WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell fate specification

  1. Divergence of zebrafish and mouse lymphatic cell fate specification pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Impel, Andreas; Zhao, Zhonghua; Hermkens, Dorien M A;

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 acts as the central regulator of lymphatic cell fate. Its restricted expression in a subset of cardinal vein cells leads to a switch towards lymphatic specification and hence represents a prerequisite for the initiation of lymphangiogenesis. ...

  2. Tissue-specific targeting of cell fate regulatory genes by E2f factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, L M; Liu, Y; Pakenham, C A; Dugal-Tessier, D; Ruzhynsky, V; Bae, S; Tsai, S-Y; Leone, G; Slack, R S; Blais, A

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle proteins are important regulators of diverse cell fate decisions, and in this capacity have pivotal roles in neurogenesis and brain development. The mechanisms by which cell cycle regulation is integrated with cell fate control in the brain and other tissues are poorly understood, and an outstanding question is whether the cell cycle machinery regulates fate decisions directly or instead as a secondary consequence of proliferative control. Identification of the genes targeted by E2 promoter binding factor (E2f) transcription factors, effectors of the pRb/E2f cell cycle pathway, will provide essential insights into these mechanisms. We identified the promoter regions bound by three neurogenic E2f factors in neural precursor cells in a genome-wide manner. Through bioinformatic analyses and integration of published genomic data sets we uncovered hundreds of transcriptionally active E2f-bound promoters corresponding to genes that control cell fate processes, including key transcriptional regulators and members of the Notch, fibroblast growth factor, Wnt and Tgf-β signaling pathways. We also demonstrate a striking enrichment of the CCCTC binding factor transcription factor (Ctcf) at E2f3-bound nervous system-related genes, suggesting a potential regulatory co-factor for E2f3 in controlling differentiation. Finally, we provide the first demonstration of extensive tissue specificity among E2f target genes in mammalian cells, whereby E2f3 promoter binding is well conserved between neural and muscle precursors at genes associated with cell cycle processes, but is tissue-specific at differentiation-associated genes. Our findings implicate the cell cycle pathway as a widespread regulator of cell fate genes, and suggest that E2f3 proteins control cell type-specific differentiation programs by regulating unique sets of target genes. This work significantly enhances our understanding of how the cell cycle machinery impacts cell fate and differentiation, and will

  3. A deterministic map of Waddington's epigenetic landscape for cell fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Melvin E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The image of the "epigenetic landscape", with a series of branching valleys and ridges depicting stable cellular states and the barriers between those states, has been a popular visual metaphor for cell lineage specification - especially in light of the recent discovery that terminally differentiated adult cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells or into alternative cell lineages. However the question of whether the epigenetic landscape can be mapped out quantitatively to provide a predictive model of cellular differentiation remains largely unanswered. Results Here we derive a simple deterministic path-integral quasi-potential, based on the kinetic parameters of a gene network regulating cell fate, and show that this quantity is minimized along a temporal trajectory in the state space of the gene network, thus providing a marker of directionality for cell differentiation processes. We then use the derived quasi-potential as a measure of "elevation" to quantitatively map the epigenetic landscape, on which trajectories flow "downhill" from any location. Stochastic simulations confirm that the elevation of this computed landscape correlates to the likelihood of occurrence of particular cell fates, with well-populated low-lying "valleys" representing stable cellular states and higher "ridges" acting as barriers to transitions between the stable states. Conclusions This quantitative map of the epigenetic landscape underlying cell fate choice provides mechanistic insights into the "forces" that direct cellular differentiation in the context of physiological development, as well as during artificially induced cell lineage reprogramming. Our generalized approach to mapping the landscape is applicable to non-gradient gene regulatory systems for which an analytical potential function cannot be derived, and also to high-dimensional gene networks. Rigorous quantification of the gene regulatory circuits that govern cell

  4. Removal of damaged proteins during ES cell fate specification requires the proteasome activator PA28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernebring, Malin; Fredriksson, Asa; Liljevald, Maria; Cvijovic, Marija; Norrman, Karin; Wiseman, John; Semb, Tor Henrik; Nyström, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is triggered upon the first signs of cell fate specification but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we report that this phase of differentiation encompasses an unexpected induction of genes encoding the proteasome activato...... that PA28aß has a hitherto unidentified role required for resetting the levels of protein damage at the transition from self-renewal to cell differentiation.......In embryonic stem cells, removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is triggered upon the first signs of cell fate specification but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we report that this phase of differentiation encompasses an unexpected induction of genes encoding the proteasome activator...... PA28aß (11S), subunits of the immunoproteasome (20Si), and the 20Si regulator TNFa. This induction is accompanied by assembly of mature PA28-20S(i) proteasomes and elevated proteasome activity. Inhibiting accumulation of PA28a using miRNA counteracted the removal of damaged proteins demonstrating...

  5. Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Differences in Site-specific Cell Fate Determination in Mammalian Brain

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    Gokhan eErtaylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons - is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a and Nr3c1.We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report thirty-one candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar - Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2 - Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact.Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis.

  6. Rare amplicons implicate frequent deregulation of cell fate specification pathways in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Antoine M; Schmidt, Brian L; Fridlyand, Jane; Dekker, Nusi; Pinkel, Daniel; Jordan, Richard C K; Albertson, Donna G

    2005-06-16

    Genomes of solid tumors are characterized by gains and losses of regions, which may contribute to tumorigenesis by altering gene expression. Often the aberrations are extensive, encompassing whole chromosome arms, which makes identification of candidate genes in these regions difficult. Here, we focused on narrow regions of gene amplification to facilitate identification of genetic pathways important in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) to define minimum common amplified regions and then used expression analysis to identify candidate driver genes in amplicons that spanned LAMA3, MMP7), as well as members of the hedgehog (GLI2) and notch (JAG1, RBPSUH, FJX1) pathways to be amplified and overexpressed. Deregulation of these and other members of the hedgehog and notch pathways (HHIP, SMO, DLL1, NOTCH4) implicates deregulation of developmental and differentiation pathways, cell fate misspecification, in oral SCC development. PMID:15824737

  7. Divergent Paths Lnc Cell Fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounzain, Samir; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) comprise a class of regulatory molecules that may control diverse stem cell properties. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Luo et al. (2016) show that a specific group of lncRNAs, those transcribed divergently from protein coding genes, activate key developmental genes to control embryonic stem cell fate. PMID:27152437

  8. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  9. Neuronal Cell Fate Specification by the Convergence of Different Spatiotemporal Cues on a Common Terminal Selector Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Gabilondo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Specification of the myriad of unique neuronal subtypes found in the nervous system depends upon spatiotemporal cues and terminal selector gene cascades, often acting in sequential combinatorial codes to determine final cell fate. However, a specific neuronal cell subtype can often be generated in different parts of the nervous system and at different stages, indicating that different spatiotemporal cues can converge on the same terminal selectors to thereby generate a similar cell fate. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying such convergence are poorly understood. The Nplp1 neuropeptide neurons in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord can be subdivided into the thoracic-ventral Tv1 neurons and the dorsal-medial dAp neurons. The activation of Nplp1 in Tv1 and dAp neurons depends upon the same terminal selector cascade: col>ap/eya>dimm>Nplp1. However, Tv1 and dAp neurons are generated by different neural progenitors (neuroblasts with different spatiotemporal appearance. Here, we find that the same terminal selector cascade is triggered by Kr/pdm>grn in dAp neurons, but by Antp/hth/exd/lbe/cas in Tv1 neurons. Hence, two different spatiotemporal combinations can funnel into a common downstream terminal selector cascade to determine a highly related cell fate.

  10. Neuronal Cell Fate Specification by the Convergence of Different Spatiotemporal Cues on a Common Terminal Selector Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabilondo, Hugo; Stratmann, Johannes; Rubio-Ferrera, Irene; Millán-Crespo, Irene; Contero-García, Patricia; Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Thor, Stefan; Benito-Sipos, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Specification of the myriad of unique neuronal subtypes found in the nervous system depends upon spatiotemporal cues and terminal selector gene cascades, often acting in sequential combinatorial codes to determine final cell fate. However, a specific neuronal cell subtype can often be generated in different parts of the nervous system and at different stages, indicating that different spatiotemporal cues can converge on the same terminal selectors to thereby generate a similar cell fate. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying such convergence are poorly understood. The Nplp1 neuropeptide neurons in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord can be subdivided into the thoracic-ventral Tv1 neurons and the dorsal-medial dAp neurons. The activation of Nplp1 in Tv1 and dAp neurons depends upon the same terminal selector cascade: col>ap/eya>dimm>Nplp1. However, Tv1 and dAp neurons are generated by different neural progenitors (neuroblasts) with different spatiotemporal appearance. Here, we find that the same terminal selector cascade is triggered by Kr/pdm>grn in dAp neurons, but by Antp/hth/exd/lbe/cas in Tv1 neurons. Hence, two different spatiotemporal combinations can funnel into a common downstream terminal selector cascade to determine a highly related cell fate. PMID:27148744

  11. Role of SCHIZORIZA in asymmetric cell division, cell fate segregation and specification in Arabidopsis root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansweijer, V.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Multicellular organisms develop their large variety of cell types from just one single cell, the zygote. Both plants and animals use asymmetric cell division to establish a multicellular body plan How different cell and tissue types are determined, how patterns are created and maintained, and which

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Ectoderm Specification to Keratinocyte Fate in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Mafalda Baptista Tadeu; Samantha Lin; Lin Hou; Lisa Chung; Mei Zhong; Hongyu Zhao; Valerie Horsley

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shed light into the processes that regulate epidermal specification and homeostasis. We previously showed that a broad-spectrum γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT promoted early keratinocyte specification in human embryonic stem cells triggered to undergo ectoderm specification. Here, we show that DAPT accelerates human embryonic stem cell differentiation and induces expression of the ectoderm protein AP2. Furthermore, we utilize RNA sequencing to identify severa...

  13. A specific box switches the cell fate determining activity of XOTX2 and XOTX5b in the Xenopus retina

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    He Rong-Qiao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Otx genes, orthologues of the Drosophila orthodenticle gene (otd, play crucial roles in vertebrate brain development. In the Xenopus eye, Xotx2 and Xotx5b promote bipolar and photoreceptor cell fates, respectively. The molecular basis of their differential action is not completely understood, though the carboxyl termini of the two proteins seem to be crucial. To define the molecular domains that make the action of these proteins so different, and to determine whether their retinal abilities are shared by Drosophila OTD, we performed an in vivo molecular dissection of their activity by transfecting retinal progenitors with several wild-type, deletion and chimeric constructs of Xotx2, Xotx5b and otd. Results We identified a small 8–10 amino acid divergent region, directly downstream of the homeodomain, that is crucial for the respective activities of XOTX2 and XOTX5b. In lipofection experiments, the exchange of this 'specificity box' completely switches the retinal activity of XOTX5b into that of XOTX2 and vice versa. Moreover, the insertion of this box into Drosophila OTD, which has no effect on retinal cell fate, endows it with the specific activity of either XOTX protein. Significantly, in cell transfection experiments, the diverse ability of XOTX2 and XOTX5b to synergize with NRL, a cofactor essential for vertebrate rod development, to transactivate the rhodopsin promoter is also switched depending on the box. We also show by GST-pull down that XOTX2 and XOTX5b differentially interact with NRL, though this property is not strictly dependent on the box. Conclusion Our data provide molecular evidence on how closely related homeodomain gene products can differentiate their functions to regulate distinct cell fates. A small 'specificity box' is both necessary and sufficient to confer on XOTX2 and XOTX5b their distinct activities in the developing frog retina and to convert the neutral orthologous OTD protein of Drosophila

  14. Opposing Fgf and Bmp activities regulate the specification of olfactory sensory and respiratory epithelial cell fates

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Esther; von Hofsten, Jonas; Nord, Hanna; Fernandes, Marie; Paek, Hunki; Hébert, Jean M.; Gunhaga, Lena

    2010-01-01

    The olfactory sensory epithelium and the respiratory epithelium are derived from the olfactory placode. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the differential specification of the sensory and the respiratory epithelium have remained undefined. To address this issue, we first identified Msx1/2 and Id3 as markers for respiratory epithelial cells by performing quail chick transplantation studies. Next, we established chick explant and intact chick embryo assays of sensory/respiratory epit...

  15. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

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    Dany Gaillard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF and posterior circumvallate (CV taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  16. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, D.; Li, L.; Huebner, A; H. Zeng; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A.; Chen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP...

  17. rBMP Represses Wnt Signaling and Influences Skeletal Progenitor Cell Fate Specification During Bone Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Minear, Steve; Leucht, Philipp; Miller, Samara; Helms, Jill A.

    2010-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) participate in multiple stages of the fetal skeletogenic program from promoting cell condensation to regulating chondrogenesis and bone formation through endochondral ossification. Here, we show that these pleiotropic functions are recapitulated when recombinant BMPs are used to augment skeletal tissue repair. In addition to their well-documented ability to stimulate chondrogenesis in a skeletal injury, we show that recombinant BMPs (rBMPs) simultaneously su...

  18. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals

  19. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie, E-mail: Fanie.Barnabe-Heider@ki.se

    2014-02-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals.

  20. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED; (Keele); (Scripps)

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  1. The Drosophila STIM1 orthologue, dSTIM, has roles in cell fate specification and tissue patterning

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    Hime Gary R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian STIM1 and STIM2 and the single Drosophila homologue dSTIM have been identified as key regulators of store-operated Ca2+ entry in cells. STIM proteins function both as molecular sensors of Ca2+concentration in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the molecular triggers that activate SOC channels in the plasma membrane. Ca2+ is a crucial intracellular messenger utilised in many cellular processes, and regulators of Ca2+ homeostasis in the ER and cytosol are likely to play important roles in developmental processes. STIM protein expression is altered in several tumour types but the role of these proteins in developmental signalling pathways has not been thoroughly examined. Results We have investigated the expression and developmental function of dSTIM in Drosophila and shown that dSTIM is widely expressed in embryonic and larval tissues. Using the UAS-Gal4 induction system, we have expressed full-length dSTIM protein and a dsRNAi construct in different tissues. We demonstrate an essential role for dSTIM in larval development and survival, and a tissue-specific role in specification of mechanosensory bristles in the notum and specification of wing vein thickness. Conclusion Our studies show that dSTIM regulates growth and patterning of imaginal discs and indicate potential interactions with the Notch and Wingless signaling pathways. These interactions may be relevant to studies implicating STIM family proteins in tumorigenesis.

  2. Control of stem cell fate by engineering their micro andnanoenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michelle F Griffin; Peter E Butler; Alexander M Seifalian; Deepak M Kalaskar

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of long-term self-renewal anddifferentiation into specialised cell types, making theman ideal candidate for a cell source for regenerativemedicine. The control of stem cell fate has become amajor area of interest in the field of regenerative medicineand therapeutic intervention. Conventional methodsof chemically inducing stem cells into specific lineagesis being challenged by the advances in biomaterialtechnology, with evidence highlighting that materialproperties are capable of driving stem cell fate. Materialsare being designed to mimic the clues stem cells receivein their in vivo stem cell niche including topographicaland chemical instructions. Nanotopographical clues thatmimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo have shownto regulate stem cell differentiation. The delivery of ECMcomponents on biomaterials in the form of short peptidessequences has also proved successful in directing stem celllineage. Growth factors responsible for controlling stemcell fate in vivo have also been delivered via biomaterialsto provide clues to determine stem cell differentiation. Analternative approach to guide stem cells fate is to providegenetic clues including delivering DNA plasmids andsmall interfering RNAs via scaffolds. This review, aims toprovide an overview of the topographical, chemical andmolecular clues that biomaterials can provide to guidestem cell fate. The promising features and challenges ofsuch approaches will be highlighted, to provide directionsfor future advancements in this exciting area of stem celltranslation for regenerative medicine.

  3. Strabismus-mediated primary archenteron invagination is uncoupled from Wnt/β-catenin-dependent endoderm cell fate specification in Nematostella vectensis (Anthozoa, Cnidaria: Implications for the evolution of gastrulation

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    Kumburegama Shalika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrulation is a uniquely metazoan character, and its genesis was arguably the key step that enabled the remarkable diversification within this clade. The process of gastrulation involves two tightly coupled events during embryogenesis of most metazoans. Morphogenesis produces a distinct internal epithelial layer in the embryo, and this epithelium becomes segregated as an endoderm/endomesodermal germ layer through the activation of a specific gene regulatory program. The developmental mechanisms that induced archenteron formation and led to the segregation of germ layers during metazoan evolution are unknown. But an increased understanding of development in early diverging taxa at the base of the metazoan tree may provide insights into the origins of these developmental mechanisms. Results In the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, initial archenteron formation begins with bottle cell-induced buckling of the blastula epithelium at the animal pole. Here, we show that bottle cell formation and initial gut invagination in Nematostella requires NvStrabismus (NvStbm, a maternally-expressed core component of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP pathway. The NvStbm protein is localized to the animal pole of the zygote, remains asymmetrically expressed through the cleavage stages, and becomes restricted to the apical side of invaginating bottle cells at the blastopore. Antisense morpholino-mediated NvStbm-knockdown blocks bottle cell formation and initial archenteron invagination, but it has no effect on Wnt/ß-catenin signaling-mediated endoderm cell fate specification. Conversely, selectively blocking Wnt/ß-catenin signaling inhibits endoderm cell fate specification but does not affect bottle cell formation and initial archenteron invagination. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Wnt/PCP-mediated initial archenteron invagination can be uncoupled from Wnt/ß-catenin-mediated endoderm cell fate specification in

  4. Chemicals as the Sole Transformers of Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors in somatic cells can result in the generation of different cell types in a process named direct reprogramming, bypassing the pluripotent state. However, the introduction of transgenes limits the therapeutic applications of the produced cells. Numerous small-molecules have been introduced in the field of stem cell biology capable of governing self-renewal, reprogramming, transdifferentiation and regeneration. These chemical compounds are versatile tools for cell fate conversion toward desired outcomes. Cell fate conversion using small-molecules alone (chemical reprogramming) has superiority over arduous traditional genetic techniques in several aspects. For instance, rapid, transient, and reversible effects in activation and inhibition of functions of specific proteins are of the profits of small-molecules. They are cost-effective, have a long half-life, diversity on structure and function, and allow for temporal and flexible regulation of signaling pathways. Additionally, their effects could be adjusted by fine-tuning concentrations and combinations of different small-molecules. Therefore, chemicals are powerful tools in cell fate conversion and study of stem cell and chemical biology in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, transgene-free and chemical-only transdifferentiation approaches provide alternative strategies for the generation of various cell types, disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. The current review gives an overview of the recent findings concerning transdifferentiation by only small-molecules without the use of transgenes. PMID:27426081

  5. Binary cell fate decisions and fate transformation in the Drosophila larval eye.

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    Abhishek Kumar Mishra

    Full Text Available The functionality of sensory neurons is defined by the expression of specific sensory receptor genes. During the development of the Drosophila larval eye, photoreceptor neurons (PRs make a binary choice to express either the blue-sensitive Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5 or the green-sensitive Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6. Later during metamorphosis, ecdysone signaling induces a cell fate and sensory receptor switch: Rh5-PRs are re-programmed to express Rh6 and become the eyelet, a small group of extraretinal PRs involved in circadian entrainment. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of how the binary cell fate decisions are made and switched remain poorly understood. We show that interplay of two transcription factors Senseless (Sens and Hazy control cell fate decisions, terminal differentiation of the larval eye and its transformation into eyelet. During initial differentiation, a pulse of Sens expression in primary precursors regulates their differentiation into Rh5-PRs and repression of an alternative Rh6-cell fate. Later, during the transformation of the larval eye into the adult eyelet, Sens serves as an anti-apoptotic factor in Rh5-PRs, which helps in promoting survival of Rh5-PRs during metamorphosis and is subsequently required for Rh6 expression. Comparably, during PR differentiation Hazy functions in initiation and maintenance of rhodopsin expression. Hazy represses Sens specifically in the Rh6-PRs, allowing them to die during metamorphosis. Our findings show that the same transcription factors regulate diverse aspects of larval and adult PR development at different stages and in a context-dependent manner.

  6. Glucocorticoid dose determines osteocyte cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Junjing; Yao, Wei; Guan, Min; Dai, WeiWei; Shahnazari, Mohammad; Kar, Rekha; Bonewald, Lynda; Jiang, Jean X.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    In response to cellular insult, several pathways can be activated, including necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Because glucocorticoids (GCs) have been shown to induce both osteocyte apoptosis and autophagy, we sought to determine whether osteocyte cell fate in the presence of GCs was dose dependent by performing in vivo and in vitro studies. Male Swiss-Webster mice were treated with slow-release prednisolone pellets at 1.4, 2.8, and 5.6 mg/kg/d for 28 d. An osteocyte cell line, MLO-Y4 cells...

  7. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, Efrat; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-08-01

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell-cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species.

  8. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell–cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species. (paper)

  9. Fibronectin mediates mesendodermal cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Paul; Andersen, Peter; Hassel, David; Kaynak, Bogac L.; Limphong, Pattraranee; Juergensen, Lonny; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous signals often play crucial roles in cell fate decisions during animal development. Reciprocal signaling between endoderm and mesoderm is vital for embryonic development, yet the key signals and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that endodermal cells efficiently promote the emergence of mesodermal cells in the neighboring population through signals containing an essential short-range component. The endoderm-mesoderm interaction promoted precardiac mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells and involved endodermal production of fibronectin. In vivo, fibronectin deficiency resulted in a dramatic reduction of mesoderm accompanied by endodermal expansion in zebrafish embryos. This event was mediated by regulation of Wnt signaling in mesodermal cells through activation of integrin-β1. Our findings highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in mediating short-range signals and reveal a novel function of endoderm, involving fibronectin and its downstream signaling cascades, in promoting the emergence of mesoderm. PMID:23715551

  10. β-catenin-driven binary cell fate decisions in animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays key roles during animal development. In several species, β-catenin is used in a reiterative manner to regulate cell fate diversification between daughter cells following division. This binary cell fate specification mechanism has been observed in animals that belong to very diverse phyla: the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the annelid Platynereis, and the ascidian Ciona. It may also play a role in the regulation of several stem cell lineages in vertebrates. While the molecular mechanism behind this binary cell fate switch is not fully understood, it appears that both secreted Wnt ligands and asymmetric cortical factors contribute to the generation of the difference in nuclear β-catenin levels between daughter cells. β-Catenin then cooperates with lineage specific transcription factors to induce the expression of novel sets of transcription factors at each round of divisions, thereby diversifying cell fate. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26952169

  11. The "occlusis" model of cell fate restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahn, Bruce T

    2011-01-01

    A simple model, termed "occlusis", is presented here to account for both cell fate restriction during somatic development and reestablishment of pluripotency during reproduction. The model makes three assertions: (1) A gene's transcriptional potential can assume one of two states: the "competent" state, wherein the gene is responsive to, and can be activated by, trans-acting factors in the cellular milieu, and the "occluded" state, wherein the gene is blocked by cis-acting, chromatin-based mechanisms from responding to trans-acting factors such that it remains silent irrespective of whether transcriptional activators are present in the milieu. (2) As differentiation proceeds in somatic lineages, lineage-inappropriate genes shift progressively and irreversibly from competent to occluded state, thereby leading to the restriction of cell fate. (3) During reproduction, global deocclusion takes place in the germline and/or early zygotic cells to reset the genome to the competent state in order to facilitate a new round of organismal development. PMID:20954221

  12. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries.

    OpenAIRE

    Ai Tian; Hassina Benchabane; Zhenghan Wang; Yashi Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the m...

  13. Muscle Stem Cell Fate Is Controlled by the Cell-Polarity Protein Scrib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ono

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells that supply myonuclei for homeostasis, hypertrophy, and repair in adult muscle. Scrib is one of the major cell-polarity proteins, acting as a potent tumor suppressor in epithelial cells. Here, we show that Scrib also controls satellite-cell-fate decisions in adult mice. Scrib is undetectable in quiescent cells but becomes expressed during activation. Scrib is asymmetrically distributed in dividing daughter cells, with robust accumulation in cells committed to myogenic differentiation. Low Scrib expression is associated with the proliferative state and preventing self-renewal, whereas high Scrib levels reduce satellite cell proliferation. Satellite-cell-specific knockout of Scrib in mice causes a drastic and insurmountable defect in muscle regeneration. Thus, Scrib is a regulator of tissue stem cells, controlling population expansion and self-renewal with Scrib expression dynamics directing satellite cell fate.

  14. EMT and MET as paradigms for cell fate switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiekai Chen; Qingkai Han; Duanqing Pei

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is a major unsolved problem in cell and developmental biology,The discovery of reprogramming by pluripotent factors offers a rational system to investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with cell fate decisions.The idea that reprogramming of fibroblasts starts with a mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) suggests that the process is perhaps a reversal of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) found frequently during early embryogenesis,As such,we believe that investigations into MET-EMT may yield detailed molecular insights into cell fate decisions,not only for the switching between epithelial and mesenchymal cells,but also other cell types.

  15. Wnt signaling and the control of human stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, J K; Beckers, S; Zegers, D; Van Hul, W

    2014-04-01

    Wnt signaling determines major developmental processes in the embryonic state and regulates maintenance, self-renewal and differentiation of adult mammalian tissue stem cells. Both β-catenin dependent and independent Wnt pathways exist, and both affect stem cell fate in developing and adult tissues. In this review, we debate the response to Wnt signal activation in embryonic stem cells and human, adult stem cells of mesenchymal, hematopoetic, intestinal, gastric, epidermal, mammary and neural lineages, and discuss the need for Wnt signaling in these cell types. Due to the vital actions of Wnt signaling in developmental and maintenance processes, deregulation of the pathway can culminate into a broad spectrum of developmental and genetic diseases, including cancer. The way in which Wnt signals can feed tumors and maintain cancer stem stells is discussed as well. Manipulation of Wnt signals both in vivo and in vitro thus carries potential for therapeutic approaches such as tissue engineering for regenerative medicine and anti-cancer treatment. Although many questions remain regarding the complete Wnt signal cell-type specific response and interplay of Wnt signaling with pathways such as BMP, Hedgehog and Notch, we hereby provide an overview of current knowledge on Wnt signaling and its control over human stem cell fate. PMID:24323281

  16. Blastomeres show differential fate changes in 8-cell Xenopus laevis embryos that are rotated 90 degrees before first cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Wang, H. Z.

    1998-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of dorsal axis specification, the alteration in dorsal cell fate of cleavage stage blastomeres in axis-respecified Xenopus laevis embryos was investigated. Fertilized eggs were rotated 90 degrees with the sperm entry point up or down with respect to the gravitational field. At the 8-cell stage, blastomeres were injected with the lineage tracers, Texas Red- or FITC-Dextran Amines. The distribution of the labeled progeny was mapped at the tail-bud stages (stages 35-38) and compared with the fate map of an 8-cell embryo raised in a normal orientation. As in the normal embryos, each blastomere in the rotated embryos has a characteristic and predictable cell fate. After 90 degrees rotation the blastomeres in the 8-cell stage embryo roughly switched their position by 90 degrees, but the fate of the blastomeres did not simply show a 90 degrees switch appropriate for their new location. Four types of fate change were observed: (i) the normal fate of the blastomere is conserved with little change; (ii) the normal fate is completely changed and a new fate is adopted according to the blastomere's new position: (iii) the normal fate is completely changed, but the new fate is not appropriate for its new position; and (4) the blastomere partially changed its fate and the new fate is a combination of its original fate and a fate appropriate to its new location. According to the changed fates, the blastomeres that adopt dorsal fates were identified in rotated embryos. This identification of dorsal blastomeres provides basic important information for further study of dorsal signaling in Xenopus embryos.

  17. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  18. Erythropoietin guides multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells toward an erythroid fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Amit; Mancini, Elena; Moore, Susan; Mead, Adam J.; Atkinson, Deborah; Rasmussen, Kasper D.; O’Carroll, Donal; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2014-01-01

    The erythroid stress cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) supports the development of committed erythroid progenitors, but its ability to act on upstream, multipotent cells remains to be established. We observe that high systemic levels of Epo reprogram the transcriptomes of multi- and bipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in vivo. This induces erythroid lineage bias at all lineage bifurcations known to exist between hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and committed erythroid progenitors, leading to increased erythroid and decreased myeloid HSC output. Epo, therefore, has a lineage instructive role in vivo, through suppression of non-erythroid fate options, demonstrating the ability of a cytokine to systematically bias successive lineage choices in favor of the generation of a specific cell type. PMID:24493804

  19. Msx2 alters the timing of retinal ganglion cells fate commitment and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shao-Yun, E-mail: jiangshaoyun@yahoo.com [School of Dentistry, Tianjin Medical University, 12 Qi Xiang Tai Street, Tianjin 300070 (China); Wang, Jian-Tao, E-mail: wangjiantao65@hotmail.com [Eye Center, Tianjin Medical University, 64 Tongan Road, Tianjin 300070 (China); Dohney Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1355 San Pablo Street, DOH 314, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2010-05-14

    Timing of cell fate commitment determines distinct retinal cell types, which is believed to be controlled by a tightly coordinated regulatory program of proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation. Although homeobox protein Msx2 could induce apoptosis of optic vesicle, it is unclear whether Msx2 regulates differentiation and cell fate commitment of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In this study, we show that overexpression of Msx2 transiently suppressed the expression of Cyclin D1 and blocked cell proliferation. Meanwhile, overexpression of Msx2 delayed the expression of RGC-specific differentiation markers (Math5 and Brn3b), which showed that Msx2 could affect the timing of RGCs fate commitment and differentiation by delaying the timing of cell cycle exit of retinal progenitors. These results indicate Msx2 possesses dual regulatory functions in controlling cell cycle progression of retinal RPCs and timing of RGCs differentiation.

  20. Msx2 alters the timing of retinal ganglion cells fate commitment and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timing of cell fate commitment determines distinct retinal cell types, which is believed to be controlled by a tightly coordinated regulatory program of proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation. Although homeobox protein Msx2 could induce apoptosis of optic vesicle, it is unclear whether Msx2 regulates differentiation and cell fate commitment of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In this study, we show that overexpression of Msx2 transiently suppressed the expression of Cyclin D1 and blocked cell proliferation. Meanwhile, overexpression of Msx2 delayed the expression of RGC-specific differentiation markers (Math5 and Brn3b), which showed that Msx2 could affect the timing of RGCs fate commitment and differentiation by delaying the timing of cell cycle exit of retinal progenitors. These results indicate Msx2 possesses dual regulatory functions in controlling cell cycle progression of retinal RPCs and timing of RGCs differentiation.

  1. Cellular Programming and Reprogramming: Sculpting Cell Fate for the Production of Dopamine Neurons for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Aguila

    2012-01-01

    success of clinical applications depends on our ability to steer pluripotent stem cells towards the right neuronal identity. In Parkinson disease, the loss of dopamine neurons is more pronounced in the ventrolateral population that projects to the sensorimotor striatum. Because synapses are highly specific, only neurons with this precise identity will contribute, upon transplantation, to the synaptic reconstruction of the dorsal striatum. Thus, understanding the developmental cell program of the mesostriatal dopamine neurons is critical for the identification of the extrinsic signals and cell-intrinsic factors that instruct and, ultimately, determine cell identity. Here, we review how extrinsic signals and transcription factors act together during development to shape midbrain cell fates. Further, we discuss how these same factors can be applied in vitro to induce, select, and reprogram cells to the mesostriatal dopamine fate.

  2. Oct4 shuffles Sox partners to direct cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    AlFatah Mansour, Abed; Hanna, Jacob H.

    2013-01-01

    Early cell fate decisions demand rapid rewiring of transcriptional circuits. Stanton and colleagues report on enhancer-dependent partnering of Oct4 with either Sox2 or Sox17 to switch from pluripotency to differentiation.

  3. Deubiquitylating Enzyme UBP64 Controls Cell Fate through Stabilization of the Transcriptional Repressor Tramtrack▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpe, Prashanth Kumar; van der Knaap, Jan A.; Demmers, Jeroen A. A.; Bezstarosti, Karel; Bassett, Andrew; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Travers, Andrew A.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation plays a central role in multiple signal transduction pathways. However, the substrate specificity and potential developmental roles of deubiquitylating enzymes remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the Drosophila ubiquitin protease UBP64 controls cell fate in the developing eye. UBP64 represses neuronal cell fate but promotes the formation of nonneuronal cone cells. Using a proteomics approach, we identified the transcriptional repressor Tramtrack (TTK) as a primary UBP64 substrate. In common with TTK, reduced UBP64 levels lead to a loss of cone cells, supernumerary photoreceptors, and mechanosensory bristle cells. Previously, it was demonstrated that the blockade of neuronal cell fate was relieved by SINA-dependent ubiquitylation and degradation of TTK. We found that UBP64 counteracts SINA function by deubiquitylating TTK, leading to its stabilization and thereby promoting a nonneuronal cell fate. Mass spectrometric mapping revealed that SINA ubiquitylates multiple sites dispersed throughout TTK, which are duly deubiquitylated by UBP64. This observation suggests that both E3 SINA and UBP64 use a scanning mechanism to (de)ubiquitylate TTK. We conclude that the balance of TTK ubiquitylation by SINA and deubiquitylation by UBP64 constitutes a specific posttranslational switch controlling cell fate. PMID:18160715

  4. Dictyostelium possesses highly diverged presenilin/γ-secretase that regulates growth and cell-fate specification and can accurately process human APP: a system for functional studies of the presenilin/γ-secretase complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Vanessa C.; Myre, Michael; Kreppel, Lisa; Kimmel, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Presenilin (PS) is the catalytic moiety of the γ-secretase complex. PS and other γ-secretase components are well conserved among metazoa, but their presence and function in more-distant species are not resolved. Because inappropriate γ-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in humans is associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease, understanding essential elements within each γ-secretase component is crucial to functional studies. Diverged proteins have been identified in primitive plants but experiments have failed to demonstrate γ-secretase activity. We have identified highly diverged orthologs for each γ-secretase component in the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium, which lacks equivalents of APP, Notch and other characterized PS/γ-secretase substrates. We show that wild-type (WT) Dictyostelium is capable of amyloidogenic processing of ectopically expressed human APP to generate amyloid-β peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42; strains deficient in γ-secretase cannot produce Aβ peptides but accumulate processed intermediates of APP that co-migrate with the C-terminal fragments α- and β-CTF of APP that are found in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that Dictyostelium requires PS for phagocytosis and cell-fate specification in a cell-autonomous manner, and show that regulation of phagocytosis requires an active γ-secretase, a pathway suggested, but not proven, to occur in mammalian and Drosophila cells. Our results indicate that PS signaling is an ancient process that arose prior to metazoan radiation, perhaps independently of Notch. Dictyostelium might serve to identify novel PS/γ-secretase signaling targets and provide a unique system for high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries to select new therapeutic targets for diseases associated with this pathway. PMID:20699477

  5. Dictyostelium possesses highly diverged presenilin/gamma-secretase that regulates growth and cell-fate specification and can accurately process human APP: a system for functional studies of the presenilin/gamma-secretase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Vanessa C; Myre, Michael; Kreppel, Lisa; Kimmel, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    Presenilin (PS) is the catalytic moiety of the gamma-secretase complex. PS and other gamma-secretase components are well conserved among metazoa, but their presence and function in more-distant species are not resolved. Because inappropriate gamma-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in humans is associated with familial Alzheimer's disease, understanding essential elements within each gamma-secretase component is crucial to functional studies. Diverged proteins have been identified in primitive plants but experiments have failed to demonstrate gamma-secretase activity. We have identified highly diverged orthologs for each gamma-secretase component in the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium, which lacks equivalents of APP, Notch and other characterized PS/gamma-secretase substrates. We show that wild-type (WT) Dictyostelium is capable of amyloidogenic processing of ectopically expressed human APP to generate amyloid-beta peptides Abeta(40) and Abeta(42); strains deficient in gamma-secretase cannot produce Abeta peptides but accumulate processed intermediates of APP that co-migrate with the C-terminal fragments alpha- and beta-CTF of APP that are found in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that Dictyostelium requires PS for phagocytosis and cell-fate specification in a cell-autonomous manner, and show that regulation of phagocytosis requires an active gamma-secretase, a pathway suggested, but not proven, to occur in mammalian and Drosophila cells. Our results indicate that PS signaling is an ancient process that arose prior to metazoan radiation, perhaps independently of Notch. Dictyostelium might serve to identify novel PS/gamma-secretase signaling targets and provide a unique system for high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries to select new therapeutic targets for diseases associated with this pathway. PMID:20699477

  6. Long noncoding RNAs in neuronal-glial fate specification and oligodendrocyte lineage maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Solen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cellular differentiation and are widely expressed in the brain. Results Here we show that many long ncRNAs exhibit dynamic expression patterns during neuronal and oligodendrocyte (OL lineage specification, neuronal-glial fate transitions, and progressive stages of OL lineage elaboration including myelination. Consideration of the genomic context of these dynamically regulated ncRNAs showed they were part of complex transcriptional loci that encompass key neural developmental protein-coding genes, with which they exhibit concordant expression profiles as indicated by both microarray and in situ hybridization analyses. These included ncRNAs associated with differentiation-specific nuclear subdomains such as Gomafu and Neat1, and ncRNAs associated with developmental enhancers and genes encoding important transcription factors and homeotic proteins. We also observed changes in ncRNA expression profiles in response to treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor that prevents the progression of OL progenitors into post-mitotic OLs by altering lineage-specific gene expression programs. Conclusion This is the first report of long ncRNA expression in neuronal and glial cell differentiation and of the modulation of ncRNA expression by modification of chromatin architecture. These observations explicitly link ncRNA dynamics to neural stem cell fate decisions, specification and epigenetic reprogramming and may have important implications for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric diseases.

  7. Sigma factors, asymmetry, and the determination of cell fate in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, P J; Partridge, S R; Errington, J

    1994-01-01

    Soon after the initiation of sporulation, Bacillus subtilis divides asymmetrically to produce sister cells that have very different developmental fates. Recently, it has been proposed that the differential gene expression which begins soon after this division is due to cell-specific activation of the transcription factors sigma F and sigma E in the prespore and the mother cell, respectively. We describe the use of a method for the localization of gene expression in individual sporulating cell...

  8. FY08 LDRD Final Report Stem Cell Fate Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiddessen, A

    2009-03-02

    A detailed understanding of the biological control of fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells is needed to harness their full power for tissue repair and/or regeneration. Currently, internal and external factors that regulate stem cell fate are not fully understood. We aim to engineer biocompatible tools to facilitate the measurement and comparison of the roles and significance of immobilized factors such as extracellular matrix and signaling peptides, synergistic and opposing soluble factors and signals, and cell-to-cell communication, in stem cell fate decisions. Our approach is based on the development of cell microarrays to capture viable stem/progenitor cells individually or in small clusters onto substrate-bound signals (e.g. proteins), combined with conventional antibody and customized subcellular markers made in-house, to facilitate tracking of cell behavior during exposure to relevant signals. Below we describe our efforts, including methods to manipulate a model epithelial stem cell system using a custom subcellular reporter to track and measure cell signaling, arrays with surface chemistry that support viable cells and enable controlled presentation of immobilized signals to cells on the array and fluorescence-based measurement of cell response, and successful on-array tests via conventional immunofluorescence assays that indicate correct cell polarity, localization of junctional proteins, and phenotype, properties which are essential to measuring true cell responses.

  9. Cdc20 control of cell fate during prolonged mitotic arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The fate of cells arrested in mitosis by antimitotic compounds is complex but is influenced by competition between pathways promoting cell death and pathways promoting mitotic exit. As components of both of these pathways are regulated by Cdc20-dependent degradation, I hypothesize that variations...

