed chemistry at the break site may not be very important, perhaps explaining why there is considerable overlap in responses to RE and to ionizing radiations. (author)

  12. Release of cell-free ice nuclei by Erwinia herbicola.

    OpenAIRE

    Phelps, P; Giddings, T. H.; Prochoda, M; Fall, R

    1986-01-01

    Several ice-nucleating bacterial strains, including Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas syringae isolates, were examined for their ability to shed ice nuclei into the growth medium. Only E. herbicola isolates shed cell-free ice nuclei active at -2 to -10 degrees C. These cell-free nuclei exhibited a freezing spectrum similar to that of ice nuclei found on whole cells, both above and below -5 degrees C. Partially purified cell-free nuclei were examined by density gradie...

  13. Cell-free DNA: Comparison of Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Pe'er; Shani, Hagit; Evans, Mark I

    2016-06-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA screening for Down syndrome has gained rapid acceptance over the past few years with increasing market penetration. Three main laboratory methodologies are currently used: a massive parallel shotgun sequencing (MPSS), a targeted massive parallel sequencing (t-MPS) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based approach. Although each of these technologies has its own advantages and disadvantages, the performance of all was shown to be comparable and superior to that of traditional first-trimester screening for the detection of trisomy 21 in a routine prenatal population. Differences in performance were predominantly shown for chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21. Understanding the limitations and benefits of each technology is essential for proper counseling to patients. These technologies, as well as few investigational technologies described in this review, carry a great potential beyond screening for the common aneuploidies. PMID:27235906

  14. Cell-Free Metabolic Engineering: Biomanufacturing beyond the cell

    OpenAIRE

    Dudley, Quentin M.; Karim, Ashty S.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology and microbial metabolic engineering are poised to help meet the growing demand for sustainable, low-cost commodity chemicals and natural products, yet the fraction of biochemicals amenable to commercial production remains limited. Common problems afflicting the current state-of-the-art include low volumetric productivities, build-up of toxic intermediates or products, and byproduct losses via competing pathways. To overcome these limitations, cell-free metabolic engin...

  15. Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in spontaneous abortion with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both. The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001 than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002 and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037. The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852-0.945 and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903-0.975, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA

  16. Riemann pendulum in free fall systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The possible detection in space and in different free fall system of the tidal effects via a Riemann pendulum rate, is considered. The possibility to perform such an experiment for educational purpouse by a Moire' or Holographic double exposure detection is described. The International Space Station may obtain high quality test of 3D Riemann pendulum effects.

  17. Design and exergetic analysis of a novel carbon free tri-generation system for hydrogen, power and heat production from natural gas, based on combined solid oxide fuel and electrolyser cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikaris, N.; Hofmann, Ph.; Spyrakis, S. [Laboratory of Steam Boilers and Thermal Plants, School of Mechanical Engineering, Thermal Engineering Section, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Ave., Zografou, 15780 Athens (Greece); Panopoulos, K.D. [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 4th km N.R. Ptolemais-Kozani, P.O. Box 95, 50200 Ptolemais (Greece); Kakaras, E. [Laboratory of Steam Boilers and Thermal Plants, School of Mechanical Engineering, Thermal Engineering Section, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Ave., Zografou, 15780 Athens (Greece); Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 4th km N.R. Ptolemais-Kozani, P.O. Box 95, 50200 Ptolemais (Greece)

    2010-03-15

    The Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) are able to operate in two modes: (a) the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) that produce electricity and heat and (b) the Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cells (SOEC) that consume electricity and heat to electrolyse water and produce hydrogen and oxygen. The present paper presents a carbon free SOEC/SOFC combined system for the production of hydrogen, electricity and heat (tri-generation) from natural gas fuel. Hydrogen can be locally used as automobile fuel whereas the oxygen produced in the SOEC is used to combust the depleted fuel from the SOFC, which is producing electricity and heat from natural gas. In order to achieve efficient carbon capture in such a system, water steam should be used as the SOEC anode sweep gas, to allow the production of nitrogen free flue gases. The SOEC and SOFC operations were matched through modeling of all components in Aspenplus trademark. The exergetic efficiency of the proposed decentralised system is 28.25% for power generation and 18.55% for production of hydrogen. The system is (a) carbon free because it offers an almost pure pressurised CO{sub 2} stream to be driven for fixation via parallel pipelines to the natural gas feed, (b) does not require any additional water for its operation and (c) offers 26.53% of its energetic input as hot water for applications. (author)

  18. LIF-free embryonic stem cell culture in simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Kawahara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF is an indispensable factor for maintaining mouse embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency. A feeder layer and serum are also needed to maintain an undifferentiated state, however, such animal derived materials need to be eliminated for clinical applications. Therefore, a more reliable ES cell culture technique is required. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We cultured mouse ES cells in simulated microgravity using a 3D-clinostat. We used feeder-free and serum-free media without LIF. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we show that simulated microgravity allows novel LIF-free and animal derived material-free culture methods for mouse ES cells.

  19. Photovoltaic power generation system free of bypass diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-07-28

    A photovoltaic power generation system that includes a solar panel that is free of bypass diodes is described herein. The solar panel includes a plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules, wherein at least two of photovoltaic sub-modules in the plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules are electrically connected in parallel. A photovoltaic sub-module includes a plurality of groups of electrically connected photovoltaic cells, wherein at least two of the groups are electrically connected in series. A photovoltaic group includes a plurality of strings of photovoltaic cells, wherein a string of photovoltaic cells comprises a plurality of photovoltaic cells electrically connected in series. The strings of photovoltaic cells are electrically connected in parallel, and the photovoltaic cells are microsystem-enabled photovoltaic cells.

  20. A Free Energy Principle for Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friston Karl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a free energy principle that tries to explain the ability of biological systems to resist a natural tendency to disorder. It appeals to circular causality of the sort found in synergetic formulations of self-organization (e.g., the slaving principle and models of coupled dynamical systems, using nonlinear Fokker Planck equations. Here, circular causality is induced by separating the states of a random dynamical system into external and internal states, where external states are subject to random fluctuations and internal states are not. This reduces the problem to finding some (deterministic dynamics of the internal states that ensure the system visits a limited number of external states; in other words, the measure of its (random attracting set, or the Shannon entropy of the external states is small. We motivate a solution using a principle of least action based on variational free energy (from statistical physics and establish the conditions under which it is formally equivalent to the information bottleneck method. This approach has proved useful in understanding the functional architecture of the brain. The generality of variational free energy minimisation and corresponding information theoretic formulations may speak to interesting applications beyond the neurosciences; e.g., in molecular or evolutionary biology.

  1. Preparation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-free extract for in vitro translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng; Sachs, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell-free in vitro translation systems have been in use since the 1970s. These systems can faithfully synthesize polypeptides when programmed with mRNA, enabling the production of polypeptides for analysis as well as permitting analyses of the cis- and trans-acting factors that regulate translation. Here we describe the preparation and use of cell-free translation systems from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Efficient cell-free expression with the endogenous E. Coli RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems use bacteriophage RNA polymerases, such as T7, to synthesize large amounts of recombinant proteins. These systems are used for many applications in biotechnology, such as proteomics. Recently, informational processes have been reconstituted in vitro with cell-free systems. These synthetic approaches, however, have been seriously limited by a lack of transcription modularity. The current available cell-free systems have been optimized to work with bacteriophage RNA polymerases, which put significant restrictions to engineer processes related to biological information. The development of efficient cell-free systems with broader transcription capabilities is required to study complex informational processes in vitro. Results In this work, an efficient cell-free expression system that uses the endogenous E. coli RNA polymerase only and sigma factor 70 for transcription was prepared. Approximately 0.75 mg/ml of Firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein were produced in batch mode. A plasmid was optimized with different regulatory parts to increase the expression. In addition, a new eGFP was engineered that is more translatable in cell-free systems than the original eGFP. The protein production was characterized with three different adenosine triphosphate (ATP regeneration systems: creatine phosphate (CP, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP, and 3-phosphoglyceric acid (3-PGA. The maximum protein production was obtained with 3-PGA. Preparation of the crude extract was streamlined to a simple routine procedure that takes 12 hours including cell culture. Conclusions Although it uses the endogenous E. coli transcription machinery, this cell-free system can produce active proteins in quantities comparable to bacteriophage systems. The E. coli transcription provides much more possibilities to engineer informational processes in vitro. Many E. coli promoters/operators specific to sigma

  3. A cell-free extract from yeast cells for studying mRNA turnover.

    OpenAIRE

    Vreken, P.; Buddelmeijer, N.; Raué, H A

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cell-free extract from yeast cells that reproduces the differences observed in vivo in the rate of turnover of individual yeast mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the degradation of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) mRNA in this system demonstrated that both natural and synthetically prepared PGK transcripts are degraded by the same pathway previously established by us in vivo, consisting of endonucleolytic cleavage at a number of 5'-GGUG-3' sequence motifs within a short target...

  4. Contact-free single-cell cultivation by negative dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Magnus S; Uhlig, Katja [Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering (IBMT), Am Muehlenberg 13, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Schnelle, Thomas [Zimmermann and Partner, European Patent Attorneys, Oranienburger Strasse 90, 10178 Berlin (Germany); Mueller, Torsten [JPK Instruments AG, Aufgang C, Haus 2, Bouchestrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: magnus.jaeger@ibmt.fraunhofer.de

    2008-09-07

    In parallel to recent progress of high-content analysis in cell biology, negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) has continuously evolved as a potent tool for contact-free manipulation and investigation of single cells. As such, it can be especially beneficial for the handling of rare and valuable cells, e.g. in stem cell research, immunology and autologous therapy. Current nDEP applications are mainly based on flow-through systems where a small volume or single cells are pumped through microfluidic channels and analysed in seconds to minutes. Such short-term electric field exposures were repeatedly shown to be physiologically harmless. Conditions, however, might change in longer experiments when damages may accumulate. Therefore, we focus on potential limits to long-term nDEP application, with yeast serving as a model organism. Cells are reported to be successfully cultivated over several hours while suspended contact-freely in cell medium by nDEP. From comparisons of the cell division in nDEP structures under different electric conditions, conclusions are drawn with respect to which parameters govern the possible stress on the cells and how to avoid it. Firstly, the observed frequency dependence hints at an influence of the membrane polarization. Secondly, the inhibition of proliferation at high voltages is found to be overcome by external cooling of the microchips. This implies thermal effects on the cells. The warming is further examined by infrared (IR) thermometry. Despite its inherent drawbacks, IR provides a quick and easy method of determining the temperature of microfluidic systems without interfering local probes or reporter substances.

  5. The scale-free dynamics of eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Aon

    Full Text Available Temporal organization of biological processes requires massively parallel processing on a synchronized time-base. We analyzed time-series data obtained from the bioenergetic oscillatory outputs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolated cardiomyocytes utilizing Relative Dispersional (RDA and Power Spectral (PSA analyses. These analyses revealed broad frequency distributions and evidence for long-term memory in the observed dynamics. Moreover RDA and PSA showed that the bioenergetic dynamics in both systems show fractal scaling over at least 3 orders of magnitude, and that this scaling obeys an inverse power law. Therefore we conclude that in S. cerevisiae and cardiomyocytes the dynamics are scale-free in vivo. Applying RDA and PSA to data generated from an in silico model of mitochondrial function indicated that in yeast and cardiomyocytes the underlying mechanisms regulating the scale-free behavior are similar. We validated this finding in vivo using single cells, and attenuating the activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane anion channel with 4-chlorodiazepam to show that the oscillation of NAD(PH and reactive oxygen species (ROS can be abated in these two evolutionarily distant species. Taken together these data strongly support our hypothesis that the generation of ROS, coupled to redox cycling, driven by cytoplasmic and mitochondrial processes, are at the core of the observed rhythmicity and scale-free dynamics. We argue that the operation of scale-free bioenergetic dynamics plays a fundamental role to integrate cellular function, while providing a framework for robust, yet flexible, responses to the environment.

  6. A portable free space optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yong; Lu, Xingguang; Yang, Jinglin; Chen, Jing; Hao, Zhonggang

    2005-08-01

    A portable protocol independent free space optical communication terminal was developed, which enables customer to quickly deploy optical bandwidth services for applications such as fiber extension, wild field point to point communication and wireless backhaul while avoiding costly and time-consuming fiber installation. By using specially designed optical components and optical-mechanical structure, the system is very compact and effective, can establish optical link within a few minutes, with total weight 4kg, size 160 x 360 x 155 mm, effective transmitting/receiving aperture 40mm, data rate 100Mbps, maximum communication distance 1500m. The system and experiments are presented in the paper.

  7. Overview of OBPR Free Flyer System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ronald Y.; Lieberman, Alvin S.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following:OBPR free flyer theme. OBPR free flyer technical activity last 2 years. GSFC integrated mission design center (IMDC) studies. Free flyer assumptions and goals. Free flyer total payload reference concept capabilities. FFM reference payload requirements. FFM mission. FFM medium summary. FFH block diagram FFH spacecraft configuration.concept.

  8. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages.

  9. BRAF Mutation Testing in Cell-Free DNA from the Plasma of Patients with Advanced Cancers Using a Rapid, Automated Molecular Diagnostics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janku, Filip; Huang, Helen J; Claes, Bart; Falchook, Gerald S; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Ramzanali, Nishma M; Nitti, Giovanni; Cabrilo, Goran; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Naing, Aung; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Wheler, Jennifer J; Karp, Daniel D; Holley, Veronica R; Zinner, Ralph G; Subbiah, Vivek; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Kopetz, Scott; Overman, Michael J; Kee, Bryan K; Patel, Sapna; Devogelaere, Benoit; Sablon, Erwin; Maertens, Geert; Mills, Gordon B; Kurzrock, Razelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2016-06-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA from plasma offers an easily obtainable material for BRAF mutation analysis for diagnostics and response monitoring. In this study, plasma-derived cfDNA samples from patients with progressing advanced cancers or malignant histiocytosis with known BRAF(V600) status from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors were tested using a prototype version of the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test, a fully integrated real-time PCR-based test with turnaround time about 90 minutes. Of 160 patients, BRAF(V600) mutations were detected in 62 (39%) archival FFPE tumor samples and 47 (29%) plasma cfDNA samples. The two methods had overall agreement in 141 patients [88%; κ, 0.74; SE, 0.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.63-0.85]. Idylla had a sensitivity of 73% (95% CI, 0.60-0.83) and specificity of 98% (95% CI, 0.93-1.00). A higher percentage, but not concentration, of BRAF(V600) cfDNA in the wild-type background (>2% vs. ≤ 2%) was associated with shorter overall survival (OS; P = 0.005) and in patients with BRAF mutations in the tissue, who were receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors, shorter time to treatment failure (TTF; P = 0.001). Longitudinal monitoring demonstrated that decreasing levels of BRAF(V600) cfDNA were associated with longer TTF (P = 0.045). In conclusion, testing for BRAF(V600) mutations in plasma cfDNA using the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test has acceptable concordance with standard testing of tumor tissue. A higher percentage of mutant BRAF(V600) in cfDNA corresponded with shorter OS and in patients receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors also with shorter TTF. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1397-404. ©2016 AACR.

  10. BRAF Mutation Testing in Cell-Free DNA from the Plasma of Patients with Advanced Cancers Using a Rapid, Automated Molecular Diagnostics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janku, Filip; Huang, Helen J; Claes, Bart; Falchook, Gerald S; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Ramzanali, Nishma M; Nitti, Giovanni; Cabrilo, Goran; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Naing, Aung; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Wheler, Jennifer J; Karp, Daniel D; Holley, Veronica R; Zinner, Ralph G; Subbiah, Vivek; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Kopetz, Scott; Overman, Michael J; Kee, Bryan K; Patel, Sapna; Devogelaere, Benoit; Sablon, Erwin; Maertens, Geert; Mills, Gordon B; Kurzrock, Razelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2016-06-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA from plasma offers an easily obtainable material for BRAF mutation analysis for diagnostics and response monitoring. In this study, plasma-derived cfDNA samples from patients with progressing advanced cancers or malignant histiocytosis with known BRAF(V600) status from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors were tested using a prototype version of the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test, a fully integrated real-time PCR-based test with turnaround time about 90 minutes. Of 160 patients, BRAF(V600) mutations were detected in 62 (39%) archival FFPE tumor samples and 47 (29%) plasma cfDNA samples. The two methods had overall agreement in 141 patients [88%; κ, 0.74; SE, 0.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.63-0.85]. Idylla had a sensitivity of 73% (95% CI, 0.60-0.83) and specificity of 98% (95% CI, 0.93-1.00). A higher percentage, but not concentration, of BRAF(V600) cfDNA in the wild-type background (>2% vs. ≤ 2%) was associated with shorter overall survival (OS; P = 0.005) and in patients with BRAF mutations in the tissue, who were receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors, shorter time to treatment failure (TTF; P = 0.001). Longitudinal monitoring demonstrated that decreasing levels of BRAF(V600) cfDNA were associated with longer TTF (P = 0.045). In conclusion, testing for BRAF(V600) mutations in plasma cfDNA using the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test has acceptable concordance with standard testing of tumor tissue. A higher percentage of mutant BRAF(V600) in cfDNA corresponded with shorter OS and in patients receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors also with shorter TTF. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1397-404. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27207774

  11. Community dynamics of attached and free cells and the effects of attached cells on chalcopyrite bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hailin; Feng, Shoushuai; Xin, Yu; Wang, Wu

    2014-02-01

    The community dynamics of attached and free cells of Acidithiobacillus sp. were investigated and compared during chalcopyrite bioleaching process. In the mixed strains system, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the dominant species at the early stage while Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans owned competitive advantage from the middle stage to the end of bioprocess. Meanwhile, compared to A. ferrooxidans, more significant effects of attached cells on free biomass with A. thiooxidans were shown in either the pure or mixed strains systems. Moreover, the effects of attached cells on key chemical parameters were also studied in different adsorption-deficient systems. Consistently, the greatest reduction of key chemical ion was shown with A. thiooxidans and the loss of bioleaching efficiency was high to 50.5%. These results all demonstrated the bioleaching function of attached cells was more efficient than the free cells, especially with A. thiooxidans. These notable results would help us to further understand the chalcopyrite bioleaching.

  12. Cell-free biology: exploiting the interface between synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. Calvin; Jewett, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Just as synthetic organic chemistry once revolutionized the ability of chemists to build molecules (including those that did not exist in nature) following a basic set of design rules, cell-free synthetic biology is beginning to provide an improved toolbox and faster process for not only harnessing but also expanding the chemistry of life. At the interface between chemistry and biology, research in cell-free synthetic systems is proceeding in two different directions: using synthetic biology ...

  13. Cell-Free Expression of Protein Kinase A for Rapid Activity Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Leippe, Donna M.; Kate Qin Zhao; Kevin Hsiao; Slater, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein analysis often calls for lengthy, laborious in vivo protein expression and purification, and can be complicated by the lack of stability of the purified protein. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a simplified procedure for functional protein analysis on magnetic particles using cell-free protein synthesis of the catalytic subunit of human cAMP-dependent protein kinase as a HaloTag® fusion protein. The cell-free protein synthesis systems provide quick access t...

  14. Free Heme and the Polymerization of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Uzunova, Veselina V.; Pan, Weichun; Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    In search of novel control parameters for the polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS), the primary pathogenic event of sickle cell anemia, we explore the role of free heme, which may be excessively released in sickle erythrocytes. We show that the concentration of free heme in HbS solutions typically used in the laboratory is 0.02–0.04 mole heme/mole HbS. We show that dialysis of small molecules out of HbS solutions arrests HbS polymerization. The addition of 100–260 μM of free heme to...

  15. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  16. Escherichia coli NemA is an efficient chromate reductase that can be biologically immobilized to provide a cell free system for remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Robins

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is a serious and widespread environmental pollutant. Although many bacteria have been identified that can transform highly water-soluble and toxic Cr(VI to insoluble and relatively non-toxic Cr(III, bacterial bioremediation of Cr(VI pollution is limited by a number of issues, in particular chromium toxicity to the remediating cells. To address this we sought to develop an immobilized enzymatic system for Cr(VI remediation. To identify novel Cr(VI reductase enzymes we first screened cell extracts from an Escherichia coli library of soluble oxidoreductases derived from a range of bacteria, but found that a number of these enzymes can reduce Cr(VI indirectly, via redox intermediates present in the crude extracts. Instead, activity assays for 15 candidate enzymes purified as His6-tagged proteins identified E. coli NemA as a highly efficient Cr(VI reductase (k(cat/K(M= 1.1×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 with NADH as cofactor. Fusion of nemA to the polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene phaC from Ralstonia eutropha enabled high-level biosynthesis of functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate granules displaying stable and active NemA on their surface. When these granules were combined with either Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase or Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase as a cofactor regenerating partner, high levels of chromate transformation were observed with only low initial concentrations of expensive NADH cofactor being required, the overall reaction being powered by consumption of the cheap sacrificial substrates glucose or formic acid, respectively. This system therefore offers promise as an economic solution for ex situ Cr(VI remediation.

  17. Flexible ITO-Free Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Krebs, Frederik C

    2013-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is the material-of-choice for transparent conductors in any optoelectronic application. However, scarce resources of indium and high market demand of ITO have created large price fluctuations and future supply concerns. In polymer solar cells (PSCs), ITO is the single......-most cost driving factor due to expensive raw materials and processing. Given the limited lifetime and stability of PSCs as compared with other mature technologies such as silicon-based solar cells, the technological future of PSCs beyond that of academic interests rests in reducing cost of production......-cost alternatives to ITO suitable for use in PSCs. These alternatives belong to four material groups: polymers; metal and polymer composites; metal nanowires and ultra-thin metal films; and carbon nanotubes and graphene. We further present the progress of employing these alternatives in PSCs and identify future...

  18. Free Extracellular miRNA Functionally Targets Cells by Transfecting Exosomes from Their Companion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bryniarski

    Full Text Available Lymph node and spleen cells of mice doubly immunized by epicutaneous and intravenous hapten application produce a suppressive component that inhibits the action of the effector T cells that mediate contact sensitivity reactions. We recently re-investigated this phenomenon in an immunological system. CD8+ T lymphocyte-derived exosomes transferred suppressive miR-150 to the effector T cells antigen-specifically due to exosome surface coat of antibody light chains made by B1a lymphocytes. Extracellular RNA (exRNA is protected from plasma RNases by carriage in exosomes or by chaperones. Exosome transfer of functional RNA to target cells is well described, whereas the mechanism of transfer of exRNA free of exosomes remains unclear. In the current study we describe extracellular miR-150, extracted from exosomes, yet still able to mediate antigen-specific suppression. We have determined that this was due to miR-150 association with antibody-coated exosomes produced by B1a cell companions of the effector T cells, which resulted in antigen-specific suppression of their function. Thus functional cell targeting by free exRNA can proceed by transfecting companion cell exosomes that then transfer RNA cargo to the acceptor cells. This contrasts with the classical view on release of RNA-containing exosomes from the multivesicular bodies for subsequent intercellular targeting. This new alternate pathway for transfer of exRNA between cells has distinct biological and immunological significance, and since most human blood exRNA is not in exosomes may be relevant to evaluation and treatment of diseases.

  19. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  20. Free-Flying Magnetometer Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, B.; Javadi, H.; Spencer, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Free-Flying Magnetometer (FFM) is an autonomous "sensorcraft" developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy sounding rocket mission. This mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University and JPL. The science goal of the mission was the study of current filamentation phenomena in the northern auroral region through multipoint measurements of magnetic field. The technical objective of the mission was the proof of concept of the JPL FFM design and the demonstration of an in-situ multipoint measurement technique employing many free-flying spacecraft. Four FFMs were successfully deployed from a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. These hockey-puck-sized (80 mm diameter, 38 mm. height, 250 gram mass) free flyers each carry a miniature 3-axis flux-gate magnetometer that output +/- 2 V signals corresponding to a +/- 60,000 nT measurement range for each axis. The FFM uses a synchronized four-channel Sigma(Delta) Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) having a dynamic range of +/- 2.5V and converting at a rate of 279 samples/second/channel. Three channels are used to digitize the magnetometer signals to 17-bit (1.144 nT/bit) resolution. The fourth ADC channel is multiplexed for system monitoring of four temperature sensors and two battery voltages. The FFM also contains two sun sensors, a laser diode which emits a fan-shaped beam, a miniature S-band transmitter for direct communication to the ground station antennas, an ultra-stable Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) clock, an integrated data subsystem implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), a 4 Mbit Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) for data storage and Lithium Thionyl Chloride batteries for power. Communicating commands to the FFM prior to deployment is achieved with an infrared (IR) link. The FFM IR receiver responds to 9-bit pulse coded signals that are generated by an IR Light Emitting

  1. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  2. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: Detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we repor...

  3. Canine and Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Serum Free Media Have Altered Immunophenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Kaitlin C.; Kol, Amir; Shahbenderian, Salpi; Granick, Jennifer L.; Walker, Naomi J.; Borjesson, Dori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is being increasingly used to treat dogs and horses with naturally-occurring diseases. However these animals also serve as critical large animal models for ongoing translation of cell therapy products to the human market. MSC manufacture for clinical use mandates improvement in cell culture systems to meet demands for higher MSC numbers and removal of xeno-proteins (i.e. fetal bovine serum, FBS). While serum-free media (SFM) is commercially available, its a...

  4. Processing of DNA for nonhomologous end-joining by cell-free extract

    OpenAIRE

    Budman, Joe; Chu, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    In mammalian cells, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repairs DNA double-strand breaks created by ionizing radiation and V(D)J recombination. We have developed a cell-free system capable of processing and joining noncompatible DNA ends. The system had key features of NHEJ in vivo, including dependence on Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4/Ligase4. The NHEJ reaction had striking properties. Processing of noncompatible ends involved polymerase and nuclease activities that often stabilized the alignment of ...

  5. Current Collecting Grids for ITO-Free Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galagan, Yulia; Zimmermann, Birger; Coenen, Erica W. C.;

    2012-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) free polymer solar cells prepared by ink jet printing a composite front electrode comprising silver grid lines and a semitransparent PEDOT:PSS conductor are demonstrated. The effect of grid line density is explored for a large series of devices and a careful modeling study...

  6. Systems and methods for free space optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Warren W [Benton City, WA; Aker, Pamela M [Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2011-05-10

    Free space optical communication methods and systems, according to various aspects are described. The methods and systems are characterized by transmission of data through free space with a digitized optical signal acquired using wavelength modulation, and by discrimination between bit states in the digitized optical signal using a spectroscopic absorption feature of a chemical substance.

  7. Modular PEM Fuel Cell SCADA & Simulator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Segura

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a Supervision, Control, Data Acquisition and Simulation (SCADA & Simulator system that allows for real-time training in the actual operation of a modular PEM fuel cell system. This SCADA & Simulator system consists of a free software tool that operates in real time and simulates real situations like failures and breakdowns in the system. This developed SCADA & Simulator system allows us to properly operate a fuel cell and helps us to understand how fuel cells operate and what devices are needed to configure and run the fuel cells, from the individual stack up to the whole fuel cell system. The SCADA & Simulator system governs a modular system integrated by three PEM fuel cells achieving power rates higher than tens of kilowatts.

  8. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L;

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic ...

  9. Scale-Free Properties in Traffic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new model of evolution networks, which is based on the evolution of the traffic flow. In our method, the network growth does not take into account preferential attachment, and the attachment of new node is independent of the degree of nodes. Our aim is that employing the theory of evolution network, we give a further understanding about the dynamical evolution of the traffic flow. We investigate the probability distributions and scaling properties of the proposed model. The simulation results indicate that in the proposed model, the distribution of the output connections can be well described by scale-free distribution. Moreover, the distribution of the connections is largely related to the traffic flow states, such as the exponential distribution (i.e., the scale-free distribution) and random distribution etc.

  10. Cell-Free Fetal DNA Testing for Prenatal Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, S; Hill, M; Chitty, L S

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis and screening have undergone rapid development in recent years, with advances in molecular technology driving the change. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down syndrome as a highly sensitive screening test is now available worldwide through the commercial sector with many countries moving toward implementation into their publically funded maternity systems. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) can now be performed for definitive diagnosis of some recessive and X-linked conditions, rather than just paternally inherited dominant and de novo conditions. NIPD/T offers pregnant couples greater choice during their pregnancy as these safer methods avoid the risk of miscarriage associated with invasive testing. As the cost of sequencing falls and technology develops further, there may well be potential for whole exome and whole genome sequencing of the unborn fetus using cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. How such assays can or should be implemented into the clinical setting remain an area of significant debate, but it is clear that the progress made to date for safer prenatal testing has been welcomed by expectant couples and their healthcare professionals. PMID:27645814

  11. Characterizing and prototyping genetic networks with cell-free transcription-translation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Chappell, James; Sun, Zachary Z; Murray, Richard M; Noireaux, Vincent; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-09-15

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to engineer cellular behavior by engineering synthetic gene networks for a variety of biotechnology and medical applications. The process of engineering gene networks often involves an iterative 'design-build-test' cycle, whereby the parts and connections that make up the network are built, characterized and varied until the desired network function is reached. Many advances have been made in the design and build portions of this cycle. However, the slow process of in vivo characterization of network function often limits the timescale of the testing step. Cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems offer a simple and fast alternative to performing these characterizations in cells. Here we provide an overview of a cell-free TX-TL system that utilizes the native Escherichia coli TX-TL machinery, thereby allowing a large repertoire of parts and networks to be characterized. As a way to demonstrate the utility of cell-free TX-TL, we illustrate the characterization of two genetic networks: an RNA transcriptional cascade and a protein regulated incoherent feed-forward loop. We also provide guidelines for designing TX-TL experiments to characterize new genetic networks. We end with a discussion of current and emerging applications of cell free systems.

  12. Large area shunt defect free GaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunt defects have been found to be the type of defect that can degrade and cause failure in GaAs solar cells. Because of their catastrophic effects, it is necessary to insure that no shunt defects are formed in the solar cell. A technique for fabricating large area shunt defect free GaAs solar cells has been investigated. A Be doped GaAlAs window layer was grown directly on a n-type GaAs substrate by isothermal liquid phase epitaxial growth (ILPE). By growing directly on the GaAs substrate and not growing the usual buffer, absorber, collector, and window layer combination, the fabrication is simplified and yields can be large. It was found that the Be from the liquid GaAlAs melt diffused into the GaAs to form a complete collector layer. Because the collector is complete, a shunt defect free solar cell is produced. The results of the ILPE growth are reported for both 5.1 cm2 and 0.12 cm2 solar cells. The technique is very versatile and may be used to fabricate larger area solar cells

  13. Systems cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred D; Ratushny, Alexander V; Aitchison, John D

    2014-09-15

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology.

  14. [The cell-free protein synthesis-based protein microarray technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Linli; Lin, Bicheng

    2010-12-01

    The major bottle-neck in the way of constructing high density protein microarray is the availability and stability of proteins. The traditional methods of generating protein arrays require the in-vivo expression, purification and immobilization of hundreds or thousands of proteins. The cell-free protein array technology employs cell-free expression systems to produce proteins directly onto surface from co-distributed or pre-arrayed DNA or RNA, thus avoiding the laborious and often costly processes of protein preparation in the traditional approach. Here we provide an overview of recently developed novel technology in cell free based protein microarray and their applications in protein interaction analysis, in antibody specificity and vaccine screening, and in biomarker assay. PMID:21375003

  15. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Narayan, K. S., E-mail: rajaram@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Rajaram, Sridhar, E-mail: rajaram@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in [International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.

  16. Solar cell concentrating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews fabrication techniques and testing facilities for different solar cells under concentration which have been developed and tested. It is also aimed to examine solar energy concentrators which are prospective candidates for photovoltaic concentrator systems. This may provide an impetus to the scientists working in the area of solar cell technology

  17. Defective thymine dimer excision by cell-free extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crude extracts of normal human diploid fibroblasts and of human peripheral blood lymphocytes excise thymine dimers from purified ultraviolet-irradiated DNA, or from the DNA presumably present as chromatin in unfractionated cell-free preparations of cells that had been labeled with [3H]thymidine. Extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum cells from complementation groups A, C, and D also excise thymine dimers from purified DNA, but extracts of group A cells do not excise dimers from the DNA of radioactively labeled unfractionated cell-free preparations

  18. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J; Baljeet Kaur; Naveed Sarwar; Michael J Seckl; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients wit...

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: New Opportunity in Cell-Free Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashoutan Sarvar, Davod; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are involved in tissue homeostasis through direct cell-to-cell interaction, as well as secretion of soluble factors. Exosomes are the sort of soluble biological mediators that obtained from MSCs cultured media in vitro. MSC-derived exosomes (MSC-DEs) which produced under physiological or pathological conditions are central mediators of intercellular communications by conveying proteins, lipids, mRNAs, siRNA, ribosomal RNAs and miRNAs to the neighbor or distant cells. MSC-DEs have been tested in various disease models, and the results have revealed that their functions are similar to those of MSCs. They have the supportive functions in organisms such as repairing tissue damages, suppressing inflammatory responses, and modulating the immune system. MSC-DEs are of great interest in the scope of regenerative medicine because of their unique capacity to the regeneration of the damaged tissues, and the present paper aims to introduce MSC-DEs as a novel hope in cell-free therapy.

  20. A novel mesh-free poly-cell Galerkin method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Zheng; X.H.Tang; J.H.Zhang; S.C.Wu

    2009-01-01

    A novel numerical method is explored and named as mesh-free poly-cell Galerkin method. An improved moving least-square (MLS) scheme is presented, which can avoid the matrix inversion in standard MLS and can be used to construct shape functions possessing delta Kronecher property. A new type of local support is introduced to ensure the alignment of integral domains with the cells of the background mesh, which will reduce the difficult in integration. An intensive numerical study is conducted to test the accuracy of the present method. It is observed that solutions with good accuracy can be obtained with the present method.

  1. GPS-Aided Gyroscope-Free Inertial Navigation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sungsu; Tan, Chin-Woo

    2002-01-01

    A gyroscope-free inertial navigation system uses only accelerometers to compute navigation trajectories. It is a low-cost navigation system, but its output error diverges at a rate that is an order faster than that of a conventional gyroscope-based system. So integration with an external reference system, such as the Global Positioning System, is necessary for long-term navigation applications. In this pa-per, an integrated GPS and gyroscope-free INS system is designed to achieve stable long-...

  2. Cell Maintenance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Living human cells require attachment to a suitable surface and special culture conditions in order to grow. These requirements are modified and amplified when cells are taken into a weightless environment. Special handling and maintenance systems are required for routine laboratory procedures conducted in the Orbiter and in the Spacelab. Methods were developed to maintain cells in special incubators designed for the Orbiter middeck, however, electrophoresis and other experiments require cells to be harvested off of the culture substrate before they can be processed or used. The cell transport assembly (CTA) was flown on STS-8, and results show that improvements are required to maintain adequate numbers of cells in this device longer than 48 hours. The life sciences middeck centrifuge probably can be used, but modifications will be required to transfer cells from the CTA and keep the cells sterile. Automated systems such as the Skylab SO-15 flight hardware and crew operated systems are being evaluated for use on the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and Space Station research modules.

  3. Parametric study on the advantages of weather-predicted control algorithm of free cooling ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predicted climate changes and the increased intensity of urban heat islands, as well as population aging, will increase the energy demand for the cooling of buildings in the future. However, the energy demand for cooling can be efficiently reduced by low-exergy free-cooling systems, which use natural processes, like evaporative cooling or the environmental cold of ambient air during night-time ventilation for the cooling of buildings. Unlike mechanical cooling systems, the energy for the operation of free-cooling system is needed only for the transport of the cold from the environment into the building. Because the natural cold potential is time dependent, the efficiency of free-cooling systems could be improved by introducing a weather forecast into the algorithm for the controlling. In the article, a numerical algorithm for the optimization of the operation of free-cooling systems with night-time ventilation is presented and validated on a test cell with different thermal storage capacities and during different ambient conditions. As a case study, the advantage of weather-predicted controlling is presented for a summer week for typical office room. The results show the necessity of the weather-predicted controlling of free-cooling ventilation systems for achieving the highest overall energy efficiency of such systems in comparison to mechanical cooling, better indoor comfort conditions and a decrease in the primary energy needed for cooling of the buildings. - Highlights: • Energy demand for cooling will increase due to climate changes and urban heat island • Free cooling could significantly reduce energy demand for cooling of the buildings. • Free cooling is more effective if weather prediction is included in operation control. • Weather predicted free cooling operation algorithm was validated on test cell. • Advantages of free-cooling on mechanical cooling is shown with different indicators

  4. Isolation and characterization of Wharton’s jelly-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from bovine umbilical cord and maintained in a defined serum-free three-dimensional system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Tereza C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibility for isolating bovine mesenchymal multipotent cells (MSCs from fetal adnexa is an interesting prospect because of the potential for these cells to be used for biotechnological applications. Bone marrow and adipose tissue are the most common sources of MSCs derived from adult animals. However, little knowledge exists about the characteristics of these progenitors cells in the bovine species. Traditionally most cell cultures are developed in two dimensional (2D environments. In mammalian tissue, cells connect not only to each other, but also support structures called the extracellular matrix (ECM. The three-dimensional (3D cultures may play a potential role in cell biotechnology, especially in tissue therapy. In this study, bovine-derived umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly (UC-WJ cells were isolated, characterized and maintained under 3D-free serum condition as an alternative of stem cell source for future cell banking. Results Bovine-derived UC-WJ cells, collected individually from 5 different umbilical cords sources, were successfully cultured under serum-free conditions and were capable to support 60 consecutive passages using commercial Stemline® mesenchymal stem cells expansion medium. Moreover, the UC-WJ cells were differentiated into osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes and neural-like cells and cultured separately. Additionally, the genes that are considered important embryonic, POU5F1 and ITSN1, and mesenchymal cell markers, CD105+, CD29+, CD73+ and CD90+ in MSCs were also expressed in five bovine-derived UC-WJ cultures. Morphology of proliferating cells typically appeared fibroblast-like spindle shape presenting the same viability and number. These characteristics were not affected during passages. There were 60 chromosomes at the metaphase, with acrocentric morphology and intense telomerase activity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of T cells in response to a mitogen stimulus was suppressed when

  5. Cell-free (RNA and cell-associated (DNA HIV-1 and postnatal transmission through breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ndirangu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transmission through breastfeeding remains important for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT in resource-limited settings. We quantify the relationship between cell-free (RNA and cell-associated (DNA shedding of HIV-1 virus in breastmilk and the risk of postnatal HIV-1 transmission in the first 6 months postpartum. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six HIV-positive mothers who transmitted HIV-1 by breastfeeding were matched to 36 non-transmitting HIV-1 infected mothers in a case-control study nested in a cohort of HIV-infected women. RNA and DNA were quantified in the same breastmilk sample taken at 6 weeks and 6 months. Cox regression analysis assessed the association between cell-free and cell-associated virus levels and risk of postnatal HIV-1 transmission. RESULTS: There were higher median levels of cell-free than cell-associated HIV-1 virus (per ml in breastmilk at 6 weeks and 6 months. Multivariably, adjusting for antenatal CD4 count and maternal plasma viral load, at 6 weeks, each 10-fold increase in cell-free or cell-associated levels (per ml was significantly associated with HIV-1 transmission but stronger for cell-associated than cell-free levels [2.47 (95% CI 1.33-4.59 vs. aHR 1.52 (95% CI, 1.17-1.96, respectively]. At 6 months, cell-free and cell-associated levels (per ml in breastmilk remained significantly associated with HIV-1 transmission but was stronger for cell-free than cell-associated levels [aHR 2.53 (95% CI 1.64-3.92 vs. 1.73 (95% CI 0.94-3.19, respectively]. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that cell-associated virus level (per ml is more important for early postpartum HIV-1 transmission (at 6 weeks than cell-free virus. As cell-associated virus levels have been consistently detected in breastmilk despite antiretroviral therapy, this highlights a potential challenge for resource-limited settings to achieve the UNAIDS goal for 2015 of eliminating vertical transmission. More studies would further knowledge on

  6. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Wu

    2003-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 31, 2003 time period.

  7. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2004-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period.

  8. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Wu; Z. Fan; R. Herman

    2004-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the January 1 to March 31, 2004 time period.

  9. Controls to validate plasma samples for cell free DNA quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Niels; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund;

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in serum and plasma for clinical application, especially in oncology. The literature holds promise of cfDNA as a valuable tumour marker to be used for treatment selection, monitoring and follow-up. The results, however, are diver......Recent research has focused on the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in serum and plasma for clinical application, especially in oncology. The literature holds promise of cfDNA as a valuable tumour marker to be used for treatment selection, monitoring and follow-up. The results, however......, are diverging due to methodological differences with lack of standardisation and definition of sensitivity. The new biological information has not yet come into routine use. The present study presents external standardisation by spiking with non-human DNA fragments to control for loss of DNA during sample...... preparation and measurement. It also suggests a method to control for admixture of DNA from normal lymphocytes by utilizing the unique immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in the B-cells. The results show that this approach improves the quality of the analysis and lowers the risk of falsely increased values...

  10. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  11. Cell-free DNA screening and sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennuti, Michael T; Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Khalek, Nahla; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidies. This technology may also identify fetal sex and can be used to screen for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Physicians offering this screening will need to be prepared to offer comprehensive prenatal counseling about these disorders to an increasing number of patients. The purpose of this article is to consider the source of information to use for counseling, factors in parental decision-making, and the performance characteristics of cfDNA testing in screening for SCAs. Discordance between ultrasound examination and cfDNA results regarding fetal sex is also discussed.

  12. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Xuefeng; He, Yan; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qi, Jing; SHI, Wei; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ova...

  13. Decreased serum cell-free DNA levels in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Dunaeva, Marina; Buddingh’, Bastiaan C.; René E M Toes; Luime, Jolanda J.; Lubberts, Erik; Pruijn, Ger J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have demonstrated that serum/plasma DNA and RNA molecules in addition to proteins can serve as biomarkers. Elevated levels of these nucleic acids have been found not only in acute, but also in chronic conditions, including autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to assess cell-free DNA (cfDNA) levels in sera of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients compared to controls. Methods cfDNA was extracted from sera of patients with early and established RA, relapsing-remitt...

  14. Label-free all-electronic biosensing in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael A.

    Label-free, all-electronic detection techniques offer great promise for advancements in medical and biological analysis. Electrical sensing can be used to measure both interfacial and bulk impedance changes in conducting solutions. Electronic sensors produced using standard microfabrication processes are easily integrated into microfluidic systems. Combined with the sensitivity of radiofrequency electrical measurements, this approach offers significant advantages over competing biological sensing methods. Scalable fabrication methods also provide a means of bypassing the prohibitive costs and infrastructure associated with current technologies. We describe the design, development and use of a radiofrequency reflectometer integrated into a microfluidic system towards the specific detection of biologically relevant materials. We developed a detection protocol based on impedimetric changes caused by the binding of antibody/antigen pairs to the sensing region. Here we report the surface chemistry that forms the necessary capture mechanism. Gold-thiol binding was utilized to create an ordered alkane monolayer on the sensor surface. Exposed functional groups target the N-terminus, affixing a protein to the monolayer. The general applicability of this method lends itself to a wide variety of proteins. To demonstrate specificity, commercially available mouse anti- Streptococcus Pneumoniae monoclonal antibody was used to target the full-length recombinant pneumococcal surface protein A, type 2 strain D39 expressed by Streptococcus Pneumoniae. We demonstrate the RF response of the sensor to both the presence of the surface decoration and bound SPn cells in a 1x phosphate buffered saline solution. The combined microfluidic sensor represents a powerful platform for the analysis and detection of cells and biomolecules.

  15. Plant RNA processing: soybean pre-mRNA in a pea cell-free extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a pea cell-free extract they have demonstrated the splicing of an SP6 fusion transcript containing an intron derived from the soybean seed storage protein β-subunit gene. Intron 115 from the conglycinin gene was cloned into a SP6 vector and transcribed using standard recombinant DNA techniques. Incubation of radioactively labeled fusion transcripts in the cell-free system produced a number of products which were identified by primer extension and S1 nuclease analysis. All the products are linear RNA molecules. Lariat intermediates, similar to those found in the yeast and HeLa cell RNA processing systems, have not been detected. The linear RNA products detected in their plant in vitro processing system have various portions of the intron removed which suggests that alternative splice sites are used in processing of this plant intron due to activation of cryptic splice sites or creation of splice sites in the fusion construction. The kinetics of the reactions and parameters of the extract are similar to those determined for the HeLa cell system. Sucrose gradient analysis has demonstrated that the plant RNA products sedimented in a 30S particle, similar in size to that found for the spliceosome of the HeLa cell system

  16. Transparent conducting oxide free backside illuminated perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Yao, Jiexiong; Xia, Huarong; Sun, Wentao; Liu, Jian; Peng, Lianmao

    2015-07-01

    Recently, hybrid perovskites have attracted great attention because of their promising applications in solar cells. However, perovskite solar devices reported till now are mostly based on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates which account for a large proportion in the total cost. Herein, TCO-free perovskite solar cells are fabricated. A photo-electricity conversion efficiency of 5.27% is obtained with short circuit current density (Jsc) of 10.7 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.837 V, and fill factor of 0.588. This study points a feasible way of replacing TCO substrate by low cost substrates, indicating promising potentials in solar energy conversion applications.

  17. Study on Vehicle Hands Free System With Bluetooth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xuexin; DONG Guiju; GAO Yanxu; CUI Tianshi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the appfication of bluetooth in vehicle hands free system was described,then the hardware and software structure of system had been designed.Finally,selection about electron parts and chip of electronic equipments was presented in detail.

  18. Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, M.; Donohoe, B.; Katahira, R.; Ashutosh, M.; Beckham, G.; Himmel, M.; Decker, S.

    2014-04-01

    Fungal free enzymes and bacterial complexed cellulosomes deconstruct biomass using different physical mechanisms. Free enzymes, which typically contain a large proportion of GH7 cellobiohydrolase, diffuse throughout the substrate and hydrolyze primarily from the cellulose reducing end, resulting in 'sharpened' macrofibrils. In contrast, complexed cellulosomes contain a diverse array of carbohydrate binding modules and multiple catalytic specificities leading to delamination and physical peeling of the cellulose macrofibril structures. To investigate how cellulose structure contributes to recalcitrance, we compared the deconstruction of cellulose I, II, and III; using free and complexed enzyme systems. We also evaluated both systems on Clean Fractionation and alkaline pretreated biomass, which remove much of the lignin, to determine the impact on enzyme loading reduction. Free fungal enzymes demonstrated a swelling of the outer surface of the plant cell walls while removing localized disruptions, resulting in a smooth surface appearance. Cellulosomes produced cell wall surfaces with localized areas of disruption and little surface layer swelling. These studies contribute to the overall understanding of biomass recalcitrance and how combining different enzymatic paradigms may lead to the formulation of new enzyme cocktails to reduce the cost of producing sugars from plant cell wall carbohydrates.

  19. Biological activity assays of cell-free reassembled nuclei——Injecting cell-free reassembled nuclei into unfertilized eggs can induce the eggs to cleave and reconstitute asters,and the injected nuclei undergo cell cycle changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传茂; 曲健; 梁金华; 翟中和

    1995-01-01

    Nucleus may reassemble spontaneously in cell-free mixture of HeLa metaphase chromosomes,Xenopus egg extracts and ATP-regenerating system,and the nucleus shows some biological activities.It isfound that,after being injected into unfertilized mature eggs,the cell-free reassembled nuclei can cause theeggs to cleave and reconstitute asters in their cytoplasm,and the injected nuclei undergo changes in response tocell cycle regulators stored in the eggs,and that reinjecting cytostatic factors(CSF)into the eggs can stabilizethe eggs in mitotic phase,cause the nuclei disassembly and chromatin condensation to chromosomes.

  20. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. PMID

  1. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Paul Mason

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis. The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR, and easy (not quantum mechanical method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and

  2. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology.

  3. Label-free haemogram using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy for identifying immune-cell subset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Dholakia, Kishan; Powis, Simon J.

    2014-03-01

    Leucocytes in the blood of mammals form a powerful protective system against a wide range of dangerous pathogens. There are several types of immune cells that has specific role in the whole immune system. The number and type of immune cells alter in the disease state and identifying the type of immune cell provides information about a person's state of health. There are several immune cell subsets that are essentially morphologically identical and require external labeling to enable discrimination. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy (WMRS) with suitable machine learning algorithms as a label-free method to distinguish between different closely lying immune cell subset. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on WMRS data from single cells, obtained using confocal Raman microscopy for feature reduction, followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) for binary discrimination of various cell subset, which yielded an accuracy >85%. The method was successful in discriminating between untouched and unfixed purified populations of CD4+CD3+ and CD8+CD3+ T lymphocyte subsets, and CD56+CD3- natural killer cells with a high degree of specificity. It was also proved sensitive enough to identify unique Raman signatures that allow clear discrimination between dendritic cell subsets, comprising CD303+CD45+ plasmacytoid and CD1c+CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells. The results of this study clearly show that WMRS is highly sensitive and can distinguish between cell types that are morphologically identical.

  4. Chasing Salmonella Typhimurium in free range egg production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousalkar, Kapil; Gole, Vaibhav; Caraguel, Charles; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2016-08-30

    Free range production systems are becoming a major source of egg production in Australia and worldwide. This study investigated shedding and ecology of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella species in a free range layer flock, wild birds and foxes in the vicinity of the free range farm in different seasons. Shedding of Salmonella was significantly higher in summer. Within the shed, overall, Salmonella prevalence was highest in dust. Corticosterone level in faeces was highest in spring and lowest in winter. There was no direct association between the Salmonella shedding (MPN/gm) and corticosterone levels in faeces. Salmonella Typhimurium MLVA types isolated from fox and wild birds were similar to MLVA types isolated from layer flock and reported during human food borne illness. Wild birds and foxes appear to play an important role in S. Typhimurium ecology and food safety. Environmental factors could play a role in evolution of S. Typhimurium in free range environment. PMID:27527766

  5. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins. PMID:18840687

  6. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins.

  7. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems.

  8. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems. PMID:26838317

  9. Feeder-free Derivation of Neural Crest Progenitor Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zeltner, Nadja; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Fattahi, Faranak; Studer, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential for studying human embryonic development, for modeling human diseases in the dish and as a source of transplantable cells for regenerative applications after disease or accidents. Neural crest (NC) cells are the precursors for a large variety of adult somatic cells, such as cells from the peripheral nervous system and glia, melanocytes and mesenchymal cells. They are a valuable source of cells to study aspects of human embryonic develo...

  10. The monopurpose operating system FreeNAS and its usage

    OpenAIRE

    NAVRÁTIL, Václav

    2009-01-01

    This work has examined features of the commonly available NAS operating systems based on kernels of FreeBSD, Linux, and OpenSolaris. Described in the theoretical part of the work is a detailed explanation of today's' current situation, along with basic information regarding these NAS systems that are being tested. The practical part discusses varying methods and the processes of testing NAS systems, when installed on an experimental machine. Testing is divided into three areas. The first one ...

  11. The shipboard employment of a free electron laser weapon system

    OpenAIRE

    Allgaier, Gregory G.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited A megawatt (MW) class Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows promise as a new weapon for antiship cruise missile defense. An FEL weapon system delivers energy at the speed of light at controllable energy levels, giving the war fighter new engagement options. Considerations for this weapon system include employment, design, and stability. In order to reach a MW class laser, system parameters must be optimized and the high power optical beam mu...

  12. β Style Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control System Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE control system, a three -phase bridge circuit is reused as the system output about rectifier and start inverter. When FPSE system is in the power stage, the double closed loop control strategy and optimization algorithm of PI control parameters is adopted to ensure the highest system transmission efficiency under the requirements of the system output power and guarantee the stability of the running system. The simulation results prove the effectiveness of the above research content.

  13. Cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster: a model for the in vitro assembly of metalloprotein metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Shiigi, Stacey A; Swartz, James R

    2014-01-01

    Many organometallic cofactors are highly complex and require multiple accessory proteins for both their assembly and transfer to a target protein. A cell-free system in which the biosynthetic pathway for a prosthetic group has been fully or even partially reconstructed enables investigations of the reaction sequence as well as the cofactor itself. As a model for the in vitro assembly of protein-bound metal centers, we describe a procedure for the cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster in the context of producing purified and active [FeFe] hydrogenase samples for spectroscopic studies. In general terms, this in vitro system is a combination of non-purified accessory proteins, exogenous substrates, and purified hydrogenase apoprotein. We also describe methods for making the required components used in the cell-free system. Specifically, these procedures include anaerobic expression of heterologous metalloproteins in Escherichia coli, anaerobic cell lysate production, and anaerobic metalloprotein purification using Strep-Tactin(®) chromatography.

  14. Preparative scale production of functional mouse aquaporin 4 using different cell-free expression modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Kai

    Full Text Available The continuous progress in the structural and functional characterization of aquaporins increasingly attracts attention to study their roles in certain mammalian diseases. Although several structures of aquaporins have already been solved by crystallization, the challenge of producing sufficient amounts of functional proteins still remains. CF (cell free expression has emerged in recent times as a promising alternative option in order to synthesize large quantities of membrane proteins, and the focus of this report was to evaluate the potential of this technique for the production of eukaryotic aquaporins. We have selected the mouse aquaporin 4 as a representative of mammalian aquaporins. The protein was synthesized in an E. coli extract based cell-free system with two different expression modes, and the efficiencies of two modes were compared. In both, the P-CF (cell-free membrane protein expression as precipitate mode generating initial aquaporin precipitates as well as in the D-CF (cell-free membrane protein expression in presence of detergent mode, generating directly detergent solubilized samples, we were able to obtain mg amounts of protein per ml of cell-free reaction. Purified aquaporin samples solubilized in different detergents were reconstituted into liposomes, and analyzed for the water channel activity. The calculated P(f value of proteoliposome samples isolated from the D-CF mode was 133 µm/s at 10°C, which was 5 times higher as that of the control. A reversible inhibitory effect of mercury chloride was observed, which is consistent with previous observations of in vitro reconstituted aquaporin 4. In this study, a fast and convenient protocol was established for functional expression of aquaporins, which could serve as basis for further applications such as water filtration.

  15. Relationship of circulating cell-free DNA levels to cell-free fetal DNA levels, clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters in preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mézes Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of our study was to examine whether increased circulating total cell-free DNA levels are related to the clinical characteristics and standard laboratory parameters of preeclamptic patients, to markers of inflammation, endothelial activation or injury, oxidative stress and to cell-free fetal DNA levels. Methods Circulating total cell-free DNA was measured by real-time quantitative PCR in plasma samples obtained from 67 preeclamptic and 70 normotensive pregnant women. Standard laboratory parameters, C-reactive protein, plasma von Willebrand factor antigen, plasma fibronectin, plasma malondialdehyde and cell-free fetal DNA levels were also determined. Results and Conclusion Circulating total cell-free and fetal deoxyribonucleic acid levels were significantly elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (median: 11.395 vs. 32.460 and 0.001 vs. 0.086 pg/μl; P < .001. The quantity of plasma total cell-free DNA did not correlate with most of the laboratory parameters, except for serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities (correlation coefficient: 0.31; P = 0.012 and 0.46; P < .001. There was no correlation with clinical characteristics, including body mass index. The releases of both free fetal and total cell-free deoxyribonucleic acid were found to be affected in preeclampsia. Hepatocellular necrosis seems to be responsible - at least partly - for increased circulating total DNA levels in preeclampsia, as suggested by the significant correlation with liver enzyme activities.

  16. Efficient Generation of Viral and Integration-Free Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Blanchi, Bruno; Biancotti, Juan Carlos; Kumar, Shalini; Hirose, Megumi; Mandefro, Berhan; Talavera-Adame, Dodanim; Benvenisty, Nissim; de Vellis, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Here we document three highly reproducible protocols: (1) a culture system for the derivation of human oligodendrocytes (OLs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS) and their further maturation-our protocol generates viral- and integration-free OLs that efficiently commit and move forward in the OL lineage, recapitulating all the steps known to occur during in vivo development; (2) a method for the isolation, propagation and maintenance of neural stem cells (NSCs); and (3) a protocol for the production, isolation, and maintenance of OLs from perinatal rodent and human brain-derived NSCs. Our unique culture systems rely on a series of chemically defined media, specifically designed and carefully characterized for each developmental stage of OL as they advance from OL progenitors to mature, myelinating cells. We are confident that these protocols bring our field a step closer to efficient autologous cell replacement therapies and disease modeling. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532816

  17. Human adipose derived stroma/stem cells grow in serum-free medium as floating spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromard, C; Bourin, P; André, M; De Barros, S; Casteilla, L; Planat-Benard, V

    2011-04-01

    With the goal of obtaining clinically safe human adipose-derived stroma/stem cells (ASC) and eliminating the use of serum, we have developed a new culture system that allows the expansion of ASC as spheres in a defined medium. These spheres can be passaged several times. They are not only aggregated cells but rather originate from single cells as clonal spheres can be obtained after seeding at very low density and reform clonal spheres after dissociation. These spheres can also revert to monolayer growth when plated in medium containing human plasma and even generate fibroblast-like colonies (CFU-f). Under several differentiation-specific media, spheres-derived ASC maintain their capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes. These results indicate that human ASC can be maintained in a serum-free 3D culture system, which is of great interest for the expansion in bioreactors of autologous ASC and their use in clinical trials.

  18. Fetal bovine serum and human constitutive androstane receptor: Evidence for activation of the SV23 splice variant by artemisinin, artemether, and arteether in a serum-free cell culture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Aik Jiang; Chang, Thomas K.H., E-mail: thomas.chang@ubc.ca

    2014-06-01

    The naturally occurring SV23 splice variant of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR-SV23) is activated by di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), which is detected as a contaminant in fetal bovine serum (FBS). In our initial experiment, we compared the effect of dialyzed FBS, charcoal-stripped, dextran-treated FBS (CS-FBS), and regular FBS on the basal activity and ligand-activation of hCAR-SV23 in a cell-based reporter gene assay. In transfected HepG2 cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10% FBS, basal hCAR-SV23 activity varied with the type of FBS (regular > dialyzed > CS). DEHP increased hCAR-SV23 activity when 10% CS-FBS, but not regular FBS or dialyzed FBS, was used. With increasing concentrations (1–10%) of regular FBS or CS-FBS, hCAR-SV23 basal activity increased, whereas in DEHP-treated cells, hCAR-SV23 activity remained similar (regular FBS) or slightly increased (CS-FBS). Subsequent experiments identified a serum-free culture condition to detect DEHP activation of hCAR-SV23. Under this condition, artemisinin, artemether, and arteether increased hCAR-SV23 activity, whereas they decreased it in cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10% regular FBS. By comparison, FBS increased the basal activity of the wild-type isoform of hCAR (hCAR-WT), whereas it did not affect the basal activity of the SV24 splice variant (hCAR-SV24) or ligand activation of hCAR-SV24 and hCAR-WT by 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). The use of serum-free culture condition was suitable for detecting CITCO activation of hCAR-WT and hCAR-SV24. In conclusion, FBS leads to erroneous classification of pharmacological ligands of hCAR-SV23 in cell-based assays, but investigations on functional ligands of hCAR isoforms can be conducted in serum-free culture condition. - Highlights: • FBS leads to erroneous pharmacological classification of hCAR-SV23 ligands. • Artemisinin, artemether, and arteether activate h

  19. Fetal bovine serum and human constitutive androstane receptor: Evidence for activation of the SV23 splice variant by artemisinin, artemether, and arteether in a serum-free cell culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The naturally occurring SV23 splice variant of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR-SV23) is activated by di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), which is detected as a contaminant in fetal bovine serum (FBS). In our initial experiment, we compared the effect of dialyzed FBS, charcoal-stripped, dextran-treated FBS (CS-FBS), and regular FBS on the basal activity and ligand-activation of hCAR-SV23 in a cell-based reporter gene assay. In transfected HepG2 cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10% FBS, basal hCAR-SV23 activity varied with the type of FBS (regular > dialyzed > CS). DEHP increased hCAR-SV23 activity when 10% CS-FBS, but not regular FBS or dialyzed FBS, was used. With increasing concentrations (1–10%) of regular FBS or CS-FBS, hCAR-SV23 basal activity increased, whereas in DEHP-treated cells, hCAR-SV23 activity remained similar (regular FBS) or slightly increased (CS-FBS). Subsequent experiments identified a serum-free culture condition to detect DEHP activation of hCAR-SV23. Under this condition, artemisinin, artemether, and arteether increased hCAR-SV23 activity, whereas they decreased it in cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10% regular FBS. By comparison, FBS increased the basal activity of the wild-type isoform of hCAR (hCAR-WT), whereas it did not affect the basal activity of the SV24 splice variant (hCAR-SV24) or ligand activation of hCAR-SV24 and hCAR-WT by 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). The use of serum-free culture condition was suitable for detecting CITCO activation of hCAR-WT and hCAR-SV24. In conclusion, FBS leads to erroneous classification of pharmacological ligands of hCAR-SV23 in cell-based assays, but investigations on functional ligands of hCAR isoforms can be conducted in serum-free culture condition. - Highlights: • FBS leads to erroneous pharmacological classification of hCAR-SV23 ligands. • Artemisinin, artemether, and arteether activate h

  20. Strategies for Implementing Cell-Free DNA Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuckle, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Maternal plasma cell-free (cf) DNA testing has higher discriminatory power for aneuploidy than any conventional multi-marker screening test. Several strategies have been suggested for introducing it into clinical practice. Secondary cfDNA, restricted only to women with positive conventional screening test, is generally cost saving and minimizes the need for invasive prenatal diagnosis but leads to a small loss in detection. Primary cfDNA, replacing conventional screening or retaining the nuchal translucency scan, is not currently cost-effective for third-party payers. Contingent cfDNA, testing about 20% of women with the highest risks based on a conventional test, is the preferred approach. PMID:27235907

  1. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... phenylketonuria (a disease that can cause brain damage). (b) Classification. Class I....

  2. Prospective guidance in a free-swimming cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delafield-Butt, Jonathan T.; Pepping, Gert-Jan; McCaig, Colin D.; Lee, David N.

    2012-01-01

    A systems theory of movement control in animals is presented in this article and applied to explaining the controlled behaviour of the single-celled Paramecium caudatum in an electric field. The theory-General Tau Theory-is founded on three basic principles: (i) all purposive movement entails prospe

  3. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  4. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  5. SmartBall™: Free Swimming Leak Detection System

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2008-01-01

    Leak detection systems measure ultrasonic noise, infrared temperature variances or electrical flux to detect leakage in structures like, pipes, tanks, geo-membrane retaining structures etc. SmartBall® is a free flowing leak detection system developed by Pure Technologies. It consists of a foam ball that has a smaller aluminum ball at its core. This aluminum core houses an ultrasonic device that sends ultrasonic signals and also collects the reflected sound waves.

  6. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; DE GIORGI, VINCENZO; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the pres...

  7. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, J.E.; Ross, H.H.

    1980-01-11

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  8. A Simple and Rapid Method for Preparing a Cell-Free Bacterial Lysate for Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduri, Maya; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Goldfeder, Mor; Ivanir, Eran; Benhar, Itai; Shoham, Yuval; Schroeder, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems are important laboratory tools that are used for various synthetic biology applications. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale method for preparing a CFPS system from E. coli. The procedure uses basic lab equipment, a minimal set of reagents, and requires less than one hour to process the bacterial cell mass into a functional S30-T7 extract. BL21(DE3) and MRE600 E. coli strains were used to prepare the S30-T7 extract. The CFPS system was used to produce a set of fluorescent and therapeutic proteins of different molecular weights (up to 66 kDa). This system was able to produce 40–150 μg-protein/ml, with variations depending on the plasmid type, expressed protein and E. coli strain. Interestingly, the BL21-based CFPS exhibited stability and increased activity at 40 and 45°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most rapid and affordable lab-scale protocol for preparing a cell-free protein synthesis system, with high thermal stability and efficacy in producing therapeutic proteins. PMID:27768741

  9. A cell-free expression and purification process for rapid production of protein biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Challise J; Pendleton, Erik D; Sasmor, Henri H; Hicks, William L; Farnum, John B; Muto, Machiko; Amendt, Eric M; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Martin, Rey W; Clark, Lauren G; Anderson, Mark J; Choudhury, Alaksh; Fior, Raffaella; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Griffey, Richard H; Chappell, Stephen A; Jewett, Michael C; Mauro, Vincent P; Dresios, John

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis has emerged as a powerful technology for rapid and efficient protein production. Cell-free methods are also amenable to automation and such systems have been extensively used for high-throughput protein production and screening; however, current fluidic systems are not adequate for manufacturing protein biopharmaceuticals. In this work, we report on the initial development of a fluidic process for rapid end-to-end production of recombinant protein biologics. This process incorporates a bioreactor module that can be used with eukaryotic or prokaryotic lysates that are programmed for combined transcription/translation of an engineered DNA template encoding for specific protein targets. Purification of the cell-free expressed product occurs through a series of protein separation modules that are configurable for process-specific isolation of different proteins. Using this approach, we demonstrate production of two bioactive human protein therapeutics, erythropoietin and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in yeast and bacterial extracts, respectively, each within 24 hours. This process is flexible, scalable and amenable to automation for rapid production at the point-of-need of proteins with significant pharmaceutical, medical, or biotechnological value. PMID:26427345

  10. A cell-free expression and purification process for rapid production of protein biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Challise J; Pendleton, Erik D; Sasmor, Henri H; Hicks, William L; Farnum, John B; Muto, Machiko; Amendt, Eric M; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Martin, Rey W; Clark, Lauren G; Anderson, Mark J; Choudhury, Alaksh; Fior, Raffaella; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Griffey, Richard H; Chappell, Stephen A; Jewett, Michael C; Mauro, Vincent P; Dresios, John

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis has emerged as a powerful technology for rapid and efficient protein production. Cell-free methods are also amenable to automation and such systems have been extensively used for high-throughput protein production and screening; however, current fluidic systems are not adequate for manufacturing protein biopharmaceuticals. In this work, we report on the initial development of a fluidic process for rapid end-to-end production of recombinant protein biologics. This process incorporates a bioreactor module that can be used with eukaryotic or prokaryotic lysates that are programmed for combined transcription/translation of an engineered DNA template encoding for specific protein targets. Purification of the cell-free expressed product occurs through a series of protein separation modules that are configurable for process-specific isolation of different proteins. Using this approach, we demonstrate production of two bioactive human protein therapeutics, erythropoietin and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in yeast and bacterial extracts, respectively, each within 24 hours. This process is flexible, scalable and amenable to automation for rapid production at the point-of-need of proteins with significant pharmaceutical, medical, or biotechnological value.

  11. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  12. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yehezkel, Tuval; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-02-29

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. PMID:26481354

  13. Elevated levels of cell-free circulating DNA in patients with acute dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Ngoc Ha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue and the release of cell-free DNA into the circulatory system in several medical conditions. Therefore, we investigated circulating DNA as a potential biomarker for severe dengue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A direct fluorometric degradation assay using PicoGreen was performed to quantify cell-free DNA from patient plasma. Circulating DNA levels were significantly higher in patients with dengue virus infection than with other febrile illnesses and healthy controls. Remarkably, the increase of DNA levels correlated with the severity of dengue. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that circulating DNA levels independently correlated with dengue shock syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating DNA levels were increased in dengue patients and correlated with dengue severity. Additional studies are required to show the benefits of this biomarker in early dengue diagnosis and for the prognosis of shock complication.

  14. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. PMID:26481354

  15. Photographic monitoring system for observing heavy free-falling objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the consideration of safety it is required that packages containing radioactive wastes when dumped at sea should keep their integrity and retain their contents until they reach the seabed. Packages containing simulated radioactive wastes (non-radioactive) were tested by a free-fall method at depths ca. 4,300 m in an area for dumping industrial waste off Shikoku Island. Since the weight of the largest package was 4,300kg, special attention was paid to the connection of a buoyancy system with mooring rope. Descent and ascent velocities of the free-fall system were calculated prior to the experiment. A free-fall experiment with an extremely heavy object, heavier than ever previously reported, was accomplished without trouble by using the free-fall system. Recovery of a camera, flash-light, and other components was successful in each of the three experiments. Successive photographing of the package during descent was made and its integrity was observed using the photographs taken by the recovered camera. The packages remained intact during descent and at least for a short time after arrival on the seabed. (author)

  16. Red blood cell engineering in stroma and serum/plasma-free conditions and long term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok; Baek, Eun Jung

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of artificial red blood cells (RBCs) is very important to overcome insufficient and unsafe blood supply. Despite recent progresses in RBCs engineering from several stem cell sources, none of them could succeed in generation of functional RBCs in the absence of serum/plasma and feeder cells. Without the elimination of serum and plasma, human RBC engineering in a large scale is impossible, especially for the future bioreactor system. Using an appropriate combination of cost-effective and safe reagents, the present study demonstrated the terminal maturation of hematopoietic stem cells into enucleated RBCs, which were functional comparable to donated human RBCs. Surprisingly, the viability of erythroid cells was higher in our serum- and feeder-free culture condition than in the previous serum-added condition. This was possible by supplementation with vitamin C in media and hypothermic conditions. Also, our report firstly presents the storability of artificial RBCs, which possibility is essential for clinical application. In summary, our report demonstrates engineering of human applicable RBCs with a dramatically enhanced viability and shelf-life in both serum- and stroma-free conditions. This innovative culture technology could contribute to the realization of the large-scale pharming of human RBCs using bioreactor systems. PMID:21902543

  17. Red blood cell engineering in stroma and serum/plasma-free conditions and long term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok; Baek, Eun Jung

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of artificial red blood cells (RBCs) is very important to overcome insufficient and unsafe blood supply. Despite recent progresses in RBCs engineering from several stem cell sources, none of them could succeed in generation of functional RBCs in the absence of serum/plasma and feeder cells. Without the elimination of serum and plasma, human RBC engineering in a large scale is impossible, especially for the future bioreactor system. Using an appropriate combination of cost-effective and safe reagents, the present study demonstrated the terminal maturation of hematopoietic stem cells into enucleated RBCs, which were functional comparable to donated human RBCs. Surprisingly, the viability of erythroid cells was higher in our serum- and feeder-free culture condition than in the previous serum-added condition. This was possible by supplementation with vitamin C in media and hypothermic conditions. Also, our report firstly presents the storability of artificial RBCs, which possibility is essential for clinical application. In summary, our report demonstrates engineering of human applicable RBCs with a dramatically enhanced viability and shelf-life in both serum- and stroma-free conditions. This innovative culture technology could contribute to the realization of the large-scale pharming of human RBCs using bioreactor systems.