  10. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium

  11. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  12. Nanomaterials for regulating cancer and stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Birju P.

    The realm of nanomedicine has grown exponentially over the past few decades. However, there are several obstacles that need to be overcome, prior to the wide-spread clinical applications of these nanoparticles, such as (i) developing well-defined nanoparticles of varying size, morphology and composition to enable various clinical applications; (ii) overcome various physiological barriers encountered in order to deliver the therapeutics to the target location; and (iii) real-time monitoring of the nano-therapeutics within the human body for tracking their uptake, localization and effect. Hence, this dissertation focuses on developing multimodal nanotechnology-based approaches to overcome the above-mentioned challenges and thus enable regulation of cancer and stem cell fate. The initial part of this dissertation describes the development of multimodal magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCNPs), comprised of a highly magnetic core surrounded by a thin gold shell, thus combining magnetic and plasmonic properties. These nanoparticles were utilized for mainly two applications: (i) Magnetically-facilitated delivery of siRNA and plasmid DNA for effective stem cell differentiation and imaging and (ii) Combined hyperthermia and targeted delivery of a mitochondria-targeting peptide for enhancing apoptosis in cancer cells. The following part of this dissertation presents the generation of a multi-functional cyclodextrin-conjugated polymeric delivery platform (known as DexAMs), for co-delivery of anticancer drugs and siRNAs in a target-specific manner to brain tumor cells. This combined delivery of chemotherapeutics and siRNA resulted in a synergistic effect on the apoptosis of brain tumor cells, as compared to the individual treatments. The final part of this thesis presents development of stimuli-responsive uorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mesoporous silica nanoparticles for real-time monitoring of drug release in cells. The stimuli-responsive behavior of

  13. GATA-3 Maintains the Differentiation of the Luminal Cell Fate in the Mammary Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Kouros-Mehr, Hosein; Slorach, Euan M.; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Werb, Zena

    2006-01-01

    The GATA family of transcription factors plays fundamental roles in cell-fate specification. However, it is unclear if these genes are necessary for the maintenance of cellular differentiation after development. We identified GATA-3 as the most highly enriched transcription factor in the mammary epithelium of pubertal mice. GATA-3 was found in the luminal cells of mammary ducts and the body cells of terminal end buds (TEBs). Upon conditional deletion of GATA-3, mice exhibited severe defects i...

  14. Fate and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFevre, Gregory Hallett

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the fate of hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention areas and those mechanisms that affect hydrocarbon fate in such systems. Seventy-five samples from 58 bioretention areas were collected and analyzed to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) residual and biodegradation functional genes. TPH residual in bioretention areas was greater than background sites but low overall (<3 µg/kg), and well below either the TPH concentration of concern or the expected concentration, assuming no losses. Bioretention areas with deep-root vegetation contained significantly greater quantites of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and two functional genes involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Field soils were capable of mineralizing naphthalene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) when incubated in the laboratory. In an additional laboratory investigation, a column study was initiated to comprehensively determine naphthalene fate in a simulated bioretention cell using a 14C-labeled tracer. Sorption to soil was the greatest sink of naphthalene in the columns, although biodegradation and vegetative uptake were also important loss mechanisms. Little leaching occurred following the first flush, and volatilization was insignificant. Significant enrichment of naphthalene degrading bacteria occurred over the course of the experiment as a result of naphthalene exposure. This was evident from enhanced naphthalene biodegradation kinetics (measured via batch tests), significant increases in naphthalene dioxygenase gene quantities, and a significant correlation observed between naphthalene residual and biodegradation functional genes. Vegetated columns outperformed the unplanted control column in terms of total naphthalene removal and biodegradation kinetics. As a result of these experiments, a final study focused on why planted systems outperform unplanted systems was conducted. Plant root exudates were harvested from hydroponic setups for three

  15. An ECHO in biology II: Insights in chondrocyte cell fate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schivo, S.; Scholma, J.; Huang, X.; Zhong, L.; Pol, van de J.C.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Langerak, R.; Post, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: An intricate network of regulatory processes determines the chondrocyte cell fate during development and maintains tissue homeostasis. In the event of a disease such as OA, the regulatory network is critically compromised. To cure the disease, we need to restore the regulatory processes to

  16. Essential role of Bmp signaling and its positive feedback loop in the early cell fate evolution of chordates

    OpenAIRE

    Kozmiková, I. (Iryna); S Candiani; P. Fabian; Gurská, D. (Daniela); Kozmik, Z

    2013-01-01

    In chordates, early separation of cell fate domains occurs prior to the final specification of ectoderm to neural and non-neural as well as mesoderm to dorsal and ventral during development. Maintaining such division with the establishment of an exact border between the domains is required for the formation of highly differentiated structures such as neural tube and notochord. We hypothesized that the key condition for efficient cell fate separation in a chordate embryo is the presence of a p...

  17. Stem cell fate determination during development and regeneration of ectodermal organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LuciaJimenez-Rojo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of ectoderm-derived appendages results in a large variety of highly specialized organs such as hair follicles, mammary glands, salivary glands and teeth. Despite varying in number, shape and function, all these ectodermal organs develop through continuous and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, sharing common morphological and molecular features especially during their embryonic development. Diseases such as ectodermal dysplasias can affect simultaneously these organs, suggesting that they may arise from common multipotent precursors residing in the embryonic ectoderm. During embryogenesis, these putative ectodermal stem cells may adopt different fates and consequently be able to generate a variety of tissue-specific stem cells, which are the sources for the various cell lineages that form the diverse organs. The specification of those common epithelial precursors, as well as their further lineage commitment to tissue-specific stem cells, might be controlled by specific signals. It has been well documented that Notch, Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathways regulate cell fate decisions during the various stages of ectodermal organ development. However, the in vivo spatial and temporal dynamics of these signaling pathways are not yet well understood. Improving the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in stem cell fate determination during organogenesis and homeostasis of ectodermal organs is crucial to develop effective stem cell-based therapies in order to regenerate or replace pathological and damaged tissues.

  18. Formula G1: Cell cycle in the driver's seat of stem cell fate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Lisa M; Carpenedo, Richard L; Rothberg, Janet L Manias; Stanford, William L

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle dynamics has emerged as a key regulator of stem cell fate decisions. In particular, differentiation decisions are associated with the G1 phase, and recent evidence suggests that self-renewal is actively regulated outside of G1. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are largely unknown, but direct control of gene regulatory programs by the cell cycle machinery is heavily implicated. A recent study sheds important mechanistic insight by demonstrating that in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) the Cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2 controls a wide-spread epigenetic program that drives transcription at differentiation-related gene promoters specifically in G1. Here, we discuss this finding and explore whether similar mechanisms are likely to function in multipotent stem cells. The implications of this discovery toward our understanding of stem cell-related disease are discussed, and we postulate novel mechanisms that position the cell cycle as a regulator of cell fate gene networks at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:26857166

  19. Asymmetric Cell Division in T Lymphocyte Fate Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenio, Janilyn; Metz, Patrick J; Chang, John T

    2015-11-01

    Immunological protection against microbial pathogens is dependent on robust generation of functionally diverse T lymphocyte subsets. Upon microbial infection, naïve CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes can give rise to effector- and memory-fated progeny that together mediate a potent immune response. Recent advances in single-cell immunological and genomic profiling technologies have helped elucidate early and late diversification mechanisms that enable the generation of heterogeneity from single T lymphocytes. We discuss these findings here and argue that one such mechanism, asymmetric cell division, creates an early divergence in T lymphocyte fates by giving rise to daughter cells with a propensity towards the terminally differentiated effector or self-renewing memory lineages, with cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic cues from the microenvironment driving the final maturation steps. PMID:26474675

  20. Fate and metabolism of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in rice cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songfeng; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Yongfeng; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Sun, Feifei; Ji, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the brominated flame retardant with the highest production volume and its bioaccumulation in environment has caused both human health and environmental concerns, however the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants is unknown. We studied the fate, metabolites, and transformation of (14)C-labeled TBBPA in rice cell suspension culture. During the incubation for 14 days, TBBPA degradation occurred continuously in the culture, accompanied by formation of one anisolic metabolite [2,6-dibromo-4-(2-(2-hydroxy)-propyl)-anisole] (DBHPA) (50% of the degraded TBBPA) and cellular debris-bound residues (46.4%) as well as mineralization (3.6%). The cells continuously accumulated TBBPA in the cytoplasm, while a small amount of DBHPA (2.1% of the initially applied TBBPA) was detectable inside the cells only at the end of incubation. The majority of the accumulated residues in the cells was attributed to the cellular debris-bound residues, accounting for 70-79% of the accumulation after the first incubation day. About 5.4% of the accumulation was associated with cell organelles, which contributed 7.5% to the cellular debris-bound residues. Based on the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in the rice cell suspension culture, a type II ipso-substitution pathway was proposed to describe the initial step for TBBPA degradation in the culture and balance the fate of TBBPA in the cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides for the first time the insights into the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants and points out the potential role of type II ipso-hydroxylation substitution in degradation of alkylphenols in plants. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms for the bound-residue formation (e.g., binding of residues to specific cell wall components), nature of the binding, and toxicological effects of the bound residues and DBHPA. PMID:27105166

  1. Distinct fates of self-specific T cells developing in irradiation bone marrow chimeras: Clonal deletion, clonal anergy, or in vitro responsiveness to self-Mls-1a controlled by hemopoietic cells in the thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speiser, D.E.; Chvatchko, Y.; Zinkernagel, R.M.; MacDonald, H.R. (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Epalinges (Switzerland))

    1990-11-01

    Elimination of potentially self-reactive T lymphocytes during their maturation in the thymus has been shown to be a major mechanism in accomplishing self-tolerance. Previous reports demonstrated that clonal deletion of self-Mls-1a-specific V beta 6+ T lymphocyte is controlled by a radiosensitive I-E+ thymic component. Irradiation chimeras reconstituted with I-E- bone marrow showed substantial numbers of mature V beta 6+ T cells despite host Mls-1a expression. Analysis of the functional properties of such chimeric T cells revealed a surprising variability in their in vitro reactivity to host Mls-1a, depending on the H-2 haplotype of stem cells used for reconstitution. In chimeras reconstituted with B10.S (H-2s) stem cells, mature V beta 6+ lymphocytes were present but functionally anergic to host-type Mls-1a in vitro. In contrast, in chimeras reconstituted with B10.G (H-2q) bone marrow, nondeleted V beta 6+ cells were highly responsive to Mls-1a in vitro. These findings suggest that clonal anergy of V beta 6+ cells to self-Mls-1a may be controlled by the affinity/avidity of T cell receptor interactions with bone marrow-derived cells in the thymus depending on the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules involved. Furthermore, chimeras bearing host (Mls-1a)-reactive V beta 6+ cells did not differ clinically from those with anergic or deleted V beta 6+ cells and survived more than one year without signs of autoimmune disease. Interestingly, their spleen cells had no Mls-1a stimulatory capacity in vitro. Therefore, regulation at the level of antigen presentation may be an alternative mechanism for maintenance of tolerance to certain self-antigens such as Mls-1a.

  2. Distinct fates of self-specific T cells developing in irradiation bone marrow chimeras: Clonal deletion, clonal anergy, or in vitro responsiveness to self-Mls-1a controlled by hemopoietic cells in the thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination of potentially self-reactive T lymphocytes during their maturation in the thymus has been shown to be a major mechanism in accomplishing self-tolerance. Previous reports demonstrated that clonal deletion of self-Mls-1a-specific V beta 6+ T lymphocyte is controlled by a radiosensitive I-E+ thymic component. Irradiation chimeras reconstituted with I-E- bone marrow showed substantial numbers of mature V beta 6+ T cells despite host Mls-1a expression. Analysis of the functional properties of such chimeric T cells revealed a surprising variability in their in vitro reactivity to host Mls-1a, depending on the H-2 haplotype of stem cells used for reconstitution. In chimeras reconstituted with B10.S (H-2s) stem cells, mature V beta 6+ lymphocytes were present but functionally anergic to host-type Mls-1a in vitro. In contrast, in chimeras reconstituted with B10.G (H-2q) bone marrow, nondeleted V beta 6+ cells were highly responsive to Mls-1a in vitro. These findings suggest that clonal anergy of V beta 6+ cells to self-Mls-1a may be controlled by the affinity/avidity of T cell receptor interactions with bone marrow-derived cells in the thymus depending on the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules involved. Furthermore, chimeras bearing host (Mls-1a)-reactive V beta 6+ cells did not differ clinically from those with anergic or deleted V beta 6+ cells and survived more than one year without signs of autoimmune disease. Interestingly, their spleen cells had no Mls-1a stimulatory capacity in vitro. Therefore, regulation at the level of antigen presentation may be an alternative mechanism for maintenance of tolerance to certain self-antigens such as Mls-1a

  3. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  4. Structure of the Phosphatase Domain of the Cell Fate Determinant SpoIIE from Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Levdikov, Vladimir M; Blagova, Elena V.; Rawlings, Andrea E.; Jameson, Katie; Tunaley, James; Hart, Darren J.; Barak, Imrich; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis begins with an asymmetric cell division producing two genetically identical cells with different fates. SpoIIE is a membrane protein that localizes to the polar cell division sites where it causes FtsZ to relocate from mid-cell to form polar Z-rings. Following polar septation, SpoIIE establishes compartment-specific gene expression in the smaller forespore cell by dephosphorylating the anti-sigma factor antagonist SpoIIAA, leading to the release of the RNA pol...

  5. MicroRNA-126–mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors

    OpenAIRE

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2013-01-01

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstra...

  6. Epigenetic control of embryonic stem cell fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Nicolaj Strøyer; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    be induced rapidly to differentiate. Maintaining this balance of stability versus plasticity is a challenge, and extensive studies in recent years have focused on understanding the contributions of transcription factors and epigenetic enzymes to the "stemness" properties of these cells. Identifying...

  7. Interrogating a cell signalling network sensitively monitors cell fate transition during early differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yi-Hsin; HO; Chih-ming

    2010-01-01

    The different cell types in an animal are often considered to be specified by combinations of transcription factors,and defined by marker gene expression.This paradigm is challenged,however,in stem cell research and application.Using a mouse embryonic stem cell(mESC) culture system,here we show that the expression level of many key stem cell marker genes/transcription factors such as Oct4,Sox2 and Nanog failed to monitor cell status transition during mESC differentiation.On the other hand,the response patterns of cell signalling network to external stimuli,as monitored by the dynamics of protein phosphorylation,changed dramatically.Our results also suggest that an irreversible alternation in the cell signalling network precedes the adjustment of transcription factor levels.This is consistent with the notion that signal transduction events regulate cell fate specification.We propose that interrogating a cell signalling network can assess the cell property more precisely,and provide a sensitive measurement for the early events in cell fate transition.We wish to bring attention to the potential problem of cell identification using a few marker genes,and suggest a novel methodology to address this issue.

  8. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled...... later for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and...

  9. Prox1 physically and functionally interacts with COUP-TFII to specify lymphatic endothelial cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunju; Kang, Jinjoo; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Ganesan, Sathish K.; Cook, Sarah C.; Aguilar, Berenice; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Juneyong

    2009-01-01

    Specification of endothelial cell (EC) fate during vascular development is controlled by distinct key regulators. While Notch plays an essential role in induction of arterial phenotypes, COUP-TFII is required to maintain the venous EC identity. Homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 functions to reprogram venous ECs to lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Here, we report that the venous EC fate regulator COUP-TFII is expressed in LECs throughout development and physically interacts with Prox1 to form a stable complex in various cell types including LECs. We found that COUP-TFII functions as a coregulator of Prox1 to control several lineage-specific genes including VEGFR-3, FGFR-3, and neuropilin-1 and is required along with Prox1 to maintain LEC phenotype. Together, we propose that the physical and functional interactions of the 2 proteins constitute an essential part in the program specifying LEC fate and may provide the molecular basis for the hypothesis of venous EC identity being the prerequisite for LEC specification. PMID:18815287

  10. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  11. Targeting pleiotropic signaling pathways to control adult cardiac stem cell fate and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GiancarloForte

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of different pools of cardiac progenitor cells resident in the adult mammalian heart opened a new era in heart regeneration as a means to restore the loss of functional cardiac tissue and overcome the limited availability of donor organs. Indeed, resident stem cells are believed to participate to tissue homeostasis and renewal in healthy and damaged myocardium although their actual contribution to these processes remain unclear. The poor outcome in terms of cardiac regeneration following tissue damage point out at the need for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling CPC behavior and fate determination before new therapeutic strategies can be developed. The regulation of cardiac resident stem cell fate and function is likely to result from the interplay between pleiotropic signaling pathways as well as tissue- and cell-specific regulators. Such a modular interaction – which has already been described in the nucleus of a number of different cells where transcriptional complexes form to activate specific gene programs - would account for the unique responses of cardiac progenitors to general and tissue-specific stimuli.The study of the molecular determinants involved in cardiac stem/progenitor cell regulatory mechanisms may shed light on the processes of cardiac homeostasis in health and disease and thus provide clues on the actual feasibility of cardiac cell therapy through tissue-specific progenitors.

  12. Role of Notch signaling in cell-fate determination of human mammary stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notch signaling has been implicated in the regulation of cell-fate decisions such as self-renewal of adult stem cells and differentiation of progenitor cells along a particular lineage. Moreover, depending on the cellular and developmental context, the Notch pathway acts as a regulator of cell survival and cell proliferation. Abnormal expression of Notch receptors has been found in different types of epithelial metaplastic lesions and neoplastic lesions, suggesting that Notch may act as a proto-oncogene. The vertebrate Notch1 and Notch4 homologs are involved in normal development of the mammary gland, and mutated forms of these genes are associated with development of mouse mammary tumors. In order to determine the role of Notch signaling in mammary cell-fate determination, we have utilized a newly described in vitro system in which mammary stem/progenitor cells can be cultured in suspension as nonadherent 'mammospheres'. Notch signaling was activated using exogenous ligands, or was inhibited using previously characterized Notch signaling antagonists. Utilizing this system, we demonstrate that Notch signaling can act on mammary stem cells to promote self-renewal and on early progenitor cells to promote their proliferation, as demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in secondary mammosphere formation upon addition of a Notch-activating DSL peptide. In addition to acting on stem cells, Notch signaling is also able to act on multipotent progenitor cells, facilitating myoepithelial lineage-specific commitment and proliferation. Stimulation of this pathway also promotes branching morphogenesis in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. These effects are completely inhibited by a Notch4 blocking antibody or a gamma secretase inhibitor that blocks Notch processing. In contrast to the effects of Notch signaling on mammary stem/progenitor cells, modulation of this pathway has no discernable effect on fully committed, differentiated, mammary epithelial cells. These studies

  13. Engineering Cell Instructive Materials To Control Cell Fate and Functions through Material Cues and Surface Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-22

    Mastering the interaction between cells and extracellular environment is a fundamental prerequisite in order to engineer functional biomaterial interfaces able to instruct cells with specific commands. Such advanced biomaterials might find relevant application in prosthesis design, tissue engineering, diagnostics and stem cell biology. Because of the highly complex, dynamic, and multifaceted context, a thorough understanding of the cell-material crosstalk has not been achieved yet; however, a variety of material features including biological cues, topography, and mechanical properties have been proved to impact the strength and the nature of the cell-material interaction, eventually affecting cell fate and functions. Although the nature of these three signals may appear very different, they are equated by their participation in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway as they regulate cell adhesion events. In this work we present recent and relevant findings on the material-induced cell responses, with a particular emphasis on how the presentation of biochemical/biophysical signals modulates cell behavior. Finally, we summarize and discuss the literature data to draw out unifying elements concerning cell recognition of and reaction to signals displayed by material surfaces. PMID:26693600

  14. SOX17 is a critical specifier of human primordial germ cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Naoko; Weinberger, Leehee; Tang, Walfred W C; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Viukov, Sergey; Manor, Yair S; Dietmann, Sabine; Hanna, Jacob H; Surani, M Azim

    2015-01-15

    Specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs) marks the beginning of the totipotent state. However, without a tractable experimental model, the mechanism of human PGC (hPGC) specification remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate specification of hPGC-like cells (hPGCLCs) from germline competent pluripotent stem cells. The characteristics of hPGCLCs are consistent with the embryonic hPGCs and a germline seminoma that share a CD38 cell-surface marker, which collectively defines likely progression of the early human germline. Remarkably, SOX17 is the key regulator of hPGC-like fate, whereas BLIMP1 represses endodermal and other somatic genes during specification of hPGCLCs. Notable mechanistic differences between mouse and human PGC specification could be attributed to their divergent embryonic development and pluripotent states, which might affect other early cell-fate decisions. We have established a foundation for future studies on resetting of the epigenome in hPGCLCs and hPGCs for totipotency and the transmission of genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:25543152

  15. Regulation of spindle orientation and neural stem cell fate in the Drosophila optic lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Andrea H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice of a stem cell to divide symmetrically or asymmetrically has profound consequences for development and disease. Unregulated symmetric division promotes tumor formation, whereas inappropriate asymmetric division affects organ morphogenesis. Despite its importance, little is known about how spindle positioning is regulated. In some tissues cell fate appears to dictate the type of cell division, whereas in other tissues it is thought that stochastic variation in spindle position dictates subsequent sibling cell fate. Results Here we investigate the relationship between neural progenitor identity and spindle positioning in the Drosophila optic lobe. We use molecular markers and live imaging to show that there are two populations of progenitors in the optic lobe: symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells and asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts. We use genetically marked single cell clones to show that neuroepithelial cells give rise to neuroblasts. To determine if a change in spindle orientation can trigger a neuroepithelial to neuroblast transition, we force neuroepithelial cells to divide along their apical/basal axis by misexpressing Inscuteable. We find that this does not induce neuroblasts, nor does it promote premature neuronal differentiation. Conclusion We show that symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells give rise to asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts in the optic lobe, and that regulation of spindle orientation and division symmetry is a consequence of cell type specification, rather than a mechanism for generating cell type diversity.

  16. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  17. Control of Cell Fate in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning. Volumes 1 and 2 are devoted to cell organization and fate, as well as activities that are autoregulated and/or controlled by the cell environment. Volume 1 examined cellular features that allow adaptation to env...

  18. Notch1 is required in newly postmitotic cells to inhibit the rod photoreceptor fate

    OpenAIRE

    Mizeracka, Karolina; DeMaso, Christina R.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2013-01-01

    Several models of cell fate determination can be invoked to explain how single retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) produce different cell types in a terminal division. To gain insight into this process, the effects of the removal of a cell fate regulator, Notch1, were studied in newly postmitotic cells using a conditional allele of Notch1 (N1-CKO) in mice. Almost all newly postmitotic N1-CKO cells became rod photoreceptors, whereas wild-type (WT) cells achieved a variety of fates. Single cell pro...

  19. Integrative modelling of the influence of MAPK network on cancer cell fate decision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Grieco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK network consists of tightly interconnected signalling pathways involved in diverse cellular processes, such as cell cycle, survival, apoptosis and differentiation. Although several studies reported the involvement of these signalling cascades in cancer deregulations, the precise mechanisms underlying their influence on the balance between cell proliferation and cell death (cell fate decision in pathological circumstances remain elusive. Based on an extensive analysis of published data, we have built a comprehensive and generic reaction map for the MAPK signalling network, using CellDesigner software. In order to explore the MAPK responses to different stimuli and better understand their contributions to cell fate decision, we have considered the most crucial components and interactions and encoded them into a logical model, using the software GINsim. Our logical model analysis particularly focuses on urinary bladder cancer, where MAPK network deregulations have often been associated with specific phenotypes. To cope with the combinatorial explosion of the number of states, we have applied novel algorithms for model reduction and for the compression of state transition graphs, both implemented into the software GINsim. The results of systematic simulations for different signal combinations and network perturbations were found globally coherent with published data. In silico experiments further enabled us to delineate the roles of specific components, cross-talks and regulatory feedbacks in cell fate decision. Finally, tentative proliferative or anti-proliferative mechanisms can be connected with established bladder cancer deregulations, namely Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR over-expression and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 activating mutations.

  20. Environmental cues to guide stem cell fate decision for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsberg, Eben; von Recum, Horst A; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2006-09-01

    The human body contains a variety of stem cells capable of both repeated self-renewal and production of specialised, differentiated progeny. Critical to the implementation of these cells in tissue engineering strategies is a thorough understanding of which external signals in the stem cell microenvironment provide cues to control their fate decision in terms of proliferation or differentiation into a desired, specific phenotype. These signals must then be incorporated into tissue regeneration approaches for regulated exposure to stem cells. The precise spatial and temporal presentation of factors directing stem cell behaviour is extremely important during embryogenesis, development and natural healing events, and it is possible that this level of control will be vital to the success of many regenerative therapies. This review covers existing tissue engineering approaches to guide the differentiation of three disparate stem cell populations: mesenchymal, neural and endothelial. These progenitor cells will be of central importance in many future connective, neural and vascular tissue regeneration technologies. PMID:16918253

  1. An exquisite cross-control mechanism among endothelial cell fate regulators directs the plasticity and heterogeneity of lymphatic endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinjoo; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Sunju; Tang, Wanli; Aguilar, Berenice; Ramu, Swapnika; Choi, Inho; Otu, Hasan H.; Shin, Jay W.; Dotto, G. Paolo; Koh, Chester J.; Detmar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Arteriovenous-lymphatic endothelial cell fates are specified by the master regulators, namely, Notch, COUP-TFII, and Prox1. Whereas Notch is expressed in the arteries and COUP-TFII in the veins, the lymphatics express all 3 cell fate regulators. Previous studies show that lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) fate is highly plastic and reversible, raising a new concept that all 3 endothelial cell fates may coreside in LECs and a subtle alteration can result in a reprogramming of LEC fate. We provide a molecular basis verifying this concept by identifying a cross-control mechanism among these cell fate regulators. We found that Notch signal down-regulates Prox1 and COUP-TFII through Hey1 and Hey2 and that activated Notch receptor suppresses the lymphatic phenotypes and induces the arterial cell fate. On the contrary, Prox1 and COUP-TFII attenuate vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, known to induce Notch, by repressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and neuropilin-1. We show that previously reported podoplanin-based LEC heterogeneity is associated with differential expression of Notch1 in human cutaneous lymphatics. We propose that the expression of the 3 cell fate regulators is controlled by an exquisite feedback mechanism working in LECs and that LEC fate is a consequence of the Prox1-directed lymphatic equilibrium among the cell fate regulators. PMID:20351309

  2. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates in cancer and stem/progenitor cell pedigrees with competing risks analysis

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Cornwell; Hallett, R. M.; S. Auf der Mauer; A. Motazedian; Schroeder, T.; J. S. Draper; Harvey, R. P.; R. E. Nordon

    2016-01-01

    The molecular control of cell fate and behaviour is a central theme in biology. Inherent heterogeneity within cell populations requires that control of cell fate is studied at the single-cell level. Time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking are powerful technologies for acquiring cell lifetime data, allowing quantification of how cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors control single-cell fates over time. However, cell lifetime data contain complex features. Competing cell fates, censoring, an...

  3. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis K. Politis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs, promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibits astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs, differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis.

  4. Dynamic Pax6 expression during the neurogenic cell cycle influences proliferation and cell fate choices of retinal progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xian-Jie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paired homeobox protein Pax6 is essential for proliferation and pluripotency of retinal progenitors. However, temporal changes in Pax6 protein expression associated with the generation of various retinal neurons have not been characterized with regard to the cell cycle. Here, we examine the dynamic changes of Pax6 expression among chicken retinal progenitors as they progress through the neurogenic cell cycle, and determine the effects of altered Pax6 levels on retinogenesis. Results We provide evidence that during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition, Pax6 protein levels in proliferating progenitor cells are down-regulated. Neurogenic retinal progenitors retain a relatively low level of Pax6 protein, whereas postmitotic neurons either elevate or extinguish Pax6 expression in a cell type-specific manner. Cell imaging and cell cycle analyses show that neurogenic progenitors in the S phase of the cell cycle contain low levels of Pax6 protein, whereas a subset of progenitors exhibits divergent levels of Pax6 protein upon entering the G2 phase of the cell cycle. We also show that M phase cells contain varied levels of Pax6, and some correlate with the onset of early neuronal marker expression, forecasting cell cycle exit and cell fate commitment. Furthermore, either elevating or knocking down Pax6 attenuates cell proliferation and results in increased cell death. Reducing Pax6 decreases retinal ganglion cell genesis and enhances cone photoreceptor and amacrine interneuron production, whereas elevating Pax6 suppresses cone photoreceptor and amacrine cell fates. Conclusion These studies demonstrate for the first time quantitative changes in Pax6 protein expression during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition and during the neurogenic cell cycle. The results indicate that Pax6 protein levels are stringently controlled in proliferating progenitors. Maintaining a relatively low Pax6 protein level is necessary for S phase

  5. Time-variant clustering model for understanding cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Xiaoyi; Biase, Fernando H; Yu, Pengfei; Zhong, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Both spatial characteristics and temporal features are often the subjects of concern in physical, social, and biological studies. This work tackles the clustering problems for time course data in which the cluster number and clustering structure change with respect to time, dubbed time-variant clustering. We developed a hierarchical model that simultaneously clusters the objects at every time point and describes the relationships of the clusters between time points. The hidden layer of this model is a generalized form of branching processes. A reversible-jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo method was implemented for model inference, and a feature selection procedure was developed. We applied this method to explore an open question in preimplantation embryonic development. Our analyses using single-cell gene expression data suggested that the earliest cell fate decision could start at the 4-cell stage in mice, earlier than the commonly thought 8- to 16-cell stage. These results together with independent experimental data from single-cell RNA-seq provided support against a prevailing hypothesis in mammalian development. PMID:25339442

  6. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  7. Generation of bivalent chromatin domains during cell fate decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gobbi Marco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In self-renewing, pluripotent cells, bivalent chromatin modification is thought to silence (H3K27me3 lineage control genes while 'poising' (H3K4me3 them for subsequent activation during differentiation, implying an important role for epigenetic modification in directing cell fate decisions. However, rather than representing an equivalently balanced epigenetic mark, the patterns and levels of histone modifications at bivalent genes can vary widely and the criteria for identifying this chromatin signature are poorly defined. Results Here, we initially show how chromatin status alters during lineage commitment and differentiation at a single well characterised bivalent locus. In addition we have determined how chromatin modifications at this locus change with gene expression in both ensemble and single cell analyses. We also show, on a global scale, how mRNA expression may be reflected in the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K27me3. Conclusions While truly 'poised' bivalently modified genes may exist, the original hypothesis that all bivalent genes are epigenetically premarked for subsequent expression might be oversimplistic. In fact, from the data presented in the present work, it is equally possible that many genes that appear to be bivalent in pluripotent and multipotent cells may simply be stochastically expressed at low levels in the process of multilineage priming. Although both situations could be considered to be forms of 'poising', the underlying mechanisms and the associated implications are clearly different.

  8. Mitophagy-driven mitochondrial rejuvenation regulates stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Van den Haute, Chris; Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Rodriguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Baekelandt, Veerle; Menendez, Javier A

    2016-07-01

    Our understanding on how selective mitochondrial autophagy, or mitophagy, can sustain the archetypal properties of stem cells is incomplete. PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) plays a key role in the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function and in the selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy. Here, using embryonic fibroblasts fromPINK1 gene-knockout (KO) mice, we evaluated whether mitophagy is a causal mechanism for the control of cell-fate plasticity and maintenance of pluripotency. Loss of PINK1-dependent mitophagy was sufficient to dramatically decrease the speed and efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming. Mitophagy-deficient iPSC colonies, which were characterized by a mixture of mature and immature mitochondria, seemed unstable, with a strong tendency to spontaneously differentiate and form heterogeneous populations of cells. Although mitophagy-deficient iPSC colonies normally expressed pluripotent markers, functional monitoring of cellular bioenergetics revealed an attenuated glycolysis in mitophagy-deficient iPSC cells. Targeted metabolomics showed a notable alteration in numerous glycolysis- and TCA-related metabolites in mitophagy-deficient iPSC cells, including a significant decrease in the intracellular levels of α-ketoglutarate -a key suppressor of the differentiation path in stem cells. Mitophagy-deficient iPSC colonies exhibited a notably reduced teratoma-initiating capacity, but fully retained their pluripotency and multi-germ layer differentiation capacity in vivo. PINK1-dependent mitophagy pathway is an important mitochondrial switch that determines the efficiency and quality of somatic reprogramming. Mitophagy-driven mitochondrial rejuvenation might contribute to the ability of iPSCs to suppress differentiation by directing bioenergetic transition and metabolome remodeling traits. These findings provide new insights into how mitophagy might influence the stem cell decisions to retain

  9. Determination of wing cell fate by the escargot and snail genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, N; Hirose, S; Hayashi, S

    1996-04-01

    Inset appendages such as the wing and the leg are formed in response to inductive signals in the embryonic field. In Drosophila, cells receiving such signals initiate developmental programs which allow them to become imaginal discs. Subsequently, these discs autonomously organize patterns specific for each appendage. We here report that two related transcription factors, Escargot and Snail that are expressed in the embryonic wing disc, function as intrinsic determinants of the wing cell fate. In escargot or snail mutant embryos, wing-specific expression of Snail, Vestigial and beta-galactosidase regulated by escargot enhancer were found as well as in wild-type embryos. However, in escargot snail double mutant embryos, wing development proceeded until stage 13, but the marker expression was not maintained in later stages, and the invagination of the primordium was absent. From such analyses, it was concluded that Escargot and Snail expression in the wing disc are maintained by their auto- and crossactivation. Ubiquitous escargot or snail expression induced from the hsp70 promoter rescued the escargot snail double mutant phenotype with the effects confined to the prospective wing cells. Similar DNA binding specificities of Escargot and Snail suggest that they control the same set of genes required for wing development. We thus propose the following scenario for early wing disc development. Prospective wing cells respond to the induction by turning on escargot and snail transcription, and become competent for regulation by Escargot and Snail. Such cells initiate auto- and crossregulatory circuits of escargot and snail. The sustained Escargot and Snail expression then activates vestigial and other target genes that are essential for wing development. This maintains the commitment to the wing cell fate and induces wing-specific cell shape change. PMID:8620833

  10. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation. PMID:27147029

  11. Bar represses dPax2 and decapentaplegic to regulate cell fate and morphogenetic cell death in Drosophila eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongkyun Kang

    Full Text Available The coordinated regulation of cell fate and cell survival is crucial for normal pattern formation in developing organisms. In Drosophila compound eye development, crystalline arrays of hexagonal ommatidia are established by precise assembly of diverse cell types, including the photoreceptor cells, cone cells and interommatidial (IOM pigment cells. The molecular basis for controlling the number of cone and IOM pigment cells during ommatidial pattern formation is not well understood. Here we present evidence that BarH1 and BarH2 homeobox genes are essential for eye patterning by inhibiting excess cone cell differentiation and promoting programmed death of IOM cells. Specifically, we show that loss of Bar from the undifferentiated retinal precursor cells leads to ectopic expression of Prospero and dPax2, two transcription factors essential for cone cell specification, resulting in excess cone cell differentiation. We also show that loss of Bar causes ectopic expression of the TGFβ homolog Decapentaplegic (Dpp posterior to the morphogenetic furrow in the larval eye imaginal disc. The ectopic Dpp expression is not responsible for the formation of excess cone cells in Bar loss-of-function mutant eyes. Instead, it causes reduction in IOM cell death in the pupal stage by antagonizing the function of pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Taken together, this study suggests a novel regulatory mechanism in the control of developmental cell death in which the repression of Dpp by Bar in larval eye disc is essential for IOM cell death in pupal retina.

  12. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  13. ¬Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Hilary Jane Anderson; Matthew John Dalby; Jugal eSahoo; Rein eUljin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell BehaviourHilary J Anderson1, Jugal Kishore Sahoo2, Rein V Ulijn2,3, Matthew J Dalby1*1 Centre for Cell Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.2 Technology and Innovation centre, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. 3 Advanced Science Research Centre (ASRC) and Hunter College, City University of New York, NY 10031, NY, USA. Correspondence:*Hilary Andersonh.anderson...

  14. Putting things in place for fertilization: discovering roles for importin proteins in cell fate and spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L. Loveland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Importin proteins were originally characterized for their central role in protein transport through the nuclear pores, the only intracellular entry to the nucleus. This vital function must be tightly regulated to control access by transcription factors and other nuclear proteins to genomic DNA, to achieve appropriate modulation of cellular behaviors affecting cell fate. Importin-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport relies on their specific recognition of cargoes, with each importin binding to distinct and overlapping protein subsets. Knowledge of importin function has expanded substantially in regard to three key developmental systems: embryonic stem cells, muscle cells and the germ line. In the decade since the potential for regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport to contribute to spermatogenesis was proposed, we and others have shown that the importins that ferry transcription factors into the nucleus perform additional roles, which control cell fate. This review presents key findings from studies of mammalian spermatogenesis that reveal potential new pathways by which male fertility and infertility arise. These studies of germline genesis illuminate new ways in which importin proteins govern cellular differentiation, including via directing proteins to distinct intracellular compartments and by determining cellular stress responses.

  15. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

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    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  16. Thickness sensing of hMSCs on collagen gel directs stem cell fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → hMSCs appeared to sense thin collagen gel (130 μm) with higher effective modulus as compared to thick gel (1440 μm). → Control of collagen gel thickness can modulate cellular behavior, even stem cell fate (neuronal vs. Quiescent). → Distinct cellular behavior of hMSCs on thin and thick collagen gel suggests long range interaction of hMSCs with collagen gel. -- Abstract: Mechanically compliant substrate provides crucial biomechanical cues for multipotent stem cells to regulate cellular fates such as differentiation, proliferation and maintenance of their phenotype. Effective modulus of which cells sense is not only determined by intrinsic mechanical properties of the substrate, but also the thickness of substrate. From our study, it was found that interference from underlying rigid support at hundreds of microns away could induce significant cellular response. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured on compliant biological gel, collagen type I, of different thickness but identical ECM composition and local stiffness. The cells sensed the thin gel (130 μm) as having a higher effective modulus than the thick gel (1440 μm) and this was reflected in their changes in morphology, actin fibers structure, proliferation and tissue specific gene expression. Commitment into neuronal lineage was observed on the thin gel only. Conversely, the thick gel (1440 μm) was found to act like a substrate with lower effective modulus that inhibited actin fiber polymerization. Stem cells on the thick substrate did not express tissue specific genes and remained at their quiescent state. This study highlighted the need to consider not only the local modulus but also the thickness of biopolymer gel coating during modulation of cellular responses.

  17. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are productsof interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBarge, Mark A.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, René;

    2009-01-01

    factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify...

  18. Early specification of dopaminergic phenotype during ES cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Meng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how lineage choices are made during embryonic stem (ES cell differentiation is critical for harnessing strategies for controlled production of therapeutic somatic cell types for cell transplantation and pharmaceutical drug screens. The in vitro generation of dopaminergic neurons, the type of cells lost in Parkinson's disease patients' brains, requires the inductive molecules sonic hedgehog and FGF8, or an unknown stromal cell derived inducing activity (SDIA. However, the exact identity of the responding cells and the timing of inductive activity that specify a dopaminergic fate in neural stem/progenitors still remain elusive. Results Using ES cells carrying a neuroepithelial cell specific vital reporter (Sox1-GFP and FACS purification of Sox1-GFP neural progenitors, we have investigated the temporal aspect of SDIA mediated dopaminergic neuron specification during ES cell differentiation. Our results establish that SDIA induces a dopaminergic neuron fate in nascent neural stem or progenitor cells at, or prior to, Sox1 expression and does not appear to have further instructive role or neurotrophic activity during late neuronal differentiation of neural precursors. Furthermore, we show that dopaminergic neurons could be produced efficiently in a monolayer differentiation paradigm independent of SDIA activity or exogenous signalling molecules. In this case, the competence for dopaminergic neuron differentiation is also established at the level of Sox1 expression. Conclusion Dopaminergic neurons are specified early during mouse ES cell differentiation. The subtype specification seems to be tightly linked with the acquisition of a pan neuroectoderm fate.