  18. The serial cultivation of suspended BHK-21/13 cells in serum-free Waymouth medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskey, L E; Jenkin, H M

    1976-01-01

    A simple medium system was developed to obtain growth of BHK-21 cells in shaker cultures in the absence of serum. These cells have now undergone over 80 serial passages in serum-free Waymouth medium and have been recovered from the frozen state after storage for over 1 month in medium containing 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA). Various amounts of exogenous lipid in the form of sodium oleate were added to cultures of cells growing in serum-free Waymouth medium. Concentrations of 10-50 mug of sodium oleate/ml had no detrimental effects on the cells as measured by trypan blue uptake. Furthermore, the cells were serially passed ten times in the presence of 10 mug sodium oleate/ml. Depletion of calf serum from the growth medium and addition of known quantities of lipids to the system provides a means of revealing subtle changes in lipid synthesis and lipid turnover during cellular growth. PMID:1250851

  19. Nucleotide-excision repair of DNA in cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide spectrum of DNA lesions are repaired by the nucleotide-excision repair (NER) pathway in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We have developed a cell-free system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that supports NER. NER was monitored by measuring repair synthesis in DNA treated with cisplatin or with UV radiation. Repair synthesis in vitro was defective in extracts of rad1, rad2, and rad10 mutant cells, all of which have mutations in genes whose products are known to be required for NER in vivo. Additionally, repair synthesis was complemented by mixing different mutant extracts, or by adding purified Rad1 or Rad10 protein to rad1 or rad10 mutant extracts, respectively. The latter observation demonstrates that the Rad1 and Rad10 proteins directly participate in the biochemical pathway of NER. NER supported by nuclear extracts requires ATP and Mg2+ and is stimulated by polyethylene glycol and by small amounts of whole cell extract containing overexpressed Rad2 protein. The nuclear extracts also contain base-excision repair activity that is present at wild-type levels in rad mutant extracts. This cell-free system is expected to facilitate studies on the biochemical pathway of NER in S. cerevisiae

  20. a Man-Portable Imu-Free Mobile Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchter, A.; Borrmann, D.; Koch, P.; Kühn, M.; May, S.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile mapping systems are commonly mounted on cars, ships and robots. The data is directly geo-referenced using GPS data and expensive IMU (inertial measurement systems). Driven by the need for flexible, indoor mapping systems we present an inexpensive mobile mapping solution that can be mounted on a backpack. It combines a horizontally mounted 2D profiler with a constantly spinning 3D laser scanner. The initial system featuring a low-cost MEMS IMU was revealed and demonstrated at MoLaS: Technology Workshop Mobile Laser Scanning at Fraunhofer IPM in Freiburg in November 2014. In this paper, we present an IMU-free solution.

  1. Free energy functional for nonequilibrium systems: an exactly solvable case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, B; Lebowitz, J L; Speer, E R

    2001-10-01

    We consider the steady state of an open system in which there is a flux of matter between two reservoirs at different chemical potentials. For a large system of size N, the probability of any macroscopic density profile rho(x) is exp[-NF([rho])]; F thus generalizes to nonequilibrium systems the notion of free energy density for equilibrium systems. Our exact expression for F is a nonlocal functional of rho, which yields the macroscopically long range correlations in the nonequilibrium steady state previously predicted by fluctuating hydrodynamics and observed experimentally. PMID:11580688

  2. A free-blockage controlled release system based on the hydrophobic/hydrophilic conversion of mesoporous silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqian; Chen, Linfeng; Xu, Li-Ping; Du, Hongwu; Wen, Yongqiang; Song, Yanlin; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-02-01

    A pH-responsive free-blockage release system was achieved through controlling the hydrophobic/hydrophilic conversion of mesoporous silica nanopores. This system further presented pulsatile release with changing pH values between 4.0 and 7.0 for several cycles. This free-blockage release system could also release antitumor agents to induce cell death after infecting tumor cells and could have the ability of continuous infection to tumor cells with high drug-delivery efficiency and few side effects.

  3. A precious-metal free micro fuel cell accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretthauer, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, integrated fuel cell (FC) type primary and secondary batteries attracted a great deal of attention as integrated on-chip power sources due to their high theoretical power densities. Unfortunately, the costs of these devices have been rather high. This is partially due to the involved clean-room processes, but also due to the fact that these devices generally rely on expensive precious-metals such as Pd and Pt. Therefore we developed a novel integrated FC type accumulator that is based on non-precious-metals only. The key component of the presented accumulator is its alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane that allows not only the usage of a low-cost AB5 type hydrogen storage electrode, but also the usage of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 as a precious-metal free bifunctional catalyst for the air-breathing electrode. Additionally the presented design requires only comparatively few cleanroom processes which further reduces the overall production costs. Although abdicating precious-metals, the presented accumulator shows an open circuit voltage of 0.81 V and a maximum power density of 0.66 mW cm-2 which is comparable or even superior to former precious-metal based cells.

  4. Determination of the potency of a novel saw palmetto supercritical CO2 extract (SPSE for 5α-reductase isoform II inhibition using a cell-free in vitro test system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pais P

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Pais, Agustí Villar, Santiago Rull Euromed, Barcelona, Spain Background: The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent membrane protein 5α-reductase catalyses the conversion of testosterone to the most potent androgen – 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Two 5α-reductase isoenzymes are expressed in humans: type I and type II. The latter is found primarily in prostate tissue. Saw palmetto extract (SPE has been used extensively in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The pharmacological effects of SPE include the inhibition of 5α-reductase, as well as anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects. Clinical studies of SPE have been inconclusive – some have shown significant results, and others have not – possibly the result of varying bioactivities of the SPEs used in the studies. Purpose: To determine the in vitro potency in a cell-free test system of a novel SP supercritical CO2 extract (SPSE, an inhibitor of the 5α-reductase isoenzyme type II. Materials and methods: The inhibitory potency of SPSE was compared to that of finasteride, an approved 5α-reductase inhibitor, on the basis of the enzymatic conversion of the substrate androstenedione to the 5α-reduced product 5α-androstanedione. Results: By concentration-dependent inhibition of 5α-reductase type II in vitro (half-maximal inhibitory concentration 3.58±0.05 µg/mL, SPSE demonstrated competitive binding toward the active site of the enzyme. Finasteride, the approved 5α-reductase inhibitor tested as positive control, led to 63%–75% inhibition of 5α-reductase type II. Conclusion: SPSE effectively inhibits the enzyme that has been linked to BPH, and the amount of extract required for activity is comparatively low. It can be confirmed from the results of this study that SPSE has bioactivity that promotes prostate health at a level that is superior to that of many other phytotherapeutic extracts. The

  5. Generation and characterization of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mi-Young; Lee, Mi-Ok; Jeon, Hyejin; Seol, Binna; Kim, Jung Hwa; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs), a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated disorders, are a major and growing health problem. Although AIDs are currently treated primarily with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, the use of stem cell transplantation in patients with AIDs is becoming increasingly common. However, stem cell transplantation therapy has limitations, including a shortage of available stem cells and immune rejection of cells from nonautologous sources. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, which allows the generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, could offer an alternative source for clinical applications of stem cell therapies in AID patients. We used nonintegrating oriP/EBNA-1-based episomal vectors to reprogram dermal fibroblasts from patients with AIDs such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS), Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The pluripotency and multilineage differentiation capacity of each patient-specific iPSC line was validated. The safety of these iPSCs for use in stem cell transplantation is indicated by the fact that all AID-specific iPSCs are integrated transgene free. Finally, all AID-specific iPSCs derived in this study could be differentiated into cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineages in vitro as shown by flow cytometric analysis and induction of terminal differentiation potential. Our results demonstrate the successful generation of integration-free iPSCs from patients with AS, SS and SLE. These findings support the possibility of using iPSC technology in autologous and allogeneic cell replacement therapy for various AIDs, including AS, SS and SLE. PMID:27174201

  6. In vitro translation of cardiovirus ribonucleic acid by mammalian cell-free extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, K L; Shatkin, A J

    1972-04-01

    Cell-free extracts prepared from Ehrlich ascites and mouse L cells synthesize viral proteins in response to encephalomyocarditis virus, mouse Elberfeld virus, and mengovirus ribonucleic acid. Although HeLa cell extracts are inactive, their ribosomes are functional in the presence of heterologous supernatant fractions. Synthesis depends upon the addition of adenosine triphosphate, guanosine triphosphate, an energy-generating system, and 4 mm Mg(2+). Initiation is completed during the first 10 to 20 min of incubation, but chain elongation continues for 1 hr or more. The products are of higher molecular weight than virion structural proteins and resemble polypeptides formed in virus-infected cells during a short pulse. Tryptic peptides of virion proteins and in vitro products are similar for all three cardioviruses.

  7. Radio-modification by caffeine alone and in combination with phosphorothioates: in vivo and cell-free studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine is generally considered to result in radiosensitization by affecting the cell cycle. Data from in vivo studies, however, do not suggest sensitization; caffeine administration did not adversely affect survival of mice irradiated at doses causing hematopoietic injury, or gastrointestinal injury, or when administered in combination with phosphorothioates. For example, caffeine administration (20 mg/kg IP) in combination with the radioprotector WR-151327, S-2-(3-methyl-amino-propyl-amino)propyl-phosphoro-thioic acid. (200 mg/kg IP) resulted in a dose modification factor of 1.54 in comparison to 1.51 for WR-151327 treatment alone. In a cell-free system, the active metabolites of phosphorothiotates, i.e. free thiols and disulfides, appear to mimic polyamines and modulate enzymes involves in DNA structure and synthesis. The free thiol of WR-151327 (WR-151326) actively enhanced topoisomerase I-mediated unwinding of supercoiled plB130 DNA and super-coiling of DNA mediated by DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II). Caffeine, in general, had opposite effects on potoisomerase activities compared to WR-151326. When caffeine was added to the cell-free system together with WR-151326, the stimulatory effects of WR-151326 were suppressed. Further studies are needed in cell-free systems, cells, and animals to elucidate the potential utility of caffeine administration in combination with radiation and other therapeutic agents. (authors)

  8. Free boundary problems in PDEs and particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carinci, Gioia; Giardinà, Cristian; Presutti, Errico

    2016-01-01

    In this volume a theory for models of transport in the presence of a free boundary is developed. Macroscopic laws of transport are described by PDE's. When the system is open, there are several mechanisms to couple the system with the external forces. Here a class of systems where the interaction with the exterior takes place in correspondence of a free boundary is considered. Both continuous and discrete models sharing the same structure are analysed. In Part I a free boundary problem related to the Stefan Problem is worked out in all details. For this model a new notion of relaxed solution is proposed for which global existence and uniqueness is proven. It is also shown that this is the hydrodynamic limit of the empirical mass density of the associated particle system. In Part II several other models are discussed. The expectation is that the results proved for the basic model extend to these other cases. All the models discussed in this volume have an interest in problems arising in several research fields...

  9. Interface for WWW of Data-Free-Way system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pilot system on the distributed database for advanced nuclear materials named 'Data-Free-Way' was constructed under the collaboration of National Research Institute for Metals, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation during fiscal years from 1990 through 1994. In order to make the system more substantial, the second stage collaborative research activity in which the main objective was to develop the utilization techniques for 'Data-Free-Way' was initiated in 1995 among three above-mentioned organizations and Japan Science and Technology Corporation, which newly joined this program. In the original pilot system, material information was mutually utilized through the local circuit. In the second stage collaborative research activity, the system was made more substantial through the advanced network with high data processing speed and multi-functions by taking advantage of current excellent data communication techniques like the Internet. In future each organization will take its share of its strong field to develop the utilization techniques for 'Data-Free-Way', to enrich the stored data and to enlarge the network itself. (author)

  10. Noninvasive Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Stephanie A.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Scott, Joan A.; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2015-01-01

    Context Noninvasive prenatal determination of fetal sex using cell-free fetal DNA provides an alternative to invasive techniques for some heritable disorders. In some countries this testing has transitioned to clinical care, despite the absence of a formal assessment of performance. Objective To document overall test performance of noninvasive fetal sex determination using cell-free fetal DNA and to identify variables that affect performance. Data Sources Systematic review and meta-analysis with search of PubMed (January 1, 1997–April 17, 2011) to identify English-language human studies reporting primary data. References from review articles were also searched. Study Selection and Data Extraction Abstracts were read independently to identify studies reporting primary data suitable for analysis. Covariates included publication year, sample type, DNA amplification methodology, Y chromosome sequence, and gestational age. Data were independently extracted by 2 reviewers. Results From 57 selected studies, 80 data sets (representing 3524 male-bearing pregnancies and 3017 female-bearing pregnancies) were analyzed. Overall performance of the test to detect Y chromosome sequences had the following characteristics: sensitivity, 95.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 94.7%–96.1%) and specificity, 98.6% (95% CI, 98.1%–99.0%); diagnostic odds ratio (OR), 885; positive predictive value, 98.8%; negative predictive value, 94.8%; area under curve (AUC), 0.993 (95% CI, 0.989–0.995), with significant interstudy heterogeneity. DNA methodology and gestational age had the largest effects on test performance. Methodology test characteristics were AUC, 0.988 (95% CI, 0.979–0.993) for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and AUC, 0.996 (95% CI, 0.993–0.998) for real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) (P=.02). Gestational age test characteristics were AUC, 0.989 (95% CI, 0.965–0.998) (20 weeks) (P=.02 for comparison of diagnostic ORs across age ranges). RTQ-PCR (sensitivity, 96

  11. Production of cell-free xanthan fermentation broth by cell adsorption on fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang; Lo; Chattopadhyay

    1998-03-01

    Xanthan gum is a microbial polysaccharide widely used in food and oil-drilling industries. Xanthan gum produced from the current commercial fermentation process usually contains cells and cell debris, which lower the filterability of the xanthan solution and limit its applications. The production of cell-free xanthan gum fermentation broth is thus desirable. The feasibility of removing cells from the xanthan fermentation broth by cell adsorption to various woven fibrous materials was studied. It was found that both cotton and polyester fibers could be used to adsorb Xanthomonas campestris cells present in the fermentation broth either during batch fermentation or after the fermentation. Almost all cells were removed from the fermentation broth by adsorption to fibers. Cotton terry cloth had rough surfaces and was the preferred material for cell adsorption. Cell adsorption to cotton was faster than to polyester fibers. The adsorption kinetics can be modeled by a first-order rate equation. The adsorption rate constants were 30-40% higher for cotton than for polyester. Cell adsorption was not efficient in the absence of xanthan gum, suggesting that the exopolysaccharide, xanthan gum, was important for efficient cell adsorption to fibers. PMID:9548777

  12. Cell-free methods to produce structurally intact mammalian membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tomita, Taisuke; Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of four membrane proteins, from bacteria or a unicellular alga, have been solved with samples produced by cell-free protein synthesis. In this study, for mammalian membrane protein production, we established the precipitating and soluble membrane fragment methods: membrane proteins are synthesized with the Escherichia coli cell-free system in the presence of large and small membrane fragments, respectively, and are simultaneously integrated into the lipid environments. We applied the precipitating membrane fragment method to produce various mammalian membrane proteins, including human claudins, glucosylceramide synthase, and the γ-secretase subunits. These proteins were produced at levels of about 0.1-1.0 mg per ml cell-free reaction under the initial conditions, and were obtained as precipitates by ultracentrifugation. Larger amounts of membrane proteins were produced by the soluble membrane fragment method, collected in the ultracentrifugation supernatants, and purified directly by column chromatography. For several proteins, the conditions of the membrane fragment methods were further optimized, such as by the addition of specific lipids/detergents. The functional and structural integrities of the purified proteins were confirmed by analyses of their ligand binding activities, size-exclusion chromatography profiles, and/or thermal stabilities. We successfully obtained high-quality crystals of the complex of human claudin-4 with an enterotoxin. PMID:27465719

  13. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Qin; Vladimir A Ljubimov; Cuiqi Zhou; Yunguang Tong; Jimin Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason under-lying difculties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive“liquid biopsy”from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials.

  14. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J.; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J.; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  15. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Openshaw

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis.

  16. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Zhou, Cuiqi; Tong, Yunguang; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason underlying difficulties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive "liquid biopsy" from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials. PMID:27056366

  17. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Kishino

    Full Text Available Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  18. Intensity Position Modulation for Free-Space Laser Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Faghihi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a novel analog modulation-demodulation technique for free-space laser communication system called Intensity Position Modulation (IPM is carried out. According to TEM00 mode of a laser beam and by linear fitting on the Gaussian function as an approximation, the variation of the linear part on the reverse biased pn photodiode produced various currents. Our simulated results show fine response bandwidth and fidelity of the analog communication system, is made upon the present method, is satisfactory. According to the present method, we are able to transmit the audio signals up to 1 Km.

  19. Infrared free electron laser magnet power supply control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared free-electron laser (IR-FEL) is under development at Materials and Advanced Accelerator Sciences Division, RRCAT, Indore, for the investigation of materials using an electron beam. This system consists of a 90 keV electron gun as an electron source, a linear accelerator (LINAC) which accelerates the beam to energy in the range of 15-25 MeV, beam transport line and an undulator. Beam transport line consists of dipoles, quadrupoles and steering magnets for transporting beam from the LINAC exit to the entrance of the undulator. In this paper we are presenting the development of control system for these precision power supplies

  20. Hands-Free System for Bronchoscopy Planning and Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Rahul; Bascom, Rebecca; Higgins, William E

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy is a commonly used minimally invasive procedure for lung-cancer staging. In standard practice, however, physicians differ greatly in their levels of performance. To address this concern, image-guided intervention (IGI) systems have been devised to improve procedure success. Current IGI bronchoscopy systems based on virtual bronchoscopic navigation (VBN), however, require involvement from the attending technician. This lessens physician control and hinders the overall acceptance of such systems. We propose a hands-free VBN system for planning and guiding bronchoscopy. The system introduces two major contributions. First, it incorporates a new procedure-planning method that automatically computes airway navigation plans conforming to the physician's bronchoscopy training and manual dexterity. Second, it incorporates a guidance strategy for bronchoscope navigation that enables user-friendly system control via a foot switch, coupled with a novel position-verification mechanism. Phantom studies verified that the system enables smooth operation under physician control, while also enabling faster navigation than an existing technician-assisted VBN system. In a clinical human study, we noted a 97% bronchoscopy navigation success rate, in line with existing VBN systems, and a mean guidance time per diagnostic site = 52 s. This represents a guidance time often nearly 3 min faster per diagnostic site than guidance times reported for other technician-assisted VBN systems. Finally, an ergonomic study further asserts the system's acceptability to the physician and long-term potential.

  1. Label-free Imaging of Arterial Cells and Extracellular Matrix Using a Multimodal CARS Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Le, Thuc T; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-04-01

    A multimodal nonlinear optical imaging system that integrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on the same platform was developed and applied to visualize single cells and extracellular matrix in fresh carotid arteries. CARS signals arising from CH(2)-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the arterial wall. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are also rich in CH(2) bonds. The extracellular matrix organization were further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. Label-free imaging of significant components of arterial tissues suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  2. Optimizing Immobilized Enzyme Performance in Cell-Free Environments to Produce Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belfort, Georges [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Grimaldi, Joseph J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2015-01-27

    Limitations on biofuel production using cell culture (Escherichia coli, Clostridium, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, brown microalgae, blue-green algae and others) include low product (alcohol) concentrations (≤0.2 vol%) due to feedback inhibition, instability of cells, and lack of economical product recovery processes. To overcome these challenges, an alternate simplified biofuel production scheme was tested based on a cell-free immobilized enzyme system. Using this cell free system, we were able to obtain about 2.6 times higher concentrations of iso-butanol using our non-optimized system as compared with live cell systems. This process involved two steps: (i) converts acid to aldehyde using keto-acid decarboxylase (KdcA), and (ii) produces alcohol from aldehyde using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with a cofactor (NADH) conversion from inexpensive formate using a third enzyme, formate dehydrogenase (FDH). To increase stability and conversion efficiency with easy separations, the first two enzymes were immobilized onto methacrylate resin. Fusion proteins of labile KdcA (fKdcA) were expressed to stabilize the covalently immobilized KdcA. Covalently immobilized ADH exhibited long-term stability and efficient conversion of aldehyde to alcohol over multiple batch cycles without fusions. High conversion rates and low protein leaching were achieved by covalent immobilization of enzymes on methacrylate resin. The complete reaction scheme was demonstrated by immobilizing both ADH and fKdcA and using FDH free in solution. The new system without in situ removal of isobutanol achieved a 55% conversion of ketoisovaleric acid to isobutanol at a concentration of 0.5 % (v/v). Further increases in titer will require continuous removal of the isobutanol using our novel brush membrane system that exhibits a 1.5 fold increase in the separation factor of isobutanol from water versus that obtained for commercial silicone rubber membranes. These bio-inspired brush membranes are based on the

  3. Low-Cost Upscaling Compatibility of Five Different ITO-Free Architectures for Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Gonzalez-Valls, Irene; Veenstra, Sjoerd;

    2013-01-01

    Five different indium-tin-oxide free (ITO-free) polymer solar cell architectures provided by four participating research institutions that all presented a laboratory cell performance sufficient for use in mobile and information and communication technology (ICT) were evaluated based on photovolta...

  4. Fuel cell based hybrid systems

    OpenAIRE

    Davat, B.; Astier, S.; Bethoux, O.; CANDUSSO,D; Coquery, G.; DE-BERNARDINIS, A; DRUART, F; Francois, M; GARCIA ARREGUI, F; Harel, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents different works which are currently developed in the field of fuel cell hybrid systems indifferent public laboratories in France. These works are presented in three sections corresponding to: 1. Hybrid fuel cell/battery or supercapacitor power sources; 2. Fuel cell multistack power sources; 3. Fuel cell in hybrid power systems for distributed generation. The presented works combine simulation and experimental results.

  5. High-yield Escherichia coli-based cell-free expression of human proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of sufficient amounts of human proteins is a frequent bottleneck in structural biology. Here we describe an Escherichia coli-based cell-free system which yields mg-quantities of human proteins in N-terminal fusion constructs with the GB1 domain, which show significantly increased translation efficiency. A newly generated E. coli BL21 (DE3) RIPL-Star strain was used, which contains a variant RNase E with reduced activity and an excess of rare-codon tRNAs, and is devoid of lon and ompT protease activity. In the implementation of the expression system we used freshly in-house prepared cell extract. Batch-mode cell-free expression with this setup was up to twofold more economical than continuous-exchange expression, with yields of 0.2–0.9 mg of purified protein per mL of reaction mixture. Native folding of the proteins thus obtained is documented with 2D [15N,1H]-HSQC NMR.

  6. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Effect of castanospermine on cell-free synthesis of aminopeptidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Olsen, Jørgen

    1988-01-01

    the blocked removal of glucose residues. In contrast to its reduced expression in a mucosal explant system [(1986) Biochem. J. 240, 777-782], this molecular form of aminopeptidase N was at least as abundant in cell-free translation as its normal high mannose-glycosylated counterpart, ruling out degradation...... taking place in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Degradation of newly produced, malprocessed enzyme must therefore occur at a later stage during intracellular transport, presumably in the sarcoplasmic reticulum or in transitional elements between this organelle and the Golgi complex....

  7. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Hoon eHong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  8. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  9. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  10. Flavor formation and cell physiology during the production of alcohol-free beer with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, van M.F.M.; Dieren, van B.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    1999-01-01

    Production of alcohol-free beer by limited fermentation is optimally performed in a packed-bed reactor operating in downflow. This ensures a highly controllable system with optimal reactor design. In the present study, we report on changes in the physiology of immobilized yeast cells in the reactor.

  11. Forced versus free traffic in an automated milking system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, Lene; Rushen, J.; de Passillé, A.M.;

    2011-01-01

    Cows in automated milking systems with free access to feeders sometimes show a reduced use of the robotic milkers, while forced traffic where cows have to pass through the robot to reach the feeders may reduce feeding time and frequency. We examined two groups of 35 lactating cows. For 21 d, one...... group had free access to feeders, while the other group had to pass through the robot to reach feed. For a subsequent 21 d period, the treatments were reversed. The behaviour of the cows was observed for 3 periods of 24 h using 10 min scan sampling. Milking data were obtained from the robot milkers....... The average number of visits to the robot, either with or without milking, did not differ between the two types of traffic. On average cows lay down for 12.3 h/d, with no significant difference between free and forced traffic. The type of traffic did not affect the duration of time spent in the feeding area...

  12. Antibody-free magnetic cell sorting of genetically modified primary human CD4+ T cells by one-step streptavidin affinity purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Matheson

    Full Text Available Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP is displayed at the cell surface by the truncated Low Affinity Nerve Growth Receptor (LNGFRF and used as an affinity tag for one-step selection with streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads. Cells are released through competition with the naturally occurring vitamin biotin, free of either beads or antibody-antigen complexes and ready for culture or use in downstream applications. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting is a rapid, cost-effective, scalable method of magnetic selection applicable to either viral transduction or transient transfection of cell lines or primary cells. We have optimised the system for enrichment of primary human CD4+ T cells expressing shRNAs and exogenous genes of interest to purities of >99%, and used it to isolate cells following Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

  13. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  14. Optimizing front metallization patterns: Efficiency with aesthetics in free-form solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, D.K.; Langelaar, M.; Barink, M.; Keulen, F. van

    2016-01-01

    Free-form solar cells are cells of unconventional shapes (e.g. hexagonal, leaf-shaped etc). Their flexible shape adds to the aesthetics of the surroundings as well as allows to place them over objects where conventional solar cells might not fit. Evidently, these cells need to be efficient as well,

  15. Properties of ras-amplified recombinant BHK-21 cells in protein-free culture

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Seiji; Shoji, Masahiro; Hashizume, Shuichi; Teruya, Kiichiro; Katakura, Yoshinori; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2000-01-01

    We compared serum and protein-free cultures ofa ras-amplified recombinant BHK-21 cell line(ras-rBHK-IgG), which hyperproduces a lungcancer specific recombinant human monoclonal antibody. Ras-rBHK-IgG cells were shown to grow well, evenin protein-free medium and to be morphologicallysimilar to cells cultured in serum containing medium. However, the growth rate of ras-rBHK-IgG cellswas considerably slower in protein-free medium, whichresults in a longer maintenance period compared with cells cu...

  16. Systems biomechanics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Maly, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biomechanics of the Cell attempts to outline systems biomechanics of the cell as an emergent and promising discipline. The new field owes conceptually to cell mechanics, organism-level systems biomechanics, and biology of biochemical systems. Its distinct methodology is to elucidate the structure and behavior of the cell by analyzing the unintuitive collective effects of elementary physical forces that interact within the heritable cellular framework. The problematics amenable to this approach includes the variety of cellular activities that involve the form and movement of the cell body and boundary (nucleus, centrosome, microtubules, cortex, and membrane). Among the elementary system effects in the biomechanics of the cell, instability of symmetry, emergent irreversibility, and multiperiodic dissipative motion can be noted. Research results from recent journal articles are placed in this unifying framework. It is suggested that the emergent discipline has the potential to expand the spectrum of ques...

  17. Actuator prototype system by voice commands using free software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Andrango

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This prototype system is a software application that through the use of techniques of digital signal processing, extracts information from the user's speech, which is then used to manage the on/off actuator on a peripheral computer when vowels are pronounced. The method applies spectral differences. The application uses the parallel port as actuator, with the information recorded in the memory address 378H. This prototype was developed using free software tools for its versatility and dynamism, and to allow other researchers to base on it for further studies.

  18. Free Fermionic Heterotic Model Building and Root Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, M; Hunziker, M

    2008-01-01

    We consider an alternative derivation of the GSO Projection in the free fermionic construction of the weakly coupled heterotic string in terms of root systems, as well as the interpretation of the GSO Projection in this picture. We then present an algorithm to systematically and efficiently generate input sets (i.e. basis vectors) in order to study Landscape statistics with minimal computational cost. For example, the improvement at order 6 is approximately 10^{-13} over a traditional brute force approach, and improvement increases with order. We then consider an example of statistics on a relatively simple class of models.

  19. Elevated Concentrations of Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chains in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients in Relation to Disease Activity, Inflammatory Status, B Cell Activity and Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, Anette H; Lydolph, Magnus; Westergaard, Marie;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we examined the concentration of serum immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and investigated its association with various disease parameters in order to evaluate the role of FLCs as a potential biomarker in SLE. Furthermore......, FLCs' association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibodies was examined. METHODS: Using a nephelometric assay, κFLC and λFLC concentrations were quantified in sera from 45 SLE patients and 40 healthy controls. SLE patients with renal insufficiency were excluded in order to preclude high concentrations...... index (SLEDAI)) score of the SLE patients (r = 0.399, p = 0.007). Furthermore, concentrations of FLCs correlated with titers of dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.383, p = 0.009), and FLC levels and SLEDAI scores correlated in the anti-dsDNA-positive SLE patients, but not in anti-dsDNA-negative SLE patients. Total...

  20. Characterization of the Cell-Free Layer in a Microvessel by Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Sol Keun; Freund, Jonathon; Moser, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The cell-free layer between the erythrocyte-rich core of a micro-vessel and the vessel wall is a significant component of the hydrodynamics of the microcirculation. To investigate the mechanics of the cell-free layer, we simulate a two-dimensional periodic blood flow in a microvessel containing numerous erythrocytes, modeled as capsules with elastic shell membranes using the boundary integral method. Cell-cell interactions are mediated with an interaction potential which represents aggregation forces. Our model successfully recreates in-vivo hemodynamic properties such as blunt velocity profile and Fahraeus effect. The cell-free layer has a thickness of order one erythrocyte radius which is consistent with experimental results. To investigate the mechanics of the cell-free layer a number of numerical experiments were conducted, in which the effects of aggregation forces, and lubrication forces are investigated, by varying the aggregation potential, introducing artificial body forces and changing boundary condition.

  1. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHAO, XUEFENG; He, YAN; JI, MIN; CHEN, XIAOFANG; QI, JING; SHI, WEI; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer. PMID:26788153

  2. Multiparametric analysis of cell-free DNA in melanoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Salvianti

    Full Text Available Cell-free DNA in blood (cfDNA represents a promising biomarker for cancer diagnosis. Total cfDNA concentration showed a scarce discriminatory power between patients and controls. A higher specificity in cancer diagnosis can be achieved by detecting tumor specific alterations in cfDNA, such as DNA integrity, genetic and epigenetic modifications.The aim of the present study was to identify a sequential multi-marker panel in cfDNA able to increase the predictive capability in the diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma in comparison with each single marker alone. To this purpose, we tested total cfDNA concentration, cfDNA integrity, BRAF(V600E mutation and RASSF1A promoter methylation associated to cfDNA in a series of 76 melanoma patients and 63 healthy controls. The chosen biomarkers were assayed in cfDNA samples by qPCR. Comparison of biomarkers distribution in cases and controls was performed by a logistic regression model in both univariate and multivariate analysis. The predictive capability of each logistic model was investigated by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC. To aid the reader to interpret the value of the AUC, values between 0.6 and 0.7, between 0.71 and 0.8 and greater than 0.8 were considered as indicating a weak predictive, satisfactory and good predictive capacity, respectively. The AUC value for each biomarker (univariate logistic model was weak/satisfactory ranging between 0.64 (BRAF(V600E to 0.85 (total cfDNA. A good overall predictive capability for the final logistic model was found with an AUC of 0.95. The highest predictive capability was given by total cfDNA (AUC:0.86 followed by integrity index 180/67 (AUC:0.90 and methylated RASSF1A (AUC:0.89.An approach based on the simultaneous determination of three biomarkers (total cfDNA, integrity index 180/67 and methylated RASSF1A could improve the diagnostic performance in melanoma.

  3. Quantification of circulating cell-free DNA in the plasma of cancer patients during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free plasma DNA is elevated in cancer patients and decreases in response to effective treatments. Consequently, these nucleic acids have potential as new tumor markers. In our current study, we investigated whether the plasma DNA concentrations in patients with cancer are altered during the course of radiation therapy. To first determine the origin of cell-free plasma DNA, plasma samples from mice bearing transplanted human tumors were analyzed for human-specific and mouse-specific cell-free DNA. Human-specific DNA was detectable only in plasma from tumor-bearing mice. However, mouse-specific plasma DNA was significantly higher in tumor-bearing mice than in normal mice, suggesting that cell-free plasma DNA originated from both tumor and normal cells. We measured the total cell-free plasma DNA levels by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 15 cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy and compared these values with healthy control subjects. The cancer patients showed higher pretreatment plasma DNA concentrations than the healthy controls. Eleven of these patients showed a transient increase of up to eightfold in their cell-free plasma DNA concentrations during the first or second week of radiation therapy, followed by decreasing concentrations toward the end of treatment. In two other cancer patients, the cell-free plasma DNA concentrations only decreased over the course of the treatment. The total cell-free plasma DNA levels in cancer patients thus show dynamic changes associated with the progression of radiation therapy. Additional prospective studies will be required to elucidate the potential clinical utility and biological implications of dynamic changes in cell-free plasma DNA during radiation therapy. (author)

  4. Practical, Microfabrication-Free Device for Single-Cell Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Liang-I Lin; Shih-Hui Chao; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA) as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrop...

  5. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 μm to 0.05μm and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 μm). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs

  6. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Green light radiation effects on free radicals inhibition in cellular and chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Jipa, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Marton, George; Ionescu, Elena; Cristache, Ligia; Badila, Dumitru; Mitrica, Radu

    2011-01-10

    Free radicals generation is inhibited through green light (GL) irradiation in cellular systems and in chemical reactions. Standard melanocyte cultures were UV-irradiated and the induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the fluorescence technique. The same cell cultures, previously protected by a 24h GL exposure, displayed a significantly lower ROS production. A simple chemical reaction is subsequently chosen, in which the production of free radicals is well defined. Paraffin wax and mineral oil were GL irradiated during thermal degradation and the oxidation products checked by chemiluminescence [CL] and Fourier transform infrared spectra [FT-IR]. The same clear inhibition of the radical oxidation of alkanes is recorded. A quantum chemistry modeling of these results is performed and a mechanism involving a new type of Rydberg macromolecular systems with implications for biology and medicine is suggested. PMID:20934350

  8. Achievements and Problems of Reform of Investment Management System for Shanghai Pilot Free Trade Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengrong; PAN

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of Shanghai Pilot Free Trade Zone provides many possibilities for China’s economic construction. This paper made a comparative analysis on investment management system of Shanghai Pilot Free Trade Zone and traditional investment management system,discussed achievements and problems of reform of investment management system of Shanghai Pilot Free Trade Zone,and finally came up with pertinent policy recommendations.

  9. Equation-free model reduction for complex dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a reduced model strategy for simulation of complex physical systems. A classical reduced basis is first constructed relying on proper orthogonal decomposition of the system. Then, unlike the alternative approaches, such as Galerkin projection schemes for instance, an equation-free reduced model is constructed. It consists in the determination of an explicit transformation, or mapping, for the evolution over a coarse time-step of the projection coefficients of the system state on the reduced basis. The mapping is expressed as an explicit polynomial transformation of the projection coefficients and is computed once and for all in a pre-processing stage using the detailed model equation of the system. The reduced system can then be advanced in time by successive applications of the mapping. The CPU cost of the method lies essentially in the mapping approximation which is performed offline, in a parallel fashion, and only once. Subsequent application of the mapping to perform a time-integration is carried out at a low cost thanks to its explicit character. Application of the method is considered for the 2-D flow around a circular cylinder. We investigate the effectiveness of the reduced model in rendering the dynamics for both asymptotic state and transient stages. It is shown that the method leads to a stable and accurate time-integration for only a fraction of the cost of a detailed simulation, provided that the mapping is properly approximated and the reduced basis remains relevant for the dynamics investigated. (authors)

  10. Modifying Risk of Aneuploidy with a Positive Cell-Free Fetal DNA Result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, A Ashleigh; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Warsof, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Noninvasive genomic assessments of the fetus while in utero have been made possible by the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA fragments from the serum of pregnant women, as part of a noninvasive prenatal testing screening strategy. Between 7% and 10% of total cell-free DNA in the maternal blood comes from placental trophoblasts, allowing for identification of the DNA associated with the fetal component of the placenta. Using simple venipuncture in the outpatient setting, this cell-free, extracellular fetal DNA can be isolated in the maternal serum from a single blood draw as early as the seventh week of gestation. PMID:27235910

  11. Comparison of Di-n-methyl Phthalate Biodegradation by Free and Immobilized Microbial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; YU-CAI YE; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare the biodegradation of di-n-methyl pathalate by free and immobilizedmicrobial cells. Methods The enrichment and isolation technique was used to isolate themicroorganism. The PAV-entrapment method was utilized to immobilize the microorganisms. Thescanning electron microscophy (SEM) was used to observe the growth and distribution of microbialcells immobilized inside the PVA bead gels. The GC/MS method was used to identify the mainintermediates of DMP degradation. Results The microbial cells could grow quite well in PVA gel.The metabolic pathway did not change before and after immobilization of the microbial cells. Thedegradation rate of immobilized cells was higher than that of free cells. Conclusion Theimmobilized microbial cells possess advantages than free cells when applied to the biodegradation oftoxic organic pollutants.

  12. Evaporation-based microfluidic production of oil-free cell-containing hydrogel particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Rong; Naqvi, Kubra; Patel, Krishna; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an evaporation-based microfluidic strategy to produce oil-free cell containing hydrogel particles. Perfluoro-n-pentane, which is used as the continuous oil phase to generate cell-containing hydrogel (Extracel) particles, is removed at an elevated temperature. Human colon cancer cells (HCT116) encapsulated in the hydrogel particles show higher viability than cells encapsulated in particles that are produced via a non-evaporative oil phase. In addition, single HCT116 cells can be...

  13. Label-free identification of white blood cell using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Min-hyeok; Kang, Suk-Jo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    White blood cells (WBC) have crucial roles in immune systems which defend the host against from disease conditions and harmful invaders. Various WBC subsets have been characterized and reported to be involved in many pathophysiologic conditions. It is crucial to isolate a specific WBC subset to study its pathophysiological roles in diseases. Identification methods for a specific WBC population are rely on invasive approaches, including Wright-Gimesa staining for observing cellular morphologies and fluorescence staining for specific protein markers. While these methods enable precise classification of WBC populations, they could disturb cellular viability or functions. In order to classify WBC populations in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative phase imaging technique that measures 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions of individual WBCs. To test feasibility of label-free classification of WBC populations using ODT, we measured four subtypes of WBCs, including B cell, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, and natural killer (NK) cell. From measured 3-D RI tomograms of WBCs, we obtain quantitative structural and biochemical information and classify each WBC population using a machine learning algorithm.

  14. Free electron laser irradiation at 200 microns affects DNA synthesis in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the effect of a 200-microns wavelength free electron laser beam on the ability of asynchronized and synchronized mammalian tissue culture cells to incorporate tritiated thymidine. Compared to controls (unexposed cells), a significant proportion of exposed cells exhibited a reduction in isotope incorporation. The results suggest that this wavelength may affect DNA synthesis

  15. Quantification of cell-free layer thickness and cell distribution of blood by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Janne; Bykov, Alexander; Fabritius, Tapio

    2016-04-01

    A high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) with 1-μm axial resolution was applied to assess the thickness of a cell-free layer (CFL) and a spatial distribution of red blood cells (RBC) next to the microchannel wall. The experiments were performed in vitro in a plain glass microchannel with a width of 2 mm and height of 0.2 mm. RBCs were suspended in phosphate buffered saline solution at the hematocrit level of 45%. Flow rates of 0.1 to 0.5 ml/h were used to compensate gravity induced CFL. The results indicate that OCT can be efficiently used for the quantification of CFL thickness and spatial distribution of RBCs in microcirculatory blood flow.

  16. Practical, microfabrication-free device for single-cell isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I Lin

    Full Text Available Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrophilic areas across a relatively more hydrophobic substrate. The number of randomly seeded Escherichia coli bacteria in each discrete droplet approaches single-cell levels. The cell distribution on MOCCA is well-fit with Poisson distribution. In this pioneer study, we created an array of 900-picoliter droplets. The total time needed to seed cells in approximately 3000 droplets was less than 10 minutes. Compared to traditional microfabrication techniques, MOCCA dramatically lowers the cost of microscale cell arrays, yet enhances the fabrication and operational efficiency for single-cell analysis.

  17. OPTIMIZATION OF XYLANASE PRODUCTION FROM FREE AND IMMOBILIZED CELLS OF FUSARIUM SOLANI F7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijai Kumar Gupta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to characterize a xylanase-producing Fusarium solani isolate and to optimize cultural conditions for xylanase enzyme production from free and immobilized cells. Screening of Fusarium solani isolate was based on the diameter of the clear zone formation in oat spelt xylan agar plates. Fusarium solani isolate F7 was selected and optimized for xylanase enzyme production using cheaper substrates such as wheat straw, rice straw, rice bran, and wood husk. Maximum enzyme activity was observed in wheat straw (78.32 U ml-1 for free cells and 94.68 U ml-1 for immobilized cells. Optimum pH and temperature for xylanase activity were found to be 5.5 and 30°C at 3% substrate concentration for free cells and 5.0 and 30°C at 3% substrate concentration for immobilized cells. In the purification step, 75% ammonium sulphate saturation was found to be suitable, giving maximum xylanase activity. Production of xylanase was greater from immobilized cells than from free cells. Purified xylanase from free cells yielded a single band with a molecular weight of 89kDa, while it was 92.8kDa for immobilized cells. The use of wheat straw as a major carbon source is particularly valuable, because oat spelt xylan is very expensive. The Fusarium solani F7 isolate proved to be a promising microorganism for xylanase production.

  18. Protocols for Relay-Assisted Free-Space Optical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzidiamantis, Nestor D; Kriezis, Emmanouil E; Karagiannidis, George K; Schober, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We investigate transmission protocols for relay-assisted free-space optical (FSO) systems, when multiple parallel relays are employed and there is no direct link between the source and the destination. As alternatives to all-active FSO relaying, where all the available relays transmit concurrently, we propose schemes that select only a single relay to participate in the communication between the source and the destination in each transmission slot. This selection is based on the channel state information (CSI) obtained either from all or from some of the FSO links. Thus, the need for synchronizing the relays' transmissions is avoided and the slowly varying nature of the atmospheric channel is exploited. For both relay selection and all-active relaying, novel closed-form expressions for their outage performance are derived, assuming the versatile Gamma-Gamma channel model. Furthermore, based on the derived analytical results, the problem of allocating the optical power resources to the FSO links is addressed, ...

  19. Advanced free space optics (FSO) a systems approach

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, unified tutorial covering the most recent advances in the technology of free-space optics (FSO). It is an all-inclusive source of information on the fundamentals of FSO as well as up-to-date information on the state-of-the-art in technologies available today. This text is intended for graduate students, and will also be useful for research scientists and engineers with an interest in the field. FSO communication is a practical solution for creating a three dimensional global broadband communications grid, offering bandwidths far beyond what is possible in the Radio Frequency (RF) range. However, the attributes of atmospheric turbulence and scattering impose perennial limitations on availability and reliability of FSO links. From a systems point-of-view, this groundbreaking book provides a thorough understanding of channel behavior, which can be used to design and evaluate optimum transmission techniques that operate under realistic atmospheric conditions. Topics addressed...

  20. Antioxidative Effect of Schiff Bases with o-Hydroxybenzylidene Groupon Free Radical Induced Hemolysis of Human Red Blood Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The hemolysis of human red blood cells was initiated by a water-soluble free radical initiator, 2,2′-azobis-(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride)(AAPH), at 37 ℃ in phosphate buffered saline(pH=7.4). The respective addition of 1-[N-(o-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]tetradecane(TDCA), 1,2-di[N-(o-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]cyclohexane(DACH), 4-[N-(o-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]benzoic acid(PABA), 4-nitro[N-(o-hydroxybenzylidene)]aniline(APNA) or N-(o-hydroxybenzylidene)aniline(APA) can all prolong the inhibition period of hemolysis, indicating that the above Schiff bases play an antioxidative role in free radical induced hemolysis. It can be concluded that Schiff base with an alkyl group or a conjugated system in the molecule protect red blood cells against free radical induced hemolysis efficiently. This information may be useful for antioxidant drug design.

  1. Vector-free and transgene-free human iPS cells differentiate into functional neurons and enhance functional recovery after ischemic stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Mohamad

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of human death and disability in the adult population in the United States and around the world. While stroke treatment is limited, stem cell transplantation has emerged as a promising regenerative therapy to replace or repair damaged tissues and enhance functional recovery after stroke. Recently, the creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells through reprogramming of somatic cells has revolutionized cell therapy by providing an unlimited source of autologous cells for transplantation. In addition, the creation of vector-free and transgene-free human iPS (hiPS cells provides a new generation of stem cells with a reduced risk of tumor formation that was associated with the random integration of viral vectors seen with previous techniques. However, the potential use of these cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke has not been explored. In the present investigation, we examined the neuronal differentiation of vector-free and transgene-free hiPS cells and the transplantation of hiPS cell-derived neural progenitor cells (hiPS-NPCs in an ischemic stroke model in mice. Vector-free hiPS cells were maintained in feeder-free and serum-free conditions and differentiated into functional neurons in vitro using a newly developed differentiation protocol. Twenty eight days after transplantation in stroke mice, hiPS-NPCs showed mature neuronal markers in vivo. No tumor formation was seen up to 12 months after transplantation. Transplantation of hiPS-NPCs restored neurovascular coupling, increased trophic support and promoted behavioral recovery after stroke. These data suggest that using vector-free and transgene-free hiPS cells in stem cell therapy are safe and efficacious in enhancing recovery after focal ischemic stroke in mice.

  2. Isolation and functional aspects of free luteal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luborsky, J.L.; Berhrman, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of luteal cell isolation employ enzymatic treatment of luteal tissue with collagenase and deoxyribonuclease. Additional enzymes such as hyaluronidase or Pronase are also used in some instances. Isolated luteal cells retain the morphological characteristics of steroid secreting cells after isolation. They contain mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, and an extensive smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Isolated luteal cells have been used in numerous studies to examine the regulation of steriodogenesis by luteinizing hormone (LH). LH receptor binding studies were employed to quantitate specific properties of hormone-receptor interaction in relation to cellular function. Binding of (/sup 125/I)LH to bovine luteal cells and membranes was compared and it was concluded that the enzymatic treatment used to isolate cells did not change the LH receptor binding kinetics.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1245 - Dehydroepiandrosterone (free and sulfate) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1245 Dehydroepiandrosterone (free and sulfate) test system. (a)...

  4. Serum-free culture conditions for serial subculture of undifferentiated PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Hayashi, Yohei; Furue, Miho; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Asashima, Makoto

    2006-03-15

    PC12 cells, a widely used model neuronal cell line, are usually cultured in serum-supplemented medium. This report describes a serum-free medium for the culture of PC12 cells. PC12 cells grown in the two media types had similar growth rates and released dopamine in response to high potassium-induced calcium elevation. However, the levels of dopamine and of dopamine release in cells cultured in the serum-free medium were less than 10% of that in cells cultured in serum-supplemented medium. Dopamine levels recovered within 10 days if cells were returned to serum-supplemented medium, but dopamine release could not be recovered. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induced similar responses in PC12 cells cultured in both media, including phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases and neurite extension. Transferrin was necessary for survival of neurite-bearing PC12 cells subcultured in serum-free medium and insulin promoted the cells proliferation. Ten days culture with NGF produced a similar increase in neurofilament expression and acetylcholinesterase activity in both media. These results suggest that PC12 in the hormonally defined serum-free media are qualitatively the same as those cultured in serum-supplemented media, and therefore this new culture protocol should enable more precise studies of PC12 cells culture in the absence of confounding unknown factors.

  5. Phase Space Cell in Nonextensive Classical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Quarati, F

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the phase space volume $Omega$ occupied by a nonextensive system of $N$ classical particles described by an equilibrium (or steady-state, or long-term stationary state of a nonequilibrium system) distribution function, which slightly deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution in the high energy tail. We explicitly require that the number of accessible microstates does not change respect to the extensive MB case. We also derive, within a classical scheme, an analytical expression of the elementary cell that can be seen as a macrocell, different from the third power of Planck constant. Thermodynamic quantities like entropy, chemical potential and free energy of a classical ideal gas, depending on elementary cell, are evaluated. Considering the fractional deviation from MB distribution we can deduce a physical meaning of the nonextensive parameter $q$ of the Tsallis nonextensive thermostatistics in terms of particle correlation functions (valid at least in the case, discussed in this work, of...

  6. Cell-free translation and purification of Arabidopsis thaliana regulator of G signaling 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Beebe, Emily T; Urano, Daisuke; Aceti, David J; Misenheimer, Tina M; Peters, Jonathan; Fox, Brian G; Jones, Alan M

    2016-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana Regulator of G protein Signalling 1 (AtRGS1) is a protein with a predicted N-terminal 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain and a C-terminal cytosolic RGS1 box domain. The RGS1 box domain exerts GTPase activation (GAP) activity on Gα (AtGPA1), a component of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in plants. AtRGS1 may perceive an exogenous agonist to regulate the steady-state levels of the active form of AtGPA1. It is uncertain if the full-length AtRGS1 protein exerts any atypical effects on Gα, nor has it been established exactly how AtRGS1 contributes to perception of an extracellular signal and transmits this response to a G-protein dependent signaling cascade. Further studies on full-length AtRGS1 have been inhibited due to the extreme low abundance of the endogenous AtRGS1 protein in plants and lack of a suitable heterologous system to express AtRGS1. Here, we describe methods to produce full-length AtRGS1 by cell-free synthesis into unilamellar liposomes and nanodiscs. The cell-free synthesized AtRGS1 exhibits GTPase activating activity on Gα and can be purified to a level suitable for biochemical analyses. PMID:27164033

  7. Efficient production of isotopically labeled proteins by cell-free synthesis: A practical protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide detailed descriptions of our refined protocols for the cell-free production of labeled protein samples for NMR spectroscopy. These methods are efficient and overcome two critical problems associated with the use of conventional Escherichia coli extract systems. Endogenous amino acids normally present in E. coli S30 extracts dilute the added labeled amino acids and degrade the quality of NMR spectra of the target protein. This problem was solved by altering the protocol used in preparing the S30 extract so as to minimize the content of endogenous amino acids. The second problem encountered in conventional E. coli cell-free protein production is non-uniformity in the N-terminus of the target protein, which can complicate the NMR spectra. This problem was solved by adding a DNA sequence to the construct that codes for a cleavable N-terminal peptide tag. Addition of the tag serves to increase the yield of the protein as well as to ensure a homogeneous protein product following tag cleavage. We illustrate the method by describing its stepwise application to the production of calmodulin samples with different stable isotope labeling patterns for NMR analysis

  8. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  9. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  10. Effect of trimetazidine on membrane damage induced by oxygen free radicals in human red cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Maridonneau-Parini, I; Harpey, C.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trimetazidine, 1-(2, 3, 4 trimethoxybenzyl)piperazine di-hydrochloride, on membrane damage induced by oxygen free radicals in red cells was studied in seven healthy volunteers after oral administration. Red cells collected prior to and after a 7 day treatment period with trimetazidine were incubated in the presence of phenazine methosulphate (an intracellular oxygen free radical generator) and diethyldithiocarbamate (a Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase inhibitor). The loss of intracell...

  11. Influence of free fatty acids on glucose uptake in prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntalkumar;

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate.......The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate....

  12. Virus-Free Human Placental Cell Lines To Study Genetic Functions | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.

  13. Protein-free cell culture on an artificial substrate with covalently immobilized insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Y.; Zheng, J.; Imanishi, Y.; Yonezawa, K; Kasuga, M.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin was immobilized on a surface-hydrolyzed poly(methyl methacrylate) film. Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing human insulin receptors were cultured on the film in the absence of serum or soluble proteins. Small amounts of immobilized insulin (1-10% of the required amount of free insulin) were sufficient to stimulate cell proliferation. In addition, the maximal mitogenic effect of immobilized insulin was greater than that of free insulin. Immobilized insulin activated the insulin ...

  14. FREE ENERGY MEASUREMENT DISTINGUISHES NORMAL FROM CANCER CELL, OFFERING A NEW PERSPECTIVE FOR CURING CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Afrasiabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interplay of the second law of thermodynamics with the normal state and the methodology needed for the measurement of free energy of normal and malignant cells and its practical implications has not been clearly addressed in current literature. The second law of thermodynamics is one of the most fundamental laws governing the known universe at all levels. A normal cell has an exceptional ability to minimize the speed of rise in entropy to saturation of the limits of the second law. By virtue of this law, any normal resting cell is at a maximum allowable free energy. In this regard mitosis could be viewed as an attempt to maximize the lowered cellular free energy. Here we present the result of our first series of measurements, which show a significant measurable difference between the free energy of normal and malignant cells using an Olympus 510 Argon laser to calculate a diffusion correlation as well as direct visualization of motion of malignant and normal cells cultured overnight in collagen mesh. We found a significantly higher vibratory motion of the normal cells after correction for confounding factors. We also propose a new way to increase the free energy of the malignant cell to match that of its normal counterpart. This could offer hope for cure by conversion of distorted energetics of the malignant cell.

  15. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard; Delaforce, Philip Mark

    2016-03-08

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having an interconnect that reduces or eliminates diffusion (leakage) of fuel and oxidant by providing an increased densification, by forming the interconnect as a ceramic/metal composite.

  16. Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

  17. Effect of feeding whole compared with cell-free colostrum on calf immune status: Vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, S N; Wark, W A; Garst, S N; James, R E; McGilliard, M L; Petersson-Wolfe, C S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, I

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination contributes to improved herd health and production. Boosting immune development at a young age may have long-term effects by enhancing vaccine immune response and efficacy. In the bovine, colostrum is the sole source of maternal immunity, having a substantial effect on health status in the neonate. To date, colostral antibody concentration is used to evaluate colostrum quality. However, colostrum also contains proteins and cells, which may affect immune development and future responses to vaccines. To determine the effect of maternal colostral cells on immune development, 37 female Holstein and Jersey dairy calves were bottle-fed 4 quarts total of whole colostrum (WC) or cell-free colostrum (CFC) at birth. Calves were vaccinated with 2 series of multivalent vaccines. Series A consisted of vaccines given between 1 and 4mo of life. Series B consisted of vaccines given between 5 and 10mo of life. Calf peripheral blood samples were obtained before each vaccination series and monthly for 3mo after each vaccination series. Cellular blood parameters were determined by flow cytometry. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine cytokine gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before vaccination series B and once a month for 2mo after vaccination series B. Calves fed CFC had fewer numbers of B cells in mo 2 after vaccination series A when compared with WC-fed calves. Calves fed CFC had decreased gene expression levels of IL-2 in mo 1 and numbers of CD4(+)CD62L(+)CD45RO(-) and CD4(+)CD62L(+)CD45RO(+) T cells in mo 0 and 1 after vaccination series B as compared with WC-fed calves. Our findings indicate a greater response to vaccines up to 6 to 10mo post-WC feeding when compared with CFC. These data suggest that adoptive transfer of maternal colostral cells at birth has a long-term effect on development of the neonatal immune system. PMID:26923041

  18. Effect of feeding whole compared with cell-free colostrum on calf immune status: Vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, S N; Wark, W A; Garst, S N; James, R E; McGilliard, M L; Petersson-Wolfe, C S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, I

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination contributes to improved herd health and production. Boosting immune development at a young age may have long-term effects by enhancing vaccine immune response and efficacy. In the bovine, colostrum is the sole source of maternal immunity, having a substantial effect on health status in the neonate. To date, colostral antibody concentration is used to evaluate colostrum quality. However, colostrum also contains proteins and cells, which may affect immune development and future responses to vaccines. To determine the effect of maternal colostral cells on immune development, 37 female Holstein and Jersey dairy calves were bottle-fed 4 quarts total of whole colostrum (WC) or cell-free colostrum (CFC) at birth. Calves were vaccinated with 2 series of multivalent vaccines. Series A consisted of vaccines given between 1 and 4mo of life. Series B consisted of vaccines given between 5 and 10mo of life. Calf peripheral blood samples were obtained before each vaccination series and monthly for 3mo after each vaccination series. Cellular blood parameters were determined by flow cytometry. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine cytokine gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before vaccination series B and once a month for 2mo after vaccination series B. Calves fed CFC had fewer numbers of B cells in mo 2 after vaccination series A when compared with WC-fed calves. Calves fed CFC had decreased gene expression levels of IL-2 in mo 1 and numbers of CD4(+)CD62L(+)CD45RO(-) and CD4(+)CD62L(+)CD45RO(+) T cells in mo 0 and 1 after vaccination series B as compared with WC-fed calves. Our findings indicate a greater response to vaccines up to 6 to 10mo post-WC feeding when compared with CFC. These data suggest that adoptive transfer of maternal colostral cells at birth has a long-term effect on development of the neonatal immune system.

  19. Effect of Laser radiation on free radicals in human cancer G361 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EPR spectroscopy was used to the examination of free radicals evolution in cancer G361 cells during photodynamic therapy. The cancer cells were cultured with photosensitizer ALA and irradiated with 635 nm light by laser. The number of cells was determined microscopically. The decrease of the cell number and the increase in free radicals, obtained for G361 cells cultured with ALA and irradiated with laser, were stronger than relevant changes for the cells which were only irradiated with laser. The studied melanotic cells susceptible for photodynamic therapy differ from the other melanotic SK human cancer by fast spin-lattice relaxation processes. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in the studied earlier non susceptible for photodynamic therapy SK human melanoma cells. (author)

  20. Robotic milking and milk quality: effects on bacterial counts, somatic cell counts, freezing point and free fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne van der Vorst

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in milk quality after the introduction of automatic milking systems (AM-systems on dairy farms in TheNetherlands, Germany and Denmark were examined and the data were compared with milk quality results of farms withconventional milking technology. After introduction, a small, but significant increase in total bacterial count, somatic cellcount, freezing point and free fatty acids was observed. The highest levels for total plate count and cell count are foundin the first six months after introduction. After this period the milk quality slightly improves to a more stable level.Risk factors related with milk quality concern general farm characteristics, animal health, AM-system, cleaning and cooling,housing, management skills of the farmer and the hygiene on the farm. Total plate count was significantly relatedto milk yield of the herd, cleaning of the area around the AM-system and the overall hygiene on the farm. Bulk milksomatic cell count appeared to be significantly related to milk yield of the herd and the number of milkings before replacementof the liners. An increased milking frequency is not the only explanation of increased free fatty acid levels. Technicalfactors related to free fatty acids mainly concerned the air inlet in the teat cups, bubbling (excessive air inlet and a toolong post run time of the milk pump. However, several questions regarding the causes of increased free fatty acid levelsremained unclear.

  1. Serum-free microcarrier based production of replication deficient Influenza vaccine candidate virus lacking NS1 using Vero cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Mylene L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus is a major health concern that has huge impacts on the human society, and vaccination remains as one of the most effective ways to mitigate this disease. Comparing the two types of commercially available Influenza vaccine, the live attenuated virus vaccine is more cross-reactive and easier to administer than the traditional inactivated vaccines. One promising live attenuated Influenza vaccine that has completed Phase I clinical trial is deltaFLU, a deletion mutant lacking the viral Nonstructural Protein 1 (NS1 gene. As a consequence of this gene deletion, this mutant virus can only propagate effectively in cells with a deficient interferon-mediated antiviral response. To demonstrate the manufacturability of this vaccine candidate, a batch bioreactor production process using adherent Vero cells on microcarriers in commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media is described. Results Five commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media (SFM were evaluated for growth of Vero cells in agitated Cytodex 1 spinner flask microcarrier cultures. EX-CELL Vero SFM achieved the highest cell concentration of 2.6 × 10^6 cells/ml, whereas other SFM achieved about 1.2 × 10^6 cells/ml. Time points for infection between the late exponential and stationary phases of cell growth had no significant effect in the final virus titres. A virus yield of 7.6 Log10 TCID50/ml was achieved using trypsin concentration of 10 μg/ml and MOI of 0.001. The Influenza vaccine production process was scaled up to a 3 liter controlled stirred tank bioreactor to achieve a cell density of 2.7 × 10^6 cells/ml and virus titre of 8.3 Log10 TCID50/ml. Finally, the bioreactor system was tested for the production of the corresponding wild type H1N1 Influenza virus, which is conventionally used in the production of inactivated vaccine. High virus titres of up to 10 Log10 TCID50/ml were achieved. Conclusions We describe for the

  2. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Papadimou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  3. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  4. Carbon Nanohorn-Derived Graphene Nanotubes as a Platinum-Free Fuel Cell Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unni, Sreekuttan M; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Bhange, Siddheshwar N; Puthenpediakkal, Hasna; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-11-01

    Current low-temperature fuel cell research mainly focuses on the development of efficient nonprecious electrocatalysts for the reduction of dioxygen molecule due to the reasons like exorbitant cost and scarcity of the current state-of-the-art Pt-based catalysts. As a potential alternative to such costly electrocatalysts, we report here the preparation of an efficient graphene nanotube based oxygen reduction electrocatalyst which has been derived from single walled nanohorns, comprising a thin layer of graphene nanotubes and encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles (FeGNT). FeGNT shows a surface area of 750 m(2)/g, which is the highest ever reported among the metal encapsulated nanotubes. Moreover, the graphene protected iron oxide nanoparticles assist the system to attain efficient distribution of Fe-Nx and quaternary nitrogen based active reaction centers, which provides better activity and stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic as well as alkaline conditions. Single cell performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell by using FeGNT as the cathode catalyst delivered a maximum power density of 200 mW cm(-2) with Nafion as the proton exchange membrane at 60 °C. The facile synthesis strategy with iron oxide encapsulated graphitic carbon morphology opens up a new horizon of hope toward developing Pt-free fuel cells and metal-air batteries along with its applicability in other energy conversion and storage devices. PMID:26458554

  5. Cloning-Independent Expression and Analysis of ω-Transaminases by Use of a Cell-Free Protein Synthesis System▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Han, Kyuboem; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2010-01-01

    Herewith we report the expression and screening of microbial enzymes without involving cloning procedures. Computationally predicted putative ω-transaminase (ω-TA) genes were PCR amplified from the bacterial colonies and expressed in a cell-free protein synthesis system for subsequent analysis of their enzymatic activity and substrate specificity. Through the cell-free expression analysis of the putative ω-TA genes, a number of enzyme-substrate pairs were identified in a matter of hours. We e...

  6. Free radicals and antioxidant systems in reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Pilar; Piazuelo, Elena; Sánchez, M. Teresa; Ortego, Javier; Soteras, Fernando; Lanas, Angel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Experimental studies suggest that free radicals are involved in acid and pepsin-induced damage of esophageal mucosa. The profile and balance between free radicals and antioxidant systems in human esophagitis are unknown.

  7. Comparison of chemical binding to recombinant fathead minnow and human estrogen receptors alpha in whole cell and cell-free binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V; Hartig, Phillip C; Cardon, Mary C; Wilson, Vickie S

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian receptors and assay systems are generally used for in vitro screening of endocrine-disrupting chemicals with the assumption that minor differences in amino acid sequences among species do not translate into significant differences in receptor function. Objectives of the present study were to evaluate the performance of two different in vitro assay systems (a whole cell and a cell-free competitive binding assay) in assessing whether binding of chemicals differs significantly between full-length recombinant estrogen receptors from fathead minnows (fhERalpha) and those from humans (hERalpha). It was confirmed that 17beta-estradiol displays a reduction in binding to fhERalpha at an elevated temperature (37 degrees C), as has been reported with other piscine estrogen receptors. Several of the chemicals (17beta-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, alpha-zearalanol, fulvestrant, dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, and cadmium chloride) displayed higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the whole cell assay, while only dibutyl phthalate had a higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the cell-free assay. Both assays were effective in identifying strong binders, weak binders, and nonbinders to the two receptors. However, the cell-free assay provided a less complicated and more efficient binding platform and is, therefore, recommended over the whole cell binding assay. In conclusion, no strong evidence showed species-specific binding among the chemicals tested. PMID:19453209

  8. Cell Free DNA of Tumor Origin Induces a ‘Metastatic’ Expression Profile in HT-29 Cancer Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Fűri, István; Kalmár, Alexandra; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Schöller, Andrea; Barták, Barbara; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial cells in malignant conditions release DNA into the extracellular compartment. Cell free DNA of tumor origin may act as a ligand of DNA sensing mechanisms and mediate changes in epithelial-stromal interactions. Aims To evaluate and compare the potential autocrine and paracrine regulatory effect of normal and malignant epithelial cell-related DNA on TLR9 and STING mediated pathways in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and normal fibroblasts. Materials and Methods...

  9. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics and N-terminal Analysis of Human Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Hophil; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Cho, Jee Yeon; Jin, Jonghwa; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is helpful in identifying cancer-associated proteins that are differentially expressed and fragmented that can be annotated as dysregulated networks and pathways during metastasis. To examine meta-static process in lung cancer, we performed a proteomics study by label-free quantitative analysis and N-terminal analysis in 2 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines with disparate metastatic potentials—NCI-H1703 (primary cell, stage I) and NCI-H1755 (metastatic cell, stage ...

  10. Berry Phase Physics in Free and Interacting Fermionic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Berry phase plays an important role in many non-trivial phenomena over a broad range of many-body systems. In this thesis we focus on the Berry phase due to the change of the particles' momenta, and study its effects in free and interacting fermionic systems. We start with reviewing the semi-classical kinetic theory with Berry phase for a non-interacting ensemble of fermions -- a Berry Fermi gas -- which might be far-from-equilibrium. We particularly review the famous Berry phase contribution to the anomalous Hall current. We then provide a concrete and general path integral derivation for the semi-classical theory. Then we turn to the specific example of Weyl fermion, which exhibits the profound quantum phenomenon of chiral anomaly; we review how this quantum effect, and its closely related chiral magnetic effect and chiral vortical effect, arise from Berry phase in the semi-classical kinetic theory. We also discuss how Lorentz symmetry in the kinetic theory of Weyl fermion, seemly violated by the Berry phas...

  11. Metabolism meets immunity: the role of free fatty acid receptors in the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    There are significant numbers of nutrient sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be found in cells of the immune system and in tissues that are involved in metabolic function, such as the pancreas or the intestinal epithelium. The family of free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1-4, GPR84), plus a few other metabolite sensing receptors (GPR109A, GPR91, GPR35) have been for this reason the focus of studies linking the effects of nutrients with immunological responses. A number of the be...

  12. Probiotic Properties of Lyophilized Cell Free Extract of Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Saadatzadeh, Afrooz; Fazeli, Mohamma Reza; Jamalifar, Hossein; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years there have been considerable interests in the use of probiotic live cells for nutritional and therapeutic purposes. This strategy can be concomitant with some limitations such as survival of live cell during the GI-transit and their effective delivery to target tissues upon ingestion. Several attempts have been made to overcome these limitations such as their microencapsulation, spray-drying and lyophilization. Objectives In this study extract of cultured probiotics...

  13. Compact bipolar plate-free direct methanol fuel cell stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xue; Takahashi, Motohiro; Nagao, Masahiro; Hibino, Takashi

    2011-05-14

    Fuel cells with a PtAu/C anode and a Pr-doped Mn(2)O(3)/C cathode were stacked without using a bipolar plate, and their discharge properties were investigated in a methanol aqueous solution bubbled with air. A three-cell stack exhibited a stack voltage of 2330 mV and a power output of 21 mW. PMID:21451850

  14. Analyzing free zinc(II) ion concentrations in cell biology with fluorescent chelating molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Essential metal ions are tightly controlled in biological systems. An understanding of metal metabolism and homeostasis is being developed from quantitative information of the sizes, concentrations, and dynamics of cellular and subcellular metal ion pools. In the case of human zinc metabolism, minimally 24 proteins of two zinc transporter families and a dozen metallothioneins participate in cellular uptake, extrusion, and re-distribution among cellular compartments. Significantly, zinc(ii) ions are now considered signaling ions in intra- and intercellular communication. Such functions require transients of free zinc ions. It is experimentally quite challenging to distinguish zinc that is protein-bound from zinc that is not bound to proteins. Measurement of total zinc is relatively straightforward with analytical techniques such as atomic absorption/emission spectroscopy or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Total zinc concentrations of human cells are 200-300 μM. In contrast, the pool of non-protein bound zinc is mostly examined with fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy. There are two widely applied fluorescence approaches, one employing low molecular weight chelating agents ("probes") and the other metal-binding proteins ("sensors"). The protein sensors, such as the CALWY, Zap/ZifCY, and carbonic anhydrase-based sensors, can be genetically encoded and have certain advantages in terms of controlling intracellular concentration, localization, and calibration. When employed correctly, both probes and sensors can establish qualitative differences in free zinc ion concentrations. However, when quantitative information is sought, the assumptions underlying the applications of probes and sensors must be carefully examined and even then measured pools of free zinc ions remain methodologically defined. A consensus is building that the steady-state free zinc ion concentrations in the cytosol are in the picomolar range but there is no consensus on their

  15. Classical and Quantum Mechanics of Free \\k Relativistic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lukierski, J.; Ruegg, H.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formalism describing free \\k-relativistic particles with their four-momenta constrained to the \\k-deformed mass shell. We study the modifications of the formalism which follow from the introduction of space coordinates with nonvanishing Poisson brackets and from the redefinitions of the energy operator. The quantum mechanics of free \\k-relativistic particles and of the free \\k-relativistic oscillator is also presented. It is shown that the \\k-relativ...

  16. Unitized regenerative fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell system uses heat pipes to convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the reactant storage tanks. The storage tanks act as heat sinks/sources and as passive radiators of the waste heat from the fuel cell stack. During charge up, i.e., the electrolytic process, gases are conveyed to the reactant storage tanks by way of tubes that include dryers. Reactant gases moving through the dryers give up energy to the cold tanks, causing water vapor in with the gases to condense and freeze on the internal surfaces of the dryer. During operation in its fuel cell mode, the heat pipes convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the respective reactant storage tanks, thereby heating them such that the reactant gases, as they pass though the respective dryers on their way to the fuel cell stacks retrieve the water previously removed.

  17. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, M.