  19. Forced expression of Hnf1b/Foxa3 promotes hepatic fate of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Ebadifar, Asghar; Fathi, Fardin; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-05-20

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived hepatocytes have the potential to be used for basic research, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery. Recent reports demonstrated that in addition to conventional differentiation inducers such as chemical compounds and cytokines, overexpression of lineage-specific transcription factors could induce ES cells to differentiate to a hepatic fate. Here, we hypothesized that lentivirus-mediated inducible expression of hepatic lineage transcription factors could enhance mouse ES cells to hepatocyte-like cells. We screened the effects of candidate transcription factors Hnf1b, Hnf1a, Hnf4a, Foxa1, Foxa3 and Hex, and determined that the combination of Hnf1b/Foxa3 promoted expression of several hepatic lineage-specific markers and proteins, in addition to glycogen storage, ICG uptake, and secretion of albumin and urea. The differentiated cells were engraftable and expressed albumin when transplanted into a carbon tetrachloride-injured mouse model. These results demonstrated the crucial role of Hnf1b and Foxa3 in hepatogenesis in vitro and provided a valuable tool for the efficient differentiation of HLCs from ES cells. PMID:27107701

  20. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  1. The neural stem cell fate determinant TRIM32 regulates complex behavioral traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena eHillje

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, new neurons are generated throughout the entire lifespan in two restricted areas of the brain, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ – olfactory bulb (OB system. In both regions newborn neurons display unique properties that clearly distinguish them from mature neurons. Enhanced excitability and increased synaptic plasticity enables them to add specific properties to information processing by modulating the existing local circuitry of already established mature neurons. Hippocampal neurogenesis has been suggested to play a role in spatial-navigation learning, spatial memory and spatial pattern separation. Cumulative evidences implicate that adult-born OB neurons contribute to learning processes and odor memory. We recently demonstrated that the cell fate determinant TRIM32 is upregulated in differentiating neuroblasts of the SVZ-OB system in the adult mouse brain. The absence of TRIM32 leads to increased progenitor cell proliferation and less cell death. Both effects accumulate in an overproduction of adult-generated OB neurons. Here, we present novel data from behavioral studies showing that such an enhancement of OB neurogenesis not necessarily leads to increased olfactory performance but in contrast even results in impaired olfactory capabilities. In addition, we show at the cellular level that TRIM32 protein levels increase during differentiation of neural stem cells. At the molecular level, several metabolic intermediates that are connected to glycolysis, glycine or cysteine metabolism are deregulated in TRIM32 knockout mice brain tissue. These metabolomics pathways are directly or indirectly linked to anxiety or depression like behavior. In summary, our study provides comprehensive data on how the impairment of neurogenesis caused by the loss of the cell fate determinant TRIM32 causes a decrease of olfactory performance as well as a deregulation of metabolomic pathways that are linked to

  2. Role of Geminin in cell fate determination of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Ohno, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Naoto; Zhang, Bo; Suzuki-Takedachi, Kyoko; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Geminin exerts two distinct molecular roles. Geminin negatively regulates DNA replication licensing through the direct interaction with Cdt1 to prevent re-replication in proliferating cells. Geminin also regulates chromatin remodeling through the direct interaction with Brahma/Brg1 to maintain undifferentiated states of stem cells. We previously uncovered that Polycomb-group complex 1 and Hoxb4/Hoxa9, well-known intrinsic factors that are essential for maintaining the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, alternatively act as ubiquitin-proteasome systems for Geminin protein to reduce the protein expression level, and sustain the HSC activity. Thus, Geminin is presumed to play an important role in determining cell fate, i.e., turning on and off cellular quiescence and proliferation/differentiation, in HSCs. We recently generated recombinant cell-penetrating Geminin (CP-Geminin), enabling rapid incorporation and withdraw of Geminin protein in cells. CP-Geminin may be useful in regulating the cell cycle and chromatin configuration. In this article, we summarize current information on the molecular functions of Geminin and the regulatory system for Geminin protein expression, and argue for the molecular role of Geminin in cell fate determination of HSCs, and future perspective of a new technology for manipulating the activities of HSCs and cancer stem cells (CSCs). PMID:27422432

  3. A fungicide-responsive kinase as a tool for synthetic cell fate regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kentaro; Hohmann, Stefan

    2015-08-18

    Engineered biological systems that precisely execute defined tasks have major potential for medicine and biotechnology. For instance, gene- or cell-based therapies targeting pathogenic cells may replace time- and resource-intensive drug development. Engineering signal transduction systems is a promising, yet presently underexplored approach. Here, we exploit a fungicide-responsive heterologous histidine kinase for pathway engineering and synthetic cell fate regulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rewiring the osmoregulatory Hog1 MAPK signalling system generates yeast cells programmed to execute three different tasks. First, a synthetic negative feedback loop implemented by employing the fungicide-responsive kinase and a fungicide-resistant derivative reshapes the Hog1 activation profile, demonstrating how signalling dynamics can be engineered. Second, combinatorial integration of different genetic parts including the histidine kinases, a pathway activator and chemically regulated promoters enables control of yeast growth and/or gene expression in a two-input Boolean logic manner. Finally, we implemented a genetic 'suicide attack' system, in which engineered cells eliminate target cells and themselves in a specific and controllable manner. Taken together, fungicide-responsive kinases can be applied in different constellations to engineer signalling behaviour. Sensitizing engineered cells to existing chemicals may be generally useful for future medical and biotechnological applications. PMID:26138483

  4. Cell Adhesion Geometry Regulates Non-Random DNA Segregation and Asymmetric Cell Fates in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Siham Yennek; Mithila Burute; Manuel Théry; Shahragim Tajbakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole position also promote non-rand...

  5. Cell Adhesion Geometry Regulates Non-Random DNA Segregation and Asymmetric Cell Fates in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yennek, Siham; Burute, Mithila; Théry, Manuel; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-01-01

    International audience Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole posi...

  6. Cell adhesion geometry regulates non-random DNA segregation and asymmetric cell fates in mouse skeletal muscle stem cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Yennek, Siham; Burute, Mithila; Théry, Manuel; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-01-01

    International audience Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole posi...

  7. Cell adhesion geometry regulates non-random DNA segregation and asymmetric cell fates in mouse skeletal muscle stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yennek, Siham; Burute, Mithila; Thery, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole position also promote non-rand...

  8. Opposing Regulation of PROX1 by Interleukin-3 Receptor and NOTCH Directs Differential Host Cell Fate Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Aguilar, Berenice; Kang, Jinjoo; Park, Eunkyung; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Kim, Nam Yoon; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) during embryogenesis and this physiological cell fate specification is controlled by PROX1, the master regulator for lymphatic development. When Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infects host cells, it activates the otherwise silenced embryonic endothelial differentiation program and reprograms their cell fates. Interestingly, previous studies demonstrated that KSHV drives BECs to acquire a partial lymphatic phenotype by upregulating PROX1 (forward reprogramming), but stimulates LECs to regain some BEC-signature genes by downregulating PROX1 (reverse reprogramming). Despite the significance of this KSHV-induced bidirectional cell fate reprogramming in KS pathogenesis, its underlying molecular mechanism remains undefined. Here, we report that IL3 receptor alpha (IL3Rα) and NOTCH play integral roles in the host cell type-specific regulation of PROX1 by KSHV. In BECs, KSHV upregulates IL3Rα and phosphorylates STAT5, which binds and activates the PROX1 promoter. In LECs, however, PROX1 was rather downregulated by KSHV-induced NOTCH signal via HEY1, which binds and represses the PROX1 promoter. Moreover, PROX1 was found to be required to maintain HEY1 expression in LECs, establishing a reciprocal regulation between PROX1 and HEY1. Upon co-activation of IL3Rα and NOTCH, PROX1 was upregulated in BECs, but downregulated in LECs. Together, our study provides the molecular mechanism underlying the cell type-specific endothelial fate reprogramming by KSHV. PMID:22719258

  9. Stem cell decisions: a twist of fate or a niche market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januschke, Jens; Näthke, Inke

    2014-10-01

    Establishing and maintaining cell fate in the right place at the right time is a key requirement for normal tissue maintenance. Stem cells are at the core of this process. Understanding how stem cells balance self-renewal and production of differentiating cells is key for understanding the defects that underpin many diseases. Both, external cues from the environment and cell intrinsic mechanisms can control the outcome of stem cell division. The role of the orientation of stem cell division has emerged as an important mechanism for specifying cell fate decisions. Although, the alignment of cell divisions can dependent on spatial cues from the environment, maintaining stemness is not always linked to positioning of stem cells in a particular microenvironment or `niche'. Alternate mechanisms that could contribute to cellular memory include differential segregation of centrosomes in asymmetrically dividing cells. PMID:24613913

  10. A blueprint for engineering cell fate: current technologies to reprogram cell identity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samantha A Morris; George Q Daley

    2013-01-01

    Human diseases such as heart failure,diabetes,neurodegenerative disorders,and many others result from the deficiency or dysfunction of critical cell types.Strategies for therapeutic tissue repair or regeneration require the in vitro manufacture of clinically relevant quantities of defined cell types.In addition to transplantation therapy,the generation of otherwise inaccessible cells also permits disease modeling,toxicology testing and drug discovery in vitro.In this review,we discuss current strategies to manipulate the identity of abundant and accessible cells by differentiation from an induced pluripotent state or direct conversion between differentiated states.We contrast these approaches with recent advances employing partial reprogramming to facilitate lineage switching,and discuss the mechanisms underlying the engineering of cell fate.Finally,we address the current limitations of the field and how the resulting cell types can be assessed to ensure the production of medically relevant populations.

  11. Identification of novel genes involved in the commitment of endodermal cells to the thymic epithelial cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Yves D.

    2006-01-01

    The thymus provides the microenvironment for the maturation and selection of the majority of peripheral T cells. Endodermal cells of the ventral aspect of the third pharyngeal pouch (3rdpp) at 10.5 days of mouse gestation (E10.5) adopt a thymic epithelial cell fate while cells of the dorsal part of the 3rdpp give rise to the parathyroid glands. To identify novel genes potentially involved in the commitment of endodermal cells to the thymic epithelial cell fate, the transcriptome o...

  12. DEPENDENCE OF STEM CELL FATE IN ARABIDOPSIS ON A FEEDBACK LOOP REGULATED BY CLV3 ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fate of stem cells in plant meristems is governed by directional signalling systems that are regulated by negative feedback. In Arabidopsis, the CLAVATA (CLV) genes encode the essential components of a negative, stem cell restricting pathway. We have used transgenic plants over-expressing CLV3 t...

  13. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO2 nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO2 nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells

  14. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Claudia, E-mail: Claudia.Strobel@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Oehring, Hartmut [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Anatomy II (Germany); Herrmann, Rudolf [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Förster, Martin [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergy/Immunology (Germany); Reller, Armin [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Hilger, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.hilger@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  15. Cell-specific precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Bundgaard, Jens R

    2010-01-01

    The singular gene for a peptide hormone is expressed not only in a specific endocrine cell type but also in other endocrine cells as well as in entirely different cells such as neurons, adipocytes, myocytes, immune cells, and cells of the sex-glands. The cellular expression pattern for each gene...... varies with development, time and species. Endocrine regulation is, however, based on the release of a given hormone from an endocrine cell to the general circulation from whose cappilaries the hormone reaches the specific target cell elsewhere in the body. The widespread expression of hormone genes in...... different cells and tissues therefore requires control of biogenesis and secretion in order to avoid interference with the function of a specific hormonal peptide from a particular endocrine cell. Several mechanisms are involved in such control, one of them being cell-specific processing of prohormones. The...

  16. Determining the fate of fluorescent quantum dots on surface of engineered budding S. cerevisiae cell molecular landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Chouhan, Raghuraj Singh; Qureshi, Anjum; Kolkar Mohammed, Javed Hussain Niazi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we surface engineered living S. cerevisiae cells by decorating quantum dots (QDs) and traced the fate of QDs on molecular landscape of single mother cell through several generation times (progeny cells). The fate of QDs on cell-surface was tracked through the cellular division events using confocal microscopy and fluorescence emission profiles. The extent of cell-surface QDs distribution among the offspring was determined as the mother cell divides into daughter cells. Fluoresc...

  17. The ETS domain transcriptional repressor Anterior open inhibits MAP kinase and Wingless signaling to couple tracheal cell fate with branch identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Sara; Luschnig, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Cells at the tips of budding branches in the Drosophila tracheal system generate two morphologically different types of seamless tubes. Terminal cells (TCs) form branched lumenized extensions that mediate gas exchange at target tissues, whereas fusion cells (FCs) form ring-like connections between adjacent tracheal metameres. Each tracheal branch contains a specific set of TCs, FCs, or both, but the mechanisms that select between the two tip cell types in a branch-specific fashion are not clear. Here, we show that the ETS domain transcriptional repressor anterior open (aop) is dispensable for directed tracheal cell migration, but plays a key role in tracheal tip cell fate specification. Whereas aop globally inhibits TC and FC specification, MAPK signaling overcomes this inhibition by triggering degradation of Aop in tip cells. Loss of aop function causes excessive FC and TC specification, indicating that without Aop-mediated inhibition, all tracheal cells are competent to adopt a specialized fate. We demonstrate that Aop plays a dual role by inhibiting both MAPK and Wingless signaling, which induce TC and FC fate, respectively. In addition, the branch-specific choice between the two seamless tube types depends on the tracheal branch identity gene spalt major, which is sufficient to inhibit TC specification. Thus, a single repressor, Aop, integrates two different signals to couple tip cell fate selection with branch identity. The switch from a branching towards an anastomosing tip cell type may have evolved with the acquisition of a main tube that connects separate tracheal primordia to generate a tubular network. PMID:23444354

  18. Differential T Cell Function and Fate in Lymph Node and Nonlymphoid Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, N. L.; Watt, V; Ronchese, F.; Le Gros, G.

    2002-01-01

    The functions and fate of antigen-experienced T cells isolated from lymph node or nonlymphoid tissues were analyzed in a system involving adoptive transfer of in vitro-activated T cells into mice. Activated T cells present in the lymph nodes could be stimulated by antigen to divide, produce effector cytokines, and migrate to peripheral tissues. By contrast, activated T cells that had migrated into nonlymphoid tissues (lung and airway) produced substantial effector cytokines upon antigen chall...

  19. An emerging molecular mechanism for the neural vs mesodermal cell fate decision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roman A Li; Kate G Storey

    2011-01-01

    @@ Understanding how primary cell fates are established and maintained in the vertebrate embryo provides important insights that inform directed in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells or adult cells that have undergone induced pluripotency.Neural differentiation is of particular interest as new neural cells may contribute to therapeutic approaches to nervous system injury and diseases and provide in vitro disease models for small molecule screening and for determining personalized drug treatments.

  20. Combined lineage mapping and fate specification profiling with NLOM-OCM using sub-10-fs pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, H. C.; Dodson, C. R.; Bai, Y.; Lekven, A. C.; Yeh, A. T.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a combined NLOM-OCM method using ultrashort sub-10-fs pulses to study cell lineages and their gene expression profiles in zebrafish. First, time-lapse NLOM is used to capture embryo morphology (broadly excited autofluorescence) and cell lineage dynamics (eGFP reporter). The embryo is then fixed and an in situ hybridization performed, depositing NBT/BCIP precipitate where a gene of interest is actively expressed. Combined NLOM-OCM is then used to capture the gene expression pattern with 3-D resolution and these two data sets acquired from the same embryo are merged using morphological landmarks. We have used this approach to study the dynamics of the wnt1 lineage at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) in normal and in fgf8a(ace) morphant embryos. We show that with fgf8a knock-down, the MHB constriction begins to form but subsequent failure of the constriction causes the incorporation of a transient cerebellar structure into caudal tectum. Concomitantly, this morphological distortion in the dorsal MHB causes anterior displacement in a ventral subpopulation of the wnt1 lineage at the MHB. NLOM-OCM confirms the displaced wnt1 MHB lineage stops expressing the wnt1 reporter, and with further experiments we can investigate markers such as wnt4 or ascl1a, which have been shown to be expanded caudally in ace mutants, to understand the transformed molecular fate of this displaced tissue. We conclude this approach of co-registering dynamic lineage tracing and in situ hybridization data sets using morphological context will help shed light on developmental mechanisms by integrating established analysis techniques at the morphological, cellular, and molecular levels.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide – production, fate and role in redox signaling of tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lennicke, Claudia; Rahn, Jette; Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is involved in various signal transduction pathways and cell fate decisions. The mechanism of the so called “redox signaling” includes the H2O2-mediated reversible oxidation of redox sensitive cysteine residues in enzymes and transcription factors thereby altering their activities. Depending on its intracellular concentration and localization, H2O2 exhibits either pro- or anti-apoptotic activities. In comparison to normal cells, cancer cells are characterized by an in...

  2. Fate mapping of interleukin-17 producing T cells in inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Stockinger, Brigitta B; Hirota, Keiji; Duarte, Joao H; Veldhoen, Marc; Hornsby, Eve; Li, Ying; Cua, Daniel J.; Tolaini, Mauro; Menzel, Ursula; Garefalaki, Anna; Potocnik, Alexandre J.; Wilhelm, Christoph; Ahlfors, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We describe a reporter mouse strain designed to fate-map cells that have activated IL-17A. Here we show that TH17 cells show distinct plasticity in different inflammatory settings. Chronic inflammatory conditions in EAE caused a switch to alternative cytokines in TH17 cells, whereas acute cutaneous infection with Candida albicans, did not result in deviation of TH17 to alternative cytokine production, although IL-17A production was shut off in the course of the infection ....

  3. Laminopathies disrupt epigenomic developmental programs and cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovanovic, Jelena; Dell'Orso, Stefania; Gnochi, Viola F; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Vigouroux, Corinne; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Bonne, Gisèle; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-04-20

    The nuclear envelope protein lamin A is encoded by thelamin A/C(LMNA) gene, which can contain missense mutations that cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) (p.R453W). We fused mutated forms of the lamin A protein to bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) to define euchromatic-heterochromatin (epigenomic) transitions at the nuclear envelope during myogenesis (using DamID-seq). Lamin A missense mutations disrupted appropriate formation of lamin A-associated heterochromatin domains in an allele-specific manner-findings that were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) in murine H2K cells and DNA methylation studies in fibroblasts from muscular dystrophy patient who carried a distinctLMNAmutation (p.H222P). Observed perturbations of the epigenomic transitions included exit from pluripotency and cell cycle programs [euchromatin (open, transcribed) to heterochromatin (closed, silent)], as well as induction of myogenic loci (heterochromatin to euchromatin). In muscle biopsies from patients with either a gain- or change-of-functionLMNAgene mutation or a loss-of-function mutation in theemeringene, both of which cause EDMD, we observed inappropriate loss of heterochromatin formation at theSox2pluripotency locus, which was associated with persistent mRNA expression ofSox2 Overexpression ofSox2inhibited myogenic differentiation in human immortalized myoblasts. Our findings suggest that nuclear envelopathies are disorders of developmental epigenetic programming that result from altered formation of lamina-associated domains. PMID:27099177

  4. Four and a Half LIM Domains 1b (Fhl1b) Is Essential for Regulating the Liver versus Pancreas Fate Decision and for β-Cell Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Cui, Jiaxi; Del Campo, Aranzazu; Shin, Chong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    The liver and pancreas originate from overlapping embryonic regions, and single-cell lineage tracing in zebrafish has shown that Bone morphogenetic protein 2b (Bmp2b) signaling is essential for determining the fate of bipotential hepatopancreatic progenitors towards the liver or pancreas. Despite its pivotal role, the gene regulatory networks functioning downstream of Bmp2b signaling in this process are poorly understood. We have identified four and a half LIM domains 1b (fhl1b), which is primarily expressed in the prospective liver anlage, as a novel target of Bmp2b signaling. fhl1b depletion compromised liver specification and enhanced induction of pancreatic cells from endodermal progenitors. Conversely, overexpression of fhl1b favored liver specification and inhibited induction of pancreatic cells. By single-cell lineage tracing, we showed that fhl1b depletion led lateral endodermal cells, destined to become liver cells, to become pancreatic cells. Reversely, when fhl1b was overexpressed, medially located endodermal cells, fated to differentiate into pancreatic and intestinal cells, contributed to the liver by directly or indirectly modulating the discrete levels of pdx1 expression in endodermal progenitors. Moreover, loss of fhl1b increased the regenerative capacity of β-cells by increasing pdx1 and neurod expression in the hepatopancreatic ductal system. Altogether, these data reveal novel and critical functions of Fhl1b in the hepatic versus pancreatic fate decision and in β-cell regeneration. PMID:26845333

  5. Four and a Half LIM Domains 1b (Fhl1b Is Essential for Regulating the Liver versus Pancreas Fate Decision and for β-Cell Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The liver and pancreas originate from overlapping embryonic regions, and single-cell lineage tracing in zebrafish has shown that Bone morphogenetic protein 2b (Bmp2b signaling is essential for determining the fate of bipotential hepatopancreatic progenitors towards the liver or pancreas. Despite its pivotal role, the gene regulatory networks functioning downstream of Bmp2b signaling in this process are poorly understood. We have identified four and a half LIM domains 1b (fhl1b, which is primarily expressed in the prospective liver anlage, as a novel target of Bmp2b signaling. fhl1b depletion compromised liver specification and enhanced induction of pancreatic cells from endodermal progenitors. Conversely, overexpression of fhl1b favored liver specification and inhibited induction of pancreatic cells. By single-cell lineage tracing, we showed that fhl1b depletion led lateral endodermal cells, destined to become liver cells, to become pancreatic cells. Reversely, when fhl1b was overexpressed, medially located endodermal cells, fated to differentiate into pancreatic and intestinal cells, contributed to the liver by directly or indirectly modulating the discrete levels of pdx1 expression in endodermal progenitors. Moreover, loss of fhl1b increased the regenerative capacity of β-cells by increasing pdx1 and neurod expression in the hepatopancreatic ductal system. Altogether, these data reveal novel and critical functions of Fhl1b in the hepatic versus pancreatic fate decision and in β-cell regeneration.

  6. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates in cancer and stem/progenitor cell pedigrees with competing risks analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, J A; Hallett, R M; der Mauer, S Auf; Motazedian, A; Schroeder, T; Draper, J S; Harvey, R P; Nordon, R E

    2016-01-01

    The molecular control of cell fate and behaviour is a central theme in biology. Inherent heterogeneity within cell populations requires that control of cell fate is studied at the single-cell level. Time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking are powerful technologies for acquiring cell lifetime data, allowing quantification of how cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors control single-cell fates over time. However, cell lifetime data contain complex features. Competing cell fates, censoring, and the possible inter-dependence of competing fates, currently present challenges to modelling cell lifetime data. Thus far such features are largely ignored, resulting in loss of data and introducing a source of bias. Here we show that competing risks and concordance statistics, previously applied to clinical data and the study of genetic influences on life events in twins, respectively, can be used to quantify intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates. Using these statistics we demonstrate that 1) breast cancer cell fate after chemotherapy is dependent on p53 genotype; 2) granulocyte macrophage progenitors and their differentiated progeny have concordant fates; and 3) cytokines promote self-renewal of cardiac mesenchymal stem cells by symmetric divisions. Therefore, competing risks and concordance statistics provide a robust and unbiased approach for evaluating hypotheses at the single-cell level. PMID:27250534

  7. Neuregulin3 alters cell fate in the epidermis and mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashworth Alan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Neuregulin family of ligands and their receptors, the Erbb tyrosine kinases, have important roles in epidermal and mammary gland development as well as during carcinogenesis. Previously, we demonstrated that Neuregulin3 (Nrg3 is a specification signal for mammary placode formation in mice. Nrg3 is a growth factor, which binds and activates Erbb4, a receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. To understand the role of Neuregulin3 in epidermal morphogenesis, we have developed a transgenic mouse model that expresses Nrg3 throughout the basal layer (progenitor/stem cell compartment of mouse epidermis and the outer root sheath of developing hair follicles. Results Transgenic females formed supernumerary nipples and mammary glands along and adjacent to the mammary line providing strong evidence that Nrg3 has a role in the initiation of mammary placodes along the body axis. In addition, alterations in morphogenesis and differentiation of other epidermal appendages were observed, including the hair follicles. The transgenic epidermis is hyperplastic with excessive sebaceous differentiation and shows striking similarities to mouse models in which c-Myc is activated in the basal layer including decreased expression levels of the adhesion receptors, α6-integrin and β1-integrin. Conclusion These results indicate that the epidermis is sensitive to Nrg3 signaling, and that this growth factor can regulate cell fate of pluripotent epidermal cell populations including that of the mammary gland. Nrg3 appears to act, in part, by inducing c-Myc, altering the proliferation and adhesion properties of the basal epidermis, and may promote exit from the stem cell compartment. The results we describe provide significant insight into how growth factors, such as Nrg3, regulate epidermal homeostasis by influencing the balance between stem cell renewal, lineage selection and differentiation.

  8. The C. elegans TPR Containing Protein, TRD-1, Regulates Cell Fate Choice in the Developing Germ Line and Epidermis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Hughes

    Full Text Available Correct cell fate choice is crucial in development. In post-embryonic development of the hermaphroditic Caenorhabitis elegans, distinct cell fates must be adopted in two diverse tissues. In the germline, stem cells adopt one of three possible fates: mitotic cell cycle, or gamete formation via meiosis, producing either sperm or oocytes. In the epidermis, the stem cell-like seam cells divide asymmetrically, with the daughters taking on either a proliferative (seam or differentiated (hypodermal or neuronal fate. We have isolated a novel conserved C. elegans tetratricopeptide repeat containing protein, TRD-1, which is essential for cell fate determination in both the germline and the developing epidermis and has homologs in other species, including humans (TTC27. We show that trd-1(RNAi and mutant animals have fewer seam cells as a result of inappropriate differentiation towards the hypodermal fate. In the germline, trd-1 RNAi results in a strong masculinization phenotype, as well as defects in the mitosis to meiosis switch. Our data suggests that trd-1 acts downstream of tra-2 but upstream of fem-3 in the germline sex determination pathway, and exhibits a constellation of phenotypes in common with other Mog (masculinization of germline mutants. Thus, trd-1 is a new player in both the somatic and germline cell fate determination machinery, suggestive of a novel molecular connection between the development of these two diverse tissues.

  9. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controls T cell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming. PMID:27293185

  10. JAK/STAT signaling regulates tissue outgrowth and male germline stem cell fate in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shree Ram SINGH; Xiu CHEN; Steven X.HOU

    2005-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, biological activities are regulated by cell signaling. The various signal transduction pathways regulate cell fate, proliferation, migration, and polarity. Miscoordination of the communicative signals will lead to disasters like cancer and other fatal diseases. The JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway is one of the pathways, which was first identified in vertebrates and is highly conserved throughout evolution. Studying the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway in Drosophila provides an excellent opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of the cell regulation during development and tumor formation. In this review, we discuss the general overview of JAK/STAT signaling in Drosophila with respect to its functions in the eye development and stem cell fate determination.

  11. Stem-cell dynamics and lineage topology from in vivo fate mapping in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Thomas; Barile, Melania; Flossdorf, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated fate-mapping tools have been developed to study the behavior of stem cells in the intact organism. These experimental approaches are beginning to yield a quantitative picture of how cell numbers are regulated during steady state and in response to challenges. Focusing on hematopoiesis and immune responses, we discuss how novel mathematical approaches driven by these fate-mapping data have provided insights into the dynamics and topology of cellular differentiation pathways in vivo. The combination of experiment and theory has allowed to quantify the degree of self-renewal in stem and progenitor cells, shown how native hematopoiesis differs fundamentally from post-transplantation hematopoiesis, and uncovered that the diversification of T lymphocytes during immune responses resembles tissue renewal driven by stem cells. PMID:27107166

  12. Allosteric Regulation of Histidine Kinases by Their Cognate Response Regulator Determines Cell Fate

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Ralf; Jaeger, Tina; Abel, Sören; Wiederkehr, Irene; Folcher, Marc; Biondi, Emanuele G.; Laub, Michael T.; Jenal, Urs

    2008-01-01

    The two-component phosphorylation network is of critical importance for bacterial growth and physiology. Here, we address plasticity and interconnection of distinct signal transduction pathways within this network. In Caulobacter crescentus antagonistic activities of the PleC phosphatase and DivJ kinase localized at opposite cell poles control the phosphorylation state and subcellular localization of the cell fate determinator protein DivK. We show that DivK functions as an allosteric regulat...

  13. hESC Differentiation toward an Autonomic Neuronal Cell Fate Depends on Distinct Cues from the Co-Patterning Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette M. Acevedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the cellular and molecular cues that promote neurovascular co-patterning at the earliest stages of human embryogenesis, we developed a human embryonic stem cell model to mimic the developing epiblast. Contact of ectoderm-derived neural cells with mesoderm-derived vasculature is initiated via the neural crest (NC, not the neural tube (NT. Neurovascular co-patterning then ensues with specification of NC toward an autonomic fate requiring vascular endothelial cell (EC-secreted nitric oxide (NO and direct contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs via T-cadherin-mediated homotypic interactions. Once a neurovascular template has been established, NT-derived central neurons then align themselves with the vasculature. Our findings reveal that, in early human development, the autonomic nervous system forms in response to distinct molecular cues from VSMCs and ECs, providing a model for how other developing lineages might coordinate their co-patterning.

  14. Tracing Conidial Fate and Measuring Host Cell Antifungal Activity Using a Reporter of Microbial Viability in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Jhingran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence can be harnessed to monitor microbial fate and to investigate functional outcomes of individual microbial cell-host cell encounters at portals of entry in native tissue environments. We illustrate this concept by introducing fluorescent Aspergillus reporter (FLARE conidia that simultaneously report phagocytic uptake and fungal viability during cellular interactions with the murine respiratory innate immune system. Our studies using FLARE conidia reveal stepwise and cell-type-specific requirements for CARD9 and Syk, transducers of C-type lectin receptor and integrin signals, in neutrophil recruitment, conidial uptake, and conidial killing in the lung. By achieving single-event resolution in defined leukocyte populations, the FLARE method enables host cell profiling on the basis of pathogen uptake and killing and may be extended to other pathogens in diverse model host organisms to query molecular, cellular, and pharmacologic mechanisms that shape host-microbe interactions.

  15. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  16. Species-specific fate of bacteria in house flies and impact on vector potential for pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    House flies ingest bacteria during filth-feeding and consequently can transport microbes from septic environments to human habitats and food. Vector potential is influenced both by flies encountering pathogens and by the fate of bacteria in the fly alimentary canal. In order for pathogens to be tran...

  17. Cell adhesion geometry regulates non-random DNA segregation and asymmetric cell fates in mouse skeletal muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennek, Siham; Burute, Mithila; Théry, Manuel; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-05-22

    Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole position also promote non-random DNA segregation. To mimic the asymmetric divisions seen in the mouse skeletal stem cell niche, we used micropatterns coated with extracellular matrix in asymmetric and symmetric motifs. We show that the frequency of non-random DNA segregation and transcription factor asymmetry correlates with the shape of the motif and that these events can be uncoupled. Furthermore, regulation of DNA segregation by cell adhesion occurs within a defined time interval. Thus, cell adhesion cues have a major impact on determining both DNA segregation patterns and cell fates. PMID:24836002

  18. Cell Adhesion Geometry Regulates Non-Random DNA Segregation and Asymmetric Cell Fates in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Yennek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole position also promote non-random DNA segregation. To mimic the asymmetric divisions seen in the mouse skeletal stem cell niche, we used micropatterns coated with extracellular matrix in asymmetric and symmetric motifs. We show that the frequency of non-random DNA segregation and transcription factor asymmetry correlates with the shape of the motif and that these events can be uncoupled. Furthermore, regulation of DNA segregation by cell adhesion occurs within a defined time interval. Thus, cell adhesion cues have a major impact on determining both DNA segregation patterns and cell fates.

  19. Chromatin dynamics in pollen mother cells underpin a common scenario at the somatic-to-reproductive fate transition of both the male and female lineages in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    She, Wenjing; Baroux, Célia

    2015-01-01

    Unlike animals, where the germline is established early during embryogenesis, plants set aside their reproductive lineage late in development in dedicated floral organs. The specification of pollen mother cells (PMC) committed to meiosis takes place in the sporogenous tissue in anther locules and marks the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition toward the male reproductive lineage. Here we show that Arabidopsis PMC differentiation is accompanied by large-scale changes in chromatin organ...

  20. In Situ and Laboratory Studies on the Fate of Specific Organic Compounds in an Anerobic Landfill Leachate Plume, 1. Experimental Conditions and Fate of Phenolic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm;

    1995-01-01

    microcosm experiments performed and the results on the fate of 7 phenolic compounds. Part 2 of this series of papers, also published in this issue, presents the results on the fate of 8 aromatic compounds and 4 chlorinated aliphatic compounds. The redox conditions in the plume were characterized as...

  1. Phenotypic plasticity within yeast colonies: differential partitioning of cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Kapros, Tamas; Honigberg, Saul M

    2016-05-01

    Across many phyla, a common aspect of multicellularity is the organization of different cell types into spatial patterns. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, after diploid colonies have completed growth, they differentiate to form alternating layers of sporulating cells and feeder cells. In the current study, we found that as yeast colonies developed, the feeder cell layer was initially separated from the sporulating cell layer. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of sporulation in colonies depended on the colony's nutrient environment; in two environments in which overall colony sporulation efficiency was very similar, the pattern of feeder and sporulating cells within the colony was very different. As noted previously, under moderately suboptimal conditions for sporulation-low acetate concentration or high temperature-the number of feeder cells increases as does the dependence of sporulation on the feeder-cell transcription factor, Rlm1. Here we report that even under a condition that is completely blocked sporulation, the number of feeder cells still increased. These results suggest broader implications to our recently proposed "Differential Partitioning provides Environmental Buffering" or DPEB hypothesis. PMID:26743103

  2. Mark the transition: chromatin modifications and cell fate decision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wu; Huck-Hui Ng

    2011-01-01

    With their unique features of selfrenewal and pluripotency,human embryonic stem (hES) cells are considered to be a nearly unlimited resource for research and clinical applications [1].Accordingly,the transcriptional network specifying and governing human ES cell identity has been extensively studied.OCT4,NANOG and SOX2 form a core transcriptional network that regulates itself as well as a number of target genes [2].This transcriptional network acts together with signaling pathways to maintain ES cell identity [3].Moreover,the last decade has seen tremendous advances in understanding the epigenetic mechanisms underlying ES eell self-renewal and pluripotency.

  3. Intestinal Neurogenin 3 Directs Differentiation of a Bipotential Secretory Progenitor to Endocrine Cell Rather than Goblet Cell Fate

    OpenAIRE

    López-Díaz, Lymari; Jain, Renu N.; Keeley, Theresa M.; VanDussen, Kelli L.; Brunkan, Cynthia S.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Samuelson, Linda C.

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 is essential for enteroendocrine cell development; however, it is unknown whether this transcription factor is sufficient to induce an endocrine program in the intestine or how it affects the development of other epithelial cells originating from common progenitors. In this study, the mouse villin promoter was used to drive Neurogenin 3 expression throughout the developing epithelium to measure the affect on cell fate. Although the general morphology of the intestine was unchange...

  4. Tapetal cell fate, lineage and proliferation in the Arabidopsis anther.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Dickinson, Hugh G

    2010-07-01

    The four microsporangia of the flowering plant anther develop from archesporial cells in the L2 of the primordium. Within each microsporangium, developing microsporocytes are surrounded by concentric monolayers of tapetal, middle layer and endothecial cells. How this intricate array of tissues, each containing relatively few cells, is established in an organ possessing no formal meristems is poorly understood. We describe here the pivotal role of the LRR receptor kinase EXCESS MICROSPOROCYTES 1 (EMS1) in forming the monolayer of tapetal nurse cells in Arabidopsis. Unusually for plants, tapetal cells are specified very early in development, and are subsequently stimulated to proliferate by a receptor-like kinase (RLK) complex that includes EMS1. Mutations in members of this EMS1 signalling complex and its putative ligand result in male-sterile plants in which tapetal initials fail to proliferate. Surprisingly, these cells continue to develop, isolated at the locular periphery. Mutant and wild-type microsporangia expand at similar rates and the 'tapetal' space at the periphery of mutant locules becomes occupied by microsporocytes. However, induction of late expression of EMS1 in the few tapetal initials in ems1 plants results in their proliferation to generate a functional tapetum, and this proliferation suppresses microsporocyte number. Our experiments also show that integrity of the tapetal monolayer is crucial for the maintenance of the polarity of divisions within it. This unexpected autonomy of the tapetal 'lineage' is discussed in the context of tissue development in complex plant organs, where constancy in size, shape and cell number is crucial. PMID:20570940

  5. 1984: On monitoring cell fate in three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Leferink, Anne Marijke

    2014-01-01

    In cartilage and bone engineering there is a high need for methods to replace traditional tissue and organ transplantation approaches to overcome the currently faced problems of donor shortage and invasiveness of the transplantation procedure. Although many promising advances have been made in the past decades in in vitro tissue engineering, quality control remains a challenge. Most conventional methods to assess the quality of a tissue engineered construct, e.g. by studying cell fate and tis...

  6. The acquisition of cell fate in the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem

    OpenAIRE

    Scheres, B.J.G.; Berg, C. van den; Hage, W.; Willemsen, V; Werff, N. van der; Wolkenfelt, H.; McKhann, H.; Weisbeek, P.

    1997-01-01

    During plant embryogenesis an embryo with cotyledons, a shoot apical meristem, a hypocotyl and a root apical meristem, is formed. The primary root and shoot meristems initiate post-embryonic growth generating all plant organs. The root meristem forms the primary root, and the shoot meristem forms the aerial portion of the plant including secondary meristems. Histological and fate map data have shown that there is no precise correlation between the shoot meristem cells and their descendants. T...

  7. Modulation of rabbit corneal epithelial cells fate using embryonic stem cell extract

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Weijiao; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Ying; Ke, Qicheng; Ding, Yuanyuan; Lu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhichong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new culture system to cultivate differentiated autologous cells in vitro for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Methods After incubation in murine embryonic stem cell (ESC) extract for 1 h, streptolysin-O (SLO) permeabilized cells were resealed with CaCl2 and continually cultured for weeks. The morphological study was analyzed by light microscopy. Isolated colonies were selected and expanded to establish cell lines. Octamer-4 (Oct-4), stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 ...

  8. Sexual Fate Change of XX Germ Cells Caused by the Deletion of SMAD4 and STRA8 Independent of Somatic Sex Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Quan; Fukuda, Kurumi; Kato, Yuzuru; Zhou, Zhi; Deng, Chu-Xia; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    The differential programming of sperm and eggs in gonads is a fundamental topic in reproductive biology. Although the sexual fate of germ cells is believed to be determined by signaling factors from sexually differentiated somatic cells in fetal gonads, the molecular mechanism that determines germ cell fate is poorly understood. Herein, we show that mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4) in germ cells is required for female-type differentiation. Germ cells in Smad4-deficient ovaries respond to retinoic acid signaling but fail to undergo meiotic prophase I, which coincides with the weaker expression of genes required for follicular formation, indicating that SMAD4 signaling is essential for oocyte differentiation and meiotic progression. Intriguingly, germline-specific deletion of Smad4 in Stra8-null female germ cells resulted in the up-regulation of genes required for male gonocyte differentiation, including Nanos2 and PLZF, suggesting the initiation of male-type differentiation in ovaries. Moreover, our transcriptome analyses of mutant ovaries revealed that the sex change phenotype is achieved without global gene expression changes in somatic cells. Our results demonstrate that SMAD4 and STRA8 are essential factors that regulate the female fate of germ cells. PMID:27606421

  9. Transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern embryonic stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satyabrata; Levasseur, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are defined by their simultaneous capacity for limitless self-renewal and the ability to specify cells borne of all germ layers. The regulation of ESC pluripotency is governed by a set of core transcription factors that regulate transcription by interfacing with nuclear proteins that include the RNA polymerase II core transcriptional machinery, histone modification enzymes, and chromatin remodeling protein complexes. The growing adoption of systems biological approaches used in stem cell biology over last few years has contributed significantly to our understanding of pluripotency. Multilayered approaches coupling transcriptome profiling and proteomics (Nanog-, Oct4-, and Sox2-centered protein interaction networks or "interactomes") with transcription factor chromatin occupancy and epigenetic footprint measurements have enabled a more comprehensive understanding of ESC pluripotency and self-renewal. Together with the genetic and biochemical characterization of promising pluripotency modifying proteins, these systems biological approaches will continue to clarify the molecular underpinnings of the ESC state. This will most certainly contribute to the improvement of current methodologies for the derivation of pluripotent cells from adult tissues. PMID:23756950

  10. Microspore embryogenesis: reprogramming cell fate from pollen to embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hui Li,

    2014-01-01

    Microspore embryogenesis is an expression of plant cell totipotency that leads to the production of haploid embryos. Besides being a widely exploited plant breeding tool, microspore embryogenesis is also a fascinating system that can be used to obtain a deeper mechanistic understanding of plant toti

  11. Ubiquitin Ligases and Deubiquitinating Enzymes in CD4+ T Cell Effector Fate Choice and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Awo A K; Oliver, Paula M

    2016-05-15

    The human body is exposed to potentially pathogenic microorganisms at barrier sites such as the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. To mount an effective response against these pathogens, the immune system must recruit the right cells with effector responses that are appropriate for the task at hand. Several types of CD4(+) T cells can be recruited, including Th cells (Th1, Th2, and Th17), T follicular helper cells, and regulatory T cells. These cells help to maintain normal immune homeostasis in the face of constantly changing microbes in the environment. Because these cells differentiate from a common progenitor, the composition of their intracellular milieu of proteins changes to appropriately guide their effector function. One underappreciated process that impacts the levels and functions of effector fate-determining factors is ubiquitylation. This review details our current understanding of how ubiquitylation regulates CD4(+) T cell effector identity and function. PMID:27183634

  12. Fate of deposited cells in an aerobic binary bacterial biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biofilm is a matrix of microbial cells and their extracellular products that is associated with a solid surface. Previous studies on biofilm development have employed only dissolved compounds as growth limiting substrates, without the influence of microbial species invading from the bulk liquid. The goal of this research project was to quantify the kinetics of processes governing suspended biomass turnover in biofilm systems, and the accompanying effects of suspended cell deposition on biofilm population dynamics. Experiments were conducted with two species of bacteria, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 grown on glucose, and Hyphomicrobium ZV620 grown on methanol. Cryptic growth and particulate hydrolysis studies were evaluated, using combinations of these two bacteria, by measuring the uptake of radiolabelled cell lysis products, under batch conditions. Biofilms studies were performed to investigate bacterial deposition, continual biofilm removal by shear induced erosion, and biofilm ecology. Biofilms were developed in a flow cell reactor, under laminar flow conditions. Bacterial species were differentiated by radioactively labelling each species with their carbon substrate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the biofilm ecology of mixed cultures. The equations developed predict biofilm accumulation, as well as substrate and oxygen consumption. Results indicate that cryptic growth will occur for bacteria growing on their own species soluble lysis products and in some cases, bacteria growing on the soluble lysis products of other species. Particulate hydrolysis only occurred for Pseudomonas putida growing on Pseudomonas putida lysis products, but the lack of particulate hydrolysis occurring in the other studies may have been due to the short experimental period

  13. Viscoelastic Properties of Differentiating Blood Cells Are Fate- and Function-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Whyte, Graeme; Chalut, Kevin; Pagliara, Stefano; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Fiddler, Christine; Paschke, Stephan; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Guck, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Although cellular mechanical properties are known to alter during stem cell differentiation, understanding of the functional relevance of such alterations is incomplete. Here, we show that during the course of differentiation of human myeloid precursor cells into three different lineages, the cells alter their viscoelastic properties, measured using an optical stretcher, to suit their ultimate fate and function. Myeloid cells circulating in blood have to be advected through constrictions in blood vessels, engendering the need for compliance at short time-scales (minutes), compared to undifferentiated cells. These findings suggest that reduction in steady-state viscosity is a physiological adaptation for enhanced migration through tissues. Our results indicate that the material properties of cells define their function, can be used as a cell differentiation marker and could serve as target for novel therapies. PMID:23028868

  14. Cyclin D2 in the basal process of neural progenitors is linked to non-equivalent cell fates

    OpenAIRE

    Tsunekawa, Yuji; Britto, Joanne M; Takahashi, Masanori; Polleux, Franck; Tan, Seong-Seng; Osumi, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    Localized translation of the cell-cycle regulator Cyclin D2 in the basal process of radial glial progenitor cells leads to its selective inheritance by the daughter cell undergoing self-renewal, thus representing a new mechanism for asymmetric cell fate determination.

  15. Pax6- and Six3-mediated induction of lens cell fate in mouse and human ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M Anchan

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem (ES cells provide a potentially useful in vitro model for the study of in vivo tissue differentiation. We used mouse and human ES cells to investigate whether the lens regulatory genes Pax6 and Six3 could induce lens cell fate in vitro. To help assess the onset of lens differentiation, we derived a new mES cell line (Pax6-GFP mES that expresses a GFP reporter under the control of the Pax6 P0 promoter and lens ectoderm enhancer. Pax6 or Six3 expression vectors were introduced into mES or hES cells by transfection or lentiviral infection and the differentiating ES cells analyzed for lens marker expression. Transfection of mES cells with Pax6 or Six3 but not with other genes induced the expression of lens cell markers and up-regulated GFP reporter expression in Pax6-GFP mES cells by 3 days post-transfection. By 7 days post-transfection, mES cell cultures exhibited a>10-fold increase over controls in the number of colonies expressing γA-crystallin, a lens fiber cell differentiation marker. RT-PCR and immunostaining revealed induction of additional lens epithelial or fiber cell differentiation markers including Foxe3, Prox1, α- and β-crystallins, and Tdrd7. Moreover, γA-crystallin- or Prox1-expressing lentoid bodies formed by 30 days in culture. In hES cells, Pax6 or Six3 lentiviral vectors also induced lens marker expression. mES cells that express lens markers reside close to but are distinct from the Pax6 or Six3 transduced cells, suggesting that the latter induce nearby undifferentiated ES cells to adopt a lens fate by non-cell autonomous mechanisms. In sum, we describe a novel mES cell GFP reporter line that is useful for monitoring induction of lens fate, and demonstrate that Pax6 or Six3 is sufficient to induce ES cells to adopt a lens fate, potentially via non-cell autonomous mechanisms. These findings should facilitate investigations of lens development.

  16. Control of flowering and cell fate by LIF2, an RNA binding partner of the polycomb complex component LHP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Latrasse

    Full Text Available Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRC modulate the epigenetic status of key cell fate and developmental regulators in eukaryotes. The chromo domain protein like heterochromatin protein1 (LHP1 is a subunit of a plant PRC1-like complex in Arabidopsis thaliana and recognizes histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a silencing epigenetic mark deposited by the PRC2 complex. We have identified and studied an LHP1-Interacting Factor2 (LIF2. LIF2 protein has RNA recognition motifs and belongs to the large hnRNP protein family, which is involved in RNA processing. LIF2 interacts in vivo, in the cell nucleus, with the LHP1 chromo shadow domain. Expression of LIF2 was detected predominantly in vascular and meristematic tissues. Loss-of-function of LIF2 modifies flowering time, floral developmental homeostasis and gynoecium growth determination. lif2 ovaries have indeterminate growth and produce ectopic inflorescences with severely affected flowers showing proliferation of ectopic stigmatic papillae and ovules in short-day conditions. To look at how LIF2 acts relative to LHP1, we conducted transcriptome analyses in lif2 and lhp1 and identified a common set of deregulated genes, which showed significant enrichment in stress-response genes. By comparing expression of LHP1 targets in lif2, lhp1 and lif2 lhp1 mutants we showed that LIF2 can either antagonize or act with LHP1. Interestingly, repression of the FLC floral transcriptional regulator in lif2 mutant is accompanied by an increase in H3K27 trimethylation at the locus, without any change in LHP1 binding, suggesting that LHP1 is targeted independently from LIF2 and that LHP1 binding does not strictly correlate with gene expression. LIF2, involved in cell identity and cell fate decision, may modulate the activity of LHP1 at specific loci, during specific developmental windows or in response to environmental cues that control cell fate determination. These results highlight a novel link between plant RNA

  17. High-definition mapping of retroviral integration sites defines the fate of allogeneic T cells after donor lymphocyte infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Maruggi, Giulietta; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Malani, Nirav; Pellin, Danilo; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Magnani, Zulma; Ciceri, Fabio; Ambrosi, Alessandro; von Kalle, Christof; Bushman, Frederic D; Bonini, Chiara; Schmidt, Manfred; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing to build a genome-wide, high-definition map of retroviral integration sites in the genome of peripheral blood T cells from two different donors and used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to associate integration clusters to transcriptional activity and to genetic and epigenetic features of the T cell genome. Comparison with matched random controls and with integrations obtained from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells showed that integration clusters occur within chromatin regions bearing epigenetic marks associated with active promoters and regulatory elements in a cell-specific fashion. Analysis of integration sites in T cells obtained ex vivo two months after infusion showed no evidence of integration-related clonal expansion or dominance, but rather loss of cells harboring integration events interfering with RNA post-transcriptional processing. The study shows that high-definition maps of retroviral integration sites are a powerful tool to analyze the fate of genetically modified T cells in patients and the biological consequences of retroviral transduction. PMID:21203516

  18. Gastrin: a distinct fate of neurogenin3 positive progenitor cells in the embryonic pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Suissa

    Full Text Available Neurogenin3(+ (Ngn3(+ progenitor cells in the developing pancreas give rise to five endocrine cell types secreting insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. Gastrin is a hormone produced primarily by G-cells in the stomach, where it functions to stimulate acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. Gastrin is expressed in the embryonic pancreas and is common in islet cell tumors, but the lineage and regulators of pancreatic gastrin(+ cells are not known. We report that gastrin is abundantly expressed in the embryonic pancreas and disappears soon after birth. Some gastrin(+ cells in the developing pancreas co-express glucagon, ghrelin or pancreatic polypeptide, but many gastrin(+ cells do not express any other islet hormone. Pancreatic gastrin(+ cells express the transcription factors Nkx6.1, Nkx2.2 and low levels of Pdx1, and derive from Ngn3(+ endocrine progenitor cells as shown by genetic lineage tracing. Using mice deficient for key transcription factors we show that gastrin expression depends on Ngn3, Nkx2.2, NeuroD1 and Arx, but not Pax4 or Pax6. Finally, gastrin expression is induced upon differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to pancreatic endocrine cells expressing insulin. Thus, gastrin(+ cells are a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas and an alternative fate of Ngn3+ cells.

  19. Neural stem cell sex dimorphism in aromatase (CYP19 expression: a basis for differential neural fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Waldron

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Jay Waldron1, Althea McCourty1, Laurent Lecanu1,21The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, McGill University, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Neural stem cell (NSC transplantation and pharmacologic activation of endogenous neurogenesis are two approaches that trigger a great deal of interest as brain repair strategies. However, the success rate of clinical attempts using stem cells to restore neurologic functions altered either after traumatic brain injury or as a consequence of neurodegenerative disease remains rather disappointing. This suggests that factors affecting the fate of grafted NSCs are largely understudied and remain to be characterized. We recently reported that aging differentially affects the neurogenic properties of male and female NSCs. Although the sex steroids androgens and estrogens participate in the regulation of neurogenesis, to our knowledge, research on how gender-based differences affect the capacity of NSCs to differentiate and condition their neural fate is lacking. In the present study, we explored further the role of cell sex as a determining factor of the neural fate followed by differentiating NSCs and its relationship with a potential differential expression of aromatase (CYP19, the testosterone-metabolizing enzyme.Results: Using NSCs isolated from the subventricular zone of three-month-old male and female Long-Evans rats and maintained as neurospheres, we showed that differentiation triggered by retinoic acid resulted in a neural phenotype that depends on cell sex. Differentiated male NSCs mainly expressed markers of neuronal fate, including ßIII-tubulin, microtubule associated protein 2, growth-associated protein 43, and doublecortin. In contrast, female NSCs essentially expressed the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. Quantification of the expression of aromatase showed a very low level of expression in undifferentiated female NSCs

  20. Duel of the fates: the role of transcriptional circuits and noise in CD4+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, Daniel; Deonarine, Andrew; Babu, M Madan; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2012-06-01

    CD4+ T cells play key roles in orchestrating adaptive immune responses, and are a popular model for mammalian cell differentiation. While immune regulation would seem to require exactly adjusted mRNA and protein expression levels of key factors, there is little evidence that this is strictly the case. Stochastic gene expression and plasticity of cell types contrast the apparent need for precision. Recent work has provided insight into the magnitude of molecular noise, as well as the relationship between noise, transcriptional circuits and epigenetic modifications in a variety of cell types. These processes and their interplay will also govern gene expression patterns in the different CD4+ cell types, and the determination of their cellular fates. PMID:22498241

  1. The developmental fate of green fluorescent mouse embryonic germ cells in chimeric embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUXIN; SUMIOSUGANO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs),as precursors of mammalian germ lineage,have been gaining more attention as a new resource of pluripotent stem cells,which bring a great possibility to study developmental events of germ cell in vitro and at animal level.EG4 cells derived from 10.5 days post coitum (dpc) PGCs of 129/svJ strain mouse were established and maintained in an undifferentiated state.With an attempt to study the differentiation capability of EG4 cells with a reporter protein:green fluorescence protein,and the possible application of EG4 cells in the research of germ cell development,we have generated several EG4-GFP cell lines expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and still maintaining typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells.Then,the differentiation of EG4-GFP cells in vitro as well as their developmental fate in chimeric embryos which were produced by aggregating EG4-GFP cells to 8-cell stage embryos were studied.The results showed that EG4 cells carrying green fluorescence have a potential use in the research of germ cell development and other related studies.

  2. Chromatin dynamics in Pollen Mother Cells underpin a common scenario at the somatic-to-reproductive fate transition of both the male and female lineages in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing eShe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, where the germline is established early during embryogenesis, plants set aside their reproductive lineage late in development in dedicated floral organs. The specification of pollen mother cells (PMCs committed to meiosis takes place in the sporogenous tissue in anther locules and marks the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition towards the male reproductive lineage. Here we show that Arabidopsis PMCs differentiation is accompanied by large-scale changes in chromatin organization. This is characterized by significant increase in nuclear volume, chromatin decondensation, reduction in heterochromatin, eviction of linker histones and the H2AZ histone variant. These structural alterations are accompanied by dramatic, quantitative changes in histone modifications levels compared to that of surrounding somatic cells that do not share a sporogenic fate. All these changes are highly reminiscent of those we have formerly described in female megaspore mother cells (MMCs. This indicates that chromatin reprogramming is a common underlying scenario in the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition in both male and female lineages.

  3. Stem cell and progenitor fate in the mammalian intestine: Notch and lateral inhibition in homeostasis and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Rocio; Cremona, Catherine A; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The control of cell fate decisions is vital to build functional organs and maintain normal tissue homeostasis, and many pathways and processes cooperate to direct cells to an appropriate final identity. Because of its continuously renewing state and its carefully organised hierarchy, the mammalian intestine has become a powerful model to dissect these pathways in health and disease. One of the signalling pathways that is key to maintaining the balance between proliferation and differentiation in the intestinal epithelium is the Notch pathway, most famous for specifying distinct cell fates in adjacent cells via the evolutionarily conserved process of lateral inhibition. Here, we will review recent discoveries that advance our understanding of how cell fate in the mammalian intestine is decided by Notch and lateral inhibition, focusing on the molecular determinants that regulate protein turnover, transcriptional control and epigenetic regulation. PMID:25855643

  4. Cell fate after mitotic arrest in different tumor cells is determined by the balance between slippage and apoptotic threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galán-Malo, Patricia; Vela, Laura; Gonzalo, Oscar; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Gracia-Fleta, Lucía; Naval, Javier; Marzo, Isabel, E-mail: imarzo@unizar.es

    2012-02-01

    Microtubule poisons and other anti-mitotic drugs induce tumor death but the molecular events linking mitotic arrest to cell death are still not fully understood. We have analyzed cell fate after mitotic arrest produced by the microtubule-destabilizing drug vincristine in a panel of human tumor cell lines showing different response to vincristine. In Jurkat, RPMI 8226 and HeLa cells, apoptosis was triggered shortly after vincristine-induced mitotic arrest. However, A549 cells, which express a great amount of Bcl-x{sub L} and undetectable amounts of Bak, underwent mitotic slippage prior to cell death. However, when Bcl-x{sub L} gene was silenced in A549 cells, vincristine induced apoptosis during mitotic arrest. Another different behavior was found in MiaPaca2 cells, where vincristine caused death by mitotic catastrophe that switched to apoptosis when cyclin B1 degradation was prevented by proteasome inhibition. Overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} or silencing Bax and Bak expression delayed the onset of apoptosis in Jurkat and RPMI 8226 cells, enabling mitotic slippage and endoreduplication. In HeLa cells, overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} switched cell death from apoptosis to mitotic catastrophe. Mcl-1 offered limited protection to vincristine-induced cell death and Mcl-1 degradation was not essential for vincristine-induced death. All these results, taken together, indicate that the Bcl-x{sub L}/Bak ratio and the ability to degrade cyclin B1 determine cell fate after mitotic arrest in the different tumor cell types. Highlights: ► Vincristine induces cell death by apoptosis or mitotic catastrophe. ► Apoptosis-proficient cells die by apoptosis during mitosis upon vincristine treatment. ► p53wt apoptosis-deficient cells undergo apoptosis from a G1-like tetraploid state. ► p53mt apoptosis-deficient cells can survive and divide giving rise to 8N cells.

  5. Dominant effects of Δ40p53 on p53 function and melanoma cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Rie; Markovic, Svetomir; Scrable, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    The p53 gene encodes 12 distinct isoforms some of which can alter p53 activity in the absence of genomic alteration. Endogenous p53 isoforms have been identified in cancers; however, the function of these isoforms remains unclear. In melanoma, the frequency of p53 mutations is relatively low compared to other cancers suggesting that these isoforms may play a larger role in regulating p53 activity. We hypothesized that p53 function and therefore cell fate might be altered by the presence of Δ4...

  6. Targeting the hemangioblast with a novel cell type-specific enhancer

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira Vera; Arede Natacha; Gardner Rui; Rodríguez-León Joaquín; Tavares Ana T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Hemangioblasts are known as the common precursors for primitive hematopoietic and endothelial lineages. Their existence has been supported mainly by the observation that both cell types develop in close proximity and by in vitro differentiation and genetic studies. However, more compelling evidence will arise from tracking their cell fates using a lineage-specific marker. Results We report the identification of a hemangioblast-specific enhancer (Hb) located in the cis-regu...

  7. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: The orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramanandam eManavathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 17-beta estradiol (E2, a steroid hormone, which play critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERs. The activity of ERs depends on the coordinate activity of ligand binding, posttranslational modification, and importantly their interaction with their partner proteins called ‘coregulators’. Because majority of breast cancers are ERalpha positive and coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, in addition to these coregulators, the other ER partner proteins ‘pioneering factors’ also seems to contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator- and pioneering factor-mediated action on ER functions, particularly their role in mammary gland cell fate and development.

  8. Single-Cell Profiling of Epigenetic Modifiers Identifies PRDM14 as an Inducer of Cell Fate in the Mammalian Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Burton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell plasticity or potency is necessary for the formation of multiple cell types. The mechanisms underlying this plasticity are largely unknown. Preimplantation mouse embryos undergo drastic changes in cellular potency, starting with the totipotent zygote through to the formation of the pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM and differentiated trophectoderm in the blastocyst. Here, we set out to identify and functionally characterize chromatin modifiers that define the transitions of potency and cell fate in the mouse embryo. Using a quantitative microfluidics approach in single cells, we show that developmental transitions are marked by distinctive combinatorial profiles of epigenetic modifiers. Pluripotent cells of the ICM are distinct from their differentiated trophectoderm counterparts. We show that PRDM14 is heterogeneously expressed in 4-cell-stage embryos. Forced expression of PRDM14 at the 2-cell stage leads to increased H3R26me2 and can induce a pluripotent ICM fate. Our results shed light on the epigenetic networks that govern cellular potency and identity in vivo.

  9. Early Cell Fate Decisions of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Mouse Epiblast Stem Cells Are Controlled by the Same Signalling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ludovic Vallier; Thomas Touboul; Zhenzhi Chng; Minodora Brimpari; Nicholas Hannan; Enrique Millan; Smithers, Lucy E.; Matthew Trotter; Peter Rugg-Gunn; Anne Weber; Pedersen, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have unique value for regenerative medicine, as they are capable of differentiating into a broad variety of cell types. Therefore, defining the signalling pathways that control early cell fate decisions of pluripotent stem cells represents a major task. Moreover, modelling the early steps of embryonic development in vitro may provide the best approach to produce cell types with native properties. Here, we analysed the function of key developmental growth factors suc...

  10. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail;

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here......, we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... anti-inflammatory markers. These data demonstrate for the first time in human that MPs sequentially orchestrate adult myogenesis during regeneration of damaged skeletal muscle. These results support the emerging concept that inflammation, through MP activation, controls stem cell fate and coordinates...

  11. DMPD: Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmacrophage function and fate. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15691589 Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmac...(.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inma...ty in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmacrophage function and fate. Authors Bosca L, Zeini M, Traves PG,

  12. The fate of chrysotile-induced multipolar mitosis and aneuploid population in cultured lung cancer cells.

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    Beatriz de Araujo Cortez

    Full Text Available Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes.

  13. Engineering hyaluronic acid hydrogel degradation to control cellular interactions and adult stem cell fate in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Sudhir

    The design and implementation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic hydrogels for tissue engineering (TE) applications requires an intensive understanding of cell-material interactions, including matrix remodeling and stem cell differentiation. However, the influence of microenvironmental cues, e.g., matrix biodegradability, on cell behavior in vitro has not been well studied in the case of direct cell encapsulation within 3-dimensional (3D) hydrogels. To address these issues, a facile sequential crosslinking technique was developed that provides spatial and temporal control of 3D hydrogel degradability to investigate the importance of material design on cell behavior. Specifically, hydrogels were synthesized from hyaluronic acid (HA) macromers in a sequential process: (1) a primary Michael-type addition crosslinking using cell adhesive and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-degradable oligopeptides to consume a portion of total reactive groups and resulting in "-UV" hydrogels permissive to cell-mediated degradation, followed by (2) a secondary, light initiated free-radical crosslinking to consume remaining reactive groups and "switch" the network to a non-degradable structure ("+UV") via the addition of non-degradable kinetic chains. Using this approach, we demonstrated control of encapsulated hMSC spreading by varying the crosslink type (i.e., the relative hydrogel biodegradability), including with spatial control. Upon incubation with bipotential soluble differentiation factors, these same degradation-mediated spreading cues resulted in an hMSC differentiation fate switch within -UV versus +UV environments. Follow-up studies demonstrated that degradation-mediated traction generation, rather than matrix mechanics or cell morphology, is the critical biophysical signal determining hMSC fate. Sequentially crosslinked HA hydrogels were also studied for the capacity to support remodeling by in vivo and ex vivo tissues, including with spatial control, toward tissue

  14. Epigenetic profiles signify cell fate plasticity in unipotent spermatogonial stem and progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G.; Wen, Duancheng; Falciatori, Ilaria; Elemento, Olivier; Allis, C. David; Rafii, Shahin; Seandel, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem and progenitor cells (SSCs) generate adult male gametes. During in vitro expansion, these unipotent murine cells spontaneously convert to multipotent adult spermatogonial-derived stem cells (MASCs). Here we investigate this conversion process through integrative transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses. We find in SSCs that promoters essential to maintenance and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are enriched with histone H3-lysine4 and -lysine 27 trimethylations. These bivalent modifications are maintained at most somatic promoters after conversion, bestowing MASCs an ESC-like promoter chromatin. At enhancers, the core pluripotency circuitry is activated partially in SSCs and completely in MASCs, concomitant with loss of germ cell-specific gene expression and initiation of embryonic-like programs. Furthermore, SSCs in vitro maintain the epigenomic characteristics of germ cells in vivo. Our observations suggest that SSCs encode innate plasticity through the epigenome and that both conversion of promoter chromatin states and activation of cell type-specific enhancers are prominent features of reprogramming. PMID:27117588

  15. Modulation of rabbit corneal epithelial cells fate using embryonic stem cell extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Weijiao; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Ying; Ke, Qicheng; Ding, Yuanyuan; Lu, Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new culture system to cultivate differentiated autologous cells in vitro for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Methods After incubation in murine embryonic stem cell (ESC) extract for 1 h, streptolysin-O (SLO) permeabilized cells were resealed with CaCl2 and continually cultured for weeks. The morphological study was analyzed by light microscopy. Isolated colonies were selected and expanded to establish cell lines. Octamer-4 (Oct-4), stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), transformation-related protein 63 (p63), ATP-binding cassette subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2), and cytokeratin3 (K3) were detected by indirect immunofluorescent staining. Oct-4, K3, and p63 were also detected by RT–PCR analysis. To examine the stemness characteristics of the induced cells, both alkaline phosphatase (AKP) staining and tumorigenicity detection were performed, respectively. Results Reprogramming was induced in corneal epithelial cells. The reprogrammed cells showed characteristics similar to ESCs in the early weeks, including colony formation, positive AKP staining, and multi-potential differentiation in vivo. Oct-4 and SSEA1 protein expression was upregulated. However, these changes were not persistent or stable. With the passage of time, the colonies became flat. The ESC markers were downregulated, while epithelial cell related proteins gradually increased. Conclusions Less terminal differentiated rabbit corneal epithelial cells could be induced to a more pluripotent state with embryonic stem cell extract (ESC-E). These cells have the potential to return to the beginning of their own lineage and obtain the ability of long-term growth. Our findings indicate that this culture system can generate low-immunogenic autologous cells for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:20664691

  16. Graded Nodal/Activin signaling titrates conversion of quantitative phospho-Smad2 levels into qualitative embryonic stem cell fate decisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Leong Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nodal and Activin are morphogens of the TGFbeta superfamily of signaling molecules that direct differential cell fate decisions in a dose- and distance-dependent manner. During early embryonic development the Nodal/Activin pathway is responsible for the specification of mesoderm, endoderm, node, and mesendoderm. In contradiction to this drive towards cellular differentiation, the pathway also plays important roles in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic and epiblast stem cells. The molecular basis behind stem cell interpretation of Nodal/Activin signaling gradients and the undertaking of disparate cell fate decisions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that any perturbation of endogenous signaling levels in mouse embryonic stem cells leads to their exit from self-renewal towards divergent differentiation programs. Increasing Nodal signals above basal levels by direct stimulation with Activin promotes differentiation towards the mesendodermal lineages while repression of signaling with the specific Nodal/Activin receptor inhibitor SB431542 induces trophectodermal differentiation. To address how quantitative Nodal/Activin signals are translated qualitatively into distinct cell fates decisions, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation of phospho-Smad2, the primary downstream transcriptional factor of the Nodal/Activin pathway, followed by massively parallel sequencing, and show that phospho-Smad2 binds to and regulates distinct subsets of target genes in a dose-dependent manner. Crucially, Nodal/Activin signaling directly controls the Oct4 master regulator of pluripotency by graded phospho-Smad2 binding in the promoter region. Hence stem cells interpret and carry out differential Nodal/Activin signaling instructions via a corresponding gradient of Smad2 phosphorylation that selectively titrates self-renewal against alternative differentiation programs by direct regulation of distinct target gene subsets and Oct4

  17. Ascl1b and Neurod1, instead of Neurog3, control pancreatic endocrine cell fate in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Flasse, Lydie; Pirson, Justine; Stern, David,; Von Berg, Virginie; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Background NEUROG3 is a key regulator of pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation in mouse, essential for the generation of all mature hormone producing cells. It is repressed by Notch signaling that prevents pancreatic cell differentiation by maintaining precursors in an undifferentiated state. Results We show that, in zebrafish, neurog3 is not expressed in the pancreas and null neurog3 mutant embryos do not display any apparent endocrine defects. The control of endocrine cell fate is inste...

  18. Interplay of Notch and FGF signaling restricts cell fate and MAPK activation in the Drosophila trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, T; Hayashi, S

    1999-10-01

    The patterned branching in the Drosophila tracheal system is triggered by the FGF-like ligand Branchless that activates a receptor tyrosine kinase Breathless and the MAP kinase pathway. A single fusion cell at the tip of each fusion branch expresses the zinc-finger gene escargot, leads branch migration in a stereotypical pattern and contacts with another fusion cell to mediate fusion of the branches. A high level of MAP kinase activation is also limited to the tip of the branches. Restriction of such cell specialization events to the tip is essential for tracheal tubulogenesis. Here we show that Notch signaling plays crucial roles in the singling out process of the fusion cell. We found that Notch is activated in tracheal cells by Branchless signaling through stimulation of &Dgr; expression at the tip of tracheal branches and that activated Notch represses the fate of the fusion cell. In addition, Notch is required to restrict activation of MAP kinase to the tip of the branches, in part through the negative regulation of Branchless expression. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition in sending and receiving cells is thus essential to restrict the inductive influence of Branchless on the tracheal tubulogenesis. PMID:10498681

  19. The neural crest stem cells: control of neural crest cell fate and plasticity by endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISABETH DUPIN

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available How the considerable diversity of neural crest (NC-derived cell types arises in the vertebrate embryo has long been a key question in developmental biology. The pluripotency and plasticity of differentiation of the NC cell population has been fully documented and it is well-established that environmental cues play an important role in patterning the NC derivatives throughout the body. Over the past decade, in vivo and in vitro cellular approaches have unravelled the differentiation potentialities of single NC cells and led to the discovery of NC stem cells. Although it is clear that the final fate of individual cells is in agreement with their final position within the embryo, it has to be stressed that the NC cells that reach target sites are pluripotent and further restrictions occur only late in development. It is therefore a heterogenous collection of cells that is submitted to local environmental signals in the various NC-derived structures. Several factors were thus identified which favor the development of subsets of NC-derived cells in vitro. Moreover, the strategy of gene targeting in mouse has led at identifying new molecules able to control one or several aspects of NC cell differentiation in vivo. Endothelin peptides (and endothelin receptors are among those. The conjunction of recent data obtained in mouse and avian embryos and reviewed here contributes to a better understanding of the action of the endothelin signaling pathway in the emergence and stability of NC-derived cell phenotypes.O modo como a diversidade dos tipos celulares derivados da crista neural (CN surge, no embrião de vertebrado, tem sido uma pergunta chave na biologia do desenvolvimento. A pluripotência e a plasticidade na diferenciação da população de células da CN têm sido intensivamente documentadas, ficando deste modo estabelecido que os factores ambientais têm um papel importante na correta diferenciação dos derivados da CN no organismo. Na d

  20. Glow in the Dark: Fluorescent Proteins as Cell and Tissue-Specific Markers in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenzislava Ckurshumova; Adriana E. Caragea; Rochelle S. Goldstein; Thomas Berleth

    2011-01-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants,fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types,to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes,and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes.Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes.The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms.In developmental studies,the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical,where morphological markers of tissues,cell types,or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable.In this review,we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  1. Association between Tumorigenic Potential and the Fate of Cancer Cells in a Syngeneic Melanoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krelin, Yakov; Berkovich, Liron; Amit, Moran; Gil, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    The self-renewal potential of a cancer cell can be estimated by using particular assays, which include xenotransplantation in immunocompromised animals or culturing in non-adherent serum-free stem-cells media (SCM). However, whether cells with self-renewal potential actually contribute to disease is unknown. Here we investigated the tumorigenic potential and fate of cancer cells in an in-vivo melanoma model. We examined cell lines which were derived from the same parental line: a non-metastatic cell line (K1735/16), a metastatic cell line (K1735/M4) and a cell line which was selected in non-adherent conditions (K1735/16S). All cell lines exhibited similar proliferation kinetics when grown on culture plates. K1735/16 cells grown in soft agar or in suspension non-adherent conditions failed to form colonies or spheroids, whereas the other cell lines showed prominent colonogenicity and spheroid formation capacity. By using sphere limiting dilution analysis (SLDA) in serum-free media, K1735/16S and K1735/M4 cells grown in suspension were capable of forming spheroids even in low frequencies of concentrations, as opposed to K1735/16 cells. The tumorigenic potential of the cell lines was determined in SCID mice using intra footpad injections. Palpable tumors were evident in all mice. In agreement with the in-vitro studies, the K1735/M4 cell line exhibited the highest growth kinetics, followed by the K1735/16S cell line, whereas the K1735/16 cell line had the lowest tumor growth potential (P<0.001). In contrast, when we repeated the experiments in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice, the K1735/16 cell line produced macroscopic tumors 30–100 days after injection, whereas K1735/M4 and K1735/16S derived tumors regressed spontaneously in 90–100% of mice. TUNEL analysis revealed significantly higher number of apoptotic cells in K1735/16S and K1735/M4 cell line-derived tumors compared to K1735/16 tumors (P<0.001). The models we have examined here raised the possibility, that cells with

  2. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skardelly, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Skardelly@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute of Clinical Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meixensberger, Juergen [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Milosevic, Javorina [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  3. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment

  4. The CLAVATA signaling pathway mediating stem cell fate in shoot meristems requires Ca(2+) as a secondary cytosolic messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsuan; Zhu, Yingfang; Ma, Yi; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2016-02-01

    CLAVATA1 (CLV1) is a receptor protein expressed in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) that translates perception of a non-cell-autonomous CLAVATA3 (CLV3) peptide signal into altered stem cell fate. CLV3 reduces expression of WUSCHEL (WUS) and FANTASTIC FOUR 2 (FAF2) in the SAM. Expression of WUS and FAF2 leads to maintenance of undifferentiated stem cells in the SAM. CLV3 binding to CLV1 inhibits expression of these genes and controls stem cell fate in the SAM through an unidentified signaling pathway. Cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, cyclic nucleotide (cGMP)-activated Ca(2+) channels, and cGMP have been linked to signaling downstream of receptors similar to CLV1. Hence, we hypothesized that cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation mediates the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor signaling that controls meristem stem cell fate. CLV3 application to Arabidopsis seedlings results in elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) and cGMP. CLV3 control of WUS was prevented in a genotype lacking a functional cGMP-activated Ca(2+) channel. In wild-type plants, CLV3 inhibition of WUS and FAF2 expression was impaired by treatment with either a Ca(2+) channel blocker or a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. When CLV3-dependent repression of WUS is blocked, altered control of stem cell fate leads to an increase in SAM size; we observed a larger SAM size in seedlings treated with the Ca(2+) channel blocker. These results suggest that the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor system initiates a signaling cascade that elevates cytosolic Ca(2+) , and that this cytosolic secondary messenger is involved in the signal transduction cascade linking CLV3/CLV1 to control of gene expression and stem cell fate in the SAM. PMID:26756833

  5. Modeling reveals bistability and low-pass filtering in the network module determining blood stem cell fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Narula

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial regulation of gene expression is ubiquitous in eukaryotes with multiple inputs converging on regulatory control elements. The dynamic properties of these elements determine the functionality of genetic networks regulating differentiation and development. Here we propose a method to quantitatively characterize the regulatory output of distant enhancers with a biophysical approach that recursively determines free energies of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions from experimental analysis of transcriptional reporter libraries. We apply this method to model the Scl-Gata2-Fli1 triad-a network module important for cell fate specification of hematopoietic stem cells. We show that this triad module is inherently bistable with irreversible transitions in response to physiologically relevant signals such as Notch, Bmp4 and Gata1 and we use the model to predict the sensitivity of the network to mutations. We also show that the triad acts as a low-pass filter by switching between steady states only in response to signals that persist for longer than a minimum duration threshold. We have found that the auto-regulation loops connecting the slow-degrading Scl to Gata2 and Fli1 are crucial for this low-pass filtering property. Taken together our analysis not only reveals new insights into hematopoietic stem cell regulatory network functionality but also provides a novel and widely applicable strategy to incorporate experimental measurements into dynamical network models.

  6. RhoA determines lineage fate of mesenchymal stem cells by modulating CTGF–VEGF complex in extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changjun; Zhen, Gehua; Chai, Yu; Xie, Liang; Crane, Janet L.; Farber, Emily; Farber, Charles R.; Luo, Xianghang; Gao, Peisong; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in the repair/remodelling of many tissues, where MSCs commit to different lineages dependent on the cues in the local microenvironment. Here we show that TGFβ-activated RhoA/ROCK signalling functions as a molecular switch regarding the fate of MSCs in arterial repair/remodelling after injury. MSCs differentiate into myofibroblasts when RhoA/ROCK is turned on, endothelial cells when turned off. The former is pathophysiologic resulting in intimal hyperplasia, whereas the latter is physiological leading to endothelial repair. Further analysis revealed that MSC RhoA activation promotes formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) complex consisting of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Inactivation of RhoA/ROCK in MSCs induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated CTGF cleavage, resulting in VEGF release and MSC endothelial differentiation. Our findings uncover a novel mechanism by which cell–ECM interactions determine stem cell lineage specificity and offer additional molecular targets to manipulate MSC-involved tissue repair/regeneration. PMID:27126736

  7. Asymmetric Localization of Cdx2 mRNA during the First Cell-Fate Decision in Early Mouse Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skamagki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding question in mammalian development is whether the divisions that segregate pluripotent progenitor cells for the future embryo from cells that differentiate into extraembryonic structures are asymmetric in cell-fate instructions. The transcription factor Cdx2 plays a key role in the first cell-fate decision. Here, using live-embryo imaging, we show that localization of Cdx2 transcripts becomes asymmetric during development, preceding cell lineage segregation. Cdx2 transcripts preferentially localize apically at the late eight-cell stage and become inherited asymmetrically during divisions that set apart pluripotent and differentiating cells. Asymmetric localization depends on a cis element within the coding region of Cdx2 and requires cell polarization as well as intact microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Failure to enrich Cdx2 transcripts apically results in a significant decrease in the number of pluripotent cells. We discuss how the asymmetric localization and segregation of Cdx2 transcripts could contribute to multiple mechanisms that establish different cell fates in the mouse embryo.