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution imaging techniques. Also, translating findings between model substrates to intact biomass is critical for evaluating enzyme performance. Here we employ a fungal free enzyme cocktail, a complexed cellulosomal system, and a combination of the two to investigate saccharification mechanisms on cellulose I, II and III along with corn stover from Clean Fractionation (CF), which is an Organosolv pretreatment. The insoluble Cellulose Enriched Fraction (CEF) from CF contains mainly cellulose with minor amounts of residual hemicellulose and lignin, the amount of which depends on the CF pretreatment severity. Enzymatic digestions at both low and high-solids loadings demonstrate that CF reduces the amount of enzyme required to depolymerize polysaccharides relative to deacetylated, dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of the biomass provides evidence for the different mechanisms of enzymatic deconstruction between free and complexed enzyme systems, and reveals the basis for the synergistic relationship between the two enzyme paradigms on a process-relevant substrate for the first time. These results also demonstrate that the presence of lignin, rather than cellulose morphology, is more detrimental to cellulosome action than to free cellulases. As enzyme costs are a major economic driver for biorefineries, this study provides key inputs for the evaluation of CF as a pretreatment method for biomass conversion.

  18. Cooling systems of the resting area in free stall dairy barn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, F.; Calamari, L.; Frazzi, E.

    2016-04-01

    A study during the summer season evaluated the effect of different cooling systems on behavioral and productive responses of Italian Friesian dairy cows kept in an experimental-free stall barn located in the Po Valley in Italy. The study involved 30 lactating dairy cows subdivided into two groups kept in two pens with external hard court paddock in each free stall. The same cooling system was applied in the feeding area in both pens. A different cooling system in the resting area was applied to the two pens: in the pen SW, the resting area was equipped with fans and misters; in the other, there was simple ventilation (SV). Breathing rate, rectal temperature, milk yield, and milk characteristics (fat, protein, and somatic cell count) were measured. Behavioral activities (standing and lying cows in the different areas, as well as the animals in the feed bunk) were recorded. Mild to moderate heat waves during the trial were observed. On average, the breathing rate was numerically greater in SV compared with SW cows (60.2 and 55.8 breath/min, respectively), and mean rectal temperature remained below 39 °C in both groups during the trial (on average 38.7 and 38.8 °C in SV and SW, respectively. During the hotter periods of the trial, the time spent lying indoor in the free stall was greater in SW (11.8 h/day) than SV (10.7 h/day). Conversely, the time spent standing indoor without feeding was greater in SV (4.3 h/day) than SW (3.8 h/day). Milk yield was slightly better maintained during hotter period in SW compared with SV and somatic cell count was also slightly greater in the former. In conclusion, the adoption of the cooling system by means of evaporative cooling also in the resting area reduces the alteration of time budget caused by heat stress.

  19. Cell-free synthesis of functional human epidermal growth factor receptor: Investigation of ligand-independent dimerization in Sf21 microsomal membranes using non-canonical amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Robert B.; Ballion, Biljana; Stech, Marlitt; Sonnabend, Andrei; Varga, Balázs R.; Wüstenhagen, Doreen A.; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.; Kubick, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis systems represent versatile tools for the synthesis and modification of human membrane proteins. In particular, eukaryotic cell-free systems provide a promising platform for their structural and functional characterization. Here, we present the cell-free synthesis of functional human epidermal growth factor receptor and its vIII deletion mutant in a microsome-containing system derived from cultured Sf21 cells. We provide evidence for embedment of cell-free synthesized receptors into microsomal membranes and asparagine-linked glycosylation. Using the cricket paralysis virus internal ribosome entry site and a repetitive synthesis approach enrichment of receptors inside the microsomal fractions was facilitated thereby providing analytical amounts of functional protein. Receptor tyrosine kinase activation was demonstrated by monitoring receptor phosphorylation. Furthermore, an orthogonal cell-free translation system that provides the site-directed incorporation of p-azido-L-phenylalanine is characterized and applied to investigate receptor dimerization in the absence of a ligand by photo-affinity cross-linking. Finally, incorporated azides are used to generate stable covalently linked receptor dimers by strain-promoted cycloaddition using a novel linker system. PMID:27670253

  20. A scalable label-free approach to separate human pluripotent cells from differentiated derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, N A; Bock, H; Hoeve, M A; Pells, S; Williams, C; McPhee, G; Freile, P; Choudhury, D; De Sousa, P A

    2016-01-01

    The broad capacity of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to grow and differentiate demands the development of rapid, scalable, and label-free methods to separate living cell populations for clinical and industrial applications. Here, we identify differences in cell stiffness, expressed as cell elastic modulus (CEM), for hESC versus mesenchymal progenitors, osteoblast-like derivatives, and fibroblasts using atomic force microscopy and data processing algorithms to characterize the stiffness of cell populations. Undifferentiated hESC exhibited a range of CEMs whose median was nearly three-fold lower than those of differentiated cells, information we exploited to develop a label-free separation device based on the principles of tangential flow filtration. To test the device's utility, we segregated hESC mixed with fibroblasts and hESC-mesenchymal progenitors induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation. The device permitted a throughput of 10(6)-10(7) cells per min and up to 50% removal of specific cell types per single pass. The level of enrichment and depletion of soft, pluripotent hESC in the respective channels was found to rise with increasing stiffness of the differentiating cells, suggesting CEM can serve as a major discriminator. Our results demonstrate the principle of a scalable, label-free, solution for separation of heterogeneous cell populations deriving from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26858819

  1. TUMOR-RELATED METHYLATED CELL-FREE DNA AND CIRCULATING TUMOR CELLS IN MELANOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eSalvianti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA and circulating tumor cells (CTCs which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma.The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs.RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC.The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p<0.001. The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive

  2. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  3. Cell-free DNA for diagnosing myocardial infarction: not ready for prime time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2015-11-01

    A modest amount of cell-free DNA is constantly present in human blood, originating from programmed cell death, apoptosis and rupture of blood cells or pathogens. Acute or chronic cell injury contributes to enhance the pool of circulating nucleic acids, so that their assessment may be regarded as an appealing perspective for diagnosing myocardial ischemia. We performed a search in Medline, Web of Science and Scopus to identify clinical studies that investigated the concentration of cell-free DNA in patients with myocardial ischemia. Overall, eight case-control studies could be detected and reviewed. Although the concentration of cell-free DNA was found to be higher in the diseased than in the healthy population, the scenario was inconclusive due to the fact that the overall number of subjects studied was modest, the populations were unclearly defined, cases and controls were not adequately matched, the methodology for measuring the reference cardiac biomarkers was inadequately described, and the diagnostic performance of cell-free DNA was not benchmarked against highly sensitive troponin immunoassays. Several biological and technical hurdles were also identified in cell-free DNA testing, including the lack of specificity and unsuitable kinetics for early diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, the long turnaround time and low throughput, the need for specialized instrumentation and dedicated personnel, the lack of standardization or harmonization of analytical techniques, the incremental costs and the high vulnerability to preanalytical variables. Hence it seems reasonable to conclude that the analysis of cell-free DNA is not ready for prime time in diagnostics of myocardial ischemia.

  4. Failure analysis in ITO-free all-solution processed organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.; Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Biezemans, A.F.K.V.; Verhees, W.J.H.; Veenstra, S.C.; Groen, W.A.; Andriessen, R.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a problem-solving methodology and present guidance for troubleshooting defects in ITO-free all-solution processed organic solar cells with an inverted cell architecture. A systematic approach for identifying the main causes of failures in devices is presented. Comprehensive

  5. Maternal vitamin B12 deficiency and abnormal cell-free DNA results in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuring-Blom, Heleen; Lichtenbelt, Klaske; van Galen, Karin; Elferink, Martin; Weiss, Marjan; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Page-Christiaens, Lieve

    2016-01-01

    What's Already Known about this Topic? Prenatal testing with cell-free DNA may incidentally identify maternal genetic anomalies and malignancies. What does this Study Add? Profound vitamin B12 deficiency with intramedullary hemolysis may cause abnormal genomic patterns that can be detected by cell-f

  6. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New control techniques for self contained, autonomous free flying space robots were developed and tested experimentally. Free flying robots are envisioned as a key element of any successful long term presence in space. These robots must be capable of performing the assembly, maintenance, and inspection, and repair tasks that currently require human extravehicular activity (EVA). A set of research projects were developed and carried out using lab models of satellite robots and a flexible manipulator. The second generation space robot models use air cushion vehicle (ACV) technology to simulate in 2-D the drag free, zero g conditions of space. The current work is divided into 5 major projects: Global Navigation and Control of a Free Floating Robot, Cooperative Manipulation from a Free Flying Robot, Multiple Robot Cooperation, Thrusterless Robotic Locomotion, and Dynamic Payload Manipulation. These projects are examined in detail.

  7. Mating System of Free-Ranging Dogs (Canis familiaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Pal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen females belonging to five groups were selected for the study of mating system in free-ranging domestic dogs (Canis familiaris All the matings occurred between August and December with a peak in late monsoon months (September to November. Both males and females differed in their degree of attractiveness to the opposite sex. The duration of courting association increased with the number of courting males in an association. The females exhibited selectivity by readily permitting some males to mate and avoiding, or even attacking others, if they attempted to mount. Frequency of mounting in courting association increased with the number of males present. There was a positive correlation between the duration of courting association and the frequency of mounting. The young adult males were more likely to copulate successfully than the old adult males. There was a negative correlation between the number of males present in an association and the number of successful copulations. In this study, six types of mating (monogamy, polygyny, promiscuity, polyandry, opportunity and rape were recorded. Mean (±S.E. duration of copulatory ties was 25.65 (±1.43 min. Several natural factors influencing the duration of copulatory ties were identified.

  8. Development of a Xeno-Free Substrate for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Hailin Zhu; Jinliang Yang; Yuquan Wei; Harry Huimin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are cultured on inactivated live feeder cells. For clinical application using hESCs, there is a requirement to minimize the risk of contamination with animal components. Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from feeder cells is the most natural way to provide xeno-free substrates for hESC growth. In this study, we optimized the step-by-step procedure for ECM processing to develop a xeno-free ECM that supports the growth of undifferentiated hESCs...

  9. Serum-Free Cryopreservation of Five Mammalian Cell Lines in Either a Pelleted or Suspended State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsini Joe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we have explored two practical aspects of cryopreserving cultured mammalian cells during routine laboratory maintenance. First, we have examined the possibility of using a serum-free, hence more affordable, cryopreservative. Using five mammalian lines (Crandell Feline Kidney, MCF7, A72, WI 38 and NB324K, we found that the serum-free alternative preserves nearly as efficiently as the serum-containing preservatives. Second, we compared cryostorage of those cells in suspended versus a pellet form using both aforementioned cryopreservatives. Under our conditions, cells were in general recovered equally well in a suspended versus a pellet form.

  10. Actionable mutations in plasma cell-free DNA in patients with advanced cancers referred for experimental targeted therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Janku, Filip; Angenendt, Philipp; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald S.; David S Hong; Holley, Veronica R.; Cabrilo, Goran; Jennifer J Wheler; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Overman, Michael J.; Kee, Bryan K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA in the plasma of cancer patients offers an easily obtainable source of biologic material for mutation analysis. Plasma samples from 157 patients with advanced cancers who progressed on systemic therapy were tested for 21 mutations in BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA using the BEAMing method and results were compared to mutation analysis of archival tumor tissue from a CLIA-certified laboratory obtained as standard of care from diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results were ...

  11. On-line wall-free cell for laser-induced fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-Zhu; He, You-Zhao; Xie, Hai-Yang; Gao, Yong; Gan, Wu-Er; Li, Jun

    2009-05-15

    A wall-free detection method based on liquid junction in a capillary gap was proposed for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of capillary electrophoresis (CE). The capillary gap of the wall-free cell was fabricated by etching a 10-mm x 50-microm I.D. fused-silica capillary to obtain a polyimide coating sleeve, decoating about 6mm at one end of both 50 microm I.D. separation and liquid junction capillary, inserting the treated capillary ends into the coating sleeve oppositely, fixing the capillaries with a gap distance of 140 microm by epoxy glue and removing the coating sleeve by burning. The theoretical model, experimental results and wall-free cell images indicated that the gap distance and applied voltage were main influence factors on the wall-free detection. Since the wall-free cell increased the absorption light path and avoided the stray light from the capillary wall, it improved the ratio of signal to noise and limit of detection (LOD) of CE-LIF. Three flavin compounds of riboflavin (RF), flavin mononucleotide sodium (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide disodium (FAD) were used to evaluate the wall-free detection method. Compared with on-column cell, the LODs of the wall-free cell were improved 15-, 6- and 9-fold for RF, FMN and FAD, respectively. The linear calibration concentrations of the flavins ranged from 0.005 to 5.0 micromol/L. The column efficiency was in the range from 1.0 x 10(5) to 2.5 x 10(5) plates. The wall-free detection of CE-LIF was applied to the analysis of the flavins in spinach and lettuce leaves. PMID:19329123

  12. Detection of Infertility-related Neutralizing Antibodies with a Cell-free Microfluidic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, Klaus; Root, Katharina; Verboket, Pascal E.; Dittrich, Petra S.

    2015-11-01

    The unwanted emergence of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against an endogenous or a therapeutic protein can result in deficiency diseases or therapy failure. Here, we developed a cell-free microfluidic method for the sensitive detection and quantification of nAbs in human serum that are associated with infertility. We used cell-derived vesicles containing the luteinizing hormone (LH)/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHHCGR) to detect nAbs against LH. The method exploits the entire cellular signal amplification mechanism, and facilitates the detection of as little as 0.44 nM of LH-nAb (Kd 1.5 nM) in human serum matrix within only 15 minutes. In addition, dose-response curves can be generated in less than 2 hours to evaluate the nAB concentration and dissociation constant. The developed system is devoid of problems associated with cell-based assays and we believe that this simple effect-directed analysis can be used in clinical environments, and is adaptable to other hormones or cytokines and their respective nAbs.

  13. Textile cell-free scaffolds for in situ tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aibibu, Dilbar; Hild, Martin; Wöltje, Michael; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the benefits offered by micro-fibrous scaffold architectures fabricated by textile manufacturing techniques are discussed: How can established and novel fiber-processing techniques be exploited in order to generate templates matching the demands of the target cell niche? The problems related to the development of biomaterial fibers (especially from nature-derived materials) ready for textile manufacturing are addressed. Attention is also paid on how biological cues may be incorporated into micro-fibrous scaffold architectures by hybrid manufacturing approaches (e.g. nanofiber or hydrogel functionalization). After a critical review of exemplary recent research works on cell-free fiber based scaffolds for in situ TE, including clinical studies, we conclude that in order to make use of the whole range of favors which may be provided by engineered fibrous scaffold systems, there are four main issues which need to be addressed: (1) Logical combination of manufacturing techniques and materials. (2) Biomaterial fiber development. (3) Adaption of textile manufacturing techniques to the demands of scaffolds for regenerative medicine. (4) Incorporation of biological cues (e.g. stem cell homing factors).

  14. HoloMonitor M4: holographic imaging cytometer for real-time kinetic label-free live-cell analysis of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebesta, Mikael; Egelberg, Peter J.; Langberg, Anders; Lindskov, Jens-Henrik; Alm, Kersti; Janicke, Birgit

    2016-03-01

    Live-cell imaging enables studying dynamic cellular processes that cannot be visualized in fixed-cell assays. An increasing number of scientists in academia and the pharmaceutical industry are choosing live-cell analysis over or in addition to traditional fixed-cell assays. We have developed a time-lapse label-free imaging cytometer HoloMonitorM4. HoloMonitor M4 assists researchers to overcome inherent disadvantages of fluorescent analysis, specifically effects of chemical labels or genetic modifications which can alter cellular behavior. Additionally, label-free analysis is simple and eliminates the costs associated with staining procedures. The underlying technology principle is based on digital off-axis holography. While multiple alternatives exist for this type of analysis, we prioritized our developments to achieve the following: a) All-inclusive system - hardware and sophisticated cytometric analysis software; b) Ease of use enabling utilization of instrumentation by expert- and entrylevel researchers alike; c) Validated quantitative assay end-points tracked over time such as optical path length shift, optical volume and multiple derived imaging parameters; d) Reliable digital autofocus; e) Robust long-term operation in the incubator environment; f) High throughput and walk-away capability; and finally g) Data management suitable for single- and multi-user networks. We provide examples of HoloMonitor applications of label-free cell viability measurements and monitoring of cell cycle phase distribution.

  15. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-Ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-09-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs. PMID:27652340

  16. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs. PMID:27652340

  17. Cell-Free Synthesis Meets Antibody Production: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Marlitt Stech; Stefan Kubick

    2015-01-01

    Engineered antibodies are key players in therapy, diagnostics and research. In addition to full size immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) molecules, smaller formats of recombinant antibodies, such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) and antigen binding fragments (Fab), have emerged as promising alternatives since they possess different advantageous properties. Cell-based production technologies of antibodies and antibody fragments are well-established, allowing researchers to design and manufactu...

  18. Gene circuit performance characterization and resource usage in a cell-free "breadboard".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal-Gaskins, Dan; Tuza, Zoltan A; Kim, Jongmin; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M

    2014-06-20

    The many successes of synthetic biology have come in a manner largely different from those in other engineering disciplines; in particular, without well-characterized and simplified prototyping environments to play a role analogous to wind-tunnels in aerodynamics and breadboards in electrical engineering. However, as the complexity of synthetic circuits increases, the benefits--in cost savings and design cycle time--of a more traditional engineering approach can be significant. We have recently developed an in vitro "breadboard" prototyping platform based on E. coli cell extract that allows biocircuits to operate in an environment considerably simpler than, but functionally similar to, in vivo. The simplicity of this system makes it a promising tool for rapid biocircuit design and testing, as well as for probing fundamental aspects of gene circuit operation normally masked by cellular complexity. In this work, we characterize the cell-free breadboard using real-time and simultaneous measurements of transcriptional and translational activities of a small set of reporter genes and a transcriptional activation cascade. We determine the effects of promoter strength, gene concentration, and nucleoside triphosphate concentration on biocircuit properties, and we isolate the specific contributions of essential biomolecular resources-core RNA polymerase and ribosomes-to overall performance. Importantly, we show how limits on resources, particularly those involved in translation, are manifested as reduced expression in the presence of orthogonal genes that serve as additional loads on the system. PMID:24670245

  19. Imidazolineoxyl N-oxide induces COX-2 in endothelial cells: role of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Mercedes; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez, Cristina; Siguero, Laura; Seriola, Cristina; Romero, Jose-Maria; Vila, Luis

    2012-01-01

    cPTIO (2-[4-carboxyphenyl]-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) exerts beneficial actions on systemic inflammatory response. Besides its nitric oxide (NO) scavenging properties cPTIO could exert beneficial effects through modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. We studied the effect of cPTIO on the biosynthesis of vasoactive prostaglandins (PG) by endothelial cells. Human cord umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with cPTIO, and expression of cycloxygenase (COX) isoenzymes in terms of mRNA and protein was determined by real-time-PCR and immunoblotting. Release of PGE2 (as index of untransformed PGH2 release) and 6-oxo-PGF1alpha (PGI2 stable metabolite) was determined by enzyme-immunoassay. cPTIO significantly increases the release of untransformed PGH2 associated to the induction of COX-2 expression. Experiments with NO-synthase inhibitors and radical scavengers showed that induction of COX-2 by cPTIO was mediated by free radical species, likely caused by the mobilization of NO from cellular stores. Finally, using specific signal-transduction inhibitors we show the involvement of Src/PI3-K/PKC pathway. Additional effects other than a direct NO scavenging activity may confer therapeutic advantages to cPTIO as compared with NO-synthase inhibitors for the treatment of systemic inflammation-associated vascular hyporeactivity. PMID:22652668

  20. A phosphorus-free anolyte to enhance coulombic efficiency of microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinhua; Li, Haoran; Du, Zhuwei; Ng, How Yong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a phosphorus-free anolyte is prepared by using bicarbonate to replace phosphate buffer for application in two chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Optical density test and Bradford protein assay shows that this phosphorus-free anolyte effectively inhibits the growth and reproduction of microorganisms suspended in the solution and greatly reduces the suspended cell mass. As a result, it considerably enhances the coulombic efficiency (CE) of MFCs. When the acetate concentration is 11 mM, the CE of the MFC using the pH 7 phosphate-containing anolyte is 9.7% and the CE with the pH 8.3 phosphate-containing anolyte is 9.1%, while the CE of the MFC using the phosphorus-free anolyte (pH 8.3) achieves 26.6%. This study demonstrates that this phosphorus-free anolyte holds the potential to enhance the feasibility for practical applications of MFCs.

  1. Application of Serum-Free Culture Medium for Preparation of A-NK Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua Wang; Zhibin Zhang; Hui Zhang; Yan Zhang

    2006-01-01

    To compare the differences between proliferation and cytotoxicity of adherent natural killer (A-NK) cells cultured with serum-free medium AIMV and standard serum-containing medium in vitro, and also observe the assisting effect of IL-12 on the activation and the morphology character of IL-2-treated A-NK cells, cellular proliferation was evaluated by MTT method in vitro. The morphology of the target cells killed by A-NK cells was observed through electroscope. All of the A-NK cells cultured in serum-free medium AIMV could rapidly proliferate and keep high cytotoxicity compared with that in standard serum-containing medium. A-NK cells activated by both moderate-dose IL-2 and IL-12 were superior to the high-dose IL-2-treated A-NK cells. These data indicated that serum-free medium AIMV could replace standard serum-containing medium for culturing A-NK cells, and moderate-dose IL-2 and IL-12 could reduce side effects caused by high-dose IL-2. The study provided a new experimental basis for experimental and clinical preparation of A-NK cells.

  2. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  3. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Materials and Methods Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. Results The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (p<0.001). The expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA in BC patients was also significantly higher than that in noncancer patient controls and hematuria patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). High expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA was also detected in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. Conclusions In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC. PMID:26981592

  4. Noninvasive and label-free determination of virus infected cells by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin. B.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the detection of virus-infected cells. Adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells was successfully detected at 12, 24, and 48 h after initiating the infection. The score plot of principal component analysis discriminated the spectra of the infected cells from those of the control cells. The viral infection was confirmed by the conventional immunostaining method performed 24 h after the infection. The newly developed method provides a fast and label-free means for the detection of virus-infected cells.

  5. Tyrosine kinase activity of a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptor containing the insulin receptor C-terminal domain. Comparison with the tyrosine kinase activities of the insulin and insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptors using a cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothe, I; Tartare, S; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Kaliman, P; Van Obberghen, E; Ballotti, R

    1995-03-15

    In a previous study, we showed that a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, with the beta subunit C-terminal part of the insulin receptor was more efficient in stimulating glycogen synthesis and p44mapk activity compared to the wild-type IFG-1 receptor [Tartare, S., Mothe, I., Kowalski-Chauvel, A., Breittmayer, J.-P., Ballotti, R. & Van Obberghen, E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 11449-11455]. These data indicate that the receptor C-terminal domain plays an important role in the transmission of biological effects. To understand the molecular basis of the differences in receptor specificity, we studied the characteristics of insulin, IGF-1 and chimeric receptor tyrosine kinase activities in a cell-free system. We found that, compared to wild-type insulin and IGF-1 receptors, the chimeric receptor showed a decrease in (a) autophosphorylation, (b) tyrosine kinase activity towards insulin receptor substrate-1 and the insulin receptor-(1142-1158)-peptide, and (c) the ability to activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, for all the effects measured in a cell-free system, the chimeric receptor displayed an increased response to IGF-1 compared to the native IGF-1 receptor. Concerning the cation dependence of the tyrosine kinase activity, we showed that, at 10 mM Mg2+, the ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of poly(Glu80Tyr20) by both insulin receptor and chimeric receptor was increased by Mn2+. Conversely at 50 mM Mg2+, the chimeric receptor behaved like the IGF-1 receptor, since the presence of Mn2+ decreased the stimulatory effect of IGF-1 on their kinase activity. Furthermore, the Km of the chimeric receptor for ATP was increased compared to the wild-type receptors. These data demonstrate that the replacement of the C-terminal tail of the IGF-1 receptor by that of the insulin receptor has changed the receptor characteristics studied in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that the C-terminal domain of the insulin receptor beta subunit plays a

  6. Microfluidic Buffer Exchange for Interference-free Micro/Nanoparticle Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Hui Min; Yeo, David C; Wiraja, Christian; Xu, Chenjie; Hou, Han Wei

    2016-01-01

    Engineering cells with active-ingredient-loaded micro/nanoparticles (NPs) is becoming an increasingly popular method to enhance native therapeutic properties, enable bio imaging and control cell phenotype. A critical yet inadequately addressed issue is the significant number of particles that remain unbound after cell labeling which cannot be readily removed by conventional centrifugation. This leads to an increase in bio imaging background noise and can impart transformative effects onto neighboring non-target cells. In this protocol, we present an inertial microfluidics-based buffer exchange strategy termed as Dean Flow Fractionation (DFF) to efficiently separate labeled cells from free NPs in a high throughput manner. The developed spiral microdevice facilitates continuous collection (>90% cell recovery) of purified cells (THP-1 and MSCs) suspended in new buffer solution, while achieving >95% depletion of unbound fluorescent dye or dye-loaded NPs (silica or PLGA). This single-step, size-based cell purification strategy enables high cell processing throughput (10(6) cells/min) and is highly useful for large-volume cell purification of micro/nanoparticle engineered cells to achieve interference-free clinical application. PMID:27500904

  7. Recombination lifetime of free polarons in polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kejia; Li, Lijun; Campbell, Joe C.

    2012-02-01

    The recombination lifetime of free polarons was measured using three different methods: electrical field-dependent photoresponse, transient photoconductivity, and forward-to-zero bias transient-current response. The average free polaron recombination lifetime is estimated to be a few microseconds for poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) solar cells. The competition between sweep-out by the internal field and the loss of photogenerated carriers by recombination is analyzed. The short-circuit free polaron collection efficiency for P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction material was determined to be in the range of 80% to 90%.

  8. Ligation-free ribosome profiling of cell type-specific translation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Nicholas; Torres, Daniela; Das Sharma, Sohani; Tang, Guomei; Canoll, Peter; Sims, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for genome-wide measurements of translation, but library construction requires multiple ligation steps and remains cumbersome relative to more conventional deep-sequencing experiments. We report a new, ligation-free approach to ribosome profiling that does not require ligation. Library construction for ligation-free ribosome profiling can be completed in one day with as little as 1 ng of purified RNA footprints. We apply ligation-free ribosome profiling to mouse brain tissue to identify new patterns of cell type-specific translation and test its ability to identify translational targets of mTOR signaling in the brain.

  9. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  10. Obtention of Free Fatty Acids of Macauba Oil (Acrocomia Aculeata in Organic Solvent Free System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Portilho Trentini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the enzymatic hydrolysis of oil Macaúba, to obtain a hydrolyzate rich in free fatty acids (FFA for later use in step esterification. The effect of process variables (percentage of catalyst, temperature and water content was evaluated in the FFA yield, using a factorial experimental design 23, where the positive and significant effect of the variables was observed. The results reported yields of 50.5% in FFA in 6 hours of reaction at 60ºC, water percentage of 15 wt% and catalyst percentage of 5 wt%.

  11. Improved recovery of bisulphite-treated cell-free DNA in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Krarup, H.B.; Thorlacius-Ussing, O.;

    Detection of cell-free methylated DNA in plasma is a promising tool for tumour diagnosis and monitoring. Due to the very low amount of cell-free DNA in plasma, sensitivity of the detection methods are of utmost importance. The vast majority of currently available methods for analysing DNA...... of PCR amplifying methylated and umethylated MEST. This procedure allows low levels of DNA to be easily and reliably analysed, a prerequisite for the clinical usefulness of cell-free methylated DNA detection in plasma....... methylation are based on bisulphite-mediated deamination of cytosine. However, the recovery of bisulphite-converted DNA is very poor. Here we introduce an alternative method for the crucial steps of bisulphite removal and desulfonation, improving recovery, especially for specimens with low levels of DNA. The...

  12. Microfluidic microbial fuel cells: from membrane to membrane free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic microbial fuel cells (MMFCs) are small carbon-neutral devices that use self-organized bacteria to degrade organic substrates and harness energy from the waste water. Conventional MMFCs have made great strides in the past decade and have overcome some limitations, such as high capital costs and low energy output. A co-laminar flow MFC has been first proposed in 2011 with the potential to be an attractively power source to niche applications. Co-laminar MFCs typically operate without any physical membranes separating the reactants, and bacterial ecosystems can be easily manipulated by regulating the inlet conditions. This paper highlights recent accomplishments in the development of co-laminar MFCs, emphasizing basic principles, mass transport and fluid dynamics including boundary layer theory, entrance conditions and mixing zone issues. Furthermore, the development of current techniques, major challenges and the potential research directions are discussed.

  13. [In vitro cultivation of dendritic cells with serum-free medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huai-Dong; Song, Zhen-Lan; Li, Wei-Ping

    2006-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the protocol in vitro to incubate the dendritic cell (DC) derived from peripheral blood monocytes using serum-free medium X-VIVO 20. Peripheral blood monocytes from healthy donors were treated with 100 ng/ml GM-CSF and 500 U/ml IL-4, respectively. After cultivation for 6 days, they were treated with 100 ng/ml calcium ionophore A23187. After cultivation for 24 hours the cellular morphology was observed under invert microscope, the surface markers were analyzed by flow cytometry, the proliferation of allogenetic T cells was detected by MTT colorimetry, the specific cytotoxicity of T cells primed with DC was examined by MTT assay. The results showed that in all three groups with serum-free, fetal calf serum (FCS) and human AB serum mediums, cells displayed characteristic morphological features of DC. Simultaneously CD14 expression was decreased, and CD83, HLA-DR and CDw123 expression were increased on these cells. In addition, DCs cultured with these methods could evidently stimulate the proliferation of allogenetic T cell. As compared with the two controls of serum containing groups, the cultured cells in the serum-free groups showed almost the same allo-stimulatory capability and cellular morphology and surface markers, and T lymphocytes primed with the culture-derived DC exhibited the similar killing activity to K562 (P > 0.05). It is concluded that there is no significance in DC numbers, morphology, epitope and ability to stimulate the proliferation of allogenetic T cells between DC induced by serum-free X-VIVO 20 medium and DC induced by serum-contained medium. DC cultured and induced by serum-free medium is worth using in practice widely.

  14. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacatusu, I; Badea, N; Badea, G; Oprea, O; Mihaila, M A; Kaya, D A; Stan, R; Meghea, A

    2015-11-01

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5mg·mL(-1) has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5mg·mL(-1) lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications.

  15. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference. PMID:27030289

  16. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference.

  17. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of 125I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid

  18. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  19. Non-random fragmentation patterns in circulating cell-free DNA reflect epigenetic regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Maxim; Baranova, Ancha; Butler, Timothy; Spellman, Paul; Mileyko, Vladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background The assessment of cell-free circulating DNA fragments, also known as a "liquid biopsy" of the patient's plasma, is an important source for the discovery and subsequent non-invasive monitoring of cancer and other pathological conditions. Although the nucleosome-guided fragmentation patterns of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have not yet been studied in detail, non-random representation of cfDNA sequencies may reflect chromatin features in the tissue of origin at gene-regulation level. Result...

  20. Toward label-free Raman-activated cell sorting of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascut, Flavius C.; Goh, Huey T.; George, Vinoj; Denning, Chris; Notingher, Ioan

    2011-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) has been recently proposed for label-free phenotypic identification of human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes. However, the methods used for measuring the Raman spectra led to acquisition times of minutes per cell, which is prohibitive for rapid cell sorting applications. In this study we evaluated two measurement strategies that could reduce the measurement time by a factor of more than 100. We show that sampling individual cells with a laser beam focused to a line could eliminate the need of cell raster scanning and achieve high prediction accuracies (>95% specificity and >96% sensitivity) with acquisition times ~5 seconds per cell. However, the use of commercially-available higher power lasers could potentially lead to sorting speeds of ~10 cells per s. This would start to progress RMS to the field of cell sorting for applications such as enrichment and purification of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes.

  1. Free Boundary Problems for a Lotka-Volterra Competition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Zhao, Jingfu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we investigate two free boundary problems for a Lotka-Volterra type competition model in one space dimension. The main objective is to understand the asymptotic behavior of the two competing species spreading via a free boundary. We prove a spreading-vanishing dichotomy, namely the two species either successfully spread to the entire space as time t goes to infinity and survive in the new environment, or they fail to establish and die out in the long run. The long time behavior of the solutions and criteria for spreading and vanishing are also obtained. This paper is an improvement and extension of J. Guo and C. Wu.

  2. Identification of Novel GPR55 Modulators Using Cell-Impedance-Based Label-Free Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paula; Whyte, Lauren S; Chicharro, Roberto; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Goya, Pilar; Irving, Andrew J; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Ross, Ruth A; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2016-03-10

    The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been proposed as a novel receptor of the endocannabinoid system. However, the validity of this categorization is still under debate mainly because of the lack of potent and selective agonists and antagonists of GPR55. Binding assays are not yet available for GPR55 screening, and discrepancies in GPR55 mediated signaling pathways have been reported. In this context, we have designed and synthesized novel GPR55 ligands based on a chromenopyrazole scaffold. Appraisal of GPR55 activity was accomplished using a label-free cell-impedance-based assay in hGPR55-HEK293 cells. The real-time impedance responses provided an integrative assessment of the cellular consequence to GPR55 stimulation taking into account the different possible signaling pathways. Potent GPR55 partial agonists (14b, 18b, 19b, 20b, and 21-24) have been identified; one of them (14b) being selective versus classical cannabinoid receptors. Upon antagonist treatment, chromenopyrazoles 21-24 inhibited lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) effect. One of these GPR55 antagonists (21) is fully selective versus classic cannabinoid receptors. Compared to LPI, the predicted physicochemical parameters of the new compounds suggest a clear pharmacokinetic improvement.