  8. Evaluating the uptake and intracellular fate of polystyrene nanoparticles by primary and hepatocyte cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being used within diverse applications such as medicines, clothing, cosmetics and food. In order to promote the safe development of such nanotechnologies it is essential to assess the potential adverse health consequences associated with human exposure. The liver is recognised as a target site for NP toxicity, due to NP accumulation within this organ subsequent to injection, inhalation or instillation. The uptake of fluorescent polystyrene carboxylated particles (20 nm or 200 nm diameter) by hepatocytes was determined using confocal microscopy; with cells imaged 'live' during particle exposure or after exposure within fixed cells. Comparisons between the uptake of polystyrene particles by primary rat hepatocytes, and human hepatocyte cell lines (C3A and HepG2) were made. Uptake of particles by hepatocytes was size, time, and serum dependent. Specifically, the uptake of 200 nm particles was limited, but 20 nm NPs were internalised by all cell types from 10 min onwards. At 10 min, 20 nm NP fluorescence co-localised with the tubulin cytoskeleton staining; after 30 min NP fluorescence compartmentalised into structures located within and/or between cells. The fate of internalised NPs was considered and they were not contained within early endosomes or lysosomes, but within mitochondria of cell lines. NPs accumulated within bile canaliculi to a limited extent, which suggests that NPs can be eliminated within bile. This is in keeping with the finding that gold NPs were eliminated in bile following intravenous injection into rats. The findings were, in the main, comparable between primary rat hepatocytes and the different human hepatocyte cell lines.

  9. Intertwining extracellular nucleotides and their receptors with Ca2+ in determining adult neural stem cell survival, proliferation and final fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecca, Davide; Fumagalli, Marta; Ceruti, Stefania; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2016-08-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), during both brain and spinal cord development, purinergic and pyrimidinergic signalling molecules (ATP, UTP and adenosine) act synergistically with peptidic growth factors in regulating the synchronized proliferation and final specification of multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) to neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells. Some NSCs still persist throughout adulthood in both specific 'neurogenic' areas and in brain and spinal cord parenchyma, retaining the potentiality to generate all the three main types of adult CNS cells. Once CNS anatomical structures are defined, purinergic molecules participate in calcium-dependent neuron-to-glia communication and also control the behaviour of adult NSCs. After development, some purinergic mechanisms are silenced, but can be resumed after injury, suggesting a role for purinergic signalling in regeneration and self-repair also via the reactivation of adult NSCs. In this respect, at least three different types of adult NSCs participate in the response of the adult brain and spinal cord to insults: stem-like cells residing in classical neurogenic niches, in particular, in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), parenchymal oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs, also known as NG2-glia) and parenchymal injury-activated astrocytes (reactive astrocytes). Here, we shall review and discuss the purinergic regulation of these three main adult NSCs, with particular focus on how and to what extent modulation of intracellular calcium levels by purinoceptors is mandatory to determine their survival, proliferation and final fate.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377726

  10. Development of Cortical GABAergic Neurons: Interplay of progenitor diversity and environmental factors on fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alves Brandão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute an extremely diverse population of cells organized in a well-defined topology of precisely interconnected cells. They play a crucial role regulating inhibitory-excitatory balance in brain circuits, gating sensory perception and regulating spike timing to brain oscillations during distinct behaviors. Dysfunctions in the establishment of proper inhibitory circuits have been associated to several brain disorders such as autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia. In the rodent adult cortex, inhibitory neurons are generated during the second gestational week from distinct progenitor lineages located in restricted domains of the ventral telencephalon. However, only recently, studies have revealed some of the mechanisms generating the heterogeneity of neuronal subtypes and their modes of integration in brain networks. Here we will discuss some the events involved in the production of cortical GABAergic neuron diversity with focus on the interaction between intrinsically driven genetic programs and environmental signals during development.

  11. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  12. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Thomas H; Seth Childers, W; Blair, Jimmy A; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  13. Tracing Conidial Fate and Measuring Host Cell Antifungal Activity Using a Reporter of Microbial Viability in the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Jhingran, Anupam; Mar, Katrina B.; Kumasaka, Debra K.; Sue E Knoblaugh; Ngo, Lisa Y.; Segal, Brahm H; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Lowell, Clifford A.; Hamerman, Jessica A.; Lin, Xin; Tobias M Hohl

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence can be harnessed to monitor microbial fate and to investigate functional outcomes of individual microbial cell-host cell encounters at portals of entry in native tissue environments. We illustrate this concept by introducing fluorescent Aspergillus reporter (FLARE) conidia that simultaneously report phagocytic uptake and fungal viability during cellular interactions with the murine respiratory innate immune system. Our studies using FLARE conidia reveal stepwise and cell-type-spe...

  14. MEF2C and EBF1 Co-regulate B Cell-Specific Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Nikki R; Davis, Matthew; Chai, Li; Winoto, Astar; Tjian, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation along three main lineages: myeloid, erythroid, and lymphoid. One of the earliest lineage decisions for blood progenitor cells is whether to adopt the lymphoid or myeloid fate. Previous work had shown that myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) is indispensable for the lymphoid fate decision, yet the specific mechanism of action remained unclear. Here, we have identified early B cell factor-1 (EBF1) as a co-regulator of gene expression with MEF2C. A genome-wide survey of MEF2C and EBF1 binding sites identified a subset of B cell-specific genes that they target. We also determined that the p38 MAPK pathway activates MEF2C to drive B cell differentiation. Mef2c knockout mice showed reduced B lymphoid-specific gene expression as well as increased myeloid gene expression, consistent with MEF2C's role as a lineage fate regulator. This is further supported by interaction between MEF2C and the histone deacetylase, HDAC7, revealing a likely mechanism to repress the myeloid transcription program. This study thus elucidates both activation and repression mechanisms, identifies regulatory partners, and downstream targets by which MEF2C regulates lymphoid-specific differentiation. PMID:26900922

  15. Fate of pyribambenz propyl (ZJ0273) in anaerobic soils revealed by position-specific {sup 14}C labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Yue, Long; Zhang, Sufen [Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Ye, Qingfu, E-mail: qfye@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Qi, Wenyuan, E-mail: sunny0123@vip.163.com [Shanghai Academy of Agriculture Science, Shanghai 201106 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Chen, Ziyuan [Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • The time-dependent transformation of ZJ0273 in flooding soils was explained. • ZJ0273 showed long persistence, low mineralization and weak transport potential. • Phase distribution of {sup 14}C residue depended both on soil type and labeling position. • ZJ0273 tend to form bound residues in submerged soils. •Specific {sup 14}C labeling is an improved tracing technique for fate characterization. -- Abstract: Pyribambenz propyl, or ZJ0273, is a new and widely used pyrimidynyloxybenzoic herbicide; however, its behavior and safety in anaerobic soils remain poorly understood. In this study, ZJ0273 was labeled with {sup 14}C on its benzoate-, pyrimidyl- and benzyl- rings respectively, and applied to anoxic flooding soils to characterize its anaerobic fates. Over the 100 d incubation, the amended {sup 14}C-ZJ0273 was slightly mineralized to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} (<4%) or redistributed into the overlaying water (<10%), with the majority of the {sup 14}C (82–98%) remaining in the soil. The residues in soil underwent a gradual transformation from extractable residues (ER) to bound residues (BR), with the percentage of {sup 14}C-BR increasing from 1.1 to 2.5% at day 5 to 23.2–47.2% at day 100. The proportion of {sup 14}C-ER, {sup 14}C-BR and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} depended both on the soil property and the labeling position. Generally, ZJ0273 has the highest tendency to form BR in fluvio-marine yellow loamy soil, and the mineralization on both the benzoate and benzyl rings tends to be more extensive in red-clayed soil than the other soils. The ring-specific labeling {sup 14}C on three aromatic rings respectively provides full molecular information and yield information on sub-molecular level, i.e., the benzoate ring was generally more susceptible to cleavage than the pyrimidyl or benzyl rings (P < 0.01)

  16. Antigen availability determines CD8⁺ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Sarah E; Perro, Mario; Loughhead, Scott M; Senman, Balimkiz; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R; Mazo, Irina B; Haining, W Nicholas; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2013-09-19

    T cells are activated by antigen (Ag)-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in three phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8⁺ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, whereas higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12 hr and 24 hr. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure, resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  17. FGFR2IIIb-MAPK Activity Is Required for Epithelial Cell Fate Decision in the Lower Müllerian Duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Jumpei; Rocchi, Altea; Serna, Vanida A; Bottinger, Erwin P; Graff, Jonathan M; Kurita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell fate of lower Müllerian duct epithelium (MDE), to become uterine or vaginal epithelium, is determined by the absence or presence of ΔNp63 expression, respectively. Previously, we showed that SMAD4 and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) were independently required for MDE to express ΔNp63. Here, we report that vaginal mesenchyme directs vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE through paracrine activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-MAPK pathway. In the developing reproductive tract, FGF7 and FGF10 were enriched in vaginal mesenchyme, whereas FGF receptor 2IIIb was expressed in epithelia of both the uterus and vagina. When Fgfr2 was inactivated, vaginal MDE underwent uterine cell fate, and this differentiation defect was corrected by activation of MEK-ERK pathway. In vitro, FGF10 in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A (ActA) was sufficient to induce ΔNp63 in MDE, and ActA was essential for induction of RUNX1 through SMAD-independent pathways. Accordingly, inhibition of type 1 receptors for activin in neonatal mice induced uterine differentiation in vaginal epithelium by down-regulating RUNX1, whereas conditional deletion of Smad2 and Smad3 had no effect on vaginal epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE is induced by FGF7/10-MAPK, bone morphogenetic protein 4-SMAD, and ActA-RUNX1 pathway activities, and the disruption in any one of these pathways results in conversion from vaginal to uterine epithelial cell fate. PMID:27164167

  18. CAM and cell fate targeting: molecular and energetic insights into cell growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Carlo

    2005-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence-based CAM. PMID:16136206

  19. CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ventura

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

  20. Data integration for identification of important transcription factors of STAT6-mediated cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargosch, M; Kröger, S; Gralinska, E; Klotz, U; Fang, Z; Chen, W; Leser, U; Selbig, J; Groth, D; Baumgrass, R

    2016-01-01

    Data integration has become a useful strategy for uncovering new insights into complex biological networks. We studied whether this approach can help to delineate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-mediated transcriptional network driving T helper (Th) 2 cell fate decisions. To this end, we performed an integrative analysis of publicly available RNA-seq data of Stat6-knockout mouse studies together with STAT6 ChIP-seq data and our own gene expression time series data during Th2 cell differentiation. We focused on transcription factors (TFs), cytokines, and cytokine receptors and delineated 59 positively and 41 negatively STAT6-regulated genes, which were used to construct a transcriptional network around STAT6. The network illustrates that important and well-known TFs for Th2 cell differentiation are positively regulated by STAT6 and act either as activators for Th2 cells (e.g., Gata3, Atf3, Satb1, Nfil3, Maf, and Pparg) or as suppressors for other Th cell subpopulations such as Th1 (e.g., Ar), Th17 (e.g., Etv6), or iTreg (e.g., Stat3 and Hif1a) cells. Moreover, our approach reveals 11 TFs (e.g., Atf5, Creb3l2, and Asb2) with unknown functions in Th cell differentiation. This fact together with the observed enrichment of asthma risk genes among those regulated by STAT6 underlines the potential value of the data integration strategy used here. Thus, our results clearly support the opinion that data integration is a useful tool to delineate complex physiological processes. PMID:27420972

  1. Genomic DISC1 Disruption in hiPSCs Alters Wnt Signaling and Neural Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Srikanth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and clinical association studies have identified disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1 as a candidate risk gene for major mental illness. DISC1 is interrupted by a balanced chr(1;11 translocation in a Scottish family in which the translocation predisposes to psychiatric disorders. We investigate the consequences of DISC1 interruption in human neural cells using TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 to target the DISC1 locus. We show that disruption of DISC1 near the site of the translocation results in decreased DISC1 protein levels because of nonsense-mediated decay of long splice variants. This results in an increased level of canonical Wnt signaling in neural progenitor cells and altered expression of fate markers such as Foxg1 and Tbr2. These gene expression changes are rescued by antagonizing Wnt signaling in a critical developmental window, supporting the hypothesis that DISC1-dependent suppression of basal Wnt signaling influences the distribution of cell types generated during cortical development.

  2. Genomic DISC1 Disruption in hiPSCs Alters Wnt Signaling and Neural Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Priya; Han, Karam; Callahan, Dana G; Makovkina, Eugenia; Muratore, Christina R; Lalli, Matthew A; Zhou, Honglin; Boyd, Justin D; Kosik, Kenneth S; Selkoe, Dennis J; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2015-09-01

    Genetic and clinical association studies have identified disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) as a candidate risk gene for major mental illness. DISC1 is interrupted by a balanced chr(1;11) translocation in a Scottish family in which the translocation predisposes to psychiatric disorders. We investigate the consequences of DISC1 interruption in human neural cells using TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 to target the DISC1 locus. We show that disruption of DISC1 near the site of the translocation results in decreased DISC1 protein levels because of nonsense-mediated decay of long splice variants. This results in an increased level of canonical Wnt signaling in neural progenitor cells and altered expression of fate markers such as Foxg1 and Tbr2. These gene expression changes are rescued by antagonizing Wnt signaling in a critical developmental window, supporting the hypothesis that DISC1-dependent suppression of basal Wnt signaling influences the distribution of cell types generated during cortical development. PMID:26299970

  3. Fate of pup inside the Mycobacterium proteasome studied by in-cell NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Y Maldonado

    Full Text Available The Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome is required for maximum virulence and to resist killing by the host immune system. The prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup-GGE, targets proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation. We demonstrate that Pup-GGQ, a precursor of Pup-GGE, is not a substrate for proteasomal degradation. Using STINT-NMR, an in-cell NMR technique, we studied the interactions between Pup-GGQ, mycobacterial proteasomal ATPase, Mpa, and Mtb proteasome core particle (CP inside a living cell at amino acid residue resolution. We showed that under in-cell conditions, in the absence of the proteasome CP, Pup-GGQ interacts with Mpa only weakly, primarily through its C-terminal region. When Mpa and non-stoichiometric amounts of proteasome CP are present, both the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of Pup-GGQ bind strongly to Mpa. This suggests a mechanism by which transient binding of Mpa to the proteasome CP controls the fate of Pup.

  4. Fate and protective effect of marrow stromal cells after subretinal transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Pan; Xinjian Liu; Jihong Wu; Yuhua Tian; Shenghai Zhang; Zhixin Lin; Qian Huang

    2008-01-01

    Engraftment of marrow stromai cells(MSCs)has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for degenerative diseases.In this study we investigated the fate and dynamic progress of grafted MSCs in living retina with the aim of evaluating the use of transplanted MSCs to treat retinal degeneration.Approximately 1×10 5 gfp-MSCs in 2 μl phosphate-buffered saline were injected into the subretinal space of adult Sprague-Dawley rats.Two weeks later,approximately 0.174%±O.082% of the transplanted cells had survived and diffused into the subretinal space.Nine weeks after transplantation the surviving gfp-MSCs accounted for 0.049%±0.023% of the number of cells injected and were mainly located at the injection site.The same number of MSCs were transplanted into the left eye subretinal space of 3-week-old hereditary retinal degenerative Royal College of Surgeons rats,and phosphate-buffered saline was injected into their right eyes as a control.Five weeks after transplantation,the amount of rudimentary photoreceptors was more significantly increased in grafted eyes than in control eyes.The results indicated that grafted MS CS could survive and rescue retinal degeneration.

  5. Feedback from each retinal neuron population drives expression of subsequent fate determinant genes without influencing the cell cycle exit timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kei, Jeremy Ng Chi; Dudczig, Stefanie; Currie, Peter D; Jusuf, Patricia R

    2016-09-01

    During neurogenesis, progenitors balance proliferation and cell cycle exit together with expression of fate determinant genes to ensure that the correct number of each of these neuron types is generated. Although intrinsic gene expression acting cell autonomously within each progenitor drives these processes, the final number of neurons generated is also influenced by extrinsic cues, representing a potential avenue to direct neurogenesis in developmental disorders or regenerative settings without the requirement to change intrinsic gene expression. Thus, it is important to understand which of these stages of neurogenesis are amenable to such extrinsic influences. Additionally, all types of neurons are specified in a highly conserved histogenic order, although its significance is unknown. This study makes use of conserved patterns of neurogenesis in the relatively simple yet highly organized zebrafish retina model, in which such histogenic birth order is well characterized. We directly visualize and quantify birth dates and cell fate determinant expression in WT vs. environments lacking different neuronal populations. This study shows that extrinsic feedback from developing retinal neurons is important for the temporal expression of intrinsic fate determinants but not for the timing of birth dates. We found no changes in cell cycle exit timing but did find a significant delay in the expression of genes driving the generation only of later- but not earlier-born cells, suggesting that the robustness of this process depends on continuous feedback from earlier-formed cell types. Thus, extrinsic cues selectively influence cell fate determinant progression, which may explain the function of the retinal histogenic order observed. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2553-2566, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850379

  6. Thymic and Postthymic Regulation of Naïve CD4+ T-Cell Lineage Fates in Humans and Mice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Belizário

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how thymocytes differentiate into many subtypes has been increased progressively in its complexity. At early life, the thymus provides a suitable microenvironment with specific combination of stromal cells, growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines to induce the bone marrow lymphoid progenitor T-cell precursors into single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T effectors and CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs. At postthymic compartments, the CD4+ T-cells acquire distinct phenotypes which include the classical T-helper 1 (Th1, T-helper 2 (Th2, T-helper 9 (Th9, T-helper 17 (Th17, follicular helper T-cell (Tfh, and induced T-regulatory cells (iTregs, such as the regulatory type 1 cells (Tr1 and transforming growth factor-β- (TGF-β- producing CD4+ T-cells (Th3. Tregs represent only a small fraction, 5–10% in mice and 1-2% in humans, of the overall CD4+ T-cells in lymphoid tissues but are essential for immunoregulatory circuits mediating the inhibition and expansion of all lineages of T-cells. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the major cell-intrinsic developmental programs that regulate T-cell lineage fates in thymus and periphery. Next, we introduce the SV40 immortomouse as a relevant mice model for implementation of new approaches to investigate thymus organogenesis, CD4 and CD8 development, and thymus cells tumorogenesis.

  7. Thymic and Postthymic Regulation of Naïve CD4+ T-Cell Lineage Fates in Humans and Mice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belizário, José E.; Brandão, Wesley; Rossato, Cristiano; Peron, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how thymocytes differentiate into many subtypes has been increased progressively in its complexity. At early life, the thymus provides a suitable microenvironment with specific combination of stromal cells, growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines to induce the bone marrow lymphoid progenitor T-cell precursors into single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T effectors and CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs). At postthymic compartments, the CD4+ T-cells acquire distinct phenotypes which include the classical T-helper 1 (Th1), T-helper 2 (Th2), T-helper 9 (Th9), T-helper 17 (Th17), follicular helper T-cell (Tfh), and induced T-regulatory cells (iTregs), such as the regulatory type 1 cells (Tr1) and transforming growth factor-β- (TGF-β-) producing CD4+ T-cells (Th3). Tregs represent only a small fraction, 5–10% in mice and 1-2% in humans, of the overall CD4+ T-cells in lymphoid tissues but are essential for immunoregulatory circuits mediating the inhibition and expansion of all lineages of T-cells. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the major cell-intrinsic developmental programs that regulate T-cell lineage fates in thymus and periphery. Next, we introduce the SV40 immortomouse as a relevant mice model for implementation of new approaches to investigate thymus organogenesis, CD4 and CD8 development, and thymus cells tumorogenesis.

  8. Exine dehiscing induces rape microspore polarity, which results in different daughter cell fate and fixes the apical–basal axis of the embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xingchun; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2013-01-01

    The roles of cell polarity and the first asymmetric cell division during early embryogenesis in apical–basal cell fate determination remain unclear. Previously, a novel Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis system was established, by which rape exine-dehisced microspores were induced by physical stress. Unlike traditional microspore culture, cell polarity and subsequent asymmetric division appeared in the exine-dehisced microspore, which finally developed into a typical embryo with a suspensor. Further studies indicated that polarity is critical for apical–basal cell fate determination and suspensor formation. However, the pattern of the first division was not only determined by cell polarity but was also regulated by the position of the ruptured exine. The first division could be equal or unequal, with its orientation essentially perpendicular to the polar axis. In both types of cell division, the two daughter cells could have different cell fates and give rise to an embryo with a suspensor, similar to zygotic apical–basal cell differentiation. The alignment of the two daughter cells is consistent with the orientation of the apical–basal axis of future embryonic development. Thus, the results revealed that exine dehiscing induces rape microspore polarization, and this polarity results in a different cell fate and fixes the apical–basal axis of embryogenesis, but is uncoupled from cell asymmetric division. The present study demonstrated the relationships among cell polarity, asymmetric cell division, and cell fate determination in early embryogenesis. PMID:23162119

  9. Exine dehiscing induces rape microspore polarity, which results in different daughter cell fate and fixes the apical-basal axis of the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xingchun; Liu, Yuan; He, Yuqing; Ma, Ligang; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The roles of cell polarity and the first asymmetric cell division during early embryogenesis in apical-basal cell fate determination remain unclear. Previously, a novel Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis system was established, by which rape exine-dehisced microspores were induced by physical stress. Unlike traditional microspore culture, cell polarity and subsequent asymmetric division appeared in the exine-dehisced microspore, which finally developed into a typical embryo with a suspensor. Further studies indicated that polarity is critical for apical-basal cell fate determination and suspensor formation. However, the pattern of the first division was not only determined by cell polarity but was also regulated by the position of the ruptured exine. The first division could be equal or unequal, with its orientation essentially perpendicular to the polar axis. In both types of cell division, the two daughter cells could have different cell fates and give rise to an embryo with a suspensor, similar to zygotic apical-basal cell differentiation. The alignment of the two daughter cells is consistent with the orientation of the apical-basal axis of future embryonic development. Thus, the results revealed that exine dehiscing induces rape microspore polarization, and this polarity results in a different cell fate and fixes the apical-basal axis of embryogenesis, but is uncoupled from cell asymmetric division. The present study demonstrated the relationships among cell polarity, asymmetric cell division, and cell fate determination in early embryogenesis. PMID:23162119

  10. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals. PMID:27255928

  11. Aurora A Kinase Regulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Fate by Determining Mitotic Spindle Orientation in a Notch-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Regan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate determination in the progeny of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells remains poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA in regulating the balance between basal and luminal mammary lineages. We find that AURKA is highly expressed in basal stem cells and, to a lesser extent, in luminal progenitors. Wild-type AURKA expression promoted luminal cell fate, but expression of an S155R mutant reduced proliferation, promoted basal fate, and inhibited serial transplantation. The mechanism involved regulation of mitotic spindle orientation by AURKA and the positioning of daughter cells after division. Remarkably, this was NOTCH dependent, as NOTCH inhibitor blocked the effect of wild-type AURKA expression on spindle orientation and instead mimicked the effect of the S155R mutant. These findings directly link AURKA, NOTCH signaling, and mitotic spindle orientation and suggest a mechanism for regulating the balance between luminal and basal lineages in the mammary gland.

  12. Protein O-mannosylation is crucial for human mesencyhmal stem cells fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, E; Lommel, M; Moro, M; Crosti, M; Lavazza, C; Parazzi, V; Saredi, S; Strahl, S; Lazzari, L

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are promising cell types in the field of regenerative medicine. Although many pathways have been dissected in the effort to better understand and characterize MSC potential, the impact of protein N- or O-glycosylation has been neglected. Deficient protein O-mannosylation is a pathomechanism underlying severe congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) that start to develop at the embryonic developmental stage and progress in the adult, often in tissues where MSC exert their function. Here we show that O-mannosylation genes, many of which are putative or verified glycosyltransferases (GTs), are expressed in a similar pattern in MSC from adipose tissue, bone marrow, and umbilical cord blood and that their expression levels are retained constant during mesengenic differentiation. Inhibition of the first players of the enzymatic cascade, POMT1/2, resulted in complete abolishment of chondrogenesis and alterations of adipogenic and osteogenic potential together with a lethal effect during myogenic induction. Since to date, no therapy for CMD is available, we explored the possibility of using MSC extracellular vesicles (EVs) as molecular source of functional GTs mRNA. All MSC secrete POMT1 mRNA-containing EVs that are able to efficiently fuse with myoblasts which are among the most affected cells by CMD. Intriguingly, in a pomt1 patient myoblast line EVs were able to partially revert O-mannosylation deficiency and contribute to a morphology recovery. Altogether, these results emphasize the crucial role of protein O-mannosylation in stem cell fate and properties and open the possibility of using MSC vesicles as a novel therapeutic approach to CMD. PMID:26245304

  13. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased focus on the immune checkpoint protein PD-1 and its ligand PD-L1 due to the discovery that blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway with monoclonal antibodies elicits striking clinical results in many different malignancies. We have described naturally occurring PD-L1......-specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune...

  14. Essential role of Bmp signaling and its positive feedback loop in the early cell fate evolution of chordates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmiková, Iryna; Candiani, S.; Fabian, Peter; Gurská, Daniela; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 382, č. 2 (2013), s. 538-554. ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP305/10/J064; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0027 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Bmp signaling * axial patterning * cell fate * chordates * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2013

  15. Specific differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Heesang; Chang, Woochul; Song, Byeong-Wook; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent, self-renewing cells harboring multi-lineage differentiation potential and immunosuppressive properties that make them an attractive candidate for biological cell-based regenerative medicine. In addition to its undoubted clinical interest, controlling the fate and behaviors of MSCs is a crucial prerequisite for their therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine. Stem cell differentiation and modulation of functional activities are generally c...

  16. Expression Levels of Histone Deacetylases Determine the Cell Fate of Hematopoietic Progenitors*

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Taeko; Kikuchi, Jiro; Nishimura, Noriko; Shimizu, Rumi; Kitamura, Toshio; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2009-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are globally implicated in the growth and differentiation of mammalian cells; however, relatively little is known about their specific roles in hematopoiesis. In this study, we investigated the expression of HDACs in human hematopoietic cells and their functions during hematopoiesis. The expression of HDACs was very low in hematopoietic progenitor cells, which was accompanied by histone hyperacetylation. HDACs were detectable in more differentiated progenitors and...

  17. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  18. ShaPINg cell fate upon DNA damage:role of Pin1 isomerase in DNA damage-induced cell death and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 acts as a molecular timer in proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase signaling and shapes cellular responses based on recognition of phosphorylation marks and implementing conformational changes in its substrates. Accordingly, Pin1 has been linked to numerous phosphorylation-controlled signaling pathways and cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Pin1 plays a pivotal role in DNA damage-triggered cell fate decisions. Whereas moderate DNA damage is balanced by DNA repair, cells confronted with massive genotoxic stress are eliminated by the induction of programmed cell death or cellular senescence. In this review we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on how Pin1 specifies cell fate through regulating key players of the apoptotic and the repair branch of the DNA damage response.

  19. Sequence of neuron origin and neocortical laminar fate: relation to cell cycle of origin in the developing murine cerebral wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.; Goto, T.; Miyama, S.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    1999-01-01

    Neurons destined for each region of the neocortex are known to arise approximately in an "inside-to-outside" sequence from a pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE). This sequence is initiated rostrolaterally and propagates caudomedially. Moreover, independently of location in the PVE, the neuronogenetic sequence in mouse is divisible into 11 cell cycles that occur over a 6 d period. Here we use a novel "birth hour" method that identifies small cohorts of neurons born during a single 2 hr period, i.e., 10-20% of a single cell cycle, which corresponds to approximately 1.5% of the 6 d neuronogenetic period. This method shows that neurons arising with the same cycle of the 11 cycle sequence in mouse have common laminar fates even if they arise from widely separated positions on the PVE (neurons of fields 1 and 40) and therefore arise at different embryonic times. Even at this high level of temporal resolution, simultaneously arising cells occupy more than one cortical layer, and there is substantial overlap in the distributions of cells arising with successive cycles. We demonstrate additionally that the laminar representation of cells arising with a given cycle is little if at all modified over the early postnatal interval of histogenetic cell death. We infer from these findings that cell cycle is a neuronogenetic counting mechanism and that this counting mechanism is integral to subsequent processes that determine cortical laminar fate.

  20. miRNA-mediated feedback inhibition of JAK/STAT morphogen signalling establishes a cell fate threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Wan Hee; Meinhardt, Hans; Montell, Denise J

    2011-09-01

    Patterns of cell fates generated by morphogens are critically important for normal development; however, the mechanisms by which graded morphogen signals are converted into all-or-none cell fate responses are incompletely understood. In the Drosophila ovary, high and sustained levels of the secreted morphogen Unpaired (Upd) specify the migratory border-cell population by activating the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT). A lower or transient level of STAT activity specifies a non-migratory population of follicle cells. Here we identify miR-279 as a component of a feedback pathway that further dampens the response in cells with low levels of JAK/STAT activity. miR-279 directly repressed STAT, and loss of miR-279 mimicked STAT gain-of-function or loss of Apontic (Apt), a known feedback inhibitor of STAT. Apt was essential for miR-279 expression in non-migratory follicle cells, whereas another STAT target, Ken and Barbie (Ken), downregulated miR-279 in border cells. Mathematical modelling and simulations of this regulatory circuit including miR-279, Apt and Ken supported key roles for miR-279 and Apt in generating threshold responses to the Upd gradient. PMID:21857668

  1. Adrenomedullin as a Growth and Cell Fate Regulatory Factor for Adult Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Martínez-Herrero; Ignacio M Larráyoz; Laura Ochoa-Callejero; Josune García-Sanmartín; Alfredo Martínez

    2012-01-01

    The use of stem cells as a strategy for tissue repair and regeneration is one of the biomedical research areas that has attracted more interest in the past few years. Despite the classic belief that the central nervous system (CNS) was immutable, now it is well known that cell turnover occurs in the mature CNS. Postnatal neurogenesis is subjected to tight regulation by many growth factors, cell signals, and transcription factors. An emerging molecule involved in this process is adrenomedullin...

  2. Sall1 regulates cortical neurogenesis and laminar fate specification in mice: implications for neural abnormalities in Townes-Brocks syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Progenitor cells in the cerebral cortex undergo dynamic cellular and molecular changes during development. Sall1 is a putative transcription factor that is highly expressed in progenitor cells during development. In humans, the autosomal dominant developmental disorder Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS is associated with mutations of the SALL1 gene. TBS is characterized by renal, anal, limb and auditory abnormalities. Although neural deficits have not been recognized as a diagnostic characteristic of the disease, ∼10% of patients exhibit neural or behavioral abnormalities. We demonstrate that, in addition to being expressed in peripheral organs, Sall1 is robustly expressed in progenitor cells of the central nervous system in mice. Both classical- and conditional-knockout mouse studies indicate that the cerebral cortex is particularly sensitive to loss of Sall1. In the absence of Sall1, both the surface area and depth of the cerebral cortex were decreased at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5. These deficiencies are associated with changes in progenitor cell properties during development. In early cortical progenitor cells, Sall1 promotes proliferative over neurogenic division, whereas, at later developmental stages, Sall1 regulates the production and differentiation of intermediate progenitor cells. Furthermore, Sall1 influences the temporal specification of cortical laminae. These findings present novel insights into the function of Sall1 in the developing mouse cortex and provide avenues for future research into potential neural deficits in individuals with TBS.

  3. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  4. Diverse spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 and cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean; Eliaš, Ján

    2016-06-01

    The protein p53 as a tumour suppressor protein accumulates in cells in response to DNA damage and transactivates a large variety of genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and numerous other processes. Recent biological observations suggest that specific spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 may be associated with specific cellular response, and thus the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the p53 dynamics contributes to the overall complexity of p53 signalling. Reaction-diffusion equations taking into account spatial representation of the cell and motion of the species inside the cell can be used to model p53 protein network and could be thus of some help to biologists and pharmacologists in anticancer treatment.

  5. Cytoplasmic NOTCH and membrane-derived β-catenin link cell fate choice to epithelial-mesenchymal transition during myogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieiro, Daniel; Rios, Anne C; Hirst, Claire E; Marcelle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    How cells in the embryo coordinate epithelial plasticity with cell fate decision in a fast changing cellular environment is largely unknown. In chick embryos, skeletal muscle formation is initiated by migrating Delta1-expressing neural crest cells that trigger NOTCH signaling and myogenesis in selected epithelial somite progenitor cells, which rapidly translocate into the nascent muscle to differentiate. Here, we uncovered at the heart of this response a signaling module encompassing NOTCH, GSK-3β, SNAI1 and β-catenin. Independent of its transcriptional function, NOTCH profoundly inhibits GSK-3β activity. As a result SNAI1 is stabilized, triggering an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This allows the recruitment of β-catenin from the membrane, which acts as a transcriptional co-factor to activate myogenesis, independently of WNT ligand. Our results intimately associate the initiation of myogenesis to a change in cell adhesion and may reveal a general principle for coupling cell fate changes to EMT in many developmental and pathological processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14847.001 PMID:27218451

  6. Hippo pathway effectors control cardiac progenitor cell fate by acting as dynamic sensors of substrate mechanics and nanostructure

    KAUST Repository

    Mosqueira, Diogo

    2014-03-25

    Stem cell responsiveness to extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and mechanical cues has been the subject of a number of investigations so far, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell mechano-biology still need full clarification. Here we demonstrate that the paralog proteins YAP and TAZ exert a crucial role in adult cardiac progenitor cell mechano-sensing and fate decision. Cardiac progenitors respond to dynamic modifications in substrate rigidity and nanopattern by promptly changing YAP/TAZ intracellular localization. We identify a novel activity of YAP and TAZ in the regulation of tubulogenesis in 3D environments and highlight a role for YAP/TAZ in cardiac progenitor proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, we show that YAP/TAZ expression is triggered in the heart cells located at the infarct border zone. Our results suggest a fundamental role for the YAP/TAZ axis in the response of resident progenitor cells to the modifications in microenvironment nanostructure and mechanics, thereby contributing to the maintenance of myocardial homeostasis in the adult heart. These proteins are indicated as potential targets to control cardiac progenitor cell fate by materials design. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Asymmetric cell division and its role in cell fate determination in the green alga Tetraselmis indica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mani Arora; Arga Chandrashekar Anil; Karl Burgess; Jane Delany; Ehsan Mesbahi

    2015-12-01

    The prasinophytes (early diverging Chlorophyta), consisting of simple unicellular green algae, occupy a critical position at the base of the green algal tree of life, with some of its representatives viewed as the cell form most similar to the first green alga, the `ancestral green flagellate'. Relatively large-celled unicellular eukaryotic phytoflagellates (such as Tetraselmis and Scherffelia), traditionally placed in Prasinophyceae but now considered as members of Chlorodendrophyceae (core Chlorophyta), have retained some primitive characteristics of prasinophytes. These organisms share several ultrastructural features with the other core chlorophytes (Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae). However, the role of Chlorodendrophycean algae as the evolutionary link between cellular individuality and cellular cooperation has been largely unstudied. Here, we show that clonal populations of a unicellular chlorophyte, Tetraselmis indica, consist of morphologically and ultrastructurally variant cells which arise through asymmetric cell division. These cells also differ in their physiological properties. The structural and physiological differences in the clonal cell population correlate to a certain extent with the longevity and function of cells.

  8. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apo...

  9. Asymmetric cell division and its role in cell fate determination in the green alga Tetraselmis indica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Arora, M.; Anil, A.C.; Burgess, K.; Delany, J.E.; Mesbahi, E.

    The prasinophytes (early diverging Chlorophyta), consisting of simple unicellular green algae, occupy a critical position at the base of the green algal tree of life, with some of its representatives viewed as the cell form most similar to the first...

  10. IRF4 at the crossroads of effector T-cell fate decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) is a transcription factor that is expressed in hematopoietic cells and plays pivotal roles in the immune response. Originally described as a lymphocyte-specific nuclear factor, IRF4 promotes differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into T helper 2 (Th2), Th9, Th17, or T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and is required for the function of effector regulatory T (eTreg) cells. Moreover, IRF4 is essential for the sustained differentiation of cytotoxic effector CD8(+) T cells, for CD8(+) T-cell memory formation, and for differentiation of naïve CD8(+) T cells into IL-9-producing (Tc9) and IL-17-producing (Tc17) CD8(+) T-cell subsets. In this review, we focus on recent findings on the role of IRF4 during the development of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets and the impact of IRF4 on T-cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. PMID:24782159

  11. The transcription factor GATA3 controls cell fate and maintenance of type 2 innate lymphoid cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyler, Thomas; Klose, Christoph S.N.; Souabni, Abdallah; Turqueti-Neves, Adriana; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Rawlins, Emma L.; Voehringer, David; Busslinger, Meinrad; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) reside at mucosal surfaces and control immunity to intestinal infections. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) produce cytokines such as IL-5 and IL-13 and are required for immune defense against helminth infections and are involved in the pathogenesis of airway hyperreactivity. Here, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor GATA3 for ILC2 differentiation and maintenance. We showed that ILC2 and their lineage-specified bone marrow precursor (ILC2P)...

  12. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Cindy Meyer; Ulrich Hahn; Andrea Rentmeister

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have...

  13. A Role for RE-1-Silencing Transcription Factor in Embryonic Stem Cells Cardiac Lineage Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Irene; Marcy, Guillaume; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Kumar, Vibhor; John-Sanchez, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehran; Buckley, Noel J; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2016-04-01

    During development, lineage specification is controlled by several signaling pathways involving various transcription factors (TFs). Here, we studied the RE-1-silencing transcription factor (REST) and identified an important role of this TF in cardiac differentiation. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to model development, we found that REST knockout cells lost the ability to differentiate into the cardiac lineage. Detailed analysis of specific lineage markers expression showed selective downregulation of endoderm markers in REST-null cells, thus contributing to a loss of cardiogenic signals. REST regulates cardiac differentiation of ESCs by negatively regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and positively regulating the cardiogenic TF Gata4. We propose here a new role for REST in cell fate specification besides its well-known repressive role of neuronal differentiation. PMID:26864965

  14. Hydrogel formulation determines cell fate of fetal and adult neural progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R. Aurand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels provide a unique tool for neural tissue engineering. These materials can be customized for certain functions, i.e. to provide cell/drug delivery or act as a physical scaffold. Unfortunately, hydrogel complexities can negatively impact their biocompatibility, resulting in unintended consequences. These adverse effects may be combated with a better understanding of hydrogel chemical, physical, and mechanical properties, and how these properties affect encapsulated neural cells. We defined the polymerization and degradation rates and compressive moduli of 25 hydrogels formulated from different concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG. Changes in compressive modulus were driven primarily by the HA concentration. The in vitro biocompatibility of fetal-derived (fNPC and adult-derived (aNPC neural progenitor cells was dependent on hydrogel formulation. Acute survival of fNPC benefited from hydrogel encapsulation. NPC differentiation was divergent: fNPC differentiated into mostly glial cells, compared with neuronal differentiation of aNPC. Differentiation was influenced in part by the hydrogel mechanical properties. This study indicates that there can be a wide range of HA and PEG hydrogels compatible with NPC. Additionally, this is the first study comparing hydrogel encapsulation of NPC derived from different aged sources, with data suggesting that fNPC and aNPC respond dissimilarly within the same hydrogel formulation.

  15. The bantam microRNA is associated with drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein and regulates the fate of germline stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingyue Yang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome, a common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. We have previously demonstrated that dFmr1, the Drosophila ortholog of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, plays a role in the proper maintenance of germline stem cells in Drosophila ovary; however, the molecular mechanism behind this remains elusive. In this study, we used an immunoprecipitation assay to reveal that specific microRNAs (miRNAs, particularly the bantam miRNA (bantam, are physically associated with dFmrp in ovary. We show that, like dFmr1, bantam is not only required for repressing primordial germ cell differentiation, it also functions as an extrinsic factor for germline stem cell maintenance. Furthermore, we find that bantam genetically interacts with dFmr1 to regulate the fate of germline stem cells. Collectively, our results support the notion that the FMRP-mediated translation pathway functions through specific miRNAs to control stem cell regulation.

  16. ZFPIP/Zfp462 is involved in P19 cell pluripotency and in their neuronal fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, Julie [CNRS UMR 6061, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France); Piquet-Pellorce, Claire [Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex, EA 4427 SeRAIC (France); Viet, Justine; Guerrier, Daniel; Pellerin, Isabelle [CNRS UMR 6061, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France); Deschamps, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.deschamps@univ-rennes1.fr [CNRS UMR 6061, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes (IGDR), Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes 1, 35043 Rennes cedex (France)

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear zinc finger protein ZFPIP/Zfp462 is an important factor involved in cell division during the early embryonic development of vertebrates. In pluripotent P19 cells, ZFPIP/Zfp462 takes part in cell proliferation, likely via its role in maintaining chromatin structure. To further define the function of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in the mechanisms of pluripotency and cell differentiation, we constructed a stable P19 cell line in which ZFPIP/Zfp462 knockdown is inducible. We report that ZFPIP/Zfp462 was vital for mitosis and self-renewal in pluripotent P19 cells. Its depletion induced substantial decreases in the expression of the pluripotency genes Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 and was associated with the transient expression of specific neuronal differentiation markers. We also demonstrated that ZFPIP/Zfp462 expression appears to be unnecessary after neuronal differentiation is induced in P19 cells. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that ZFPIP/Zfp462 is a key chromatin factor involved in maintaining P19 pluripotency and in the early mechanisms of neural differentiation but that it is dispensable in differentiated P19 cells.

  17. ZFPIP/Zfp462 is involved in P19 cell pluripotency and in their neuronal fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear zinc finger protein ZFPIP/Zfp462 is an important factor involved in cell division during the early embryonic development of vertebrates. In pluripotent P19 cells, ZFPIP/Zfp462 takes part in cell proliferation, likely via its role in maintaining chromatin structure. To further define the function of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in the mechanisms of pluripotency and cell differentiation, we constructed a stable P19 cell line in which ZFPIP/Zfp462 knockdown is inducible. We report that ZFPIP/Zfp462 was vital for mitosis and self-renewal in pluripotent P19 cells. Its depletion induced substantial decreases in the expression of the pluripotency genes Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 and was associated with the transient expression of specific neuronal differentiation markers. We also demonstrated that ZFPIP/Zfp462 expression appears to be unnecessary after neuronal differentiation is induced in P19 cells. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that ZFPIP/Zfp462 is a key chromatin factor involved in maintaining P19 pluripotency and in the early mechanisms of neural differentiation but that it is dispensable in differentiated P19 cells.

  18. Notch-mediated post-translational control of Ngn3 protein stability regulates pancreatic patterning and cell fate commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Afelik, Solomon; Jensen, Jan Nygaard;

    2013-01-01

    involves transcriptional repression as previously shown, but also incorporates a novel post-translational mechanism. In addition to its ability to promote endocrine fate, we provide evidence of a competing ability of Ngn3 in the patterning of multipotent progenitor cells in turn controlling the formation......-producing beta-cells can be significantly enhanced upon induction of a pro-endocrine drive combined with the inhibition of Notch processing....... of ducts. On one hand, Ngn3 cell-intrinsically activates endocrine target genes; on the other, Ngn3 cell-extrinsically promotes lateral signaling via the Dll1>Notch>Hes1 pathway which substantially limits its ability to sustain endocrine formation. Prior to endocrine commitment, the Ngn3-mediated...

  19. Chinmo is sufficient to induce male fate in somatic cells of the adult Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing; de Cuevas, Margaret; Matunis, Erika L

    2016-03-01

    Sexual identity is continuously maintained in specific differentiated cell types long after sex determination occurs during development. In the adult Drosophila testis, the putative transcription factor Chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (Chinmo) acts with the canonical male sex determinant DoublesexM (Dsx(M)) to maintain the male identity of somatic cyst stem cells and their progeny. Here we find that ectopic expression of chinmo is sufficient to induce a male identity in adult ovarian somatic cells, but it acts through a Dsx(M)-independent mechanism. Conversely, the feminization of the testis somatic stem cell lineage caused by loss of chinmo is enhanced by expression of the canonical female sex determinant Dsx(F), indicating that chinmo acts in parallel with the canonical sex determination pathway to maintain the male identity of testis somatic cells. Consistent with this finding, ectopic expression of female sex determinants in the adult testis disrupts tissue morphology. The miRNA let-7 downregulates chinmo in many contexts, and ectopic expression of let-7 in the adult testis is sufficient to recapitulate the chinmo loss-of-function phenotype, but we find no apparent phenotypes upon removal of let-7 in the adult ovary or testis. Our finding that chinmo is necessary and sufficient to promote a male identity in adult gonadal somatic cells suggests that the sexual identity of somatic cells can be reprogrammed in the adult Drosophila ovary as well as in the testis. PMID:26811385

  20. Neuronal cell fate decisions:  O2 and CO2 sensing neurons require egl-13/Sox5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramstrup Petersen, Jakob; Pocock, Roger David John

    2013-01-01

    We recently conducted a study that aimed to describe the differentiation mechanisms used to generate O2 and CO2 sensing neurons in C. elegans. We identified egl-13/Sox5 to be required for the differentiation of both O2 and CO2 sensing neurons. We found that egl-13 functions cell autonomously to...... drive O2 and CO2 sensing neuron fate and is therefore essential for O2 and CO2 sensing-induced behaviors. Through systematic dissection of the egl-13 promoter we identified upstream regulators of egl-13 and proposed a model of how differentiation of O2 and CO2 sensing neurons is regulated. In this...

  1. Highly variable individual donor cell fates characterize robust horizontal gene transfer of an integrative and conjugative element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavat, François; Mitri, Sara; Pelet, Serge; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-06-14

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important evolutionary mechanism for bacterial adaptation. However, given the typical low transfer frequencies in a bacterial population, little is known about the fate and interplay of donor cells and the mobilized DNA during transfer. Here we study transfer of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) among individual live bacterial cells. ICEs are widely distributed mobile DNA elements that are different than plasmids because they reside silent in the host chromosome and are maintained through vertical descent. Occasionally, ICEs become active, excise, and transmit their DNA to a new recipient, where it is reintegrated. We develop a fluorescent tool to differentiate excision, transfer, and reintegration of a model ICE named ICEclc (for carrying the clc genes for chlorocatechol metabolism) among single Pseudomonas cells by using time-lapse microscopy. We find that ICEclc activation is initiated in stationary phase cells, but excision and transfer predominantly occur only when such cells have been presented with new nutrients. Donors with activated ICE develop a number of different states, characterized by reduced cell division rates or growth arrest, persistence, or lysis, concomitant with ICE excision, and likely, ICE loss or replication. The donor cell state transitions can be described by using a stochastic model, which predicts that ICE fitness is optimal at low initiation rates in stationary phase. Despite highly variable donor cell fates, ICE transfer is remarkably robust overall, with 75% success after excision. Our results help to better understand ICE behavior and shed a new light on bacterial cellular differentiation during horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27247406

  2. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  3. Carbon nanotube-based substrates for modulation of human pluripotent stem cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Pryzhkova, Marina V; Aria, Indrat; Cheng, Qingsu; Harris, Greg M.; Zan, Xingjie; Gharib, Morteza; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the biological response of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) cultured on a carbon nanotube (CNT) array-based substrate with the long term goal to direct hPSC germ layer specification for a wide variety of tissue engineering applications. CNT arrays were fabricated using a chemical vapor deposition system allowing for control over surface roughness and mechanical stiffness. Our results demonstrated that hPSCs readily attach to hydrophilized and extracellular matrix coated CN...

  4. Targeting the hemangioblast with a novel cell type-specific enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Vera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemangioblasts are known as the common precursors for primitive hematopoietic and endothelial lineages. Their existence has been supported mainly by the observation that both cell types develop in close proximity and by in vitro differentiation and genetic studies. However, more compelling evidence will arise from tracking their cell fates using a lineage-specific marker. Results We report the identification of a hemangioblast-specific enhancer (Hb located in the cis-regulatory region of chick Cerberus gene (cCer that is able to direct the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP to the precursors of yolk sac blood and endothelial cells in electroporated chick embryos. Moreover, we present the Hb-eGFP reporter as a powerful live imaging tool for visualizing hemangioblast cell fate and blood island morphogenesis. Conclusions We hereby introduce the Hb enhancer as a valuable resource for genetically targeting the hemangioblast population as well as for studying the dynamics of vascular and blood cell development.

  5. Transport across the cell-membrane dictates nanoparticle fate and toxicity: a new paradigm in nanotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Sabella, Stefania; Muscetti, Ornella; Belli, Valentina; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Fusco, Sabato; de Luca, Elisa; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2014-08-01

    The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions.The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  6. Cell-to-cell signaling influences the fate of prostate cancer stem cells and their potential to generate more aggressive tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Salvatori

    Full Text Available An increasing number of malignancies has been shown to be initiated and propelled by small subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSC. However, whether tumor aggressiveness is driven by CSC and by what extent this property may be relevant within the tumor mass is still unsettled. To address this issue, we isolated a rare tumor cell population on the basis of its CD44(+CD24(- phenotype from the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line DU145 and established its CSC properties. The behavior of selected CSC was investigated with respect to the bulk DU145 cells. The injection of CSC in nude mice generated highly vascularized tumors infiltrating the adjacent tissues, showing high density of neuroendocrine cells and expressing low levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin as well as high levels of vimentin. On the contrary, when a comparable number of unsorted DU145 cells were injected the resulting tumors were less aggressive. To investigate the different features of tumors in vivo, the influence of differentiated tumor cells on CSC was examined in vitro by growing CSC in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from DU145 cells. CSC grown in permissive conditions differentiated into cell populations with features similar to those of cells held in aggressive tumors generated from CSC injection. Differently, conditioned medium induced CSC to differentiate into a cell phenotype comparable to cells of scarcely aggressive tumors originated from bulk DU145 cell injection. These findings show for the first time that CSC are able to generate differentiated cells expressing either highly or scarcely aggressive phenotype, thus influencing prostate cancer progression. The fate of CSC was determined by signals released from tumor environment. Moreover, using microarray analysis we selected some molecules which could be involved in this cell-to-cell signaling, hypothesizing their potential value for prognostic or therapeutic applications.

  7. Early postnatal respiratory viral infection alters hippocampal neurogenesis, cell fate, and neuron morphology in the neonatal piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Matthew S; Harasim, Samantha; Rhodes, Justin S; Van Alstine, William G; Johnson, Rodney W

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory viral infections are common during the neonatal period in humans, but little is known about how early-life infection impacts brain development. The current study used a neonatal piglet model as piglets have a gyrencephalic brain with growth and development similar to human infants. Piglets were inoculated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to evaluate how chronic neuroinflammation affects hippocampal neurogenesis and neuron morphology. Piglets in the neurogenesis study received one bromodeoxyuridine injection on postnatal day (PD) 7 and then were inoculated with PRRSV. Piglets were sacrificed at PD 28 and the number of BrdU+ cells and cell fate were quantified in the dentate gyrus. PRRSV piglets showed a 24% reduction in the number of newly divided cells forming neurons. Approximately 15% of newly divided cells formed microglia, but this was not affected by sex or PRRSV. Additionally, there was a sexual dimorphism of new cell survival in the dentate gyrus where males had more cells than females, and PRRSV infection caused a decreased survival in males only. Golgi impregnation was used to characterize dentate granule cell morphology. Sholl analysis revealed that PRRSV caused a change in inner granule cell morphology where the first branch point was extended further from the cell body. Males had more complex dendritic arbors than females in the outer granule cell layer, but this was not affected by PRRSV. There were no changes to dendritic spine density or morphology distribution. These findings suggest that early-life viral infection can impact brain development. PMID:25176574

  8. Cell type dependent morphological adaptation in polyelectrolyte hydrogels governs chondrogenic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghothaman, Deepak; Leong, Meng Fatt; Lim, Tze Chiun; Wan, Andrew C A; Ser, Zheng; Lee, Eng Hin; Yang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Repair of critical-size articular cartilage defects typically involves delivery of cells in biodegradable, 3D matrices. Differences in the developmental status of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and terminally differentiated mature chondrocytes might be a critical factor in engineering appropriate 3D matrices for articular cartilage tissue engineering. This study examined the relationship between material-driven early cell morphological adaptations and chondrogenic outcomes, by studying the influence of aligned collagen type I (Col I) presentation on chondrocytes and MSC in interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC)-based hydrogels. In the absence of Col I, both chondrocytes and MSCs adopted rounded cell morphology and formed clusters, with chondrocyte clusters favoring the maintenance of hyaline phenotype, while MSC clusters differentiated to fibro-superficial zone-like chondrocytes. Encapsulated chondrocytes in IPC-Col I hydrogel adopted a fibroblastic morphology forming fibro-superficial zone-like phenotype, which could be reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization using cytochalasin D (CytD). In contrast, adoption of fibroblastic morphology by encapsulated MSCs in IPC-Col I facilitated superior chondrogenesis, generating a mature, hyaline neocartilage tissue. CytD treatment abrogated the elongation of MSCs and brought about a single cell-like state, resulting in insignificant chondrogenic differentiation, underscoring the essential requirement of providing matrix environments that are amenable to cell-cell interactions for robust MSC chondrogenic differentiation. Our study demonstrates that MSCs and culture-expanded chondrocytes favour differential microenvironmental niches and emphasizes the importance of designing biomaterials that meet cell type-specific requirements, in adopting chondrocyte or MSC-based approaches for regenerating hyaline, articular cartilage. PMID:27041648

  9. Fate of 1-(1 Prime ,4 Prime -cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soil: Route-specific by-product in the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Raktim [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia-5095 and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, University of South Australia (Australia); Megharaj, Mallavarapu, E-mail: Megharaj.Mallavarapu@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia-5095 and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, University of South Australia (Australia); Kirkbride, K. Paul [Australian Federal Police Forensic and Data Centres, Canberra (Australia); Naidu, Ravi [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia-5095 and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, University of South Australia (Australia)

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the fate of 1-(1 Prime ,4 Prime -cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soil. CMP is the major route-specific byproduct in the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine (MAP) by the use of excess alkali metal (e.g., lithium) in liquid ammonia, which is commonly referred to as the 'Nazi method'. This is one of the most common methods used in many countries for the illicit production of MAP. Knowledge on the fate of CMP in the terrestrial environment is essential to combat potential threats arising from illegal dumping of clandestine laboratory wastes. We report on the sorption-desorption, degradation, and metabolism patterns of CMP in three South Australian soils investigated in laboratory scale. CMP sorption in the test soils followed a Freundlich isotherm in the concentration range of 5 to 100 {mu}g mL{sup -1}. Degradation studies showed that CMP was fairly unstable in both non-sterile and sterile soils, with half-life values typically less than one week. The role of biotic and abiotic soil processes in the degradation of CMP also varied significantly between the different soils, and with the length of the incubation period. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, the results showed that the CMP was not actually degraded to any simpler compounds but transformed to more persistent MAP. Thus, the main concern with Nazi method is the potential hazard from MAP rather than CMP if wastes are disposed of into the environment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study investigated the fate of 1-(1 Prime ,4 Prime -cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMP was fairly unstable in both non-sterile and sterile soils, with half-life values less than a week. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMP transforms to more persistent methylamphetamine (MAP) in soils which is a major environmental concern.

  10. Fate of 1-(1′,4′-cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soil: Route-specific by-product in the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the fate of 1-(1′,4′-cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soil. CMP is the major route-specific byproduct in the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine (MAP) by the use of excess alkali metal (e.g., lithium) in liquid ammonia, which is commonly referred to as the “Nazi method”. This is one of the most common methods used in many countries for the illicit production of MAP. Knowledge on the fate of CMP in the terrestrial environment is essential to combat potential threats arising from illegal dumping of clandestine laboratory wastes. We report on the sorption–desorption, degradation, and metabolism patterns of CMP in three South Australian soils investigated in laboratory scale. CMP sorption in the test soils followed a Freundlich isotherm in the concentration range of 5 to 100 μg mL−1. Degradation studies showed that CMP was fairly unstable in both non-sterile and sterile soils, with half-life values typically less than one week. The role of biotic and abiotic soil processes in the degradation of CMP also varied significantly between the different soils, and with the length of the incubation period. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, the results showed that the CMP was not actually degraded to any simpler compounds but transformed to more persistent MAP. Thus, the main concern with Nazi method is the potential hazard from MAP rather than CMP if wastes are disposed of into the environment. - Highlights: ► This study investigated the fate of 1-(1′,4′-cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soils. ► CMP was fairly unstable in both non-sterile and sterile soils, with half-life values less than a week. ► CMP transforms to more persistent methylamphetamine (MAP) in soils which is a major environmental concern.

  11. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications.

  12. Long-Term Fate Mapping Using Conditional Lentiviral Vectors Reveals a Continuous Contribution of Radial Glia-Like Cells to Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah-Ann Aelvoet

    Full Text Available Newborn neurons are generated throughout life in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Stimulation of adult neurogenesis is considered as an attractive endogenous repair mechanism to treat different neurological disorders. Although tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, important questions remain unanswered, regarding the identity and the behavior of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus. We previously showed that conditional Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors can be used to label neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and to track the migration of their progeny with non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. Here, we applied these Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors to study neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus with bioluminescence imaging and histological techniques. Stereotactic injection of the Cre-Flex vectors into the dentate gyrus of transgenic Nestin-Cre mice resulted in specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells. The labeled cell population could be detected with bioluminescence imaging until 9 months post injection, but no significant increase in the number of labeled cells over time was observed with this imaging technique. Nevertheless, the specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells, combined with histological analysis at different time points, allowed detailed analysis of their neurogenic potential. This long-term fate mapping revealed that a stable pool of labeled nestin-positive neural stem cells continuously contributes to the generation of newborn neurons in the mouse brain until 9 months post injection. In conclusion, the Cre-Flex technology is a valuable tool to address remaining questions regarding neural stem cell identity and behavior in the dentate gyrus.

  13. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  14. Aging alters bone-fat reciprocity by shifting in vivo mesenchymal precursor cell fate towards an adipogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakshman; Brennan, Tracy A; Russell, Elizabeth; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Chen, Qijun; Brad Johnson, F; Pignolo, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) play an important role in bone homeostasis. Age-related changes occur in bone resulting in a decrease in bone density and a relative increase in adipocity. Although in vitro studies suggest the existence of an age-related lineage switch between osteogenic and adipogenic fates, stem cell and microenvironmental contributions to this process have not been elucidated in vivo. In order to study the effects of MPC and microenvironmental aging on functional engraftment and lineage switching, transplantation studies were performed under non-myeloablative conditions in old recipients, with donor MPCs derived from young and old green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. Robust engraftment by young MPCs or their progeny was observed in the marrow, bone-lining region and in the matrix of young recipients; however, significantly lower engraftment was seen at the same sites in old recipients transplanted with old MPCs. Differentiation of transplanted MPCs strongly favored adipogenesis over osteogenesis in old recipients irrespective of MPC donor age, suggesting that microenvironmental alterations that occur with in vivo aging are predominately responsible for MPC lineage switching. These data indicate that aging alters bone-fat reciprocity and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors towards an adipogenic fate. PMID:26805026

  15. Restoration of p53 Expression in Human Cancer Cell Lines Upregulates the Expression of Notch1: Implications for Cancer Cell Fate Determination after Genotoxic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Following genotoxic stress, transcriptional activation of target genes by p53 tumor suppressor is critical in cell fate determination. Here we report that the restoration of p53 function in human cancer cell lines that are deficient in p53 function upregulated the expression of Notch1. Interestingly, the expression of wild-type p53 in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines correlated well with increased expression of Notch1. Furthermore, knockdown of p53 expression in cancer cells that express wild-type p53 resulted in reduced expression of Notch1. Importantly, genotoxic stress to cancer cells that resulted in activation of p53 also upregulated the expression of Notch1. Moreover, p53mediated induction of Notch1 expression was associated with stimulation of the activity of Notch-responsive reporters. Notably, p53 differentially regulated the expression of Notch family members: expression of Notch2 and Notch4 was not induced by p53. Significantly, treatment of cells with gamma secretase inhibitor, an inhibitor of Notch signaling, increased susceptibility to apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Together, our observations suggest that p53mediated upregulation of Notch1 expression in human cancer cell lines contributes to cell fate determination after genotoxic stress.

  16. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  17. Imaging long-term fate of intramyocardially implanted mesenchymal stem cells in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson C Perin

    Full Text Available The long-term fate of stem cells after intramyocardial delivery is unknown. We used noninvasive, repetitive PET/CT imaging with [(18F]FEAU to monitor the long-term (up to 5 months spatial-temporal dynamics of MSCs retrovirally transduced with the sr39HSV1-tk gene (sr39HSV1-tk-MSC and implanted intramyocardially in pigs with induced acute myocardial infarction. Repetitive [(18F]FEAU PET/CT revealed a biphasic pattern of sr39HSV1-tk-MSC dynamics; cell proliferation peaked at 33-35 days after injection, in periinfarct regions and the major cardiac lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes. The sr39HSV1-tk-MSC-associated [(18F]FEAU signals gradually decreased thereafter. Cardiac lymphography studies using PG-Gd-NIRF813 contrast for MRI and near-infrared fluorescence imaging showed rapid clearance of the contrast from the site of intramyocardial injection through the subepicardial lymphatic network into the lymphatic vessels and periaortic lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical analysis of cardiac tissue obtained at 35 and 150 days demonstrated several types of sr39HSV1-tk expressing cells, including fibro-myoblasts, lymphovascular cells, and microvascular and arterial endothelium. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility and sensitivity of [(18F]FEAU PET/CT imaging for long-term, in-vivo monitoring (up to 5 months of the fate of intramyocardially injected sr39HSV1-tk-MSC cells. Intramyocardially transplanted MSCs appear to integrate into the lymphatic endothelium and may help improve myocardial lymphatic system function after MI.

  18. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs) as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Trichostatin A (TSA) combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM) induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and early and late pancreatic marker genes. When CRM was omitted, endoderm/pancreatic marker genes were not induced. Furthermore, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-azacytidine (5AZA) CRM did not affect gene expression changes, and when 5AZA was combined with TSA, no further increase in gene expression of endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine markers was seen over levels induced with TSA alone. Interestingly, TSA-CRM did not affect expression of pluripotency and hepatocyte genes but induced some mesoderm transcripts. Upon removal of TSA-CRM, the endoderm/pancreatic gene expression profile returned to baseline. Our findings underscore the role epigenetic modification in transdifferentiation of one somatic cell into another. However, full reprogramming of fibroblasts to β-cells will require combination of this approach with TF overexpression and/or culture of the partially reprogrammed cells under β-cell specific conditions. PMID:27403168

  19. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambathkumar, Rangarajan; Kalo, Eric; Van Rossom, Rob; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs) as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Trichostatin A (TSA) combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM) induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and early and late pancreatic marker genes. When CRM was omitted, endoderm/pancreatic marker genes were not induced. Furthermore, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-azacytidine (5AZA) CRM did not affect gene expression changes, and when 5AZA was combined with TSA, no further increase in gene expression of endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine markers was seen over levels induced with TSA alone. Interestingly, TSA-CRM did not affect expression of pluripotency and hepatocyte genes but induced some mesoderm transcripts. Upon removal of TSA-CRM, the endoderm/pancreatic gene expression profile returned to baseline. Our findings underscore the role epigenetic modification in transdifferentiation of one somatic cell into another. However, full reprogramming of fibroblasts to β-cells will require combination of this approach with TF overexpression and/or culture of the partially reprogrammed cells under β-cell specific conditions. PMID:27403168

  20. A Progesterone-CXCR4 Axis Controls Mammary Progenitor Cell Fate in the Adult Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Shiah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone drives mammary stem and progenitor cell dynamics through paracrine mechanisms that are currently not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that CXCR4, the receptor for stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1; CXC12, is a crucial instructor of hormone-induced mammary stem and progenitor cell function. Progesterone elicits specific changes in the transcriptome of basal and luminal mammary epithelial populations, where CXCL12 and CXCR4 represent a putative ligand-receptor pair. In situ, CXCL12 localizes to progesterone-receptor-positive luminal cells, whereas CXCR4 is induced in both basal and luminal compartments in a progesterone-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of CXCR4 signaling abrogates progesterone-directed expansion of basal (CD24+CD49fhi and luminal (CD24+CD49flo subsets. This is accompanied by a marked reduction in CD49b+SCA-1− luminal progenitors, their functional capacity, and lobuloalveologenesis. These findings uncover CXCL12 and CXCR4 as novel paracrine effectors of hormone signaling in the adult mammary gland, and present a new avenue for potentially targeting progenitor cell growth and malignant transformation in breast cancer.

  1. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangarajan Sambathkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi Trichostatin A (TSA combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and early and late pancreatic marker genes. When CRM was omitted, endoderm/pancreatic marker genes were not induced. Furthermore, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi 5-azacytidine (5AZA CRM did not affect gene expression changes, and when 5AZA was combined with TSA, no further increase in gene expression of endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and endocrine markers was seen over levels induced with TSA alone. Interestingly, TSA-CRM did not affect expression of pluripotency and hepatocyte genes but induced some mesoderm transcripts. Upon removal of TSA-CRM, the endoderm/pancreatic gene expression profile returned to baseline. Our findings underscore the role epigenetic modification in transdifferentiation of one somatic cell into another. However, full reprogramming of fibroblasts to β-cells will require combination of this approach with TF overexpression and/or culture of the partially reprogrammed cells under β-cell specific conditions.

  2. Exine dehiscing induces rape microspore polarity, which results in different daughter cell fate and fixes the apical–basal axis of the embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Xingchun; Liu, Yuan; He, Yuqing; Ma, Ligang; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2012-01-01

    The roles of cell polarity and the first asymmetric cell division during early embryogenesis in apical–basal cell fate determination remain unclear. Previously, a novel Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis system was established, by which rape exine-dehisced microspores were induced by physical stress. Unlike traditional microspore culture, cell polarity and subsequent asymmetric division appeared in the exine-dehisced microspore, which finally developed into a typical embryo with a suspen...

  3. Male germ cell-specific expression of a novel Patched-domain containing gene Ptchd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in various biological processes, including pattern formation, cell fate determination, proliferation, and differentiation. Hh function is mediated through its membrane receptor Patched. Herein, we have characterized a novel Patched-domain containing gene Ptchd3 in mouse. Messenger RNA of Ptchd3 was exclusively detected in the testis, and existed in two isoforms Ptchd3a and Ptchd3b. The expression of these two mRNA isoforms was shown to be developmentally regulated in testes, and specifically found in male germ cells. Further analysis revealed that the Ptchd3 protein was located on the midpiece of mouse, rat and human sperm. Collectively, these results indicate that Ptchd3 is a novel male germ cell-specific gene and may be involved in the Hh signaling to regulate sperm development and/or sperm function

  4. Fates of Microcystis aeruginosa Cells and Associated Microcystins in Sediment and the Effect of Coagulation Process on Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguo Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During toxic Microcystis aeruginosa blooms, large amounts of cells can enter sediment through natural settlement, and coagulation treatment used to control water blooms can enhance the accumulation of cells. However, the current understanding of the fates of these cells and associated microcystins (MCs, as well as the effect of coagulation treatment on these factors, is limited. The results of the present study show that Microcystis aeruginosa cells in sediment were steadily decomposed under experimental conditions, and that they completely disappeared within 28 days. The major MCs released from settled cells were immediately degraded in sediment, and microbial degradation may be the main mechanism involved in this process. Coagulation treatment with PAC (polyaluminium chloride + sepiolite can efficiently remove Microcystis aeruginosa cells from the water column and prevent their re-invasion. Furthermore, coagulation treatment with PAC + sepiolite had no significant effect on the release and decomposition of MCs and, thus, will not enhance the MCs pollution. However, coagulation treatment can accelerate the nutrient cycle by enhancing the settlement of cells. More attention should be paid to the effect on nutrient cycle when coagulation treatment is used for restoration of aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cameron R.; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V.; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M.; Wilson, Elizabeth B.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G.; Horwitz, Marcus A.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Smale, Stephen T.; Brooks, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  6. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Transmit RNAs and Proteins to Recipient Mature Heart Cells Modulating Cell Fate and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobis-Wozowicz, Sylwia; Kmiotek, Katarzyna; Sekula, Malgorzata; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Kamycka, Elzbieta; Adamiak, Marta; Jankowska, Urszula; Madetko-Talowska, Anna; Sarna, Michal; Bik-Multanowski, Miroslaw; Kolcz, Jacek; Boruczkowski, Dariusz; Madeja, Zbigniew; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K

    2015-09-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are membrane-enclosed cytoplasmic fragments released by normal and activated cells that have been described as important mediators of cell-to-cell communication. Although the ability of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to participate in tissue repair is being increasingly recognized, the use of hiPSC-derived MVs (hiPSC-MVs) in this regard remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated the ability of hiPSC-MVs to transfer bioactive molecules including mRNA, microRNA (miRNA), and proteins to mature target cells such as cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (cMSCs), and we next analyzed effects of hiPSC-MVs on fate and behavior of such target cells. The results show that hiPSC-MVs derived from integration-free hiPSCs cultured under serum-free and feeder-free conditions are rich in mRNA, miRNA, and proteins originated from parent cells; however, the levels of expression vary between donor cells and MVs. Importantly, we found that transfer of hiPSC components by hiPSC-MVs impacted on transcriptome and proteomic profiles of target cells as well as exerted proliferative and protective effects on cMSCs, and enhanced their cardiac and endothelial differentiation potential. hiPSC-MVs also transferred exogenous transcripts from genetically modified hiPSCs that opens new perspectives for future strategies to enhance MV content. We conclude that hiPSC-MVs are effective vehicles for transferring iPSC attributes to adult somatic cells, and hiPSC-MV-mediated horizontal transfer of RNAs and proteins to injured tissues may be used for therapeutic tissue repair. In this study, for the first time, we propose a new concept of use of hiPSCs as a source of safe acellular bioactive derivatives for tissue regeneration. PMID:26031404

  7. Laser ablation of persistent twist cells in Drosophila: muscle precursor fate is not segmentally restricted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, E. R.; Keshishian, H.

    1999-01-01

    In Drosophila the precursors of the adult musculature arise during embryogenesis. These precursor cells have been termed Persistent Twist Cells (PTCs), as they continue to express the transcription factor Twist after that gene ceases expression elsewhere in the mesoderm. In the larval abdomen, the PTCs are associated with peripheral nerves in stereotypic ventral, dorsal, and lateral clusters, which give rise, respectively, to the ventral, dorsal, and lateral muscle fiber groups of the adult. We tested the developmental potential of the PTCs by using a microbeam laser to ablate specific clusters in larvae. We found that the ablation of a single segmental PTC cluster does not usually result in the deletion of the corresponding adult fibers of that segment. Instead, normal or near normal numbers of adult fibers can form after the ablation. Examination of pupae following ablation showed that migrating PTCs from adjacent segments are able to invade the affected segment, replenishing the ablated cells. However, the ablation of homologous PTCs in multiple segments does result in the deletion of the corresponding adult muscle fibers. These data indicate that the PTCs in an abdominal segment can contribute to the formation of muscle fibers in adjacent abdominal segments, and thus are not inherently restricted to the formation of muscle fibers within their segment of origin.

  8. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shucai [Northeast Normal University, Changchun, China; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  9. Carbon nanotube-based substrates for modulation of human pluripotent stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryzhkova, Marina V.; Aria, Indrat; Cheng, Qingsu; Harris, Greg M.; Zan, Xingjie; Gharib, Morteza; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the biological response of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) cultured on a carbon nanotube (CNT) array-based substrate with the long term goal to direct hPSC germ layer specification for a wide variety of tissue engineering applications. CNT arrays were fabricated using a chemical vapor deposition system allowing for control over surface roughness and mechanical stiffness. Our results demonstrated that hPSCs readily attach to hydrophilized and extracellular matrix coated CNT arrays. hPSCs cultured as colonies in conditions supporting self-renewal demonstrated the morphology and marker expression of undifferentiated hPSCs. Conditions inducing spontaneous differentiation lead to hPSC commitment to all three embryonic germ layers as assessed by immunostaining and RT-PCR analysis. Strikingly, the physical characteristics of CNT arrays favored mesodermal specification of hPSCs. This is contradictory to the behavior of hPSCs on traditional tissue culture plastic which promotes the development of ectoderm. Altogether, these results demonstrate the potential of CNT arrays to be used in the generation of new platforms that allow for precise control of hPSC differentiation by tuning the characteristics of their physical microenvironment. PMID:24690530

  10. Carbon nanotube-based substrates for modulation of human pluripotent stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryzhkova, Marina V; Aria, Indrat; Cheng, Qingsu; Harris, Greg M; Zan, Xingjie; Gharib, Morteza; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the biological response of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) cultured on a carbon nanotube (CNT) array-based substrate with the long term goal to direct hPSC germ layer specification for a wide variety of tissue engineering applications. CNT arrays were fabricated using a chemical vapor deposition system allowing for control over surface roughness and mechanical stiffness. Our results demonstrated that hPSCs readily attach to hydrophilized and extracellular matrix coated CNT arrays. hPSCs cultured as colonies in conditions supporting self-renewal demonstrated the morphology and marker expression of undifferentiated hPSCs. Conditions inducing spontaneous differentiation lead to hPSC commitment to all three embryonic germ layers as assessed by immunostaining and RT-PCR analysis. Strikingly, the physical characteristics of CNT arrays favored mesodermal specification of hPSCs. This is contradictory to the behavior of hPSCs on traditional tissue culture plastic which promotes the development of ectoderm. Altogether, these results demonstrate the potential of CNT arrays to be used in the generation of new platforms that allow for precise control of hPSC differentiation by tuning the characteristics of their physical microenvironment. PMID:24690530

  11. Specification for dispersed fuel-cell generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, L. M.; Cohen, R.

    1981-11-01

    A general description and performance definition for a standard 11-mw fuel cell power plant designed for electric utility dispersed-generation applications are provided. Additional features available at the option of the purchaser are also described. The power plant can operate singly or grouped with other power plants to produce larger mutli-megawatt power stations. A 33-mw station is discussed as representative of multiple power plant installations. The power plant specification defines power rating, heat rate, fuels, operating modes, siting characteristics, and available options. A general description included in the attachments covers equipment, typical site arrangement, auxiliary subsystems, maintenance, fuel flexibility, and general fluid and electrical schematics.

  12. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Angela C.H.; Steffen Biechele; Janet Rossant; William L. Stanford

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn) stem (XEN) cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC). An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expressio...

  13. Repression of arterial genes in hemogenic endothelium is sufficient for haematopoietic fate acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, Carlos O; Hawkins, John S; Schmitt, Christopher E; Bos, Frank L; Zape, Joan P; Cautivo, Kelly M; Borges Pinto, Hugo; Rhyner, Alexander M; Yu, Hui; Donohoe, Mary E; Wythe, Joshua D; Zovein, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cell fate and identity are essential for endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition (EHT), an embryonic process that generates the first adult populations of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from hemogenic endothelial cells. Dissecting EHT regulation is a critical step towards the production of in vitro derived HSCs. Yet, we do not know how distinct endothelial and haematopoietic fates are parsed during the transition. Here we show that genes required for arterial identity function later to repress haematopoietic fate. Tissue-specific, temporally controlled, genetic loss of arterial genes (Sox17 and Notch1) during EHT results in increased production of haematopoietic cells due to loss of Sox17-mediated repression of haematopoietic transcription factors (Runx1 and Gata2). However, the increase in EHT can be abrogated by increased Notch signalling. These findings demonstrate that the endothelial haematopoietic fate switch is actively repressed in a population of endothelial cells, and that derepression of these programs augments haematopoietic output. PMID:26204127

  14. Biogenesis and fate of the cell-cell adhesion molecule, agglutinin, during gametogenesis and fertilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertilization in Chlamydomonas begins with the species-specific recognition and adhesion between gametes of opposite mating types via agglutinin molecules on the flagellar surface. This adhesion generates a cAMP-mediated sexual signal that initiates the subsequent events of call wall release, mating structure activation, and cell fusion. Although flagella of paired gametes remain attached to each other until the zygote forms, the process is dynamic. Engaged agglutinins rapidly become inactivated and turnover, requiring the constant supply of new agglutinins to replace the lost molecules. A population of cell body associated agglutinins has been postulated to the pool of agglutinins recruited during this turnover. Cell body agglutinins, therefore were identified, purified, localized within the cells and compared to flagellar agglutinins. The relationship between these two agglutinin populations was also examined. Cell body agglutinins were biochemically indistinguishable from the flagellar form with respect to their Mr, sedimentation coefficient, and hydrophobicity elution properties. Functionally, however, these molecules were inactive in situ. The calculated surface density of agglutinins in the cell body and flagellar domains was similar and thus could not explain their functional difference, but two domains contiguous and yet distinctive suggested they may be separated by a functional barrier. To test this, a method was developed, using a monoclonal antibody and cycloheximide, that removed the flagellar agglutinins so movement between the domains could be monitored. Mobilization of agglutinins onto the flagella did not occur unless sexual signaling was induced with cAMP and papaverine

  15. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  16. Differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells into cells with a neural phenotype: diverse effects of two specific treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Maria

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently been demonstrated that the fate of adult cells is not restricted to their tissues of origin. In particular, it has been shown that bone marrow stem cells can give rise to cells of different tissues, including neural cells, hepatocytes and myocytes, expanding their differentiation potential. Results In order to identify factors able to lead differentiation of stem cells towards cells of neural lineage, we isolated stromal cells from human adult bone marrow (BMSC. Cells were treated with: (1 TPA, forskolin, IBMX, FGF-1 or (2 retinoic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol (BME. Treatment (1 induced differentiation into neuron-like cells within 24 hours, while a longer treatment was required when using retinoic acid and BME. Morphological modifications were more dramatic after treatment (1 compared with treatment (2. In BMSC both treatments induced the expression of neural markers such as NF, GFAP, TUJ-1 and neuron-specific enolase. Moreover, the transcription factor Hes1 increased after both treatments. Conclusion Our study may contribute towards the identification of mechanisms involved in the differentiation of stem cells towards cells of neural lineage.

  17. The long noncoding RNA RNCR2 directs mouse retinal cell specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackshaw Seth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has identified that many long mRNA-like noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are expressed in the developing nervous system. Despite their abundance, the function of these ncRNAs has remained largely unexplored. We have investigated the highly abundant lncRNA RNCR2 in regulation of mouse retinal cell differentiation. Results We find that the RNCR2 is selectively expressed in a subset of both mitotic progenitors and postmitotic retinal precursor cells. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of RNCR2 results in an increase of both amacrine cells and Müller glia, indicating a role for this lncRNA in regulating retinal cell fate specification. We further report that RNCR2 RNA, which is normally nuclear-retained, can be exported from the nucleus when fused to an IRES-GFP sequence. Overexpression of RNCR2-IRES-GFP phenocopies the effects of shRNA-mediated knockdown of RNCR2, implying that forced mislocalization of RNCR2 induces a dominant-negative phenotype. Finally, we use the IRES-GFP fusion approach to identify specific domains of RNCR2 that are required for repressing both amacrine and Müller glial differentiation. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the lncRNA RNCR2 plays a critical role in regulating mammalian retinal cell fate specification. Furthermore, we present a novel approach for generating dominant-negative constructs of lncRNAs, which may be generally useful in the functional analysis of this class of molecules.