  3. Identification of Novel GPR55 Modulators Using Cell-Impedance-Based Label-Free Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paula; Whyte, Lauren S; Chicharro, Roberto; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Goya, Pilar; Irving, Andrew J; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Ross, Ruth A; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2016-03-10

    The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been proposed as a novel receptor of the endocannabinoid system. However, the validity of this categorization is still under debate mainly because of the lack of potent and selective agonists and antagonists of GPR55. Binding assays are not yet available for GPR55 screening, and discrepancies in GPR55 mediated signaling pathways have been reported. In this context, we have designed and synthesized novel GPR55 ligands based on a chromenopyrazole scaffold. Appraisal of GPR55 activity was accomplished using a label-free cell-impedance-based assay in hGPR55-HEK293 cells. The real-time impedance responses provided an integrative assessment of the cellular consequence to GPR55 stimulation taking into account the different possible signaling pathways. Potent GPR55 partial agonists (14b, 18b, 19b, 20b, and 21-24) have been identified; one of them (14b) being selective versus classical cannabinoid receptors. Upon antagonist treatment, chromenopyrazoles 21-24 inhibited lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) effect. One of these GPR55 antagonists (21) is fully selective versus classic cannabinoid receptors. Compared to LPI, the predicted physicochemical parameters of the new compounds suggest a clear pharmacokinetic improvement. PMID:26789378

  4. Prohibitin reduces mitochondrial free radical production and protects brain cells from different injury modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Qian, Liping; D’Aurelio, Marilena; Cho, Sunghee; Wang, Gang; Manfredi, Giovanni; Pickel, Virginia; Iadecola, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Prohibitin is an essential mitochondrial protein that has been implicated in a wide variety of functions in many cell types, but its role in neurons remains unclear. In a proteomic screen of rat brains in which ischemic tolerance was induced by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus, we found that prohibitin is upregulated in mitochondria. This observation prompted us to investigate the role of prohibitin in neuronal death and survival. We found that prohibitin is upregulated also in the ischemic tolerance induced by transient ischemia in vivo, or oxygen-glucose deprivation in neuronal cultures. Cell fractionation and electron microscopic immunolabeling studies demonstrated that prohibitin is localized to neuronal mitochondria. Upregulation of prohibitin in neuronal cultures or hippocampal slices was markedly neuroprotective, whereas prohibitin gene-silencing increased neuronal vulnerability, an effect associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species. Prohibitin upregulation was associated with reduced production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria exposed to the complex I inhibitor rotenone. In addition, prohibitin protected complex I activity from the inhibitory effects of rotenone. These observations, collectively, establish prohibitin as an endogenous neuroprotective protein involved in ischemic tolerance. Prohibitin exerts beneficial effects on neurons by reducing mitochondrial free radical production. The data with complex I activity suggest that prohibitin may stabilize the function of complex I. The protective effect of prohibitin has potential translational relevance in diseases of the nervous system associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:22238093

  5. Intrinsic indicator of photodamage during label-free multiphoton microscopy of cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Galli

    Full Text Available Multiphoton imaging has evolved as an indispensable tool in cell biology and holds prospects for clinical applications. When addressing endogenous signals such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS or second harmonic generation, it requires intense laser irradiation that may cause photodamage. We report that increasing endogenous fluorescence signal upon multiphoton imaging constitutes a marker of photodamage. The effect was studied on mouse brain in vivo and ex vivo, on ex vivo human brain tissue samples, as well as on glioblastoma cells in vitro, demonstrating that this phenomenon is common to a variety of different systems, both ex vivo and in vivo. CARS microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy were used to analyze the photodamage. The development of a standard easy-to-use model that employs rehydrated cryosections allowed the characterization of the irradiation-induced fluorescence and related it to nonlinear photodamage. In conclusion, the monitoring of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence during label-free multiphoton microscopy enables to estimate damage thresholds ex vivo as well as detect photodamage during in vivo experiments.

  6. A Free-Rider Forecasting Model Based on Gray System Theory in P2P Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to forecast the number of free-riders in P2P networks which can help network managers to know the status of the networks in advance and take appropriate measures to cope with free-riding behavior. Free-riding behavior is common in P2P networks, which has a negative impact on the robustness, availability and stability of the networks. Severe free-riding behavior may lead to the crash of the whole P2P application system. Based on the research of free-riding behavior in P2P networks, this paper constructs a free-rider forecasting model (GST model using Gray System Theory. Simulation experiments show that this model has high feasibility, and can carry out reasonable predictions on the number of free-riders in P2P networks.

  7. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  8. Cell-free fetal DNA in amniotic fluid supernatant for prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M; Nemati, M; Maralani, M; Estiar, M A; Andalib, S; Fardiazar, Z; Sakhinia, E

    2016-01-01

    In widespread conviction, amniotic fluid is utilized for prenatal diagnosis. Amniotic fluid supernatant is usually discarded, notwithstanding being a good source of fetal DNA. The aim of the present study was to assess cell-free fetal DNA extracted from amniotic fluid supernatant for application in prenatal diagnosis such as gender determination and early diagnosis of β-thalassemia. Samples of amniotic fluid of 70 pregnant women were collected and went through routine tests along with tests for cell-free fetal DNA from amniotic fluid supernatant. The DNA in the amniotic fluid supernatant was extracted and analyzed for gender determination by PCR and Real-time PCR. ARMS-PCR was applied to test early diagnosis of IVS II-I mutation (common β-thalassemia mutation) and E7V mutation for sickle cell anemia using DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant. Using the cell-free fetal DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant, the sensitivity of PCR and Real-time PCR for gender detection was compared with the routine cytogenetic method. The fetus tested for sickle cell anemia and β-thalassemia was observed to be healthy but heterozygous for IVS II-I mutation. The findings indicated that cell-free fetal DNA from amniotic fluid supernatant can be a good source of fetal DNA and be used in early prenatal diagnosis since because of its fast and accurate application. Therefore, it would be suggested that the amniotic fluid supernatant's disposal is prevented because if the tests needs to be repeated, cell-free fetal DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant can be used as an alternative source for prenatal diagnosis.

  9. Cell-free fetal DNA in amniotic fluid supernatant for prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M; Nemati, M; Maralani, M; Estiar, M A; Andalib, S; Fardiazar, Z; Sakhinia, E

    2016-01-01

    In widespread conviction, amniotic fluid is utilized for prenatal diagnosis. Amniotic fluid supernatant is usually discarded, notwithstanding being a good source of fetal DNA. The aim of the present study was to assess cell-free fetal DNA extracted from amniotic fluid supernatant for application in prenatal diagnosis such as gender determination and early diagnosis of β-thalassemia. Samples of amniotic fluid of 70 pregnant women were collected and went through routine tests along with tests for cell-free fetal DNA from amniotic fluid supernatant. The DNA in the amniotic fluid supernatant was extracted and analyzed for gender determination by PCR and Real-time PCR. ARMS-PCR was applied to test early diagnosis of IVS II-I mutation (common β-thalassemia mutation) and E7V mutation for sickle cell anemia using DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant. Using the cell-free fetal DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant, the sensitivity of PCR and Real-time PCR for gender detection was compared with the routine cytogenetic method. The fetus tested for sickle cell anemia and β-thalassemia was observed to be healthy but heterozygous for IVS II-I mutation. The findings indicated that cell-free fetal DNA from amniotic fluid supernatant can be a good source of fetal DNA and be used in early prenatal diagnosis since because of its fast and accurate application. Therefore, it would be suggested that the amniotic fluid supernatant's disposal is prevented because if the tests needs to be repeated, cell-free fetal DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant can be used as an alternative source for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27188728

  10. Monitoring of organ transplants through genomic analyses of circulating cell-free DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vlaminck, Iwijn

    Solid-organ transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage organ diseases, but complications due to infection and acute rejection undermine its long-term benefits. While clinicians strive to carefully monitor transplant patients, diagnostic options are currently limited. My colleagues and I in the lab of Stephen Quake have found that a combination of next-generation sequencing with a phenomenon called circulating cell-free DNA enables non-invasive diagnosis of both infection and rejection in transplantation. A substantial amount of small fragments of cell-free DNA circulate in blood that are the debris of dead cells. We discovered that donor specific DNA is released in circulation during injury to the transplant organ and we show that the proportion of donor DNA in plasma is predictive of acute rejection in heart and lung transplantation. We profiled viral and bacterial DNA sequences in plasma of transplant patients and discovered that the relative representation of different viruses and bacteria is informative of immunosuppression. This discovery suggested a novel biological measure of a person's immune strength, a finding that we have more recently confirmed via B-cell repertoire sequencing. Lastly, our studies highlight applications of shotgun sequencing of cell-free DNA in the broad, hypothesis free diagnosis of infection.

  11. Xeno-Free Extraction, Culture, and Cryopreservation of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Carlos Hugo; Chaparro, Orlando

    2016-03-01

    Molecules of animal or bacterial origin, which pose a risk for zoonoses or immune rejection, are commonly used for extraction, culture, and cryopreservation of mesenchymal stem cells. There is no sequential and orderly protocol for producing human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) under xeno-free conditions. After standardizing a human platelet lysate (hPL) production protocol, four human adipose tissue samples were processed through explants with fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented or hPL-supplemented media for extracting the adipose-derived stem cells. The cells were cultivated in cell culture medium + hPL (5%) or FBS (10%). The cellular replication rate, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential were evaluated at fourth passage. Cellular viability was evaluated before and after cryopreservation of the cells, with an hPL-based solution compared with an FBS-based solution. The explants cultured in hPL-supplemented media showed earlier and faster hASC proliferation than did those supplemented with FBS. Likewise, cells grown in hPL-supplemented media showed a greater proliferation rate, without losing the immunophenotype. Osteogenic differentiation of xeno-free hASC was higher than the hASC produced in standard conditions. However, adipogenic differentiation was reduced in xeno-free hASC. Finally, the cells cryopreserved in an hPL-based solution showed a higher cellular viability than the cells cryopreserved in an FBS-based. In conclusion, we have developed a complete xeno-free protocol for extracting, culturing, and cryopreserving hASCs that can be safely implemented in clinical studies.

  12. An impedance-based cytotoxicity assay for real-time and label-free assessment of T-cell-mediated killing of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Schuster, Heiko; Löffler, Markus W; Schmid-Horch, Barbara; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The in vitro assessment of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity plays an important and increasingly relevant role both in preclinical target evaluation and during immunomonitoring to accompany clinical trials employing targeted immunotherapies. For a long time, the gold standard for this purpose has been the chromium release assay (CRA). This end point assay, however, shows several disadvantages including the inevitable use of radioactivity. Based on electrical impedance measurements (using the xCELLigence system), we have established a label-free assay, facilitating the real-time monitoring of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The coculture of peptide-specific T-cell lines with peptide-loaded target cells reproducibly led to a decrease in impedance due to induced apoptosis and detachment of target cells. Comparing our results to the standard CRA assay, we could demonstrate that impedance-based measurements show comparable results after short incubation periods (6h) but outperform the CRA both in reproducibility and sensitivity after prolonged incubation (24h), enabling the detection of target cell lysis with an effector to target ratio as low as 0.05:1. The impedance-based assay represents a valuable and highly sensitive tool for label-free real-time high throughput analysis of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  13. The Influence of Different Cell Disruption Methods on the Activity of the Extract in Cell-free Protein Synthesis System%不同细胞破碎方法对无细胞蛋白表达系统细胞抽提物活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪; 权春善; 王建华; 范圣第

    2011-01-01

    Cell-free (CF) protein expression system can be effectively used for membrane protein and other toxic protein expression. In recent two decades, CF system has received wide range of attention and the yield was significantly improved. The extract activity is the critical factor that affects the efficiency of protein synthesis system. If a simple method could be established to evaluate the activity of the extract, lots of time and cost would be saved up. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) was the key regulatory enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway in the glucose metabolism, therefore the activity of G-6-PDH could be utilized as an indicator to assess the extract activity. A convenient and feasible method was established , which use the activity of G-6PDH in the extract to evaluate the extract activity. Three kinds cell disruption methods were compared, which included mechanical crushing, high pressure crushing and sonication, and the optimum conditions of each method were obtained. The mechanical crushing method got the most active extract by using 0. 1 mm-diameter glass beads at 5 000r/min for 6 times. When the disruption pressure was 1 300 bar, the activity of the extract reached the highest point. The sonication method got the best result at 60% power level, 30 cycles. The results indicated that the activity of the extract obtained by mechanical crushing and sonication methods were a little higher than the high pressure disruption.%无细胞蛋白表达系统由于能够有效表达膜蛋白等有毒性蛋白,因此近二十年受到了关注,其蛋白表达产率有了显著的提高.细胞抽提物活性的高低是无细胞蛋白表达系统高效运行的关键,若找到简单易行的活性评估方法,将大大降低成本及时间.葡萄糖-6-磷酸脱氢酶(glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase,G-6-PDH)是糖代谢的戊糖磷酸途径中的关键调控酶,该酶可以被用来评估细胞抽提物的活性.以G-6-PDH的活性为指标对无细

  14. Protein synthesis directly from PCR: progress and applications of cell-free protein synthesis with linear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinn, Song-Min; Broadbent, Andrew; Bradley, William T; Bundy, Bradley C

    2016-06-25

    A rapid, versatile method of protein expression and screening can greatly facilitate the future development of therapeutic biologics, proteomic drug targets and biocatalysts. An attractive candidate is cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS), a cell-lysate-based in vitro expression system, which can utilize linear DNA as expression templates, bypassing time-consuming cloning steps of plasmid-based methods. Traditionally, such linear DNA expression templates (LET) have been vulnerable to degradation by nucleases present in the cell lysate, leading to lower yields. This challenge has been significantly addressed in the recent past, propelling LET-based CFPS as a useful tool for studying, screening and engineering proteins in a high-throughput manner. Currently, LET-based CFPS has promise in fields such as functional proteomics, protein microarrays, and the optimization of complex biological systems. PMID:27085957

  15. Kinetics and metabolic specificities of Vero cells in bioreactor cultures with serum-free medium

    OpenAIRE

    Quesney, Sébastien; Marc, Annie; Gerdil, Catherine; Gimenez, Cyrille; Marvel, Jacqueline; Richard, Yves; Meignier, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the metabolism kinetics of Vero cells grown on microcarriers in bioreactors in serum-free medium (SFM). We sought to determine what nutrients are essential for Vero cells and how they are consumed. Contrary to glucose and to most of the amino acids, glutamine and serine were very quickly depleted in this medium and can be supposed to be responsible for cell apoptosis. Lactate and ammonium ions did not reach toxic levels for Vero cells. We payed more att...

  16. Quantitative Label-Free Cell Proliferation Tracking with a Versatile Electrochemical Impedance Detection Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Carminati, M; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2012-01-01

    optimal detection strategies. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to monitor and compare adhesion of different cell lines. HeLa cells and 3T3 fibroblasts have been cultured for 12 hours on interdigitated electrode arrays integrated into a tailor-made cell culture platform. Both......Since the use of impedance measurements for label-free monitoring of cells has become widespread but still the choice of sensing configuration is not unique though crucial for a quantitative interpretation of data, we demonstrate the application of a novel custom multipotentiostat platform to study...

  17. A Free-Rider Forecasting Model Based on Gray System Theory in P2P Networks

    OpenAIRE

    He Xu; Zhao-xiong Zhou; Suo-ping Wang; Ru-chuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to forecast the number of free-riders in P2P networks which can help network managers to know the status of the networks in advance and take appropriate measures to cope with free-riding behavior. Free-riding behavior is common in P2P networks, which has a negative impact on the robustness, availability and stability of the networks. Severe free-riding behavior may lead to the crash of the whole P2P application system. Based on the research of free-riding behavior in ...

  18. A FREE-BOUNDARY PROBLEM TO DYNAMIC SYSTEM FOR PURE FOREST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A free-boundary model of nonlinear dynamic system for pure forest is presented, in which the felling rate is unbounded nearby the free boundary. The effiect of unbounded function on a priori estimate and analysis of regularity is overcome, and the existence and uniqueness of the global classical solution to this system are proved.

  19. Biogrid--a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Lars; Åkesson, Elisabet; Ceric, Dario; Andersson, Per Henrik; Day, Kelly; Hovatta, Outi; Falci, Scott; Laurell, Thomas; Sundström, Erik

    2011-10-01

    Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:21850297

  20. INFLUENCE OF MIXING DEVICE ON SERUM-FREE CULTIVATION OF INSECT CELLS IN SPINNER FLASKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    IntroductionThe cultivation of insect cells is presently gainingin popularity mainly for the expression of high-valueheterologous proteins using genetically engineeredbaculoviruseslll. Efficient production of these proteinsrequires a suitable insect cell culture system, includingthe improved cell line with high productivity, suitableculture media and favorable environment that couldstrongly support cell growth.Tn-SBI-4 (Tns ) is a novel cell line establishedfrom Tnt midgut tissue, This cell line proved topo...

  1. Scavenging properties of metronidazole on free oxygen radicals in a skin lipid model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sabrina; Hünerbein, Andreas; Getie, Melkamu; Jäckel, Andreas; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2007-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the pathophysiology of the skin disease rosacea, a chronic, genetically-determined and UV-triggered disease, leading to facial redness and blemishes and exhibiting a deep impact on a patient's self-esteem and quality of life. ROS can cause oxidative damage to nucleic acids, sugars, proteins and lipids, thereby contributing to adverse effects on the skin. Metronidazole has been the first-line topical agent therapy for many years; nevertheless the mechanism of action is still not well understood. The therapeutic efficacy of metronidazole has been attributed to its antioxidant effects, which can involve two pathways: decreased generation of ROS within tissues or scavenging and inactivation of existing ROS. Previous investigations have shown that metronidazole reduces ROS by decreasing ROS production in cellular in-vitro systems. The aim of the following study was to demonstrate that metronidazole additionally exhibits antioxidative properties in a cell-free system, by acting as an antioxidant scavenger. A simple skin lipid model (oxidative) system and a complex skin adapted lipid system in conjunction with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test, a quantitative assay for the detection of malondialdehyde (MDA) and therefore lipid peroxidation, were used to determine the antioxidative properties of metronidazole after UV irradiation. Results clearly show that metronidazole has antioxidative properties in a cell-free environment, acting as a free radical scavenger. Simple skin lipid model: in the presence of 10, 100 and 500 microg mL(-1)metronidazole the MDA concentration was reduced by 25, 36 and 49%, respectively. Complex skin lipid system: in the presence of 100 and 500 microg mL(-1)metronidazole the MDA concentration was reduced by 19 and 34%, respectively. The results obtained in this study and from previous publications strongly suggest that metronidazole exhibits antioxidative effects via two mechanisms: decrease in ROS

  2. Label-free detection of liver cancer cells by aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejuan; Pan, Yangang; Liu, Huiqing; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Bailin

    2016-05-15

    Liver cancer is one of the most common and highly malignant cancers in the world. There are no effective therapeutic options if an early liver cancer diagnosis is not achieved. In this work, detection of HepG2 cells by label-free microcantilever array aptasensor was developed. The sensing microcantilevers were functionalized by HepG2 cells-specific aptamers. Meanwhile, to eliminate the interferences induced by the environment, the reference microcantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol self-assembled monolayers. The aptasensor exhibits high specificity over not only human liver normal cells, but also other cancer cells of breast, bladder, and cervix tumors. The linear relation ranges from 1×10(3) to 1×10(5)cells/mL, with a detection limit of 300 cells/mL (S/N=3). Our work provides a simple method for detection of liver cancer cells with advantages in terms of simplicity and stability.

  3. Alternative back contact for CIGS solar cells built on sodium-free substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Söderström, Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    It is widely known that the element sodium plays a vital role in providing highefficiency CIGS solar cells and that when cells are built on sodium free substrates theyneed an alternative (a substitute) sodium source. In this study a molybdenum-sodiumcompound has been deposited, investigated and evaluated as an alternative backcontact layer containing sodium. The compound had a 5 at % sodium concentrationand it was manufactured by an Austrian company called Plansee. The aim of the studywas to ...

  4. Rapid differentiation of human ESCs into RPE cells by defined xeno-free culture system%无动物源性成分培养体系快速诱导人胚胎干细胞向视网膜色素上皮细胞的分化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秋慧; 王菁; 田蓉; 王肖; 曹迪; 卢晶; 罗燕

    2016-01-01

    Background Subretinal transplantation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have accelerated the drive to develop xeno-free cultivation system that support the rapid differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into ES-RPE cells.Objective This study was to report a modified xeno-free culture system and method for accelerating derivation of hESCs to differentiate into RPE cells.Methods This study was approved by Ethic Committee of Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center.HESC H1 line was cloned and cuhured in Vitronectin XFTM-coated 6-well dish with xenogenetic-free medium.Cells were cultured in 50 ng/ml noggin,10 ng/ml DKK-1 and 10 ng/ml insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) medium for 2 days,and then the concentration of noggin was decreased to 10 ng/ml and 5 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and cultured for the following 2 days.Sequentially,noggin and bFGF were removed and cultured for 2 days.Finally,1 μmol/L CHIR99021 was added in medium for 6 days.Morphological changes in the progress of ESCs differentiation into RPE were observed by Living Cell Imaging System.The expression of Mitf and RPE65,RPE cellsspecific markers,in the cells were detected by immunofluorescence technique,and the relative expression levels of RPE cells-specific marker mRNA were assayed using real time fluorescent quantitation PCR.Results Polygonalshape monolayer cells which contained pigments were initially observed at day 14 after cultured with the cobblestonelike arrangement.Mitf and RPE65 were strongly expressed in the hES-derived RPE cells 35 days after induced,showing red fluorescence,and the cells presented hexagonal shape at cultured day 60 with numerous pigment granules in cytoplasm.Compared with before differentiation,the expression levels of Mitf mRNA in hES-RPE cells increased by (3.43±2.77) folds and (8.91 ± 2.83) folds,and the expression levels of RPE65 mRNA increased by (14.60 ± 3.94) folds and (87.16

  5. [Hyper-free fatty acidemia - insulin resistance and β-cell death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csala, Miklós

    2016-05-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes correlates with the rapid spread of obesity worldwide. Adipocytes are strained by the demand of excessive storage, and the local inflammation accelerates triglyceride turnover, which elevates the plasma levels of free fatty acids. Sustained hyper-free fatty acidemia leads to disturbances in cellular functions (lipotoxicity) or even to programmed cell death. Activated stress kinases interfere with insulin signaling, and often facilitate apoptosis. Hyper-free fatty acidemia, therefore, links obesity to diabetes through insulin resistance and β-cell damage. Lipotoxicity research - including the comparison of the effects exerted by saturated, unsaturated and trans fatty acids - provides explanations for long-known phenomena. Our widening knowledge in the field offers new strategies for prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. PMID:27133272

  6. [Hyper-free fatty acidemia - insulin resistance and β-cell death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csala, Miklós

    2016-05-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes correlates with the rapid spread of obesity worldwide. Adipocytes are strained by the demand of excessive storage, and the local inflammation accelerates triglyceride turnover, which elevates the plasma levels of free fatty acids. Sustained hyper-free fatty acidemia leads to disturbances in cellular functions (lipotoxicity) or even to programmed cell death. Activated stress kinases interfere with insulin signaling, and often facilitate apoptosis. Hyper-free fatty acidemia, therefore, links obesity to diabetes through insulin resistance and β-cell damage. Lipotoxicity research - including the comparison of the effects exerted by saturated, unsaturated and trans fatty acids - provides explanations for long-known phenomena. Our widening knowledge in the field offers new strategies for prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  7. Patient-specific cardiovascular progenitor cells derived from integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang; Wang, Yongyu; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhao, Chao; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Forde, Kaitlynn; Wang, Lunchang; Wang, Jiangang; Baylink, David J; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Gao, Shaorong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in regenerating a live vascular replacement. However, the vascular cell source is limited, and it is crucial to develop a scaffold that accommodates new type of vascular progenitor cells and facilitates in vivo lineage specification of the cells into functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to regenerate vascular tissue. In the present study, integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were established from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells through episomal vector nucleofection of reprogramming factors. The established hiPSCs were then induced into mesoderm-originated cardiovascular progenitor cells (CVPCs) with a highly efficient directed lineage specification method. The derived CVPCs were demonstrated to be able to differentiate into functional VSMCs. Subcutaneous implantation of CVPCs seeded on macroporous nanofibrous poly(l-lactide) scaffolds led to in vivo VSMC lineage specification and matrix deposition inside the scaffolds. In summary, we established integration-free patient-specific hiPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, derived CVPCs through directed lineage specification, and developed an advanced scaffold for these progenitor cells to further differentiate in vivo into VSMCs and regenerate vascular tissue in a subcutaneous implantation model. This study has established an efficient patient-specific approach towards in vivo regeneration of vascular tissue.

  8. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  9. Label-free measurements on cell apoptosis using a terahertz metamaterial-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Ding, Liang; Jin, Biaobing; Hou, Yayi; Li, Chun; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Weiwei; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-06-01

    Label-free, real-time, and in-situ measurement on cell apoptosis is highly desirable in cell biology. We propose here a design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial-based biosensor for meeting this requirement. This metamaterial consists of a planar array of five concentric subwavelength gold ring resonators on a 10 μm-thick polyimide substrate, which can sense the change of dielectric environment above the metamaterial. We employ this sensor to an oral cancer cell (SCC4) with and without cisplatin, a chemotherapy drug for cancer treatment, and find a linear relation between cell apoptosis measured by Flow Cytometry and the relative change of resonant frequencies of the metamaterial measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy. This implies that we can determine the cell apoptosis in a label-free manner. We believe that this metamaterial-based biosensor can be developed into a cheap, label-free, real-time, and in-situ detection tool, which is of significant impact on the study of cell biology.

  10. 2D light scattering static cytometry for label-free single cell analysis with submicron resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linyan; Yang, Yan; Sun, Xuming; Qiao, Xu; Liu, Qiao; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

    2015-11-01

    Conventional optical cytometric techniques usually measure fluorescence or scattering signals at fixed angles from flowing cells in a liquid stream. Here we develop a novel cytometer that employs a scanning optical fiber to illuminate single static cells on a glass slide, which requires neither microfluidic fabrication nor flow control. This static cytometric technique measures two dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns via a small numerical aperture (0.25) microscope objective for label-free single cell analysis. Good agreement is obtained between the yeast cell experimental and Mie theory simulated patterns. It is demonstrated that the static cytometer with a microscope objective of a low resolution around 1.30 μm has the potential to perform high resolution analysis on yeast cells with distributed sizes. The capability of the static cytometer for size determination with submicron resolution is validated via measurements on standard microspheres with mean diameters of 3.87 and 4.19 μm. Our 2D light scattering static cytometric technique may provide an easy-to-use, label-free, and flow-free method for single cell diagnostics.

  11. High immunogenic enterovirus 71 strain and its production using serum-free microcarrier Vero cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Lian, Wei-Cheng; Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2007-01-01

    Developing an effective vaccine against enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection provides the best means to control the disease. We have previously reported that large-scale preparation of a low immunogenic EV71 strain can be achieved using serum free microcarrier Vero cell culture in a 2-l bioreactor [Wu SC, Liu CC, Lian WC. Optimization of microcarrier cell culture process for the inactivated enterovirus type 71 vaccine development. Vaccine 2004;22:3858-64]. This present work further investigated the virus growth and the immunogenicity of two high immunogenic strains (EV71-075 and EV71-117) prepared in serum-free microcarrier cell cultures. Our results showed that serum free culture increased cell death rate after infection, reduced the virus specific productivity, but resulted in elicitation of higher neutralizing titers in immunized mice as compared to that parallel obtained in serum-containing cultures. Therefore, serum-free microcarrier culture is a valuable process for developing inactivated EV71 vaccines.

  12. Pre-Analytical Conditions in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing of Cell-Free Fetal RHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Jakobsen, Tanja Roien; Rieneck, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in maternal plasma can predict the fetal RhD type in D negative pregnant women. In Denmark, routine antenatal screening for the fetal RhD gene (RHD) directs the administration of antenatal anti-D prophylaxis only to women who carry an Rh...

  13. Carbon Supported Polyaniline as Anode Catalyst: Pathway to Platinum-Free Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zabrodskii, A G; Malyshkin, V G; Sapurina, I Y

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbon supported polyaniline as anode catalyst in a fuel cell (FC) with direct formic acid electrooxidation is experimentally demonstrated. A prototype FC with such a platinum-free composite anode exhibited a maximum room-temperature specific power of about 5 mW/cm2

  14. Cell-free plasma microRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and disease controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Anting Liu; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Knudsen, Steen;

    2013-01-01

    There are no tumor-specific biochemical markers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Tissue-specific gene expression including microRNA (miRNA) profiling, however, identifies specific PDAC signatures. This study evaluates associations between circulating, cell-free plasma-miRNA profiles a...... and PDAC in a disease and disease-control cohort....

  15. The Clinical Utilization of Circulating Cell Free DNA (CCFDNA in Blood of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyuan Wu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative and quantitative testing of circulating cell free DNA (CCFDNA can be applied for the management of malignant and benign neoplasms. Detecting circulating DNA in cancer patients may help develop a DNA profile for early stage diagnosis in malignancies. The technical issues of obtaining, using, and analyzing CCFDNA from blood will be discussed.

  16. Plasma HER2 amplification in cell-free DNA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Troels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Pallisgaard, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is an evolving technique in breast cancer, enabling liquid biopsies and treatment monitoring. The present study investigated the dynamics of plasma HER2 gene copy number and amplification...... in cfDNA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy....

  17. Free Energies of Formation Measurements on Solid-State Electrochemical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollino, J. A.; Aronson, S.

    1972-01-01

    A simple experiment is proposed that can provide the student with some insight into the chemical properties of solids. It also demonstrates the relationship between the Gibbs free energy of formation of an ionic solid and the emf of an electrochemical cell. (DF)

  18. Hepatic fat is not associated with beta-cell function or postprandial free fatty acid response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, J.M.; Doesburg, T.; Girman, C.J.; Mari, A.; Rhodes, T.; Gastaldelli, A.; Nijpels, M.G.A.A.M.; Dekker, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the association of hepatic fat with beta-cell function estimated from the oral glucose tolerance test. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that postprandial free fatty acid (FFA) suppression after a meal tolerance test (MTT) is linked to hepatic fat. Individuals with normal glucose me

  19. Free carrier generation and recombination in PbS quantum dot solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurpiers, Jona; Balazs, Daniel M.; Paulke, Andreas; Albrecht, Steve; Lange, Ilja; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Neher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Time Delayed Collection Field and Bias Assisted Charge Extraction (BACE) experiments are used to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We find that the free charge carrier creation is slightly field dependent, thus providing an upper limit to the fill fact

  20. Evaluation of prenatal RHD typing strategies on cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.H.M. Grootkerk-Tax; A.A. Soussan; M. de Haas; P.A. Maaskant-van Wijk; C.E. van der Schoot

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma led to the development of assays to predict the fetal D status with RHD-specific sequences. Few assays are designed in such a way that the fetus can be typed in RHD psi mothers and that RHD psi fetuses are correctly typed. Owing to

  1. Disruption of MDCK cell tight junctions by the free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Mineko; Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Navarro-García, Fernando; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; Sabanero, Myrna; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This parasite invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa. However, the mechanism of epithelium penetration is not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of N. fowleri trophozoites and the non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) tight junction proteins, including claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1, as well as on the actin cytoskeleton. Trophozoites from each of the free-living amoeba species were co-cultured with MDCK cells in a 1 : 1 ratio for 1, 3, 6 or 10 h. Light microscopy revealed that N. fowleri caused morphological changes as early as 3 h post-infection in an epithelial MDCK monolayer. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that after 10 h of co-culture, N. fowleri trophozoites induced epithelial cell damage, which was characterized by changes in the actin apical ring and disruption of the ZO-1 and claudin-1 proteins but not occludin. Western blot assays revealed gradual degradation of ZO-1 and claudin-1 as early as 3 h post-infection. Likewise, there was a drop in transepithelial electrical resistance that resulted in increased epithelial permeability and facilitated the invasion of N. fowleri trophozoites by a paracellular route. In contrast, N. gruberi did not induce alterations in MDCK cells even at 10 h post-infection. Based on these results, we suggest that N. fowleri trophozoites disrupt epithelial monolayers, which could enable their penetration of the olfactory epithelium and subsequent invasion of the central nervous system.

  2. Oil-Free Shaft Support System Rotordynamics: Past, Present, and Future Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in Oil-Free technologies have enabled new high-speed rotor systems and turbomachinery. Such technologies can include compliant-surface gas bearings, magnetic bearings, and advanced solid lubricants and tribo-materials. This presentation briefly reviews critical technology developments and the current state-of-the-art, emerging Oil-Free rotor systems and discusses obstacles preventing more widespread use. Key examples of "best practices" for deploying Oil-Free technologies will be presented and remaining major technical questions surrounding Oil-Free technologies will be brought forward.

  3. Control of a free-flying robot manipulator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H.

    1986-01-01

    The development of and test control strategies for self-contained, autonomous free flying space robots are discussed. Such a robot would perform operations in space similar to those currently handled by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). Use of robots should reduce the expense and danger attending EVA both by providing assistance to astronauts and in many cases by eliminating altogether the need for human EVA, thus greatly enhancing the scope and flexibility of space assembly and repair activities. The focus of the work is to develop and carry out a program of research with a series of physical Satellite Robot Simulator Vehicles (SRSV's), two-dimensionally freely mobile laboratory models of autonomous free-flying space robots such as might perform extravehicular functions associated with operation of a space station or repair of orbiting satellites. It is planned, in a later phase, to extend the research to three dimensions by carrying out experiments in the Space Shuttle cargo bay.

  4. Dynamics of Social Systems: Cooperation and Free-Riding

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y; Nadal, J P; Gordon, Mirta B.; Ma, Yiping; Nadal, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    We study the mean field dynamics of a model introduced by Phan et al [Wehia, 2005] of a polymorphic social community. The individuals may choose between three strategies: either not to join the community or, in the case of joining it, to cooperate or to behave as a free-rider. Individuals' preferences have an idiosyncratic component and a social component. Cooperators bear a fixed cost whereas free-riders support a cost proportional to the number of cooperators. We study the dynamics of this model analytically in the mean field approximation for both parallel and sequential updating. As we vary one of the parameters while keeping the other parameters fixed, the phase diagram experiences a rich class of bifurcations. Noticeably, a limit cycle is shown to exist in both parallel and sequential updating, under certain parameter settings. A comparison of the analytical predictions with computer simulation is also included.

  5. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  6. Free fucose is a danger signal to human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wai Ling; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2008-03-01

    Fucose is present in foods, and it is a major component of human mucin glycoproteins and glycolipids. l-Fucose can also be found at the terminal position of many cell-surface oligosaccharide ligands that mediate cell-recognition and adhesion-signalling pathways. Mucin fucose can be released through the hydrolytic activity of pathogens and indigenous bacteria, leading to the release of free fucose into the intestinal lumen. The immunomodulating effects of free fucose on intestinal epithelial cells (enterocyte-like Caco-2) were investigated. It was found that the presence of l-fucose up regulated genes and secretion of their encoded proteins that are involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses, possibly via the toll-like receptor-2 signalling pathway. These include TNFSF5, TNFSF7, TNF-alpha, IL12, IL17 and IL18. Besides modulating immune reactions in differentiated Caco-2 cells, fucose induced a set of cytokine genes that are involved in the development and proliferation of immune cells. These include the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) BMP2, BMP4, IL5, thrombopoietin and erythropoietin. In addition, the up regulated gene expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 may help to promote epithelial cell restitution in conjunction with the enhanced expression of transforming growth factor-beta mRNA. Since the exogenous fucose was not metabolised by the differentiated Caco-2 cells as a carbon source, the reactions elicited were suggested to be a result of the direct interaction of fucose and differentiated Caco-2 cells. The presence of free fucose may signal the invasion of mucin-hydrolysing microbial cells and breakage of the mucosal barrier. The intestinal epithelial cells respond by up regulation and secretion of cytokines, pre-empting the actual invasion of pathogens.

  7. Model-free control techniques for Stop & Go systems

    OpenAIRE

    Villagra, Jorge; Milanés, Vicente; Pérez Rastelli, Joshué; González, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a comparison of Stop & Go control algorithms, which deal with car following scenarios in urban environments. Since many vehicle/road interaction factors (road slope, aerodynamic forces) and actuator dynamics are very poorly known, two robust control strategies are proposed: an intelligent PID controller and a fuzzy controller. Both model-free techniques will be implemented and compared in simulation to show their suitability for demanding scenarios.

  8. Classical and quantum mechanics of free {kappa}-relativistic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukierski, J. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (England); Ruegg, H. [Department de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Zakrzewski, W.J. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (England)

    1995-10-01

    We consider the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formalism describing free {kappa}-relativistic particles with their four-momenta constrained to the {kappa}-deformed mass shell. We study the formalism with commuting as well as noncommuting (i.e., with nonvanishing Poisson brackets) space-time coordinates; in particular a {kappa}-deformed phase space formalism leading to the {kappa}-deformed covariant Heisenberg algebra is presented. We also describe the dependence of the formalism on the various definitions of the energy operator corresponding to different choices of basic generators in the {kappa}-deformed Poincar{acute e} algebra. The quantum mechanics of free {kappa}-relativistic particles and of the free {kappa}-relativistic oscillator are also presented. It is shown that the {kappa}-relativistic oscillator describes a quantum statistical ensemble with a finite value of the Hagedorn temperature. The relation to a {kappa}-deformed Schr{umlt o}dinger quantum mechanics in which the time derivative is replaced by a finite difference is also discussed. {copyright} 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

  9. Determination of Free and Total Sulfites in Wine using an Automatic Flow Injection Analysis System with Voltammetric Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Pacheco, João Grosso; Magalhães, Paulo Jorge; Rodrigues, José António; Barros, Aquiles Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract An automated Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) system based on a initial analyte separation by gas-diffusion and subsequent determination by square-wave voltammetry (SWV) in a flow cell is proposed for the determination of total and free content of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in wine. The proposed method was compared with two iodometric methodologies (the Ripper method and the simplified method commonly used by the wine industry). The developed method shown repeatability (RSD lower ...

  10. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. → CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca2+-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. → Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits FcεRI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. → Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl2 promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl2 in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent Fyn kinase activation.

  11. Rare-Cell Enrichment by a Rapid, Label-Free, Ultrasonic Isopycnic Technique for Medical Diagnostics**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Syed, Abeer; Reboud, Julien; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C; Barrett, Michael P; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    One significant challenge in medical diagnostics lies in the development of label-free methods to separate different cells within complex biological samples. Here we demonstrate a generic, low-power ultrasonic separation technique, able to enrich different cell types based upon their physical properties. For malaria, we differentiate between infected and non-infected red blood cells in a fingerprick-sized drop of blood. We are able to achieve an enrichment of circulating cells infected by the ring stage of the parasite over nonparasitized red blood cells by between two and three orders of magnitude in less than 3 seconds (enabling detection at parasitemia levels as low as 0.0005 %). In a second example, we also show that our methods can be used to enrich different cell types, concentrating Trypanosoma in blood at very low levels of infection, on disposable, low-cost chips. PMID:24677583

  12. Rare-cell enrichment by a rapid, label-free, ultrasonic isopycnic technique for medical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Syed, Abeer; Reboud, Julien; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C; Barrett, Michael P; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2014-05-26

    One significant challenge in medical diagnostics lies in the development of label-free methods to separate different cells within complex biological samples. Here we demonstrate a generic, low-power ultrasonic separation technique, able to enrich different cell types based upon their physical properties. For malaria, we differentiate between infected and non-infected red blood cells in a fingerprick-sized drop of blood. We are able to achieve an enrichment of circulating cells infected by the ring stage of the parasite over nonparasitized red blood cells by between two and three orders of magnitude in less than 3 seconds (enabling detection at parasitemia levels as low as 0.0005%). In a second example, we also show that our methods can be used to enrich different cell types, concentrating Trypanosoma in blood at very low levels of infection, on disposable, low-cost chips. PMID:24677583

  13. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of [3H]NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of [3H]NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on [3H]NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of [3H]NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release

  14. Phase Space Cell in Nonextensive Classical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Quarati

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We calculate the phase space volume Ω occupied by a nonextensive system of N classical particles described by an equilibrium (or steady-state, or long-term stationary state of a nonequilibrium system distribution function, which slightly deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB distribution in the high energy tail. We explicitly require that the number of accessible microstates does not change respect to the extensive MB case. We also derive, within a classical scheme, an analytical expression of the elementary cell that can be seen as a macrocell, different from the third power of Planck constant. Thermodynamic quantities like entropy, chemical potential and free energy of a classical ideal gas, depending on elementary cell, are evaluated. Considering the fractional deviation from MB distribution we can deduce a physical meaning of the nonextensive parameter q of the Tsallis nonextensive thermostatistics in terms of particle correlation functions (valid at least in the case, discussed in this work, of small deviations from MB standard case.

  15. Direct evaluation of free energy for large system through structure integration approach

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Kazuhito; Tanaka, Ryohei; Yuge, Koretaka

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new approach, "structure integration", enabling direct evaluation of configurational free energy for large systems. The present approach is based on the statistical information of lattice. Through first-principles-based simulation, we find that the present method not only evaluates configurational free energy accurately in disorder states above critical temperature but also clarify importance of lattice to determine configurational free energy at high temperature.

  16. Nitrilase-catalysed conversion of acrylonitrile by free and immobilized cells of Streptomyces sp.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Nigam; A K Khandelwal; R K Gothwal; M K Mohan; B Choudhury; A S Vidyarthi; P Ghosh

    2009-03-01

    The biotransformation of acrylonitrile was investigated using thermophilic nitrilase produced from a new isolate Streptomyces sp. MTCC 7546 in both the free and immobilized state. Under optimal conditions, the enzyme converts nitriles to acids without the formation of amides. The whole cells of the isolate were immobilized in agar-agar and the beads so formed were evaluated for 25 cycles at 50°C. The enzyme showed a little loss of activity during reuse. Seventy-one per cent of 0.5 M acrylonitrile was converted to acid at 6 h of incubation at a very low density of immobilized cells, while 100% conversion was observed at 3 h by free cells.

  17. Adjustments to the preanalytical phase of quantitative cell-free DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Jacobus Bronkhorst

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the kinetics of cell-free DNA (cfDNA in the blood of cancer patients could be a strong auxiliary component to the molecular characterization of cfDNA, but its potential clinical significance is obscured by the absence of an analytical consensus. To utilize quantitative cfDNA assessment with confidence, it is crucial that the preanalytical phase is standardized. In a previous publication, several preanalytical variables that may affect quantitative measurements of cfDNA were identified, and the most confounding variables were assessed further using the growth medium of cultured cancer cells as a source of cfDNA (“Cell-free DNA: Preanalytical variables” [1]. The data accompanying this report relates to these experiments, which includes numerous changes to the sample handling and isolation protocols, and can be used for the interpretation of these results and other similar experiments by different researchers.

  18. Adjustments to the preanalytical phase of quantitative cell-free DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronkhorst, Abel Jacobus; Aucamp, Janine; Pretorius, Piet J.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the kinetics of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the blood of cancer patients could be a strong auxiliary component to the molecular characterization of cfDNA, but its potential clinical significance is obscured by the absence of an analytical consensus. To utilize quantitative cfDNA assessment with confidence, it is crucial that the preanalytical phase is standardized. In a previous publication, several preanalytical variables that may affect quantitative measurements of cfDNA were identified, and the most confounding variables were assessed further using the growth medium of cultured cancer cells as a source of cfDNA (“Cell-free DNA: Preanalytical variables” [1]). The data accompanying this report relates to these experiments, which includes numerous changes to the sample handling and isolation protocols, and can be used for the interpretation of these results and other similar experiments by different researchers. PMID:26862578

  19. Solution-Grown Monocrystalline Hybrid Perovskite Films for Hole-Transporter-Free Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2016-03-02

    High-quality perovskite monocrystalline films are successfully grown through cavitation-triggered asymmetric crystallization. These films enable a simple cell structure, ITO/CH3NH3PbBr3/Au, with near 100% internal quantum efficiency, promising power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) >5%, and superior stability for prototype cells. Furthermore, the monocrystalline devices using a hole-transporter-free structure yield PCEs ≈6.5%, the highest among other similar-structured CH3NH3PbBr3 solar cells to date.

  20. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  1. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  2. Interaction of the 2,6-dimethoxysemiquinone and ascorbyl free radicals with Ehrlich ascites cells: a probe of cell-surface charge.

    OpenAIRE

    Pethig, R; Gascoyne, P R; McLaughlin, J. A.; Szent-Györgyi, A

    1984-01-01

    The rate of quenching by Ehrlich ascites cells of anionic 2,6-dimethoxy-p-semiquinone and ascorbyl free radicals is investigated as a function of cell concentration, the blocking of cell-surface sulfhydryl groups by N-ethylmaleimide, and the reduction of cell-surface charge by neuraminidase. The rate of quenching is found to be proportional to cell viability and to the number of free cell-surface sulfhydryl groups. The enzymatic action of neuraminidase results in an increase of the free radic...

  3. Thermally Evaporated Methylammonium Tin Triiodide Thin Films for Lead-Free Perovskite Solar Cell Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yue; Zhao, Dewei; Grice, Corey R.; Meng, Weiwei; Wang, Changlei; Liao, Weiqiang; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhu, Kai; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-09-16

    We report on the synthesis of methylammonium tin triiodide (MASnI3) thin films at room temperature by a hybrid thermal evaporation method and their application in fabricating lead (Pb)-free perovskite solar cells. The as-deposited MASnI3 thin films exhibit smooth surfaces, uniform coverage across the entire substrate, and strong crystallographic preferred orientation along the <100> direction. By incorporating this film with an inverted planar device architecture, our Pb-free perovskite solar cells are able to achieve an open-circuit voltage (Voc) up to 494 mV. The relatively high Voc is mainly ascribed to the excellent surface coverage, the compact morphology, the good stoichiometry control of the MASnI3 thin films, and the effective passivation of the electron-blocking and hole-blocking layers. Our results demonstrate the potential capability of the hybrid evaporation method to prepare high-quality Pb-free MASnI3 perovskite thin films which can be used to fabricate efficient Pb-free perovskite solar cells.

  4. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant. PMID:25723061

  5. Recombinant Human DFF45 Inhibits Apoptosis-specific Endonuclease in a Cell-free System of Xenopus Egg Extracts%重组人DFF45能抑制爪蟾卵非细胞体系中的凋亡特异核酸酶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨巍; 卢智刚; 张岚; 翟中和

    2001-01-01

    system of Xenopus egg extracts, could effectively inhibit both the digestion of λDNA and the degradation of chromosomal DNA into nucleosomal fragments in the nuclei of chicken red blood cells. Our results demonstrated the existence of an apoptosis-specific endonuclease in this cell-free system, the activity of which could be inhibited by recombinant human DFF45.

  6. Clinical relevance of circulating cell-free microRNAs in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Kenjiro; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kinose, Yasuto; Nakatsuka, Erika; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecologic malignancies. Since ovarian cancer develops asymptomatically, it is often diagnosed at an advanced and incurable stage. Despite many years of research, there is still a lack of reliable diagnostic markers and methods for early detection and screening. Recently, it was discovered that cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) circulate in the body fluids of healthy and diseased patients, suggesting that they may serve as a novel diagnostic marker. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the potential clinical relevance of circulating cell-free miRNA for ovarian cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. Despite the high levels of ribonucleases in many types of body fluids, most of the circulating miRNAs are packaged in microvesicles, exosomes, or apoptotic bodies, are binding to RNA-binding protein such as argonaute 2 or lipoprotein complexes, and are thus highly stable. Cell-free miRNA signatures are known to be parallel to those from the originating tumor cells, indicating that circulating miRNA profiles accurately reflect the tumor profiles. Since it is well established that the dysregulation of miRNAs is involved in the tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, cell-free miRNAs circulating in body fluids such as serum, plasma, whole blood, and urine may reflect not only the existence of ovarian cancer but also tumor histology, stage, and prognoses of the patients. Several groups have successfully demonstrated that serum or plasma miRNAs are able to discriminate patients with ovarian cancer patients from healthy controls, suggesting that the addition of these miRNAs to current testing regimens may improve diagnosis accuracies for ovarian cancer. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that changes in levels of cell-free circulating miRNAs are associated with the condition of cancer patients. Discrepancies between the results across studies due to the lack of an established endogenous miRNA control to

  7. Fabrication of stable photovoltachromic cells using a solvent-free hybrid polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Che; Cho, Hsun-Wei; Wu, Jih-Jen

    2014-08-21

    In this work, photovoltachromic cells (PVCCs) are fabricated using a solvent-free polyethylene glycol (PEG)-titanium hybrid polymer electrolyte. With appropriate addition of 1,2-dimethyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide in the electrolyte, the range of tunable colored-state transmittance of the PVCC is enlarged due to an improved fill factor. A transmittance modulation larger than 40% can be maintained for at least 3 months, demonstrating the good long-term stability of PVCCs fabricated using the solvent-free PEG-Ti hybrid electrolyte.

  8. Printing cell-laden gelatin constructs by free-form fabrication and enzymatic protein crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Scott A; Agrawal, Animesh; Lee, Bae Hoon; Chua, Hui Yee; Low, Kok Yao; Lau, Boon Chong; Machluf, Marcelle; Venkatraman, Subbu

    2015-02-01

    Considerable interest has arisen in precision fabrication of cell bearing scaffolds and structures by free form fabrication. Gelatin is an ideal material for creating cell entrapping constructs, yet its application in free form fabrication remains challenging. We demonstrate the use of gelatin, crosslinked with microbial transglutaminase (mTgase), as a material to print cell bearing hydrogels for both 2-dimensional (2-D) precision patterns and 3-dimensional (3-D) constructs. The precision patterning was attained with 3 % gelatin and 2 % high molecular weight poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) whereas 3-D constructs were obtained using a 5 % gelatin solution. These hydrogels, referred to as "bioinks" supported entrapped cell growth, allowing cell spreading and proliferation for both HEK293 cells and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs). These bioinks were shown to be dispensable by robotic precision, forming patterns and constructs that were insoluble and of suitable stiffness to endure post gelation handling. The two bioinks were further characterized for fabrication parameters and mechanical properties. PMID:25653062

  9. The design and implementation of the FreeBSD operating system

    CERN Document Server

    McKusick, Marshall Kirk; Watson, Robert N M

    2015-01-01

    The most complete, authoritative technical guide to the FreeBSD kernel's internal structure has now been extensively updated to cover all major improvements between Versions 5 and 11. Approximately one-third of this edition's content is completely new, and another one-third has been extensively rewritten. Three long-time FreeBSD project leaders begin with a concise overview of the FreeBSD kernel's current design and implementation. Next, they cover the FreeBSD kernel from the system-call level down-from the interface to the kernel to the hardware. Explaining key design decisions, they detail the concepts, data structures, and algorithms used in implementing each significant system facility, including process management, security, virtual memory, the I/O system, filesystems, socket IPC, and networking. This Second Edition * Explains highly scalable and lightweight virtualization using FreeBSD jails, and virtual-machine acceleration with Xen and Virtio device paravirtualization * Describes new security features...

  10. Cytotoxicity and free radical reaction of high LET particles on glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces cell damages through two different mechanisms, namely, direct and indirect effects. It is known that the indirect effect via free radicals plays a major role in low linear energy transfer (LET) photon radiations, while the direct effect is the main mechanism in high LET charged particles. However, it has not been elucidated whether free radicals are involved in IR by charged particles. Also, the ability of scavenging free radicals produced by IR should be closely related to the radiation sensitivity of cells. In this report, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was quantitatively analyzed in irradiated culture media with or without glioblastoma cell lines, and the ability of radical scavenging of glioblastoma cells was also measured using electron spin resonance (ESR). Cell culture media of minimum essential medium containing 10% fetal calf serum was used as material for measurement of hydroxyl radicals. Glioblastoma cell lines, A172, TK1 and U87MG were used for evaluation of their free radical scavenge. For irradiation, carbon neon, silicon and argon beams were used at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and 200 kV X-rays were used as control. Electron spin resonance was used for quantitative analysis of hydroxyl radical using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) for trapping hydroxyl radicals after IR. In addition, the cells' scavenging ability was determined by the decay of the stable radical: 4-Hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPO). Production of hydroxyl radicals in the media after irradiation of photon or carbon beams was in positive correlation with absorbed dose, and at 20 Gy, their signal intensities decreased as LET increased up to 90 keV/micron. Signal intensities of hydroxyl radicals after irradiation with carbon beams of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 90 keV/micron were 86, 78, 73, 69 and 70% of that of X-rays, respectively. It was indicated that the indirect effect is still

  11. Protective effect of aqueous extract from Spirulina platensis against cell death induced by free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Ammu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina is a commercial alga well known to contain various antioxidants, especially phycocyanin. Apart from being sold as a nutraceutical, Spirulina is incorporated as a functional ingredient in food products and beverages. Most of the previous reports on antioxidant activity of Spirulina were based on chemical rather than cell-based assays. The primary objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of aqueous extract from Spirulina based on its protective effect against cell death induced by free radicals. Methods The antioxidant activity of the cold water extract from food-grade Spirulina platensis was assessed using both chemical and cell-based assays. In the cell-based assay, mouse fibroblast cells (3T3 cells were incubated for 1 h in medium containing aqueous extract of Spirulina or vitamin C (positive control at 25, 125 and 250 μg/mL before the addition of 50 μM 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH or 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS. The cells were incubated for another 24 h before being assessed for cell death due to apoptosis using the Cell Death Detection ELISA Kit. Spectrophotometric assays based on DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the antioxidant activity of the extract compared to vitamin C and vitamin E (positive controls. Results Spirulina extract did not cause cytotoxic effect on 3T3 cells within the range of concentrations tested (0 - 250 μg/mL. The extract reduced significantly (p Conclusions The results showed that aqueous extract of Spirulina has a protective effect against apoptotic cell death due to free radicals. The potential application of incorporating Spirulina into food products and beverages to enhance their antioxidant capacity is worth exploring.

  12. Vanished Twins and Misdiagnosed Sex: A Case Report with Implications in Prenatal Counseling Using Noninvasive Cell-Free DNA Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, James F; Henning, George; Ambrose, Anthony; Adelman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA testing is a recently introduced method for screening pregnant women for fetal trisomy, which is associated with some common significant genetic diseases, as well as the sex of the fetus. The case described here demonstrates the connection between the ultrasound "vanishing twin" phenomenon and the misdiagnosis of prenatal sex using cell-free DNA testing. PMID:27170800

  13. Admission Cell Free DNA as a Prognostic Factor in Burns: Quantification by Use of a Direct Rapid Fluorometric Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Shoham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite great advances in the treatment of burn patients, useful prognostic markers are sparse. During the past years there has been increasing interest in circulating plasma cell free DNA as a potential marker for tissue injury. We have developed a rapid direct fluorescent assay for cell free DNA quantification that allows obtaining accurate, fast, and inexpensive measurements. Objective. To use this technique for measuring plasma cell free DNA levels in burn patients and to further explore the use of cell free DNA as a potential marker of patient outcome in burns. Methods. Cell free DNA levels obtained from 14 burn victims within 6 hours of injury and 14 healthy controls were quantified by a direct rapid fluorometric assay. Results. Patient admission cell free DNA levels were significantly elevated compared with that of controls (1797 ± 1523 ng/mL versus 374 ± 245 ng/mL, P=0.004. There are statistically significant correlations between cell free DNA admission levels and burn degree (Spearman’s correlation = 0.78, P=0.001, total body surface area (Spearman’s correlation = 0.61, P=0.02, and total burn volume (Spearman’s correlation = 0.64, P=0.014. Conclusions. Admission cell free DNA levels can serve as a prognostic factor in burns and future routine use can be made possible by use of our direct rapid fluorometric assay.

  14. Rapid and label-free separation of Burkitt's lymphoma cells from red blood cells by optically-induced electrokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Liang

    Full Text Available Early stage detection of lymphoma cells is invaluable for providing reliable prognosis to patients. However, the purity of lymphoma cells in extracted samples from human patients' marrow is typically low. To address this issue, we report here our work on using optically-induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP force to rapidly purify Raji cells' (a type of Burkitt's lymphoma cell sample from red blood cells (RBCs with a label-free process. This method utilizes dynamically moving virtual electrodes to induce negative ODEP force of varying magnitudes on the Raji cells and RBCs in an optically-induced electrokinetics (OEK chip. Polarization models for the two types of cells that reflect their discriminate electrical properties were established. Then, the cells' differential velocities caused by a specific ODEP force field were obtained by a finite element simulation model, thereby established the theoretical basis that the two types of cells could be separated using an ODEP force field. To ensure that the ODEP force dominated the separation process, a comparison of the ODEP force with other significant electrokinetics forces was conducted using numerical results. Furthermore, the performance of the ODEP-based approach for separating Raji cells from RBCs was experimentally investigated. The results showed that these two types of cells, with different concentration ratios, could be separated rapidly using externally-applied electrical field at a driven frequency of 50 kHz at 20 Vpp. In addition, we have found that in order to facilitate ODEP-based cell separation, Raji cells' adhesion to the OEK chip's substrate should be minimized. This paper also presents our experimental results of finding the appropriate bovine serum albumin concentration in an isotonic solution to reduce cell adhesion, while maintaining suitable medium conductivity for electrokinetics-based cell separation. In short, we have demonstrated that OEK technology could be a promising tool for

  15. Cholesterol: A modulator of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase activity - A cell-free study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawand Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The NADPH oxidase Nox2, a multi-subunit enzyme complex comprising membrane and cytosolic proteins, catalyzes a very intense production of superoxide ions O2•−, which are transformed into other reactive oxygen species (ROS. In vitro, it has to be activated by addition of amphiphiles like arachidonic acid (AA. It has been shown that the membrane part of phagocyte NADPH oxidase is present in lipid rafts rich in cholesterol. Cholesterol plays a significant role in the development of cardio-vascular diseases that are always accompanied by oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the influence of cholesterol on the activation process of NADPH oxidase. Our results clearly show that, in a cell-free system, cholesterol is not an efficient activator of NADPH oxidase like arachidonic acid (AA, however it triggers a basal low superoxide production at concentrations similar to what found in neutrophile. A higher concentration, if present during the assembly process of the enzyme, has an inhibitory role on the production of O2•−. Added cholesterol acts on both cytosolic and membrane components, leading to imperfect assembly and decreasing the affinity of cytosolic subunits to the membrane ones. Added to the cytosolic proteins, it retains their conformations but still allows some conformational change induced by AA addition, indispensable to activation of NADPH oxidase.

  16. Biological Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles by Cell-Free Extract of Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs using the cell-free extract of Spirulina platensis. Biosynthesised AgNPs were characterised by UV-Vis spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, and FTIR analysis and finally evaluated for antibacterial activity. Extracellular synthesis using aqueous extract of S. platensis showed the formation of well scattered, highly stable, spherical AgNPs with an average size of 30–50 nm. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were confirmed by SEM and TEM analysis. FTIR and UV-Vis spectra showed that biomolecules, proteins and peptides, are mainly responsible for the formation and stabilisation of AgNPs. Furthermore, the synthesised nanoparticles exhibited high antibacterial activity against pathogenic Gram-negative, that is, Escherichia coli, MTCC-9721; Proteus vulgaris, MTCC-7299; Klebsiella pneumoniae, MTCC-9751, and Gram-positive, that is, Staphylococcus aureus, MTCC-9542; S. epidermidis, MTCC-2639; Bacillus cereus, MTCC-9017, bacteria. The AgNPs had shown maximum zone of inhibition (ZOI that is 31.3±1.11 in P. vulgaris. Use of such a microalgal system provides a simple, cost-effective alternative template for the biosynthesis of nanomaterials of silver in a large scale that could be of great use in biomedical applications.

  17. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simone; Sibio; Cristina; Fiorani; Carmine; Stolfi; Andrea; Divizia; Roberto; Pezzuto; Fabrizio; Montagnese; Giulia; Bagaglini; Paolo; Sammartino; Giuseppe; Sigismondo; Sica

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells(IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors’ belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn’t a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC.

  18. A novel self-powered and sensitive label-free DNA biosensor in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghary, Maryam; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Ojani, Reza

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel self-powered, sensitive, low-cost, and label-free DNA biosensor is reported by applying a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a power supply. A graphite electrode and an Au nanoparticles modified graphite electrode (AuNP/graphite electrode) were used as anode and cathode in the MFC system, respectively. The active biocatalyst in the anodic chamber was a mixed culture of microorganisms. The sensing element of the biosensor was fabricated by the well-known Au-thiol binding the ssDNA probe on the surface of an AuNP/graphite cathode. Electrons produced by microorganisms were transported from the anode to the cathode through an external circuit, which could be detected by the terminal multi-meter detector. The difference between power densities of the ssDNA probe modified cathode in the absence and presence of complementary sequence served as the detection signal of the DNA hybridization with detection limit of 3.1nM. Thereafter, this biosensor was employed for diagnosis and determination of complementary sequence in a human serum sample. The hybridization specificity studies further revealed that the developed DNA biosensor could distinguish fully complementary sequences from one-base mismatched and non-complementary sequences. PMID:27085948

  19. Toward Microfluidic Reactors for Cell-Free Protein Synthesis at the Point-of-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Andrea C; Shankles, Peter G; Foster, Carmen M; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Retterer, Scott T

    2016-02-10

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro and nanofluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of-care use. Here, the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care, is described. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel "reactor" and "feeder" channels. This engineered membrane facilitates the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, and can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. It has been shown that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor. PMID:26690885

  20. Improved site-specific recombinase-based method to produce selectable marker- and vector-backbone-free transgenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Tong, Qi; Li, Zhongxia; Tian, Jinhai; Wang, Yizhi; Su, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yong

    2014-02-01

    PhiC31 integrase-mediated gene delivery has been extensively used in gene therapy and animal transgenesis. However, random integration events are observed in phiC31-mediated integration in different types of mammalian cells; as a result, the efficiencies of pseudo attP site integration and evaluation of site-specific integration are compromised. To improve this system, we used an attB-TK fusion gene as a negative selection marker, thereby eliminating random integration during phiC31-mediated transfection. We also excised the selection system and plasmid bacterial backbone by using two other site-specific recombinases, Cre and Dre. Thus, we generated clean transgenic bovine fetal fibroblast cells free of selectable marker and plasmid bacterial backbone. These clean cells were used as donor nuclei for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), indicating a similar developmental competence of SCNT embryos to that of non-transgenic cells. Therefore, the present gene delivery system facilitated the development of gene therapy and agricultural biotechnology.

  1. Imbalanced free radicals and antioxidant defense systems in schizophrenia: A comparative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-chun; CHEN Qiao-zhen; MA Ying; ZHOU Jun-fu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine changes of blood oxidative-antiovidative level in schizophrenic patients and its relationship with clinical symptoms. Methods: Forty-six Chinese patients met DSM-Ⅳ (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Ⅳ) criteria for schizophrenia and fifty age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the present study. Baseline psychiatric symptom severity was assessed with brief psychiatric rating scale, positive and negative syndrome scale on the blood draw day. Fresh blood samples were collected to measure levels of nitric oxide and lipid peroxide in plasma as well as activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in red blood cells by spectrophotometric assays simultaneously. Results:Comparison of the biochemical parameters indicated that the level of nitric oxide and lipid peroxide increased in patient group,which represented a positive correlation with positive scale scores; while the activities of three critical enzymes decreased and showed a negative linear correlation. Conclusion: This study showed that there are dysregulation of free radical metabolism and poor activities of the antioxidant defense systems in schizophrenic patients. Excess free radicals formation may play a critical role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Using antioxidants might be an effective therapeutic approach to partially alleviate or prevent the symptoms of schizophrenia.

  2. Diversity of free-living amoebae in a dual distribution (potable and recycled) water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-living amoebae are known to facilitate the growth of water associated pathogens. This study, for the first time, explored the diversity of free-living amoebae in a dual distribution (potable and recycled) water system in Rouse Hill NSW, Australia. Water and biofilm samples w...

  3. Direct evaluation of free energy for large system through structure integration approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new approach, ‘structure integration’, enabling direct evaluation of configurational free energy for large systems. The present approach is based on the statistical information of lattice. Through first-principles-based simulation, we find that the present method evaluates configurational free energy accurately in disorder states above critical temperature. (paper)

  4. Escherichia coli-based cell free production of flagellin and ordered flagellin display on virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Welsh, John P; Chan, Wei; Swartz, James R

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial flagellin has been explored as a potential vaccine adjuvant for enhancing immune responses. In this article, we describe Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) as a method to rapidly produce soluble phase 1 flagellin (FliC) protein from Salmonella typhimurium. The yield was about 300 µg/mL and the product had much higher affinity for the TLR5 receptor (EC50 = 2.4 ± 1.4 pM) than previously reported. The flagellin coding sequence was first optimized for cell-free expression. We then found that the D0 domain at the C-terminus of flagellin was susceptible to proteolytic degradation in the CFPS system. Proteolysis was reduced by protease inhibitors, the use of protease-deficient cell extracts or deletion of the flagellin D0 domain. A human Toll-Like Receptor 5 (hTLR5)-specific bioactivity analysis of purified flagellin demonstrated that, although the D0 domain is far from the TLR5 recognition region, it is important for flagellin bioactivity. We next incorporated a non-natural amino acid displaying an alkyne moiety into flagellin using the CFPS system and attached flagellin to hepatitis B core virus-like particles (VLPs) using bioorthogonal azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions. The ordered and oriented VLP display of flagellin increased its specific TLR5 stimulation activity by approximately 10-fold. PMID:23519642

  5. Acaricidal activities of whole cell suspension, cell-free supernatant,and crude cell extract of Xenorhabdus stokiae against mushroom mite (Luciaphorus sp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prapassom BUSSAMAN; Chirayu SA-UTH; Paweena RATTANAS ENA; Angsumarn CHANDRAPATYA

    2012-01-01

    Xenorhabdus bacterium has been used as a biological control agent against Luciaphorus sp.,a mushroom mite endemic in Thailand.To develop an effective formulation of Xenorhabdus stokiae,treatments using different parts of X.stokiae isolate PB09 culture,including whole cell suspension,cell-free supernatant,and crude cell extract,were performed.The results show that different parts ofX.stokiae isolate PB09 culture could induce variable effects on mite mortality and fecundity.Application with cell-free supernatant of X.stokiae culture resulted in both the highest mite mortality rate [(89.00+3.60)%] and the lowest mite fecundity [(41.33+23.69) eggs/gravid female].Whole cell suspension of X.stokiae isolate PB09 culture was found to be slightly less effective than its cell-free supernatant,suggesting that X.stokiae was more likely to release its metabolites with acaricidal activities to the surrounding culture media.Crude cell extract of X.stokiae was not effective against mites.Cell-free supernatant of X.stokiae isolate PB09 was the most effective biological control agent and it could be conveniently used in future formulations instead of live bacteria.

  6. Cr(VI reduction by cell-free extract of thermophillic Bacillus fusiformis NTR9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Residual chromium compounds in discharged effluents is a serious problem, due to hexavalent chromium or chromate[Cr(VI] being extremely toxic and showing mutagenic and carcinogenic effects on biological systems. The bacterial enzymaticCr(VI reduction can occur and this could be an effective method of detoxifying Cr(VI polluted effluent. The present studycharacterized Cr(VI reductase activity of cell-free extracts (CFE of thermophilic chromate-reducing bacteria, Bacillusfusiformis NTR9. Results showed that the optimum temperature and pH for Cr(VI reductase activity of CFE was 80°C andpH 7, respectively. The reductase activity remained at 60.34% and 26.44% after 30 minutes of exposure to 70 and 90°C,respectively, suggesting a heat stable enzyme. Moreover, the enzyme was resistant under acidic and neutral condition but itsstability was decreased under alkaline condition. The Cr(VI reductase activity of CFE was enhanced when exposed in Cu2+and Fe3+ by 188.19% and 180.38%, respectively. The Cr(VI reductase activity could be reduced to 72.19% and 8.95% in thepresence of Mn2+ and Ag+, respectively. Mg2+, Zn2+, As3+ and electron acceptors like sulfate and nitrate had no affect on Cr(VIreductase activity. The external electron donors (glucose, glycerol, citrate, malate, succinate, and acetate, but not NADHwere essential to improve the chromate reductase activity of NTR9 strain. The chromate reductase was mainly associatedwith the soluble fraction in the cytoplasm of the bacterial cell. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 20 KDa. The resultsshowed that Cr(VI reductase could be a good candidate for detoxification of Cr(VI in industrial effluents.

  7. Optimization of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis Embryonic Stem Cell Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zandi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In order to retain an undifferentiated pluripotent state, embryonic stem (ES cells have to be cultured on feeder cell layers. However, use of feeder layers limits stem cell research, since experimental data may result from a combined ES cell and feeder cell response to various stimuli. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a buffalo ES cell line was established from in vitro derived blastocysts and characterized by the Alkaline phosphatase (AP and immunoflourescence staining of various pluripotency markers. We examined the effect of various factors like fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF and Y-27632 to support the growth and maintenance of bubaline ES cells on gelatin coated dishes, in order to establish feeder free culture systems. We also analyzed the effect of feeder-conditioned media on stem cell growth in gelatin based cultures both in the presence as well as in the absence of the growth factors. Results: The results showed that Y-27632, in the presence of FGF-2 and LIF, resulted in higher colony growth and increased expression of Nanog gene. Feeder-Conditioned Medium resulted in a significant increase in growth of buffalo ES cells on gelatin coated plates, however, feeder layer based cultures produced better results than gelatin based cultures. Feeder layers from buffalo fetal fibroblast cells can support buffalo ES cells for more than two years. Conclusion: We developed a feeder free culture system that can maintain buffalo ES cells in the short term, as well as feeder layer based culture that can support the long term maintenance of buffalo ES cells.

  8. The role of endogenous proteins in the protein-free maintenance of 3 distinct tumor-cell lines invitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Chigira, M

    1992-09-01

    We established new two protein-free culture subclones from murine well-characterized Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and P815 mastocytoma using intermittent protein-free culture performed previously for a protein-free subclone of fibrosarcoma (Gc-4 PF). The Ehrlich protein-free subclone (Ehrlich PF) grew much more slowly than the original cell line and showed a proliferative response to FCS. On the other hand, like Gc-4 PF, the P815 protein-free subclone (P815 PF) showed a similar growth rate to that of the original counterpart. Interestingly the original P815 mastocytoma cells also grew exponentially in protein-free medium. Although the protein-free culture exhibited cells that were more spheroid and spread less in each of these three cell lines, the major structure protein bands demonstrated on SDS-PAGE were virtually identical between the original and protein-free culture cells. In contrast to the structural peptides, the distribution of the secretory peptide differed among the three protein-free culture cell lines, which may reflect their state of differentiation. Growth-inhibiting activities were detected from the supernatant of all three protein-free culture cells, while no protein-free culture cells secreted predominantly growth-stimulating activity into their cultured media. These results suggest that autonomy in tumor cell proliferation may result from the acquisition of the ability to escape from negative control in multicellular organisms, as shown in monads, rather than an acquisition of further response to growth-stimulating control. PMID:21584570

  9. A cell-free framework for rapid biosynthetic pathway prototyping and enzyme discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ashty S; Jewett, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    Speeding up design-build-test (DBT) cycles is a fundamental challenge facing biochemical engineering. To address this challenge, we report a new cell-free protein synthesis driven metabolic engineering (CFPS-ME) framework for rapid biosynthetic pathway prototyping. In our framework, cell-free cocktails for synthesizing target small molecules are assembled in a mix-and-match fashion from crude cell lysates either containing selectively enriched pathway enzymes from heterologous overexpression or directly producing pathway enzymes in lysates by CFPS. As a model, we apply our approach to n-butanol biosynthesis showing that Escherichia coli lysates support a highly active 17-step CoA-dependent n-butanol pathway in vitro. The elevated degree of flexibility in the cell-free environment allows us to manipulate physiochemical conditions, access enzymatic nodes, discover new enzymes, and prototype enzyme sets with linear DNA templates to study pathway performance. We anticipate that CFPS-ME will facilitate efforts to define, manipulate, and understand metabolic pathways for accelerated DBT cycles without the need to reengineer organisms. PMID:26996382

  10. Review of free software tools for image analysis of fluorescence cell micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, V; Franz, D; Held, C; Münzenmayer, C; Palmisano, R; Wittenberg, T

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of free software tools have been made available for the evaluation of fluorescence cell micrographs. The main users are biologists and related life scientists with no or little knowledge of image processing. In this review, we give an overview of available tools and guidelines about which tools the users should use to segment fluorescence micrographs. We selected 15 free tools and divided them into stand-alone, Matlab-based, ImageJ-based, free demo versions of commercial tools and data sharing tools. The review consists of two parts: First, we developed a criteria catalogue and rated the tools regarding structural requirements, functionality (flexibility, segmentation and image processing filters) and usability (documentation, data management, usability and visualization). Second, we performed an image processing case study with four representative fluorescence micrograph segmentation tasks with figure-ground and cell separation. The tools display a wide range of functionality and usability. In the image processing case study, we were able to perform figure-ground separation in all micrographs using mainly thresholding. Cell separation was not possible with most of the tools, because cell separation methods are provided only by a subset of the tools and are difficult to parametrize and to use. Most important is that the usability matches the functionality of a tool. To be usable, specialized tools with less functionality need to fulfill less usability criteria, whereas multipurpose tools need a well-structured menu and intuitive graphical user interface.