  18. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  19. Energy metabolism and energy-sensing pathways in mammalian embryonic and adult stem cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Rafalski, Victoria A.; Mancini, Elena; Brunet, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism is influenced by age, food intake, and conditions such as diabetes and obesity. How do physiological or pathological metabolic changes influence stem cells, which are crucial for tissue homeostasis? This Commentary reviews recent evidence that stem cells have different metabolic demands than differentiated cells, and that the molecular mechanisms that control stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are functionally connected to the metabolic state of the cell and the surrounding...

  20. Nkx2.2 and Nkx2.9 Are the Key Regulators to Determine Cell Fate of Branchial and Visceral Motor Neurons in Caudal Hindbrain

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrar, Wassan; Dias, Jose M.; Ericson, Johan; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Holz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cranial motor nerves in vertebrates are comprised of the three principal subtypes of branchial, visceral, and somatic motor neurons, which develop in typical patterns along the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes of hindbrain. Here we demonstrate that the formation of branchial and visceral motor neurons critically depends on the transcription factors Nkx2.2 and Nkx2.9, which together determine the cell fate of neuronal progenitor cells. Disruption of both genes in mouse embryos results in ...

  1. Promoting ectopic pancreatic fates: pancreas development and future diabetes therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Pearl, Esther J.; Horb, Marko E.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease which could be treated more effectively with a better understanding of pancreas development. This review examines the role of master regulator genes driving crucial steps in pancreas development, from foregut specification to differentiation of the five endocrine cell types. The roles of Pdx1, Ptf1a, and Ngn3 are particularly examined as they are both necessary and sufficient for promoting pancreatic cell fates (Pdx1, Ptf1a) and endocrine cell development (Ngn3). The rol...

  2. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  3. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  4. Fate of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells and Stereocilia after Loss of the Stereocilia

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Shuping; Yang, Shiming; Guo, Weiwei; David Z Z He

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical activity. The site of hair cell transduction is the hair bundle, an array of stereocilia with different height arranged in a staircase. Tip links connect the apex of each stereocilium to the side of its taller neighbor. The hair bundle and tip links of hair cells are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. It has been shown that hair cells in lower vertebrates and in the mammalian vestibular system may survive bundle ...

  5. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Busser

    Full Text Available Homeodomain (HD proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs, but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs. Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory

  6. Early specification of sensory neuron fate revealed by expression and function of neurogenins in the chick embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Sharon E.; Rebelo, Sandra; Anderson, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The generation of sensory and autonomic neurons from the neural crest requires the functions of two classes of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, the Neurogenins (NGNs) and MASH-1, respectively (Fode, C., Gradwohl, G., Morin, X., Dierich, A., LeMeur, M., Goridis, C. and Guillemot, F. (1998) Neuron 20, 483-494; Guillemot, F., Lo, L.-C., Johnson, J. E., Auerbach, A., Anderson, D. J. and Joyner, A. L. (1993) Cell 75, 463-476; Ma, Q., Chen, Z. F., Barrantes, I. B., de la Pompa, ...

  7. The Phenotypic Fate of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Feng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite increasing attention on the role of bone marrow derived stem cells in repair or rejuvenation of tissues and organs, cellular mechanisms of such cell-based therapy remain poorly understood. Methods: We reconstituted hematopoiesis in recipient C57BL/6J mice by transplanting syngeneic GFP+ bone marrow (BM cells. Subsequently, the recipients received subcutaneous injection of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and were subjected to acute renal ischemic injury. Flow cytometry and immunostaining were performed at various time points to assess engraftment and phenotype of BM derived stem cells. Results: Administration of G-CSF increased the release of BM derived stem cells into circulation and enhanced the ensuing recruitment of BM derived stem cells into injured kidney. During the second month post injury, migrated BM derived stem cells lost hematopoietic phenotype (CD45 but maintained the expression of other markers (Sca-1, CD133 and CD44, suggesting their potential of transdifferentiation into renal stem cells. Moreover, G-CSF treatment enhanced the phenotypic conversion. Conclusion: Our work depicted a time-course dependent transition of phenotypic characteristics of BM derived stem cells, demonstrated the existence of BM derived stem cells in damaged kidney and revealed the effects of G-CSF on cell transdifferentiation.

  8. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development. PMID:27056332

  9. Guaiacol and 4-methylphenol as specific markers of torrefied malts. Fate of volatile phenols in special beers through aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Caroline; Nizet, Sabrina; Collin, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    Phenol-specific extracts of 12 Belgian special beers were analyzed by gas chromatography hyphenated to olfactometry (AEDA procedure) and mass spectrometry (single ion monitoring mode). As guaiacol and 4-methylphenol were revealed to be more concentrated in brown beers (>3.5 and >1.1 μg/L, respectively), they are proposed as specific markers of the utilization of dark malts. Analysis of five differently colored malts (5, 50, 500, 900, and 1500 °EBC) allowed confirmation of high levels of guaiacol (>180 μg/L; values given in wort, for 100% specialty malt) and 4-methylphenol (>7 μg/L) for chocolate and black malts only (versus respectively beer aging highlighted major differences between phenols. Guaiacol and 4-methylphenol appeared even more concentrated in dark beers after 14 months of aging, reaching levels not far from their sensory thresholds. 4-Vinylphenols and 4-ethylphenols, on the contrary, proved to be gradually degraded in POF(+)-yeast-derived beers. Vanillin exhibited an interesting pattern: in beers initially containing Beers initially showing an above-threshold level of vanillin displayed a decrease during aging. PMID:25174984

  10. Myogenic differentiation of FSHD patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bosnakovski, Darko

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells overcome several disadvantages of human embryonic stem cells, including host specificity and ethical issues. Patient-specific IPS cells can be generated from every donor by using different cell types, making them a suitable tool for autologous cell therapy and tissue engineering. IPS cells generated from patients with genetic disorders capture the disease genotype in the cell, making them a good model for studying the pathology of the diseas...

  11. Hydrogels with tunable stress relaxation regulate stem cell fate and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Klumpers, Darinka; Darnell, Max; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Hong-Pyo; Lippens, Evi; Duda, Georg N.; Mooney, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Natural extracellular matrices (ECMs) are viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation. However, hydrogels used as synthetic ECMs for three-dimensional (3D) culture are typically elastic. Here, we report a materials approach to tune the rate of stress relaxation of hydrogels for 3D culture, independently of the hydrogel's initial elastic modulus, degradation, and cell-adhesion-ligand density. We find that cell spreading, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all enhanced in cells cultured in gels with faster relaxation. Strikingly, MSCs form a mineralized, collagen-1-rich matrix similar to bone in rapidly relaxing hydrogels with an initial elastic modulus of 17 kPa. We also show that the effects of stress relaxation are mediated by adhesion-ligand binding, actomyosin contractility and mechanical clustering of adhesion ligands. Our findings highlight stress relaxation as a key characteristic of cell-ECM interactions and as an important design parameter of biomaterials for cell culture.

  12. Skeletal Cell Fate Decisions Within Periosteum and Bone Marrow During Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Colnot, Céline

    2008-01-01

    Bone repair requires the mobilization of adult skeletal stem cells/progenitors to allow deposition of cartilage and bone at the injury site. These stem cells/progenitors are believed to come from multiple sources including the bone marrow and the periosteum. The goal of this study was to establish the cellular contributions of bone marrow and periosteum to bone healing in vivo and to assess the effect of the tissue environment on cell differentiation within bone marrow and periosteum. Results...

  13. FATE OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS TRANSPLANTED INTO THE DEAFENED MAMMALIAN COCHLEA

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, B.; Hardman, J; Coco, A.; Epp, S; Silva, M; Crook, J; Shepherd, R

    2006-01-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), the primary afferent neurons of the cochlea, degenerate following a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) due to lack of trophic support normally received from hair cells. Cell transplantation is emerging as a potential strategy for inner ear rehabilitation, as injected cells may be able to replace damaged SGNs in the deafened cochlea. An increase in the number of surviving SGNs may result in improved efficacy of cochlear implants (CIs). We examined the survival of...

  14. Use of Tritiated Thymidine to Study the Origin and Fate of Inflammatory Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of experiments mice were injected with tritiated thymidine at various times following a challenging injection of either tetanus or diphtheria toxoid and the number and proportion of mononuclear cells synthesizing DNA at the site of injection determined. It was noted that the increase in mononuclear inflammatory cells was not preceded by a similar decrease in cells synthesizing DNA. This indicates that the majority of inflammatory mononuclear cells must migrate into the inflamed area, presumably from the blood vessels. Inflammatory cells labelled with tritiated thymidine were injected into the site of inflammation, and autopsies performed at various times. Labelled cells were found not only in the inflammatory area, but in the spleen, bone marrow and lymph nodes. These experiments indicate that as the inflammation subsides, inflammatory cells pass back into the lymphatic and blood vascular systems and eventually some find their way to the hemopoietic tissues of the body. Experiments will be reported indicating formation of plasma cells by inflammatory mononuclear cells. These findings will be discussed in relation to hemopoiesis. (author)

  15. Methamphetamine decreases dentate gyrus stem cell self-renewal and shifts the differentiation towards neuronal fate

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Baptista; Charlène Lasgi; Caroline Benstaali; Nuno Milhazes; Fernanda Borges; Carlos Fontes-Ribeiro; Fabienne Agasse; Ana Paula Silva

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse that negatively interferes with neurogenesis. In fact, we have previously shown that METH triggers stem/progenitor cell death and decreases neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG). Still, little is known regarding its effect on DG stem cell properties. Herein, we investigate the impact of METH on mice DG stem/progenitor cell self-renewal functions. METH (10 nM) decreased DG stem cell self-renewal, while 1 nM...

  16. In vivo MRI of cancer cell fate at the single-cell level in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Chris; Ronald, John A; Ramadan, Soha S; Snir, Jonatan A; Barry, Andrea M; MacKenzie, Lisa T; Mikulis, David J; Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Steeg, Patricia S; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; MacDonald, Ian C; Chambers, Ann F; Rutt, Brian K; Foster, Paula J

    2006-11-01

    Metastasis (the spread of cancer from a primary tumor to secondary organs) is responsible for most cancer deaths. The ability to follow the fate of a population of tumor cells over time in an experimental animal would provide a powerful new way to monitor the metastatic process. Here we describe a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that permits the tracking of breast cancer cells in a mouse model of brain metastasis at the single-cell level. Cancer cells that were injected into the left ventricle of the mouse heart and then delivered to the brain were detectable on MR images. This allowed the visualization of the initial delivery and distribution of cells, as well as the growth of tumors from a subset of these cells within the whole intact brain volume. The ability to follow the metastatic process from the single-cell stage through metastatic growth, and to quantify and monitor the presence of solitary undivided cells will facilitate progress in understanding the mechanisms of brain metastasis and tumor dormancy, and the development of therapeutics to treat this disease. PMID:17029229

  17. DWnt-2, a Drosophila Wnt gene required for the development of the male reproductive tract, specifies a sexually dimorphic cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Kozopas, Karen M.; Samos, Cindy Harryman; Nusse, Roel

    1998-01-01

    The sexually dimorphic characteristics of the reproductive tract in Drosophila require that cells of the gonad and the genital disc be assigned sex-specific fates. We report here that DWnt-2, a secreted glycoprotein related to wingless, is a signal required for cell fate determination and morphogenesis in the developing male reproductive tract. Testes from DWnt-2 null mutant flies lack the male-specific pigment cells of the reproductive tract sheath and the muscle precursors of the sheath fai...

  18. The B-MYB transcriptional network guides cell cycle progression and fate decisions to sustain self-renewal and the identity of pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhan

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs are pluripotent and have unlimited self-renewal capacity. Although pluripotency and differentiation have been examined extensively, the mechanisms responsible for self-renewal are poorly understood and are believed to involve an unusual cell cycle, epigenetic regulators and pluripotency-promoting transcription factors. Here we show that B-MYB, a cell cycle regulated phosphoprotein and transcription factor critical to the formation of inner cell mass, is central to the transcriptional and co-regulatory networks that sustain normal cell cycle progression and self-renewal properties of ESCs. Phenotypically, B-MYB is robustly expressed in ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and it is present predominantly in a hypo-phosphorylated state. Knockdown of B-MYB results in functional cell cycle abnormalities that involve S, G2 and M phases, and reduced expression of critical cell cycle regulators like ccnb1 and plk1. By conducting gene expression profiling on control and B-MYB deficient cells, ChIP-chip experiments, and integrative computational analyses, we unraveled a highly complex B-MYB-mediated transcriptional network that guides ESC self-renewal. The network encompasses critical regulators of all cell cycle phases and epigenetic regulators, pluripotency transcription factors, and differentiation determinants. B-MYB along with E2F1 and c-MYC preferentially co-regulate cell cycle target genes. B-MYB also co-targets genes regulated by OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that are significantly associated with stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and epigenetic control. Moreover, loss of B-MYB leads to a breakdown of the transcriptional hierarchy present in ESCs. These results coupled with functional studies demonstrate that B-MYB not only controls and accelerates cell cycle progression in ESCs it contributes to fate decisions and maintenance of pluripotent stem cell identity.

  19. Modelling the fate of six common pharmaceuticals in a small stream: quantification of attenuation and retention in different stream-specific environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riml, Joakim; Wörman, Anders; Kunkel, Uwe; Radke, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Detection of pharmaceutical residues in streaming waters is common in urbanized areas. Although the occurrence and source of these micropollutants is known, their behavior in these aquatic ecosystems is still only partly understood. Specifically, quantitative information of biogeochemical processes in stream-specific environments where predominant reactions occur is often missing. In an attempt to address this knowledge gap, we performed simultaneous tracer tests in Säva Brook, Sweden, with bezafibrate, clofibric acid, diclofenac, ibuprofen, metoprolol and naproxen, as well as with the more inert solutes uranine and Rhodamine WT. The breakthrough curves at five successive sampling stations along a 16 km long stream reach were evaluated using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model framework containing surface water transport together with a representation of transient storage in slow/immobile zones of the stream. The multi-tracer experiment opens for decoupling of hydrological and biogeochemical contribution to the fate, and by linking impact and sensitivity analyses to relative significance of model parameters the most important processes for each contaminant were elucidated. Specifically for Säva Brook, the proposed methodology revealed that the pharmaceutical-contaminated stream water remained in the storage zones for times corresponding to 5-25% of the flow time of the stream. Furthermore, the results indicate a great variability in terms of predominant biogeochemical processes between the different contaminants. Rapid reactions occurring in the transient storage zone attenuated both ibuprofen and clofibric acid, and we conclude that a major degradation pathway for these contaminants was biodegradation in the hyporheic zone. In contrast, bezafibrate, metoprolol, and naproxen were mainly affected by sorption both in the storage zone and the main channel, while diclofenac displayed negligible effects of biogeochemical reactions.

  20. Imaging and fate of stem cells labeled with superparamgnetic nanoparticles in brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    Iowa, 2004. s. 17. [Stem Cell Biology Development and Plasticity A Growth Factor and Signal Transduction Symposium. 16.09.2004-19.09.2004, Iowa] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Keywords : stem cells * nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Methamphetamine decreases dentate gyrus stem cell self-renewal and shifts the differentiation towards neuronal fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Baptista

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse that negatively interferes with neurogenesis. In fact, we have previously shown that METH triggers stem/progenitor cell death and decreases neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG. Still, little is known regarding its effect on DG stem cell properties. Herein, we investigate the impact of METH on mice DG stem/progenitor cell self-renewal functions. METH (10 nM decreased DG stem cell self-renewal, while 1 nM delayed cell cycle in the G0/G1-to-S phase transition and increased the number of quiescent cells (G0 phase, which correlated with a decrease in cyclin E, pEGFR and pERK1/2 protein levels. Importantly, both drug concentrations (1 or 10 nM did not induce cell death. In accordance with the impairment of self-renewal capacity, METH (10 nM decreased Sox2+/Sox2+ while increased Sox2−/Sox2− pairs of daughter cells. This effect relied on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA signaling, which was prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (10 μM. Moreover, METH (10 nM increased doublecortin (DCX protein levels consistent with neuronal differentiation. In conclusion, METH alters DG stem cell properties by delaying cell cycle and decreasing self-renewal capacities, mechanisms that may contribute to DG neurogenesis impairment followed by cognitive deficits verified in METH consumers.

  2. A subset of osteoblasts expressing high endogenous levels of PPARgamma switches fate to adipocytes in the rat calvaria cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yoshiko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding fate choice and fate switching between the osteoblast lineage (ObL and adipocyte lineage (AdL is important to understand both the developmental inter-relationships between osteoblasts and adipocytes and the impact of changes in fate allocation between the two lineages in normal aging and certain diseases. The goal of this study was to determine when during lineage progression ObL cells are susceptible to an AdL fate switch by activation of endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARgamma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple rat calvaria cells within the ObL developmental hierarchy were isolated by either fractionation on the basis of expression of alkaline phosphatase or retrospective identification of single cell-derived colonies, and treated with BRL-49653 (BRL, a synthetic ligand for PPARgamma. About 30% of the total single cell-derived colonies expressed adipogenic potential (defined cytochemically when BRL was present. Profiling of ObL and AdL markers by qRT-PCR on amplified cRNA from over 160 colonies revealed that BRL-dependent adipogenic potential correlated with endogenous PPARgamma mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, a significant subset of relatively mature ObL cells exhibited osteo-adipogenic bipotentiality. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed that ObL cells co-expressed multiple mesenchymal lineage determinants (runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2, PPARgamma, Sox9 and MyoD which localized in the cytoplasm initially, and only Runx2 translocated to the nucleus during ObL progression. Notably, however, some cells exhibited both PPARgamma and Runx2 nuclear labeling with concomitant upregulation of expression of their target genes with BRL treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that not only immature but a subset of relatively mature ObL cells characterized by relatively high levels of endogenous PPARgamma expression can be switched to the AdL. The fact that some Ob

  3. REX-1 expression and p38 MAPK activation status can determine proliferation/differentiation fates in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilli Ram Bhandari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: REX1/ZFP42 is a well-known embryonic stem cell (ESC marker. However, the role of REX1, itself, is relatively unknown because the function of REX1 has only been reported in the differentiation of ESCs via STAT signaling pathways. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs isolated from young tissues and cancer cells express REX1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs strongly express REX1 and have a lower activation status of p38 MAPK, but bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs have weak REX1 expression and higher activation of p38 MAPK. These results indicated that REX1 expression in hMSCs was positively correlated with proliferation rates but inversely correlated with the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. In hUCB-MSCs, the roles of REX1 and p38 MAPK were investigated, and a knockdown study was performed using a lentiviral vector-based small hairpin RNA (shRNA. After REX1 knockdown, decreased cell proliferation was observed. In REX1 knocked-down hUCB-MSCs, the osteogenic differentiation ability deteriorated, but the adipogenic potential increased or was similar to that observed in the controls. The phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in hUCB-MSCs significantly increased after REX1 knockdown. After p38 MAPK inhibitor treatment, the cell growth in REX1 knocked-down hUCB-MSCs almost recovered, and the suppressed expression levels of CDK2 and CCND1 were also restored. The expression of MKK3, an upstream regulator of p38 MAPK, significantly increased in REX1 knocked-down hUCB-MSCs. The direct binding of REX1 to the MKK3 gene was confirmed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings showed that REX1 regulates the proliferation/differentiation of hMSCs through the suppression of p38 MAPK signaling via the direct suppression of MKK3. Therefore, p38 MAPK and REX-1 status can determine the cell fate of adult stem cells (ASCs. These

  4. Fate Mapping Mammalian Corneal Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alexander; Wakefield, Denis; Di Girolamo, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The anterior aspect of the cornea consists of a stratified squamous epithelium, thought to be maintained by a rare population of stem cells (SCs) that reside in the limbal transition zone. Although migration of cells that replenish the corneal epithelium has been studied for over a century, the process is still poorly understood and not well characterized. Numerous techniques have been employed to examine corneal epithelial dynamics, including visualization by light microscopy, the incorporation of vital dyes and DNA labels, and transplantation of genetically marked cells that have acted as cell and lineage beacons. Modern-day lineage tracing utilizes molecular methods to determine the fate of a specific cell and its progeny over time. Classically employed in developmental biology, lineage tracing has been used more recently to track the progeny of adult SCs in a number of organs to pin-point their location and understand their movement and influence on tissue regeneration. This review highlights key discoveries that have led researchers to develop cutting-edge genetic tools to effectively and more accurately monitor turnover and displacement of cells within the mammalian corneal epithelium. Collating information on the basic biology of SCs will have clinical ramifications in furthering our knowledge of the processes that govern their role in homeostasis, wound-healing, transplantation, and how we can improve current unsatisfactory SC-based therapies for patients suffering blinding corneal disease. PMID:26774909

  5. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 2. Field investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to determine the gas composition, attenuation, and emission of fluorocarbons in a monofill shredder residue landfill cell by field investigation. Landfill gas generated within the shredder waste primarily consisted of CH(4) (27%) and N(2) (71%), without CO(2), indicating that the gas composition was governed by chemical reactions in combination with anaerobic microbial reactions. The gas generated also contained different fluorocarbons (up to 27 μg L(-1)). The presence of HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 indicated that anaerobic degradation of CFC-11 occurred in the landfill cell, as neither of these compounds has been produced for industrial applications. This study demonstrates that a landfill cell containing shredder waste has a potential for attenuating CFC-11 released from polyurethane (PUR) insulation foam in the cell via aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes. In deeper, anaerobic zones of the cell, reductive dechlorination of CFCs to HCFCs was evident, while in the shallow, oxic zones, there was a high potential for biooxidation of both methane and lesser chlorinated fluorocarbons. These findings correlated well with both laboratory results (presented in a companion paper) and surface emission measurements that, with the exception from a few hot spots, indicated that surface emissions were negative or below detection. PMID:20444588

  6. Optimization of Femtosecond Laser Polymerized Structural Niches to Control Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Fate in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela T. Raimondi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We applied two-photon polymerization to fabricate 3D synthetic niches arranged in complex patterns to study the effect of mechano-topological parameters on morphology, renewal and differentiation of rat mesenchymal stromal cells. Niches were formed in a photoresist with low auto-fluorescence, which enabled the clear visualization of the fluorescence emission of the markers used for biological diagnostics within the internal niche structure. The niches were structurally stable in culture up to three weeks. At three weeks of expansion in the niches, cell density increased by almost 10-fold and was 67% greater than in monolayer culture. Evidence of lineage commitment was observed in monolayer culture surrounding the structural niches, and within cell aggregates, but not inside the niches. Thus, structural niches were able not only to direct stem cell homing and colony formation, but also to guide aggregate formation, providing increased surface-to-volume ratios and space for stem cells to adhere and renew, respectively.

  7. The autophagic- lysosomal pathway determines the fate of glial cells under manganese- induced oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Pomilio, C; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) overexposure is frequently associated with the development of a neurodegenerative disorder known as Manganism. The Mn-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes cellular damage, finally leading to apoptotic cell death in rat astrocytoma C6 cells. In this scenario, the autophagic pathway could play an important role in preventing cytotoxicity. In the present study, we found that Mn induced an increase in the amount and total volume of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), a process usually related to the activation of the autophagic pathway. Particularly, the generation of enlarged AVOs was a ROS- dependent event. In this report we demonstrated for the first time that Mn induces autophagy in glial cells. This conclusion emerged from the results obtained employing a battery of autophagy markers: a) the increase in LC3-II expression levels, b) the formation of autophagic vesicles labeled with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or LC3 and, c) the increase in Beclin 1/ Bcl-2 and Beclin 1/ Bcl-X(L) ratio. Autophagy inhibition employing 3-MA and mAtg5(K130R) resulted in decreased cell viability indicating that this event plays a protective role in Mn- induced cell death. In addition, mitophagy was demonstrated by an increase in LC3 and TOM-20 colocalization. On the other hand, we proposed the occurrence of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) based in the fact that cathepsins B and D activities are essential for cell death. Both cathepsin B inhibitor (Ca-074 Me) or cathepsin D inhibitor (Pepstatin A) completely prevented Mn- induced cytotoxicity. In addition, low dose of Bafilomycin A1 showed a similar effect, a finding that adds evidence about the lysosomal role in Mn cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that Mn induces injury and alters LC3 expression levels in rat striatal astrocytes. In summary, our results demonstrated that autophagy is activated to counteract the harmful effect caused by Mn. These data is valuable to

  8. SOX17 is a Critical Specifier of Human Primordial Germ Cell Fate

    OpenAIRE

    Irie, Naoko; Weinberger, Leehee; Tang, Walfred W. C.; KOBAYASHI, Toshihiro; Viukov, Sergey; Manor, Yair S.; Dietmann, Sabine; Hanna, Jacob H.; Surani, M. Azim

    2014-01-01

    We thank Rick Livesey and his lab for help with the culture of hESCs; Sohei Kitazawa and Janet Shipley for the TCam-2 cells; Nigel Miller and Andy Riddell for cell sorting, Roger Barker, Xiaoling He, and Pam Tyers for collection of human embryos; and Charles Bradshaw for help with bioinformatics. We thank members of the Surani and Hanna labs for important discussions and technical help. N.I. is supported by Grant-in-Aid for fellows of the JSPS and by BIRAX (the Britain Israe...

  9. Origin and fate of hematopoietic stem precursor cells in the leech Hirudo medicinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Grimaldi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic process by which blood cells are formed has been intensely studied for over a century using several model systems. An increasing amount of evidence shows that hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, immune response and the regulating these processes (i.e., cytokines are highly conserved across taxonomic groups. Over the last decade, the leech Hirudo medicinalis, given its simple anatomy and its repertoire of less varied cell types when compared to vertebrates, has been proposed as a powerful model for studying basic steps of hematopoiesis and immune responses. Here, I provide a broad overview of H. medicinalis hematopoiesis and I highlight the benefits of using leech as a model.

  10. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan; F Maitz, Manfred; Zhao, Anshan

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification. PMID:27127049

  11. Imaging the fate of implanted stem cells in brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    Innsbruck : organizátor, 2003, s. 1. [FENS Winter School 2003. Kitzbuehel (AT), 07.12.2003-14.12.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : Stem cells * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. Equine-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Retain Lineage Commitment Toward Myogenic and Chondrogenic Fates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Quattrocelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs hold great potential not only for human but also for veterinary purposes. The equine industry must often deal with health issues concerning muscle and cartilage, where comprehensive regenerative strategies are still missing. In this regard, a still open question is whether equine iPSCs differentiate toward muscle and cartilage, and whether donor cell type influences their differentiation potential. We addressed these questions through an isogenic system of equine iPSCs obtained from myogenic mesoangioblasts (MAB-iPSCs and chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-iPSCs. Despite similar levels of pluripotency characteristics, the myogenic differentiation appeared enhanced in MAB-iPSCs. Conversely, the chondrogenic differentiation was augmented in MSC-iPSCs through both teratoma and in vitro differentiation assays. Thus, our data suggest that equine iPSCs can differentiate toward the myogenic and chondrogenic lineages, and can present a skewed differentiation potential in favor of the source cell lineage.

  13. Genome-wide mapping of Polycomb target genes unravels their roles in cell fate transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Pasini, Diego;

    2006-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find that Pol...

  14. Prion replication occurs in endogenous adult neural stem cells and alters their neuronal fate: involvement of endogenous neural stem cells in prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroa Relaño-Ginès

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are irreversible progressive neurodegenerative diseases, leading to severe incapacity and death. They are characterized in the brain by prion amyloid deposits, vacuolisation, astrocytosis, neuronal degeneration, and by cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments. There is no treatment for these disorders and stem cell therapy therefore represents an interesting new approach. Gains could not only result from the cell transplantation, but also from the stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC or by the combination of both approaches. However, the development of such strategies requires a detailed knowledge of the pathology, particularly concerning the status of the adult neurogenesis and endogenous NSC during the development of the disease. During the past decade, several studies have consistently shown that NSC reside in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS and that adult neurogenesis occurs throughout the adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle or the Dentate Gyrus of the hippocampus. Adult NSC are believed to constitute a reservoir for neuronal replacement during normal cell turnover or after brain injury. However, the activation of this system does not fully compensate the neuronal loss that occurs during neurodegenerative diseases and could even contribute to the disease progression. We investigated here the status of these cells during the development of prion disorders. We were able to show that NSC accumulate and replicate prions. Importantly, this resulted in the alteration of their neuronal fate which then represents a new pathologic event that might underlie the rapid progression of the disease.

  15. Upon impact: the fate of adhering Pseudomonas fluorescens cells during nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habimana, Olivier; Semião, Andrea J C; Casey, Eoin

    2014-08-19

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a high-pressure membrane filtration process increasingly applied in drinking water treatment and water reuse processes. NF typically rejects divalent salts, organic matter, and micropollutants. However, the efficiency of NF is adversely affected by membrane biofouling, during which microorganisms adhere to the membrane and proliferate to create a biofilm. Here we show that adhered Pseudomonas fluorescens cells under high permeate flux conditions are met with high fluid shear and convective fluxes at the membrane-liquid interface, resulting in their structural damage and collapse. These results were confirmed by fluorescent staining, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. This present study offers a "first-glimpse" of cell damage and death during the initial phases of bacterial adhesion to NF membranes and raises a key question about the role of this observed phenomena during early-stage biofilm formation under permeate flux and cross-flow conditions. PMID:25072514

  16. Tracking Cell Fate with Synthetic Memory and Pulse Detecting Transcriptional Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Inniss, Mara Christine

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems to meet new challenges and teach us more about natural biological systems. These pursuits range from the building of relatively simple transcriptional circuits, to engineering the metabolism of an organism, to reconstructing entire genomes. While we are still emerging from the foundational stages of this new field, we are already using engineered cells to discover underlying biological mechanisms, develop new therapeutics, and produce natu...

  17. CAST-ChIP Maps Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States in the Drosophila Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Schauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP, a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II CAST-ChIP identifies ∼1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  18. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells. PMID:21447831

  19. Migration, fate and in vivo imaging of adult stem cells in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2007), s. 1336-1342. ISSN 1350-9047 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594 Grant ostatní: GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; EU(DE) 512146; EU(FR) 518233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Mesenchymal stem cells * Contrast agents * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 8.254, year: 2007

  20. Survival and persistence of fecal host-specific Bacteroidales cells and their DNA assessed by PMA-qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, S.; Bombardelli, F.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding and managing microbial pollutions in water is one of the foremost challenges of establishing effective managements and remediation strategies to impaired water bodies polluted by uncharacterized fecal sources. Quantitative microbial source tracking (MST) approaches using fecal Bacteroidales and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure gene copies of host-specific 16S rRNA genetic markers are promising because they can allow for identifying and quantifying fecal loadings from a particular animal host and understanding the fate and transport of host-specific Bacteroidales over a range of conditions in water bodies. Similar to the case of traditional fecal indicator bacteria, a relatively long persistence of target DNA may hamper applied MST studies, if genetic markers cannot be linked to recent fecal pollution in water. We report a successful approach to removing the qPCR signal derived from free DNA and dead host-specific Bacteroidales cells by selectively binding the DNA and consequently inhibiting PCR amplification using light- activated propidium monoazide (PMA). Optimal PMA-qPCR conditions were determined as 100 µM of PMA concentration and a 10-min light exposure time at different solids concentrations in order to mimic a range of water samples. Under these conditions, PMA-qPCR resulted in the selective exclusion of DNA from heat- treated cells of non-culturable Bacteroidales in human feces and wastewater influent and effluent samples. Also, the persistence of feces-derived host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and their cells (determined by universal, human-, cow- and dog-specific Bacteroidales qPCR assays) in seawater was investigated in microcosms at environmental conditions. The average T99 (two log reduction) value for host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells was 28 h, whereas that for total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA was 177 h. Natural sunlight did not have a strong influence on the fate of fecal Bacteroidales cells and their DNA, presumably

  1. The Effect of Pro-Neurogenic Gene Expression on Adult Subventricular Zone Precursor Cell Recruitment and Fate Determination After Excitotoxic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn S; Connor, Bronwen J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of on-going neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain, neurons are generally not replaced after injury. Using a rodent model of excitotoxic cell loss and retroviral (RV) lineage tracing, we previously demonstrated transient recruitment of precursor cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) into the lesioned striatum. In the current study we determined that these cells included migratory neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC), with the predominant response from glial cells. We attempted to override this glial response by ectopic expression of the pro-neurogenic genes Pax6 or Dlx2 in the adult rat SVZ following quinolinic acid lesioning. RV-Dlx2 over-expression stimulated repair at a previously non-neurogenic time point by enhancing neuroblast recruitment and the percentage of cells that retained a neuronal fate within the lesioned area, compared to RV-GFP controls. RV-Pax6 expression was unsuccessful at inhibiting glial fate and intriguingly, increased OPC cell numbers with no change in neuronal recruitment. These findings suggest that gene choice is important when attempting to augment endogenous repair as the lesioned environment can overcome pro-neurogenic gene expression. Dlx2 over-expression however was able to partially overcome an anti-neuronal environment and therefore is a promising candidate for further study of striatal regeneration.

  2. Stat3 signaling regulates embryonic stem cell fate in a dose-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-I Tai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stat3 is essential for mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC self-renewal mediated by LIF/gp130 receptor signaling. Current understanding of Stat3-mediated ESC self-renewal mechanisms is very limited, and has heretofore been dominated by the view that Stat3 signaling functions in a binary “on/off” manner. Here, in contrast to this binary viewpoint, we demonstrate a contextual, rheostat-like mechanism for Stat3's function in mESCs. Activation and expression levels determine whether Stat3 functions in a self-renewal or a differentiation role in mESCs. We also show that Stat3 induces rapid differentiation of mESCs toward the trophectoderm (TE lineage when its activation level exceeds certain thresholds. Stat3 induces this differentiation phenotype via induction of Tfap2c and its downstream target Cdx2. Our findings provide a novel concept in the realm of Stat3, self-renewal signaling, and pluripotent stem cell biology. Ultimately, this finding may facilitate the development of conditions for the establishment of authentic non-rodent ESCs.

  3. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 1. Laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to use laboratory experiments to estimate fluorocarbon release and attenuation processes in a monofill shredder residue (SR) landfill cell. Waste from the open SR landfill cell at the AV Miljø landfill in Denmark was sampled at three locations. The waste contained 1-3% metal and a relatively low fraction of rigid polyurethane (PUR) foam particles. The PUR waste contained less blowing agent (CFC-11) than predicted from a release model. However, CFC-11 was steadily released in an aerobic bench scale experiment. Anaerobic waste incubation bench tests showed that SRSR produced significant methane (CH(4)), but at rates that were in the low end of the range observed for municipal solid waste. Aerobic and anaerobic batch experiments showed that processes in SRSR potentially can attenuate the fluorocarbons released from the SRSR itself: CFC-11 is degraded under anaerobic conditions with the formation of degradation products, which are being degraded under CH(4) oxidation conditions prevailing in the upper layers of the SR. PMID:20435458

  4. Nuclear receptor NR5A2 controls neural stem cell fate decisions during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Athanasios; Politis, Panagiotis K.

    2016-01-01

    The enormous complexity of mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is generated by highly synchronized actions of diverse factors and signalling molecules in neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms that integrate extrinsic and intrinsic signals to control proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs are not well-understood. Here we identify nuclear receptor NR5A2 as a central node in these regulatory networks and key player in neural development. Overexpression and loss-of-function experiments in primary NSCs and mouse embryos suggest that NR5A2 synchronizes cell-cycle exit with induction of neurogenesis and inhibition of astrogliogenesis by direct regulatory effects on Ink4/Arf locus, Prox1, a downstream target of proneural genes, as well as Notch1 and JAK/STAT signalling pathways. Upstream of NR5a2, proneural genes, as well as Notch1 and JAK/STAT pathways control NR5a2 endogenous expression. Collectively, these observations render NR5A2 a critical regulator of neural development and target gene for NSC-based treatments of CNS-related diseases. PMID:27447294

  5. p66Shc Aging Protein in Control of Fibroblasts Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz R. Wieckowski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are wieldy accepted as one of the main factors of the aging process. These highly reactive compounds modify nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and affect the functionality of mitochondria in the first case and ultimately of the cell. Any agent or genetic modification that affects ROS production and detoxification can be expected to influence longevity. On the other hand, genetic manipulations leading to increased longevity can be expected to involve cellular changes that affect ROS metabolism. The 66-kDa isoform of the growth factor adaptor Shc (p66Shc has been recognized as a relevant factor to the oxygen radical theory of aging. The most recent data indicate that p66Shc protein regulates life span in mammals and its phosphorylation on serine 36 is important for the initiation of cell death upon oxidative stress. Moreover, there is strong evidence that apart from aging, p66Shc may be implicated in many oxidative stress-associated pathologies, such as diabetes, mitochondrial and neurodegenerative disorders and tumorigenesis. This article summarizes recent knowledge about the role of p66Shc in aging and senescence and how this protein can influence ROS production and detoxification, focusing on studies performed on skin and skin fibroblasts.