  11. Label-free single cell analysis with a chip-based impedance flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Hebeisen, Monika; Mittag, Anja; Di Berardino, Marco; Tarnok, Attila

    2010-02-01

    For description of cellular phenotypes and physiological states new developments are needed. Axetris' impedance flow cytometer (IFC) (Leister) is a new promising label-free alternative to fluorescence-based flow cytometry (FCM). IFC measures single cells at various frequencies simultaneously. The frequencies used for signal acquisition range from 0.1 to 20 MHz. The impedance signal provides information about cell volume (ionophore valinomycin. Changes in membrane potential were detectable at the level of cytoplasm conductivity (>4 MHz) and membrane capacitance (1-4 MHz). Our data indicate that IFC can be a valuable alternative to conventional FCM for various applications in the field of cell death and physiology. The work will be extended to address further potential applications of IFC in biotechnology and biomedical cell analysis, as well as in cell sorting.

  12. Generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from a patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Fidan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts from a Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF patient were reprogrammed with episomal vectors by using the Neon Transfection System for the generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. The resulting iPSC line was characterized to determine the expression of pluripotency markers, proper differentiation into three germ layers, the presence of normal chromosomal structures as well as the lack of genomic integration. A homozygous missense mutation in the MEFV gene (p.Met694Val, which lead to typical FMF phenotype, was shown to be present in the generated iPSC line.

  13. Stem cell recovering effect of copper-free GHK in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Kang, Youn-A; Ryoo, Sun-Jong; Shin, Jung-Won; Na, Jung-Im; Huh, Chang-Hun; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2012-11-01

    The peptide Gly-His-Lys (GHK) is a naturally occurring copper(II)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In industry, GHK (with or without copper) is used to make hair and skin care products. Copper-GHK plays a physiological role in the process of wound healing and tissue repair by stimulating collagen synthesis in fibroblasts. We also reported that copper-GHK promotes the survival of basal stem cells in the skin. However, the effects of copper-free GHK (GHK) have not been investigated well. In this study, the effects of GHK were studied using cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalent (SE) models. In monolayer cultured keratinocytes, GHK increased the proliferation of keratinocytes. When GHK was added during the culture of SE models, the basal cells became more cuboidal than control model. In addition, there was linear and intense staining of α6 and β1 integrin along the basement membrane. The number of p63 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells was also significantly increased in GHK-treated SEs than in control SEs. Western blot and slide culture experiment showed that GHK increased the expression of integrin by keratinocytes. All these results showed that GHK increased the stemness and proliferative potential of epidermal basal cells, which is associated with increased expression of integrin. In conclusion, copper-free GHK showed similar effects with copper-GHK. Thus, it can be said that copper-free GHK can be used in industry to obtain the effects of copper-GHK in vivo. Further study is necessary to explore the relationship between copper-free GHK and copper-GHK. PMID:23019153

  14. Protection of Acanthopanax Senticosus Saponin on Free Radical Injury Induced Aging of Nerve Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘永进; 顾永健; 顾小苏

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of Acanthopanax senticosus saponin (ASS) on free radical injury induced neuron aging. Methods: On day 7 of fetal mice, cortical neuron primary passage cultures were divided into the normal control group, model group and ASS groups. The model group using free radical (FeSO4 plus H2O2) injury mode prepared in vivo cultured ICR mice cortical neuron aging model; ASS groups: 24 hrs before and after treated with H2O2 and FeSO4, different concentration of ASS was added, according to biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) etc. and histomorphologic change to observe the protection of ASS on aging neurons. Results: The LDH, SOD, MDA of the model group were compared with the normal group, P<0.01; ASS groups added 1.25 mg/100 ml, 2.5 mg/100 ml, 5 mg/100 ml concentration of ASS, their LDH, SOD, MDA compared with the model group P<0.05-0.01, the difference was significant. In medicated groups the SOD activity of oxidization injured nerve cells obviously elevated, LDH activity and MDA content apparently lowered. Microscope and scanning electron microscopic observation showed that supplemented with ASS to protect the nerve cell injury abated, part of the cellular structure tended to normalize. Conclusion: ASS could act against free radical toxic effect, increase the anti-oxidase activity, strengthen the protection of neuron cells. It is assumed that the effect against nerve cell aging was possibly through scavenging oxygen free radical, strengthening the stability of cell membrane, thus delaying the development of aging.

  15. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacatusu, I.; Badea, N.; Badea, G.; Oprea, O. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Mihaila, M.A. [Institute of Virusology “Stefan S. Nicolau”, Center of Immunology, Bravu Road, No. 285, 030304 Bucharest (Romania); Kaya, D.A. [Department of Field Crops, Faculty of Agriculture, Mustafa Kemal University, 31030 Antakya, Hatay (Turkey); Stan, R., E-mail: rl_stan2000@yahoo.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, A. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-11-01

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5 mg·mL{sup −1} has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5 mg·mL{sup −1} lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications. - Highlights: • Functional lipid nanocarriers with unique features and broad spectrum effectiveness • Lipid nanocarriers based on laureal leaf oil (LLO) and grape seed oil (GSO) • Antioxidant activity has reached 98% for nanocarriers containing 25% GSO and 2% LLO. • LLO exerts a significant cytotoxic effect against HeLa and MDA-MB 231 tumor

  16. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5 mg·mL−1 has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5 mg·mL−1 lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications. - Highlights: • Functional lipid nanocarriers with unique features and broad spectrum effectiveness • Lipid nanocarriers based on laureal leaf oil (LLO) and grape seed oil (GSO) • Antioxidant activity has reached 98% for nanocarriers containing 25% GSO and 2% LLO. • LLO exerts a significant cytotoxic effect against HeLa and MDA-MB 231 tumor cells. • 50

  17. Brief review on plasma propulsion with neutralizer-free systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-06-01

    Electric space propulsion is an intensively developing field addressing new demands and challenges for long-term spacecraft operation. Many novel plasma propulsion concepts aim to find new acceleration principles, use alternative propellants, upscale or downscale thrusters for large thrust or for very small spacecrafts etc. In this work we review the neutralizer-free concepts, where both positive and negative particles are extracted and accelerated from plasmas. We can divide these concepts into three main categories, defined by their acceleration principle: (i) neutral beam generation, (ii) plasma acceleration/expansion and (iii) bipolar beam acceleration. We describe the basic physical principles and evaluate the main advantages and drawbacks in view of general space applications. We also present here further detail on a recent concept where RF voltages are used to accelerate quasi-simultaneously positive ions and electrons from the same source.

  18. Study of surface cell Madelung constant and surface free energy of nanosized crystal grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei-Jia; Wang Tian-Min; Rong Ai-Lun; Cui Min

    2006-01-01

    Surface cell Madelung constant is firstly defined for calculating the surface free energy of nanosized crystal grains,which explains the physical performance of small crystals and may be greatly beneficial to the analysis of surface states and the study of the dynamics of crystal nucleation and growth.A new approximative expression of the surface energy and relevant thermodynamic data are used in this calculation.New formula and computing method for calculating the Madelung constant α of any complex crystals are proposed,and the surface free energies and surface electrostatic energies of nanosized crystal grains and the Madelung constant of some complex crystals are theoretically calculated in this paper.The surface free energy of nanosized-crystal-grain TiO2 and the surface electrostatic energy (absolute value) of nanosized-crystal-grain α-A12O3 are found to be the biggest among all the crystal grains including those of other species.

  19. Study of Surface Cell Madelung Constant and Surface Free Energy of Nanosized Crystal Grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-Jia; WANG Tian-Min; CUI Min

    2005-01-01

    Surface cell Madelung constant is firstly defined in calculating surface free energy of nanosized crystal grains, which explains the physical performance of small crystals and may be great benefit to make surface analysis and study dynamics of crystal nucleus growth. A new ap- proximative expression of surface energy and relevant thermodynamic data was used in this cal- culation. A new formula and computing method for calculating the Madelung constant α of any complex crystals is proposed, and surface free energies and surface electrostatic energies of nano- sized crystal grains as well as Madelung constant of some complex crystals are theoretically cal- culated in this paper. The surface free energy of nanosized crystal grain TiO2 and surface elec- trostatic energy(absolute value) of nanosized crystal grain α-Al2O3 are found to be the biggest among other crystal grains.

  20. Inhibition of free radical induced oxidative hemolysis of red blood cells by green tea polyphenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro oxidative hemolysis of human red blood cells (RBC) was used as a model to study the free radical induced damage of biological membranes and the inhibitory effect of natural antioxidants. The hemolysis was induced by a water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2′-azo(2- asmidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH) and inhibited by the principal polyphenolic components extracted from green tea leaves, i.e. (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicat- echin gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and gallic acid (GA). Addition of AAPH at 37°C caused fast hemolysis after a short period of inhibition period, while addition of the green tea polyphenols efficiently suppressed the hemolysis in the activity sequence of EGCG>EGC>ECG≈EC>GA, demonstrating that these green tea polyphenols are effective antioxidants which could protect biological membranes from free radical induced oxidative damage.

  1. Label-free recognition of drug resistance via impedimetric screening of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Eker

    Full Text Available We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra . Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra , providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy.

  2. Development of an Integrated Microfluidic Perfusion Cell Culture System for Real-Time Microscopic Observation of Biological Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Chin Oh-Yang; Min-Hsien Wu; Jr-Lung Lin; Shih-Siou Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study reports an integrated microfluidic perfusion cell culture system consisting of a microfluidic cell culture chip, and an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-based microheater chip for micro-scale perfusion cell culture, and its real-time microscopic observation. The system features in maintaining both uniform, and stable chemical or thermal environments, and providing a backflow-free medium pumping, and a precise thermal control functions. In this work, the performance of the medium pumpin...

  3. Towards an Automated Acoustic Detection System for Free Ranging Elephants

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Hensman, Sean; Stoeger, Angela S

    2015-01-01

    The human-elephant conflict is one of the most serious conservation problems in Asia and Africa today. The involuntary confrontation of humans and elephants claims the lives of many animals and humans every year. A promising approach to alleviate this conflict is the development of an acoustic early warning system. Such a system requires the robust automated detection of elephant vocalizations under unconstrained field conditions. Today, no system exists that fulfills these requirements. In t...

  4. Label-free continuous cell sorter with specifically adhesive oblique micro-grooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development of a label-free continuous cell sorting method based on specific adhesivity between cells and surface-immobilized adhesion molecules. The separation of cells is induced by cross-flow adhesive force on micron-sized stripes with adhesion molecules immobilized on the surface. In order to accurately form the adhesive stripes on a microchannel wall, 1 µm wide micro-grooves are fabricated at a certain angle with respect to the flow direction using direct electron-beam lithography. Amino-functionalized parylene is used as the groove surface material, and streptavidin is immobilized on the entire surface, resulting in a surface with periodic adhesive patterns. The effectiveness of the proposed cell sorting principle is verified by flow-through experiments using functionalized particles as model cells. Measurements of the motion of biotin-coated microparticles show that the particles decelerated by specific adhesivity are displaced in the cross-flow direction. The observed cross-flow displacement is around 0.8% of the streamwise travelling distance. It is also shown that the rate of cross-flow displacement is independent of the flow rate or the stripe angle. Finally, it is demonstrated that a mixture of streptavidin- and biotin-coated microparticles can be completely separated after flowing over a 20 mm long patterned surface. The proposed label-free continuous lateral separation scheme has a wide range of potential applications for separation of cells which could not be distinguished by size or separated using dielectric forces

  5. Label-Free Imaging of Umbilical Cord Tissue Morphology and Explant-Derived Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesen, Rik; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Stinissen, Piet

    2016-01-01

    In situ detection of MSCs remains difficult and warrants additional methods to aid with their characterization in vivo. Two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (TPM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) could fill this gap. Both techniques enable the detection of cells and extracellular structures, based on intrinsic properties of the specific tissue and intracellular molecules under optical irradiation. TPM imaging and SHG imaging have been used for label-free monitoring of stem cells differentiation, assessment of their behavior in biocompatible scaffolds, and even cell tracking in vivo. In this study, we show that TPM and SHG can accurately depict the umbilical cord architecture and visualize individual cells both in situ and during culture initiation, without the use of exogenously applied labels. In combination with nuclear DNA staining, we observed a variance in fluorescent intensity in the vessel walls. In addition, antibody staining showed differences in Oct4, αSMA, vimentin, and ALDH1A1 expression in situ, indicating functional differences among the umbilical cord cell populations. In future research, marker-free imaging can be of great added value to the current antigen-based staining methods for describing tissue structures and for the identification of progenitor cells in their tissue of origin. PMID:27746820

  6. Label-Free Imaging of Umbilical Cord Tissue Morphology and Explant-Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raf Donders

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ detection of MSCs remains difficult and warrants additional methods to aid with their characterization in vivo. Two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (TPM and second harmonic generation (SHG could fill this gap. Both techniques enable the detection of cells and extracellular structures, based on intrinsic properties of the specific tissue and intracellular molecules under optical irradiation. TPM imaging and SHG imaging have been used for label-free monitoring of stem cells differentiation, assessment of their behavior in biocompatible scaffolds, and even cell tracking in vivo. In this study, we show that TPM and SHG can accurately depict the umbilical cord architecture and visualize individual cells both in situ and during culture initiation, without the use of exogenously applied labels. In combination with nuclear DNA staining, we observed a variance in fluorescent intensity in the vessel walls. In addition, antibody staining showed differences in Oct4, αSMA, vimentin, and ALDH1A1 expression in situ, indicating functional differences among the umbilical cord cell populations. In future research, marker-free imaging can be of great added value to the current antigen-based staining methods for describing tissue structures and for the identification of progenitor cells in their tissue of origin.

  7. Production and Characterization of High-Titer Serum-Free Cell Culture Grown Hepatitis C Virus Particles of Genotype 1–6

    OpenAIRE

    Mathiesen, Christian K.; Tanja B Jensen; Prentoe, Jannick; Krarup, Henrik; Nicosia, Alfredo; Law, Mansun; Bukh, Jens; Gottwein, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, cell culture systems producing hepatitis C virus particles (HCVcc) were developed. Establishment of serum-free culture conditions is expected to facilitate development of a whole-virus inactivated HCV vaccine. We describe generation of genotype 1–6 serum-free HCVcc (sf-HCVcc) from Huh7.5 hepatoma cells cultured in adenovirus expression medium. Compared to HCVcc, sf-HCVcc showed 0.6 to 2.1 log10 higher infectivity titers (4.7–6.2 log10 Focus Forming Units/mL), possibly due to increas...

  8. Detection in situ of γ-ray-induced DNA strand breaks in single cells: enzymatic labelling of free 3'-OH ends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is presented of a procedure allowing the detection and counting of free 3'-OH DNA strand extremities in single cells in situ. Terminal transferase (TdT) catalysed the incorporation of 3H-dGMP into fixed nuclei of human colonic adenocarcinoma cells (HT29), using free 3'-OH ends as initiator. Radioactivity was detected by autoradiography and determined quantitatively with a rapid image-processing system for grain counting. The initiator activity for TdT increases with the dose of γ-rays in the dose range 2.5-20 Gy. (author)

  9. Contagious bank failures in a free banking system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghion, P.; Bolton, P.; Dewatripont, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a model of an unregulated banking system based around a private clearing house arrangement. Whilst such a system may dominate one with a public safety net in reducing moral hazard in lending and therefore the scope for individual bank insolvency, it also increases the likelihood

  10. The cell-free fetal DNA fraction in maternal blood decreases after physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Hatt, Lotte; Bach, Cathrine;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: If noninvasive prenatal testing using next generation sequencing is to be effective for pregnant women, a cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) fraction above 4% is essential unless the depth of sequencing is increased. This study's objective is to determine whether physical activity has an eff...... prenatal diagnosis based on the fetal fraction, physical activity prior to sampling should be avoided.......OBJECTIVE: If noninvasive prenatal testing using next generation sequencing is to be effective for pregnant women, a cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) fraction above 4% is essential unless the depth of sequencing is increased. This study's objective is to determine whether physical activity has...... of cycling with a pulse-rate of 150 beats per minute. The concentrations of cffDNA (DYS14) and cfDNA (RASSF1A) were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The fetal fraction decreased significantly in all participants after physical activity (p 

  11. Characteristics of human CD34+ cells exposed to ionizing radiation under cytokine-free conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced hematopoietic stem cell death, we investigated the effects of excessive ionizing radiation on the clonogenic potential of CD34+ cells obtained from human umbilical cord blood under cytokine-free conditions. The CD34+ cells were X-ray-irradiated (up to 2 Gy) and were cultured for 0-48 h under cytokine-free conditions. At various time-points, the CD34+ cells were investigated for survival, clonogenic potential and the generation of mitochondrial superoxide. At 12 h after X-ray irradiation, the number of viable cells had decreased to ∼70-80% compared with the 0-h non-irradiated control, whereas the clonogenic potential in the X-ray-irradiated cells had decreased to ∼50%-60% compared with the 0-h non-irradiated control. Furthermore, significant generation of mitochondrial superoxide was observed at 6 h, and reached a maximum value between 12 and 24 h after X-ray irradiation. However, no significant differences were observed between non-irradiated and X-ray-irradiated cells in terms of the generation of reactive oxygen species or in the intracellular mitochondrial contents. In addition, a cDNA microarray analysis showed that the majority of the altered genes in the CD34+ cells at 6 h after X-ray irradiation were apoptosis-related genes. These results suggest the possibility that the elimination of the clonogenic potentials of CD34+ cells involves the generation of mitochondrial superoxide induced by ionizing radiation. (author)

  12. Planning and executing motions for multibody systems in free-fall. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop an end-to-end system that can be applied to a multibody system in free-fall to analyze its possible motions, save those motions in a database, and design a controller that can execute those motions. A goal is for the process to be highly automated and involve little human intervention. Ideally, the output of the system would be data and algorithms that could be put in ROM to control the multibody system in free-fall. The research applies to more than just robots in space. It applies to any multibody system in free-fall. Mathematical techniques from nonlinear control theory were used to study the nature of the system dynamics and its possible motions. Optimization techniques were applied to plan motions. Image compression techniques were proposed to compress the precomputed motion data for storage. A linearized controller was derived to control the system while it executes preplanned trajectories.

  13. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Rammos

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO. NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR.Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%. Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03 and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001. PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02 and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001.We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function.

  14. Degradation of tannic acid by cell-free extracts of Lactobacillus plantarum

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rivas, Blanca de las; Gómez-Cordovés, Carmen; Muñoz, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    The ability of Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748T to degrade hydrolysable tannins was evaluated. Three commercial tannic acids were incubated in presence of cell-free extracts containing soluble proteins from L. plantarum. By HPLC analyses, almost a complete tannic acid degradation was observed in the three samples assayed. By using HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS, we partially determined the composition of tannic acid from Quercus infectoria galls. This tannic acid is a gallotannin mainly composed o...

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF XYLANASE PRODUCTION FROM FREE AND IMMOBILIZED CELLS OF FUSARIUM SOLANI F7

    OpenAIRE

    Vijai Kumar Gupta; Rajeeva Gaur; Santosh Kumar Yadava; Nandan Singh Darmwal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to characterize a xylanase-producing Fusarium solani isolate and to optimize cultural conditions for xylanase enzyme production from free and immobilized cells. Screening of Fusarium solani isolate was based on the diameter of the clear zone formation in oat spelt xylan agar plates. Fusarium solani isolate F7 was selected and optimized for xylanase enzyme production using cheaper substrates such as wheat straw, rice straw, rice bran, and wood husk. Max...

  16. A cell-free approach to accelerate the study of protein–protein interactions in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Sierecki, E.; Giles, N.; Polinkovsky, M.; Moustaqil, M.; Alexandrov, K.; Gambin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are highly desirable targets in drug discovery, yet only a fraction of drugs act as binding inhibitors. Here, we review the different technologies used to find and validate protein–protein interactions. We then discuss how the novel combination of cell-free protein expression, AlphaScreen and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to rapidly map protein interaction networks, determine the architecture of protein complexes, and find new targets for d...

  17. Photoinitiator-Free Synthesis of Endothelial Cell Adhesive and Enzymatically Degradable Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Derek R.; Marchant, Roger E.; von Recum, Horst; Gupta, Anirban Sen; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-01-01

    We report on a photoinitiator-free synthetic method of incorporating bioactivity into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels in order to control physical properties, enzymatic biodegradability and cell-specific adhesiveness of the polymer network, while eliminating the need for UV-mediated photopolymerization. To accomplish this, hydrogel networks were polymerized using Michael addition with four-arm PEG acrylate (10 kDa), using a collagenase sensitive peptide (CSP) as a crosslinker, and intro...

  18. Integrating stakeholder perspectives into the translation of cell-free fetal DNA testing for aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Sayres, Lauren C.; Allyse, Megan; Cho, Mildred K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The translation of novel genomic technologies from bench to bedside enjoins the comprehensive consideration of the perspectives of all stakeholders who stand to influence, or be influenced by, the translational course. Non-invasive prenatal aneuploidy testing that utilizes cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) circulating in maternal blood is one example of an innovative technology that promises significant benefits for its intended end users; however, it is currently uncertain whether it w...

  19. False Negative Cell-Free DNA Screening Result in a Newborn with Trisomy 13

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Cao; Nicole L. Hoppman; Sarah E Kerr; Sattler, Christopher A.; Borowski, Kristi S.; Wick, Myra J.; Edward Highsmith, W.; Umut Aypar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) is revolutionizing prenatal screening as a result of its increased sensitivity, specificity. NIPS analyzes cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) circulating in maternal plasma to detect fetal chromosome abnormalities. However, cffDNA originates from apoptotic placental trophoblast; therefore cffDNA is not always representative of the fetus. Although the published data for NIPS testing states that the current technique ensures high sensitivity and speci...

  20. Chimeric External Control to Quantify Cell Free DNA in Plasma Samples by Real Time PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Eini, Maryam; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Ramezani, Amin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Ali; Alavi, Parniyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: DNA isolation procedure can significantly influence the quantification of DNA by real time PCR specially when cell free DNA (cfDNA) is the subject. To assess the extraction efficiency, linearity of the extraction yield, presence of co-purified inhibitors and to avoid problems with fragment size relevant to cfDNA, development of appropriate External DNA Control (EDC) is challenging. Using non-human chimeric nucleotide sequences, an EDC was developed for standardization of qPCR for ...

  1. Adjustments to the preanalytical phase of quantitative cell-free DNA analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Abel Jacobus Bronkhorst; Janine Aucamp; Piet J. Pretorius

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the kinetics of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the blood of cancer patients could be a strong auxiliary component to the molecular characterization of cfDNA, but its potential clinical significance is obscured by the absence of an analytical consensus. To utilize quantitative cfDNA assessment with confidence, it is crucial that the preanalytical phase is standardized. In a previous publication, several preanalytical variables that may affect quantitative measurements of cfDNA were identi...

  2. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and a...

  3. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Francis; Sandra Stein

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications ...

  4. Cell free fetal DNA testing in maternal blood of Romanian pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Radoi, Viorica E; Camil L Bohiltea; Roxana E Bohiltea; Dragos N Albu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The discovery of circulating fetal DNA in maternal blood led to the discovery of new strategies to perform noninvasive testing for prenatal diagnosis. Objective: The purpose of the study was to detect fetal aneuploidy at chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y by analysis of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal blood, without endangering pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study has been performed in Bucharest at Medlife Maternal and Fetal Medicine Department between ...

  5. Circulating cell-free DNA and its integrity as a prognostic marker for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Sobuhi; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Raina, Vinod; Sharma, Surabhi; Gogia, Ajay; Suryanarayana S.V. Deo; Mathur, Sandeep; Shukla, Nutan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to look for alternative predictive biomarkers for breast cancer management in limited resource setup. A comprehensive analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (CCFD) in serum at baseline was performed to assess its prognostic potential. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of ALU sequences using ALU115 and ALU247 primers was carried out in patients (N: baseline 148, postoperative 47) and 51 healthy controls. Mean serum DNA integrity, levels of ALU 247 and levels...

  6. Asynchronous Free-Space Optical CDMA Communications System for Last-mile Access Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Raddo, Thiago R.; Sanches, Anderson L.;

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new hybrid asynchronous OCDMA-FSO communications system for access network solutions. New ABER expressions are derived under gamma-gamma scintillation channels, where all users can surprisingly achieve error-free transmissions when FEC is employed.......We propose a new hybrid asynchronous OCDMA-FSO communications system for access network solutions. New ABER expressions are derived under gamma-gamma scintillation channels, where all users can surprisingly achieve error-free transmissions when FEC is employed....

  7. Coded illumination for motion-blur free imaging of cells on cell-phone based imaging flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Manish; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2014-10-01

    Cell-phone based imaging flow cytometry can be realized by flowing cells through the microfluidic devices, and capturing their images with an optically enhanced camera of the cell-phone. Throughput in flow cytometers is usually enhanced by increasing the flow rate of cells. However, maximum frame rate of camera system limits the achievable flow rate. Beyond this, the images become highly blurred due to motion-smear. We propose to address this issue with coded illumination, which enables recovery of high-fidelity images of cells far beyond their motion-blur limit. This paper presents simulation results of deblurring the synthetically generated cell/bead images under such coded illumination.

  8. The impact of residential demand response on the costs of a fossil-free system reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Jonas; Balyk, Olexandr; Hevia Koch, Pablo Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve a better understanding of the system value of residential demand response, we study the potential impact of flexible demand on the costs of system reserves in a fossil-free electricity supply. Comparing these costs with traditional means of regulation our analysis aims...... to contribute to determining the least-cost options for regulation in a fossil-free power system. We extend an existing energy system model with demand response and reserve modelling and analyse the impact for the case of Denmark in 2035 to reflect a system based on renewable resources for electricity...

  9. Cyclic Heating-Annealing and Boltzmann Distribution of Free Energies in a Spin-Glass System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Ergodicity of a spin-glass is broken at low temperatures; the system is trapped in one of many ergodic configurational domains. Transitions between different ergodic domains are achievable through a heating-annealing procedure. If this experiment is repeated infinite times, all ergodic configurational domains will be visited with frequences that decreasing exponentially with their free energies. The mean free energy density of a spin-glass system on a random graph is calculated based on this free energy Boltzmann distribution in the present work, by means of the cavity approach.

  10. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel ('nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination. PMID:20562880

  11. Growth of hybridoma cells in serum-free medium: ethanolamine is an essential component.

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, H.; Masui, H; Sato, G H; Sueoka, N; Chow, T P; Kano-Sueoka, T

    1982-01-01

    A serum-free medium supplemented with a few growth factors was devised to grow lymphocyte hybridomas. The medium was developed with the hybridoma line MPC11-BL, a fusion product between a mouse plasmacytoma cell line (MPC11TG70na3) and mouse (BALB/c) spleen cells. In the process of developing the medium, ethanolamine was found to be an essential growth factor for the hybridoma. Phosphoethanolamine at 10-fold higher concentration could substitute for ethanolamine. Long-term cultivation of the ...

  12. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E. A.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O'Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-02-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator.

  13. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Materials and Methods Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort ...

  14. Methylation of cell-free circulating DNA in the diagnosis of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Warton, Kristina; Samimi, Goli

    2015-01-01

    A range of molecular alterations found in tumor cells, such as DNA mutations and DNA methylation, is reflected in cell-free circulating DNA (circDNA) released from the tumor into the blood, thereby making circDNA an ideal candidate for the basis of a blood-based cancer diagnosis test. In many cancer types, mutations driving tumor development and progression are present in a wide range of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, even when a gene is consistently mutated in a particular ca...

  15. Highly stable precious metal-free cathode catalyst for fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexey; Workman, Michael J.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; McCool, Geoffrey; McKinney, Sam; Romero, Henry; Halevi, Barr; Stephenson, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst engineered for stability has been synthesized using the sacrificial support method (SSM). This catalyst was comprehensively characterized by physiochemical analyses and tested for performance and durability in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). This catalyst, belonging to the family of Fe-N-C materials, is easily scalable and can be manufactured in batches up to 200 g. The fuel cell durability tests were performed in a single cell configuration at realistic operating conditions of 0.65 V, 1.25 atmgauge air, and 90% RH for 100 h. In-depth characterization of surface chemistry and morphology of the catalyst layer before and after durability tests were performed. The failure modes of the PGM-free electrodes were derived from structure-to-property correlations. It is suggested that under constant voltage operation, the performance loss results from degradation of the electrode pore structure, while under carbon corrosion accelerated test protocols the failure mode is catalyst corrosion.

  16. High recovery of cell-free methylated DNA based on a rapid bisulfite-treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Inge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of cell-free methylated DNA in plasma is a promising tool for tumour diagnosis and monitoring. Due to the very low amounts of cell-free DNA in plasma, analytical sensitivity is of utmost importance. The vast majority of currently available methods for analysing DNA methylation are based on bisulfite-mediated deamination of cytosine. Cytosine is rapidly converted to uracil during bisulfite treatment, whereas 5-methylcytosine is only slowly converted. Hence, bisulfite treatment converts an epigenetic modification into a difference in sequence, amenable to analysis either by sequencing or PCR based methods. However, the recovery of bisulfite-converted DNA is very poor. Results Here we introduce an alternative method for the crucial steps of bisulfite treatment with high recovery. The method is based on an accelerated deamination step and alkaline desulfonation in combination with magnetic silica purification of DNA, allowing preparation of deaminated DNA from patient samples in less than 2 hours. Conclusions The method presented here allows low levels of DNA to be easily and reliably analysed, a prerequisite for the clinical usefulness of cell-free methylated DNA detection in plasma.

  17. Development of Serum-Free Media for Lepidopteran Insect Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leslie C L; Reid, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Baculovirus-based Insect Cell Technology (ICT) is widely used for the expression of recombinant heterologous proteins and baculovirus bioinsecticides, and has recently gained momentum as a commercial manufacturing platform for human and veterinary vaccines. The three key components of ICT are the Lepidopteran insect cell line, the baculovirus vector, and the growth medium. Insect cell growth media have evolved significantly in the past five decades, from basal media supplemented with hemolymph or animal serum, to highly optimized serum-free media and feeds (SFM and SFF) capable of supporting very high cell densities and recombinant protein yields. The substitution of animal sera with protein hydrolysates in SFM results in greatly reduced medium costs and much improved process scalability. However, both sera and hydrolysates share the disadvantage of lot-to-lot variability, which is detrimental to process reproducibility. Hence, the industrialization of ICT would benefit greatly from chemically defined media (CDM) for insect cells, which are not yet commercially available. On the other hand, applications such as baculovirus bioinsecticides would need truly low cost serum-free media and feeds (LC-SFM and LC-SFF) for economic viability, which require the substitution of a majority of expensive added amino acids with even higher levels of hydrolysates, hence increasing the risk of a variable process. CDM developments are anticipated to benefit both conventional and low cost ICT applications, by identifying key growth factors in hydrolysates for more targeted media and feed design. PMID:26820858

  18. DNA Microgels as a Platform for Cell-Free Protein Expression and Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jason S; Ruiz, Roanna C H; Sureka, Swati; Peng, Songming; Derrien, Thomas L; An, Duo; Luo, Dan

    2016-06-13

    Protein expression and selection is an essential process in the modification of biological products. Expressed proteins are selected based on desired traits (phenotypes) from diverse gene libraries (genotypes), whose size may be limited due to the difficulties inherent in diverse cell preparation. In addition, not all genes can be expressed in cells, and linking genotype with phenotype further presents a great challenge in protein engineering. We present a DNA gel-based platform that demonstrates the versatility of two DNA microgel formats to address fundamental challenges of protein engineering, including high protein yield, isolation of gene sets, and protein display. We utilize microgels to show successful protein production and capture of a model protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is further used to demonstrate a successful gene enrichment through fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of a mixed population of microgels containing the GFP gene. Through psoralen cross-linking of the hydrogels, we have synthesized DNA microgels capable of surviving denaturing conditions while still possessing the ability to produce protein. Lastly, we demonstrate a method of producing extremely high local gene concentrations of up to 32 000 gene repeats in hydrogels 1 to 2 μm in diameter. These DNA gels can serve as a novel cell-free platform for integrated protein expression and display, which can be applied toward more powerful, scalable protein engineering and cell-free synthetic biology with no physiological boundaries and limitations. PMID:27112709

  19. Photodynamic Approach for Teratoma-Free Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapy Using CDy1 and Visible Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSC) are promising resources for regeneration therapy, but teratoma formation is one of the critical problems for safe clinical application. After differentiation, the precise detection and subsequent elimination of undifferentiated PSC is essential for teratoma-free stem cell therapy, but a practical procedure is yet to be developed. CDy1, a PSC specific fluorescent probe, was investigated for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and demonstrated to induce selective death of PSC upon visible light irradiation. Importantly, the CDy1 and/or light irradiation did not negatively affect differentiated endothelial cells. The photodynamic treatment of PSC with CDy1 and visible light irradiation confirmed the inhibition of teratoma formation in mice, and suggests a promising new approach to safe PSC-based cell therapy. PMID:27725957

  20. Label Free Detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Using the Optofluidic Ring Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Gohring

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated label free detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte whole cells and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte cell lysis using the optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR sensor. The OFRR sensing platform incorporates microfluidics and photonics in a setup that utilizes small sample volume and achieves a fast detection time. In this work, white blood cells were isolated from healthy blood and the concentrations were adjusted to match T-Lymphocyte levels of individuals infected with HIV. Detection was accomplished by immobilizing CD4 and CD8 antibodies on the inner surface of the OFRR. Sensing results show excellent detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte cells at medically significant concentrations with a detection time of approximately 30 minutes. This work will lead to a rapid and low-cost sensing device that can provide a CD4 and CD8 count as a measure of HIV progression.