  6. Enteric glial cells have specific immunosuppressive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermarrec, Laetitia; Durand, Tony; Neunlist, Michel; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neveu, Isabelle

    2016-06-15

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) have trophic and neuroregulatory functions in the enteric nervous system, but whether they exert a direct effect on immune cells is unknown. Here, we used co-cultures to show that human EGC can inhibit the proliferation of activated T lymphocytes. Interestingly, EGC from Crohn's patients were effective at one EGC for two T cells whereas EGC from control patients required a ratio of 1:1. These data suggest that EGC contribute to local immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal wall. They also raise the possibility that EGC have particular immunosuppressive properties in inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. PMID:27235353

  7. Systematically labeling developmental stage-specific genes for the study of pancreatic β-cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haisong; Yang, Huan; Zhu, Dicong; Sui, Xin; Li, Juan; Liang, Zhen; Xu, Lei; Chen, Zeyu; Yao, Anzhi; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xi; Yi, Xing; Liu, Meng; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Wenjian; Lin, Hua; Xie, Lan; Lou, Jinning; Zhang, Yong; Xi, Jianzhong; Deng, Hongkui

    2014-10-01

    The applications of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cells in regenerative medicine has encountered a long-standing challenge: how can we efficiently obtain mature cell types from hPSCs? Attempts to address this problem are hindered by the complexity of controlling cell fate commitment and the lack of sufficient developmental knowledge for guiding hPSC differentiation. Here, we developed a systematic strategy to study hPSC differentiation by labeling sequential developmental genes to encompass the major developmental stages, using the directed differentiation of pancreatic β cells from hPSCs as a model. We therefore generated a large panel of pancreas-specific mono- and dual-reporter cell lines. With this unique platform, we visualized the kinetics of the entire differentiation process in real time for the first time by monitoring the expression dynamics of the reporter genes, identified desired cell populations at each differentiation stage and demonstrated the ability to isolate these cell populations for further characterization. We further revealed the expression profiles of isolated NGN3-eGFP(+) cells by RNA sequencing and identified sushi domain-containing 2 (SUSD2) as a novel surface protein that enriches for pancreatic endocrine progenitors and early endocrine cells both in human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived pancreatic cells and in the developing human pancreas. Moreover, we captured a series of cell fate transition events in real time, identified multiple cell subpopulations and unveiled their distinct gene expression profiles, among heterogeneous progenitors for the first time using our dual reporter hESC lines. The exploration of this platform and our new findings will pave the way to obtain mature β cells in vitro. PMID:25190258

  8. Distinctive effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in regulating neural stem cell fate are mediated via endocannabinoid signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, S C; Mandhair, H K; Fincham, R E A; Kerr, D M; Roche, M; Molina-Holgado, F

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a complex interplay between the endocannabinoid system, omega-3 fatty acids and the immune system in the promotion of brain self-repair. However, it is unknown if all omega-3 fatty acids elicit similar effects on adult neurogenesis and if such effects are mediated or regulated by interactions with the endocannabinoid system. This study investigated the effects of DHA and EPA on neural stem cell (NSC) fate and the role of the endocannabinoid signalling pathways in these effects. EPA, but not DHA, significantly increased proliferation of NSCs compared to controls, an effect associated with enhanced levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and p-p38 MAPK, effects attenuated by pre-treatment with CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, in NSCs derived from IL-1β deficient mice, EPA significantly decreased proliferation and p-p38 MAPK levels compared to controls, suggesting a key role for IL-1β signalling in the effects observed. Although DHA similarly increased 2-AG levels in wild-type NSCs, there was no concomitant increase in proliferation or p-p38 MAPK activity. In addition, in NSCs from IL-1β deficient mice, DHA significantly increased proliferation without effects on p-P38 MAPK, suggesting effects of DHA are mediated via alternative signalling pathways. These results provide crucial new insights into the divergent effects of EPA and DHA in regulating NSC proliferation and the pathways involved, and highlight the therapeutic potential of their interplay with endocannabinoid signalling in brain repair. PMID:27044662

  9. 重编程细胞的命运%Fate of reprogramming cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮光萍; 姚翔; 刘菊芬; 胡媛媛; 王金祥; 何洁; 赵晶; 潘兴华

    2015-01-01

    背景:体细胞重新编程技术也称细胞重组技术,使已经完成分化的体细胞回到原始的全能性或多能性状态,并可以重新分化成与原来不一样的细胞。通过重编程技术可以获得患者特异性诱导多能干细胞和疾病特异性诱导多能干细胞,显著减少了免疫排斥反应。目的:探讨关于直接重编程到特定系的方法,总结参与重编程的分子机制。方法:以“重编程”为中文检索词,“reprogramming”为英文检索词,应用计算机检索维普(VIP)期刊全文数据库、万方全文数据库、中国知网全文数据库、PubMed 数据库、Springer 数据库1958年1月至2015年4月有关细胞重编程技术的文献,排除与研究目的无关及重复性研究,保留40篇文献进一步分析。结果与结论:当前重编程的步骤效率很低,在特定群只有相对少量的细胞能进行重编程,重编程的完整性和程度也有待证实。直接重编程成体、定系的细胞从一种细胞到另一种细胞一直是发育生物学很难达到的目标。最近的研究证明分化的细胞强制表达特异转录因子能促进细胞分化。这些发现使再生医学领域有了重大进展,可以提供替代细胞治疗各种再生紊乱。目前,基本的分子机制需要进一步阐明,在直接重编程被应用于临床之前还有许多问题需要解决。%BACKGROUND:Somatic cel reprogramming technology, also known as recombinant technology, has completed differentiated somatic cels back to the original totipotent or pluripotent state, and can be re-differentiated into cels different from original ones. Re-programming techniques are able to harvest specificaly induced pluripotent stem cels and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cels from patients, which can significantly reduce the immune rejection. OBJECTIVE: To explore the method from direct reprogramming to specific cel lines and to conclude the

  10. Epigenetic control of dendritic cell development and fate determination of common myeloid progenitor by Mysm1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Haejung; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Yates, Peter; Sanchez, Suzi; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2014-10-23

    The mechanisms controlling the development of dendritic cells (DCs) remain incompletely understood. Using an Mysm1 knockout (Mysm1(-/-)) mouse model, we identified the histone H2A deubiquitinase Mysm1, as a critical regulator in DC differentiation. Mysm1(-/-) mice showed a global reduction of DCs in lymphoid organs, whereas development of granulocytes and macrophages were not severely affected. Hematopoietic progenitors and DC precursors were significantly decreased in Mysm1(-/-) mice and defective in Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3(Flt3) ligand-induced, but not in granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced DC differentiation in vitro. Molecular studies demonstrated that the developmental defect of DCs from common myeloid progenitor (CMP) in Mysm1(-/-) mice is associated with decreased Flt3 expression and that Mysm1 derepresses transcription of the Flt3 gene by directing histone modifications at the Flt3 promoter region. Two molecular mechanisms were found to be responsible for the selective role of Mysm1 in lineage determination of DCs from CMPs: the selective expression of Mysm1 in a subset of CMPs and the different requirement of Mysm1 for PU.1 recruitment to the Flt3 locus vs GM-CSF-α and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor receptor loci. In conclusion, this study reveals an essential role of Mysm1 in epigenetic regulation of Flt3 transcription and DC development, and it provides a novel mechanism for lineage determination from CMP. PMID:25217698

  11. Ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transcriptional activator Athb-1 alters leaf cell fate in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, T; Dong, C H; Wu, Y; Carabelli, M; Sessa, G; Ruberti, I; Morelli, G; Chua, N H

    1995-11-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Athb-1 is a homeobox gene of unknown function. By analogy with homeobox genes of other organisms, its gene product, Athb-1, is most likely a transcription factor involved in developmental processes. We constructed a series of Athb-1-derived genes to examine the roles of Athb-1 in transcriptional regulation and plant development. Athb-1 was found to transactivate a promoter linked to a specific DNA binding site by transient expression assays. In transgenic tobacco plants, overexpression of Athb-1 or its chimeric derivatives with heterologous transactivating domains of the yeast transcription factor GAL4 or herpes simplex virus transcription factor VP16 conferred deetiolated phenotypes in the dark, including cotyledon expansion, true leaf development, and an inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Expression of Athb-1 or the two chimeric derivatives also affected the development of palisade parenchyma under normal growth conditions, resulting in light green sectors in leaves and cotyledons, whereas other organs in the transgenic plants remained normal. Both developmental phenotypes were induced by glucocorticoid in transgenic plants expressing a chimeric transcription factor comprising the Athb-1 DNA binding domain, the VP16 transactivating domain, and the glucocorticoid receptor domain. Plants with severe inducible phenotypes showed additional abnormality in cotyledon expansion. Our results suggest that Athb-1 is a transcription activator involved in leaf development. PMID:8535134

  12. Dermatan Sulfate Interacts with Dead Cells and Regulates CD5+ B-Cell Fate: Implications for a Key Role in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Julia Y.; Lee, Jongmin; Yan, Ming; Rho, Jung-hyun; Roehrl, Michael H. A.

    2011-01-01

    CD5+ (B-1a) B cells play pivotal roles in autoimmunity through expression of autoreactive B-cell receptors and production of autoantibodies. The mechanism underlying their positive selection and expansion is currently unknown. This study demonstrates that dermatan sulfate (DS) expands the B-1a cell population and augments the specific antibody response to an antigen when it is in complex with DS. DS displays preferential affinity for apoptotic and dead cells, and DS-stimulated cell cultures p...

  13. Measles virus-specific murine T cell clones: characterization of fine specificity function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); J.P.M. Versteeg-van Oosten (José); I.K.G. Visser (Ilona); R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); S.A. Langeveld (Sacha); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus (MV)-specific murine helper T cell clones (Thy-1.2+, CD4+, CD8-) were generated from mice immunized with MV-infected mouse brain homogenate by limiting dilution and in vitro stimulation of spleen cells with UV-inactivated MV Ag. The protein specificity of 7 out of 37 stable

  14. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne A Boulanger

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+ progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  15. Allergen-Specific CD4(+) T Cells in Human Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Morris F; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    In allergic asthma, aeroallergen exposure of sensitized individuals mobilizes robust innate and adaptive airway immune responses, stimulating eosinophilic airway inflammation and the activation and infiltration of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells into the airways. Allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells are thought to be central players in the asthmatic response as they specifically recognize the allergen and initiate and orchestrate the asthmatic inflammatory response. In this article, we briefly review the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of human allergic airway inflammation in allergic individuals, discuss the use of allergen-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers to characterize allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells, and highlight current gaps in knowledge and directions for future research pertaining to the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in human asthma. PMID:27027948

  16. Fate of tumor cells injected into left ventricle of heart in BALB/c mice: role of natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Hokland, P; Heron, I;

    1988-01-01

    arrested and, to a large extent, destroyed in the lungs, which contain the first capillary bed that iv injected tumor cells meet. After LV injection the initial distribution of the tumor cells, which depends on the distribution of cardiac output at the time of injection, was estimated by use of...

  17. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process. PMID:21262217

  18. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVerso, Peter R; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  19. Fate and effect of ingested Bacillus cereus spores and vegetative cells in the intestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Licht, Tine Rask

    2006-01-01

    The fate and effect of Bacillus cereus F4433/73R in the intestine of human-flora-associated rats was studied using bacteriological culturing techniques and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with cell assays and immunoassays for detection of enterotoxins. In faecal samples...... from animals receiving vegetative cells, only few B. cereus cells were detected. Spores survived the gastric barrier well, and were in some cases detected up to 2 weeks after ingestion. Selective growing revealed no major changes in the intestinal flora during passage of B. cereus. However, denaturing...... gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with universal 16S rRNA gene primers revealed significant changes in the intestinal microbiota of animals dosed with spores. Vero cell assays and a commercial kit (BCET-RPLA) did not reveal any enterotoxin production from B. cereus F4433/73R in the intestinal tract....

  20. The fate of Müller’s glia following experimental retinal detachment: nuclear migration, cell division, and subretinal glial scar formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Geoffrey P.; Chapin, Ethan A.; Luna, Gabriel; Linberg, Kenneth A.; Fisher, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study the fate of Müller’s glia following experimental retinal detachment, using a “pulse/chase” paradigm of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling for the purpose of understanding the role of Müller cell division in subretinal scar formation. Methods Experimental retinal detachments were created in pigmented rabbit eyes, and 3 days later 10 µg of BrdU was injected intravitreally. The retinas were harvested 4 h after the BrdU was administered (i.e., day 3) or on days 4, 7, and 21 post d...

  1. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK e...

  2. Methods of Monitoring Cell Fate and Tissue Growth in Three-Dimensional Scaffold-Based Strategies for In Vitro Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leferink, Anne M; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, there is a need for methods that allow assessing the performance of tissue-engineered constructs noninvasively in vitro and in vivo. To date, histological analysis is the golden standard to retrieve information on tissue growth, cellular distribution, and cell fate on tissue-engineered constructs after in vitro cell culture or on explanted specimens after in vivo applications. Yet, many advances have been made to optimize imaging techniques for monitoring tissue-engineered constructs with a sub-mm or μm resolution. Many imaging modalities have first been developed for clinical applications, in which a high penetration depth has been often more important than lateral resolution. In this study, we have reviewed the current state of the art in several imaging approaches that have shown to be promising in monitoring cell fate and tissue growth upon in vitro culture. Depending on the aimed tissue type and scaffold properties, some imaging methods are more applicable than others. Optical methods are mostly suited for transparent materials such as hydrogels, whereas magnetic resonance-based methods are mostly applied to obtain contrast between hard and soft tissues regardless of their transparency. Overall, this review shows that the field of imaging in scaffold-based tissue engineering is developing at a fast pace and has the potential to overcome the limitations of destructive endpoint analysis. PMID:26825610

  3. Tissue specific heterogeneity in effector immune cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba eTufail

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct ‘homing codes’ (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A and sunlight (vitamin D3 prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centrestage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues alongwith giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells.

  4. Cell Theory, Specificity, and Reproduction, 1837–1870

    OpenAIRE

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental, but also the reproductive unit of life. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention by historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful ...

  5. Isolating specific embryonic cells of the sea urchin by FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Celina; Swartz, S Zachary; Wessel, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Isolating cells based on specific gene expression enables a focused biochemical and molecular analysis. While cultured cells and hematopoietic cells, for example, are routinely isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), early embryonic cells are a relatively untapped source for FACS applications often because the embryos of many animals are quite limiting. Furthermore, many applications require genetic model organisms in which cells can be labeled by fluorescent transgenes, or antibodies against cell surface antigens. Here we define conditions in the sea urchin embryo for isolation of embryonic cells based on expression of specific proteins. We use the sea urchin embryo for which a nearly unlimited supply of embryonic cells is available and demonstrate the conditions for separation of the embryo into single cells, fixation of the cells for antibody penetration into the cells, and conditions for FACS of a rare cell type in the embryo. This protocol may be adapted for analysis of mRNA, chromatin, protein, or carbohydrates and depends only on the probe availability for the cell of interest. We anticipate that this protocol will be broadly applicable to embryos of other species. PMID:24567215

  6. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We investiga...... calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  7. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells maintain effector and memory tumor-specific CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Sarah E; Jensen, Shawn M; Antony, Paul A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Fox, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapies that augment antitumor T cells have had recent success for treating patients with cancer. Here we examined whether tumor-specific CD4+ T cells enhance CD8+ T-cell adoptive immunotherapy in a lymphopenic environment. Our model employed physiological doses of tyrosinase-related protein 1-specific CD4+ transgenic T cells-CD4+ T cells and pmel-CD8+ T cells that when transferred individually were subtherapeutic; however, when transferred together provided significant (p ≤ 0.001) therapeutic efficacy. Therapeutic efficacy correlated with increased numbers of effector and memory CD8+ T cells with tumor-specific cytokine expression. When combined with CD4+ T cells, transfer of total (naïve and effector) or effector CD8+ T cells were highly effective, suggesting CD4+ T cells can help mediate therapeutic effects by maintaining function of activated CD8+ T cells. In addition, CD4+ T cells had a pronounced effect in the early posttransfer period, as their elimination within the first 3 days significantly (p < 0.001) reduced therapeutic efficacy. The CD8+ T cells recovered from mice treated with both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells had decreased expression of PD-1 and PD-1-blockade enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of pmel-CD8 alone, suggesting that CD4+ T cells help reduce CD8+ T-cell exhaustion. These data support combining immunotherapies that elicit both tumor-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:24114780

  8. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  9. Linking specification to differentiation: From proneural genes to the regulation of ciliogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    zur Lage, Petra I; Simpson, T Ian; Jarman, Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    Much of developmental biology is concerned with the processes by which cells become committed to particular fates in a regulated fashion, whereas cell biology addresses, among other things, the variety of differentiated forms and functions that cells can acquire. One open question is how the regulators of the former process lead to attainment of the latter. “High-level” regulators of cell fate specification include the proneural factors, which drive cells to commit as precursors in the sensor...

  10. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.;

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitop...... that is specifically associated with a plant cell separation process that results in complete cell detachment....... is restricted to loosely attached inner parenchyma cells at the inner face of the pea testa and does not occur in other cells of the testa. Elsewhere in the pea seedling, the LM8 epitope was found only in association with root cap cell development at the root apex. Furthermore, the LM8 epitope is...... specifically associated with root cap cells in a range of angiosperm species. In embryogenic carrot suspension cell cultures the epitope is abundant at the surface of cell walls of loosely attached cells in both induced and non-induced cultures. The LM8 epitope is the first cell wall epitope to be identified...

  11. Regulatory T-Cell (Treg) Hybridoma as a Novel Tool to Study Foxp3 Regulation and Treg Fate1

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rahul; Sung, Sun-Sang J; Ju, Chiao-Ying A.; Umesh, S. Deshmukh; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2011-01-01

    The CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Treg) that had lost CD25 and Foxp3 in vivo (ex-Treg) exist but are difficult to study. We generated antigen (Ag)-specific Treg hybridomas from iTreg clones (iTreg-hyb) using iTreg of DO11.10.Foxp3-GFP mice and presented evidence that they behave like ex-Treg. The iTreg-hyb displayed little CD25 and Foxp3-GFP but strong expression could be induced with OVA323–339 in the presence of Ag-presenting cells, rIL-2 and rTGF-β1. They displayed all of the iTreg-assoc...

  12. Cell-Type Specific Four-Component Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Timo Aberle; Katrin Franke; Elke Rist; Karin Benz; Burkhard Schlosshauer

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appr...

  13. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in specific immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jutel, M; Akdis, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment which leads to a lifelong tolerance against previously disease-causing allergens due to restoration of normal immunity against allergens. The description of T-regulatory (Treg) cells being involved in prevention of sensitization to allergens has led to great interest whether they represent a major target for allergen-SIT and whether it would be possible to manipulate Treg cells to increase its efficacy. Activationinduced cell death, ...

  14. Distinct and site-specific phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein at serine 612 in differentiated cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hattori

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (pRB is a phosphoprotein that regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. In quiescent and early G1 cells, pRB predominantly exists in the active hypophosphorylated form. The cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase complexes phosphorylate pRB at the late G1 phase to inactivate pRB. This event leads to the dissociation and activation of E2F family transcriptional factors. At least 12 serine/threonine residues in pRB are phosphorylated in vivo. Although there have been many reports describing bulk phosphorylation of pRB, detail research describing the function of each phosphorylation site remains unknown. Besides its G1/S inhibitory function, pRB is involved in differentiation, prevention of cell death and control of tissue fate. To uncover the function of phosphorylation of pRB in various cellular conditions, we have been investigating phosphorylation of each serine/threonine residue in pRB with site-specific phospho-serine/threonine antibodies. Here we demonstrate that pRB is specifically phosphorylated at Ser612 in differentiated cells in a known kinase-independent manner. We also found that pRB phosphorylated at Ser612 still associates with E2F-1 and tightly binds to nuclear structures including chromatin. Moreover, expression of the Ser612Ala mutant pRB failed to induce differentiation. The findings suggest that phosphorylation of Ser612 provides a distinct function that differs from the function of phosphorylation of other serine/threonine residues in pRB.

  15. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated 3H-5HT(10-8 to 2.5 x 10-6M) in a saturable manner, at 370C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10-5M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10-5M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of 3H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10-7M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 106 cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific 3H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated

  16. Fate of the major outer membrane protein P.IA in early and late events of gonococcal infection of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weel, J F; van Putten, J P

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the fate of the major outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, P.IA, during gonococcal infection of Chang conjunctiva epithelial cells by using immunoelectron microscopy. Probing of P.IA epitopes with mono- and polyclonal antibodies revealed variable, fixation-dependent P.IA epitope exposure in the gonococci used as an inoculum in the infection experiments. Detection of invariable exposed P.IA epitopes in cryosections of infected epithelial cells with a polyclonal antiserum revealed unaltered P.IA exposure on the bacterial membranes during early attachment of the bacteria to the eukaryotic cells. Upon entry of the bacteria into the host cells, however, labelling was extended to membraneous structures that intercalated between the bacteria and the host cell surface, and, occasionally, to the host cell plasma membrane. The latter observation is consistent with the suggested active role of P.I. in the uptake process (as shown in 1985 by E.C. Gotschlich). Once inside the epithelial cells, both morphologically intact and disintegrating bacteria could be distinguished. The disintegration of the bacteria was accompanied by a loss of P.IA immunoreactivity. PMID:1725221

  17. Tracking the fate of her4 expressing cells in the regenerating retina using her4:Kaede zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen G; Wen, Wen; Pillai-Kastoori, Lakshmi; Morris, Ann C

    2016-04-01

    The Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix-Orange (bHLH-O) transcription factor Hairy-related 4 (her4) is a downstream effector of Notch-Delta signaling that represses expression of typically pro-neural genes in proliferative domains of the central nervous system. Notch-Delta signaling in the retina has been shown to increase in response to injury and influences neuroprotective properties of Müller glia. In contrast to mammals, teleost fish are able to regenerate retinal neurons in response to injury. In zebrafish, her4 is upregulated in the regenerating neural retina in response to both acute and chronic photoreceptor damage, but the contribution of her4 expressing cells to neurogenesis following acute or chronic retinal damage has remained unexplored. Here we investigate the role of her4 in the regenerating retina in a background of chronic, rod-specific degeneration as well as following acute light damage. We demonstrate that her4 is expressed in the persistently neurogenic ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), as well as in small subsets of slowly proliferating Müller glia in the inner nuclear layer (INL) of the central retina. We generated a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses the photoconvertible Kaede reporter driven by a her4 promoter and validated that expression of the transgene faithfully recapitulates endogenous her4 expression. Lineage tracing analysis revealed that her4-expressing cells in the INL contribute to the rod lineage, and her4 expressing cells in the CMZ are capable of generating any retinal cell type except rod photoreceptors. Our results indicate that her4 is involved in a replenishing pathway that maintains populations of stem cells in the central retina, and that the magnitude of the her4-associated proliferative response mirrors the extent of retinal damage. PMID:26616101

  18. The PPARgamma-selective ligand BRL-49653 differentially regulates the fate choices of rat calvaria versus rat bone marrow stromal cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Yuji

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from a common mesenchymal progenitor and an inverse relationship between expression of the two lineages is seen with certain experimental manipulations and in certain diseases, i.e., osteoporosis, but the cellular pathway(s and developmental stages underlying the inverse relationship is still under active investigation. To determine which precursor mesenchymal cell types can differentiate into adipocytes, we compared the effects of BRL-49653 (BRL, a selective ligand for peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPARγ, a master transcription factor of adipogenesis, on osteo/adipogeneis in two different osteoblast culture models: the rat bone marrow (RBM versus the fetal rat calvaria (RC cell system. Results BRL increased the number of adipocytes and corresponding marker expression, such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid-binding protein (aP2, and adipsin, in both culture models, but affected osteoblastogenesis only in RBM cultures, where a reciprocal decrease in bone nodule formation and osteoblast markers, e.g., osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin was seen, and not in RC cell cultures. Even though adipocytes were histologically undetectable in RC cultures not treated with BRL, RC cells expressed PPAR and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP mRNAs throughout osteoblast development and their expression was increased by BRL. Some single cell-derived BRL-treated osteogenic RC colonies were stained not only with ALP/von Kossa but also with oil red O and co-expressed the mature adipocyte marker adipsin and the mature osteoblast marker OCN, as well as PPAR and C/EBP mRNAs. Conclusion The data show that there are clear differences in the capacity of BRL to alter the fate choices of precursor cells in stromal (RBM versus calvarial (RC cell populations and that recruitment of adipocytes can occur from multiple precursor cell pools (committed preadipocyte

  19. Human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells exhibit specific insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saviolakis, G.A.; Kyritsis, A.P.; Chader, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    The presence of insulin receptors was investigated in human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells grown in suspension culture. The binding of (/sup 125/I) insulin to these cells was time, temperature, and pH dependent, was competed for by insulin and proinsulin but not other peptides, and was inhibited by antibodies against the insulin receptor. The Scatchard plot of insulin competition data was curvilinear and was resolved into a high-affinity (KD approximately 0.5 X 10(-9) M)/low-capacity (approximately 3000 sites/cell) and a low-affinity (KD approximately 1 X 10(-7) M)/high-capacity (approximately 155,000 sites/cell) component. Negative cooperativity was not found, in agreement with other studies in rodent neural cells. However, in contrast to studies with rodent cells, insulin specifically down-regulated its receptor on human Y-79 cells after prolonged exposure. In conclusion, these data show for the first time the presence of specific insulin receptors in human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells. Because these cells were previously shown to have several characteristics typical of neural cells, we propose their use as a model to study the effects of insulin on neural and retinal tissues of human origin.

  20. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels; Skou, Rikke Birgitte Lyngaa; Donia, Marco; Ellebæk, Eva; Svane, Inge Marie; Schumacher, Ton N; Thor Straten, Per; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) isolated from melanoma patients and expanded in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2 treatment can elicit therapeutic response after adoptive transfer, but the antigen specificities of the T cells transferred have not been determined. By compiling all known melanoma......-associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...... from different fragments of resected melanoma lesions. In summary, our findings provide an initial definition of T-cell populations contributing to tumor recognition in TILs although the specificity of many tumor-reactive TILs remains undefined....

  1. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannath L Merbs

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO, retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW, cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW, and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods. These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA

  2. Single-molecule genomic data delineate patient-specific tumor profiles and cancer stem cell organization

    OpenAIRE

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Tavaré, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports the concept that cancers are organized in a cellular hierarchy with cancer stem cells (CSCs) at the apex. To date, the primary evidence for CSCs derives from transplantation assays, which have known limitations. In particular, they are unable to report on the fate of cells within the original human tumor. Due to the difficulty in measuring tumor characteristics in patients, cellular organization and other aspects of cancer dynamics have not been quantified direct...

  3. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  4. Secondary specific immune response in vitro to MSV tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senik, A; Hebrero, F P; Levy, J P

    1975-12-15

    The interactions which occur between antigenic tumor cells and normal or immune lymphoid cells in a 3-day in vitro culture, have been studied with a murine sarcoma virus (MSV)-induced tumor. The 3H-thymidine incorporation of lymphoma cells growing in suspension, and the radioactive-chromium release of freshly sampled lymphoma cells regularly added to the culture, have been compared to determine the part played by immune lymphoid cells in cytolysis and cytostasis of the tumor-cell population. The cytolytic activity increases in the culture from day 0 to day 3. It is due, predominantly, to T-cells, and remains specific to antigens shared by MSV tumors and related lymphomas. This activity would be difficult to detect unless freshly sampled ascitic cells were used as targets, since the lymphoma cells spontaneously lose a part of their sensitivity to immune cytolysis during in vitro culture. The method used in the present experiments is a secondary chromium release test (SCRT), which measures the invitro secondary stimulation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by tumor cells. In the absence of stimulatory cells, the CTL activity would have rapidly fallen in vitro. The cytostatic activity also increases during the 3 days in vitro, in parallel to the cytolytic activity: it is due to non-T-cells and remains mainly non-specific. The significance of these data for the interpretation of invitro demonstrated cell-mediated anti-tumor immune reactions is briefly discussed, as well as their relevance in the in vivo role of immune CTL. PMID:53210

  5. Type-specific cell line models for type-specific ovarian cancer research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Anglesio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: OVARIAN CARCINOMAS CONSIST OF AT LEAST FIVE DISTINCT DISEASES: high-grade serous, low-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous. Biomarker and molecular characterization may represent a more biologically relevant basis for grouping and treating this family of tumors, rather than site of origin. Molecular characteristics have become the new standard for clinical pathology, however development of tailored type-specific therapies is hampered by a failure of basic research to recognize that model systems used to study these diseases must also be stratified. Unrelated model systems do offer value for study of biochemical processes but specific cellular context needs to be applied to assess relevant therapeutic strategies. METHODS: We have focused on the identification of clear cell carcinoma cell line models. A panel of 32 "ovarian cancer" cell lines has been classified into histotypes using a combination of mutation profiles, IHC mutation-surrogates, and a validated immunohistochemical model. All cell lines were identity verified using STR analysis. RESULTS: Many described ovarian clear cell lines have characteristic mutations (including ARID1A and PIK3CA and an overall molecular/immuno-profile typical of primary tumors. Mutations in TP53 were present in the majority of high-grade serous cell lines. Advanced genomic analysis of bona-fide clear cell carcinoma cell lines also support copy number changes in typical biomarkers such at MET and HNF1B and a lack of any recurrent expressed re-arrangements. CONCLUSIONS: As with primary ovarian tumors, mutation status of cancer genes like ARID1A and TP53 and a general immuno-profile serve well for establishing histotype of ovarian cancer cell We describe specific biomarkers and molecular features to re-classify generic "ovarian carcinoma" cell lines into type specific categories. Our data supports the use of prototype clear cell lines, such as TOV21G and JHOC-5, and questions the use of

  6. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  7. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Timo; Franke, Katrin; Rist, Elke; Benz, Karin; Schlosshauer, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering. PMID:24475174

  8. Spatio-temporal Model of Endogenous ROS and Raft-Dependent WNT/Beta-Catenin Signaling Driving Cell Fate Commitment in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Fiete; Lemcke, Heiko; Ewald, Roland; Rharass, Tareck; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/β-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear β-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of β-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and raft dependent WNT/β-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream β-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/β-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/β-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/β-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent β-catenin activation. The model’s predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and modification of the

  9. Spatio-temporal model of endogenous ROS and raft-dependent WNT/beta-catenin signaling driving cell fate commitment in human neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiete Haack

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/β-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs, which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear β-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of β-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and raft dependent WNT/β-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream β-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/β-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/β-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/β-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent β-catenin activation. The model's predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and

  10. Spatio-temporal model of endogenous ROS and raft-dependent WNT/beta-catenin signaling driving cell fate commitment in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Fiete; Lemcke, Heiko; Ewald, Roland; Rharass, Tareck; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M

    2015-03-01

    Canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/β-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear β-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of β-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and raft dependent WNT/β-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream β-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/β-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/β-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/β-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent β-catenin activation. The model's predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and modification of the

  11. Nanomedicine for Cancer Immunotherapy: Tracking Cancer-Specific T-Cells in Vivo with Gold Nanoparticles and CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Rinat; Shamalov, Katerina; Betzer, Oshra; Motiei, Menachem; Horovitz-Fried, Miryam; Yehuda, Ronen; Popovtzer, Aron; Popovtzer, Rachela; Cohen, Cyrille J

    2015-06-23

    Application of immune cell-based therapy in routine clinical practice is challenging due to the poorly understood mechanisms underlying success or failure of treatment. Development of accurate and quantitative imaging techniques for noninvasive cell tracking can provide essential knowledge for elucidating these mechanisms. We designed a novel method for longitudinal and quantitative in vivo cell tracking, based on the superior visualization abilities of classical X-ray computed tomography (CT), combined with state-of-the-art nanotechnology. Herein, T-cells were transduced to express a melanoma-specific T-cell receptor and then labeled with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a CT contrast agent. The GNP-labeled T-cells were injected intravenously to mice bearing human melanoma xenografts, and whole-body CT imaging allowed examination of the distribution, migration, and kinetics of T-cells. Using CT, we found that transduced T-cells accumulated at the tumor site, as opposed to nontransduced cells. Labeling with gold nanoparticles did not affect T-cell function, as demonstrated both in vitro, by cytokine release and proliferation assays, and in vivo, as tumor regression was observed. Moreover, to validate the accuracy and reliability of the proposed cell tracking technique, T-cells were labeled both with green fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging, and with GNPs for CT imaging. A remarkable correlation in signal intensity at the tumor site was observed between the two imaging modalities, at all time points examined, providing evidence for the accuracy of our CT cell tracking abilities. This new method for cell tracking with CT offers a valuable tool for research, and more importantly for clinical applications, to study the fate of immune cells in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26039633

  12. Irreversibility of T-Cell Specification: Insights from Computational Modelling of a Minimal Network Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesso, Erica; Kueh, Hao Yuan; Freedman, George; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives A cascade of gene activations under the control of Notch signalling is required during T-cell specification, when T-cell precursors gradually lose the potential to undertake other fates and become fully committed to the T-cell lineage. We elucidate how the gene/protein dynamics for a core transcriptional module governs this important process by computational means. Methods We first assembled existing knowledge about transcription factors known to be important for T-cell specification to form a minimal core module consisting of TCF-1, GATA-3, BCL11B, and PU.1 aiming at dynamical modeling. Model architecture was based on published experimental measurements of the effects on each factor when each of the others is perturbed. While several studies provided gene expression measurements at different stages of T-cell development, pure time series are not available, thus precluding a straightforward study of the dynamical interactions among these genes. We therefore translate stage dependent data into time series. A feed-forward motif with multiple positive feed-backs can account for the observed delay between BCL11B versus TCF-1 and GATA-3 activation by Notch signalling. With a novel computational approach, all 32 possible interactions among Notch signalling, TCF-1, and GATA-3 are explored by translating combinatorial logic expressions into differential equations for BCL11B production rate. Results Our analysis reveals that only 3 of 32 possible configurations, where GATA-3 works as a dimer, are able to explain not only the time delay, but very importantly, also give rise to irreversibility. The winning models explain the data within the 95% confidence region and are consistent with regard to decay rates. Conclusions This first generation model for early T-cell specification has relatively few players. Yet it explains the gradual transition into a committed state with no return. Encoding logics in a rate equation setting allows determination of

  13. Investigating Striatal Function through Cell-Type-Specific Manipulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    The striatum integrates convergent input from the cortex, thalamus, and midbrain, and has a powerful influence over motivated behavior via outputs to downstream basal ganglia nuclei. Although the anatomy and physiology of distinct classes of striatal neurons has been intensively studied, the specific functions of these cell subpopulations have been more difficult to address. Recently, application of new methodologies for perturbing activity and signaling in different cell types in vivo has be...

  14. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2008-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment which leads to a lifelong tolerance against previously disease-causing allergens due to restoration of normal immunity against allergens. The description of T-regulatory (Treg) cells being involved in prevention of sensitization to allergens has led to great interest whether they represent a major target for allergen-SIT and whether it would be possible to manipulate Treg cells to increase its efficacy. Activationinduced cell death, anergy and/or immune response modulation by Treg cells are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. There is growing evidence that anergy, tolerance and active suppression are not entirely distinct, but rather represent linked mechanisms possibly involving the same cells and multiple suppressor mechanisms. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to Treg cells appears as a crucial event in the control of healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-SIT. The Treg cell response is characterized by abolished allergen- induced specific T-cell proliferation and suppressed Thelper (Th)1- and Th2-type cytokine secretion. In addition, mediators of allergic inflammation that trigger cAMP-associated G-protein-coupled receptors, such as histamine receptor-2, may contribute to peripheral tolerance mechanisms. The increased levels of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-Beta that are produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production, while simultaneously increasing production of non-inflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress effector cells of allergic inflammation such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms. It is associated with regulation of antibody isotypes and effector cells to the direction of a healthy immune response. By the application of the recent knowledge in Treg

  15. Analysis of alternative signaling pathways of endoderm induction of human embryonic stem cells identifies context specific differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Shibin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lineage specific differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs is largely mediated by specific growth factors and extracellular matrix molecules. Growth factors initiate a cascade of signals which control gene transcription and cell fate specification. There is a lot of interest in inducing hESCs to an endoderm fate which serves as a pathway towards more functional cell types like the pancreatic cells. Research over the past decade has established several robust pathways for deriving endoderm from hESCs, with the capability of further maturation. However, in our experience, the functional maturity of these endoderm derivatives, specifically to pancreatic lineage, largely depends on specific pathway of endoderm induction. Hence it will be of interest to understand the underlying mechanism mediating such induction and how it is translated to further maturation. In this work we analyze the regulatory interactions mediating different pathways of endoderm induction by identifying co-regulated transcription factors. Results hESCs were induced towards endoderm using activin A and 4 different growth factors (FGF2 (F, BMP4 (B, PI3KI (P, and WNT3A (W and their combinations thereof, resulting in 15 total experimental conditions. At the end of differentiation each condition was analyzed by qRT-PCR for 12 relevant endoderm related transcription factors (TFs. As a first approach, we used hierarchical clustering to identify which growth factor combinations favor up-regulation of different genes. In the next step we identified sets of co-regulated transcription factors using a biclustering algorithm. The high variability of experimental data was addressed by integrating the biclustering formulation with bootstrap re-sampling to identify robust networks of co-regulated transcription factors. Our results show that the transition from early to late endoderm is favored by FGF2 as well as WNT3A treatments under high activin. However

  16. Specific Protein Markers for Stem Cell Cross-Talk with Neighboring Cells in the Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung Soo; Shin, Seung Won; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Um, Soong Ho

    2013-01-01

    A stem cell interacts with the neighboring cells in its environment. To maintain a living organism’s metabolism, either cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may be significant. Usually, these cells communicate with each other through biological signaling by interactive behaviors of primary proteins or complementary chemicals. The signaling intermediates offer the stem cell’s functionality on its metabolism. With the rapid advent of omics technologies, various specific markers by which s...

  17. Internalization of bevacizumab by retinal endothelial cells and its intracellular fate: Evidence for an involvement of the neonatal Fc receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissler, Heidrun L; Lang, Gerhard K; Lang, Gabriele E

    2016-02-01

    Bevacizumab is one of the VEGF-binding proteins that are established in clinical practice to treat various ocular diseases. In view of therapeutic long-term application, potential accumulation of the antibody in retinal cells gave reason for safety concerns. Internalization of considerable amounts of bevacizumab by retinal endothelial (REC) and pigment epithelial cells has been observed which may affect their important functions. Therefore we investigated the transport and intracellular localization of bevacizumab in immortalized bovine REC (iBREC) in detail, considering possible roles of vesicles and receptors mediating uptake and intracellular transport. By performing transcytosis assays with iBREC monolayers cultivated on porous membrane inserts, we demonstrated that bevacizumab was transported efficiently through a tight monolayer from the lower to the upper chamber or vice versa. When added to the lower chamber in excess, the internalized antibody was transported through the cells, but it was also recycled to be set free at the same side of the cell into a bevacizumab-free environment. The rates of both processes strongly depended on the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the environment. This observation is important because in vivo REC might be exposed to varying amounts of serum, e.g. in patients with macular edema. FBS also affected the intracellular localization of bevacizumab as shown by analyses of subcellular fractions and direct immunofluorescence staining. When iBREC were cultivated in low-serum medium, most of the antibody was found in the fraction of cytoskeleton proteins and spots of high intensity of bevacizumab-specific staining close to the nuclei were observed. Cultivation in medium with FBS resulted in internalized bevacizumab predominately found in the membrane/organelle fraction in addition to its weaker association with proteins from the cytoskeleton and uniform staining of the cell. Bevacizumab-specific staining close to the

  18. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.C.; Walker, R.F.; Brooks, W.H.; Roszman, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated /sup 3/H-5HT(10/sup -8/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/M) in a saturable manner, at 37/sup 0/C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10/sup -5/M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10/sup -5/M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10/sup -7/M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 10/sup 6/ cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific /sup 3/H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated.

  19. Optimization Manufacture of Virus- and Tumor-Specific T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Lapteva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although ex vivo expanded T cells are currently widely used in pre-clinical and clinical trials, the complexity of manufacture remains a major impediment for broader application. In this review we discuss current protocols for the ex vivo expansion of virus- and tumor-specific T cells and describe our experience in manufacture optimization using a gas-permeable static culture flask (G-Rex. This innovative device has revolutionized the manufacture process by allowing us to increase cell yields while decreasing the frequency of cell manipulation and in vitro culture time. It is now being used in good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities for clinical cell production in our institution as well as many others in the US and worldwide.

  20. The ETS domain transcriptional repressor Anterior open inhibits MAP kinase and Wingless signaling to couple tracheal cell fate with branch identity

    OpenAIRE

    Caviglia, S; Luschnig, S.

    2013-01-01

    Cells at the tips of budding branches in the Drosophila tracheal system generate two morphologically different types of seamless tubes. Terminal cells (TCs) form branched lumenized extensions that mediate gas exchange at target tissues, whereas fusion cells (FCs) form ring-like connections between adjacent tracheal metameres. Each tracheal branch contains a specific set of TCs, FCs, or both, but the mechanisms that select between the two tip cell types in a branch-specific fashion are not cle...

  1. In vivo fate of a behaviorally potent ACTH 4-9 analog; evidence for its specific uptake in the brain septal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ACTH-like neuropeptides on conditioned avoidance behavior and their tentative central sites of action are reviewed. The in vivo fate of the [3H]-ACTH 4-9 analog after various routes of peripheral administration in mice and rats are described, in particular, the uptake of intact peptide in the brain is emphasized, since ACTH-like neuropeptides elicit their behavioral activities by directly affecting the central nervous system. Subsequently, the metabolic profiles of the ACTH 4-9 analog in plasma and brain tissue are reported. The distribution of the [3H]-ACTH 4-9 analog throughout the rat brain is studied after intraventricular injection to allow detection in small brain areas and nuclei and to limit (peripheral) proteolysis. Finally, the effects of increased and decreased circulating levels of both ACTH-like peptides and structurally non-related but behaviorally active neuropeptides on the central distribution profile of intraventricularly injected [3H]-ACTH 4-9 analog are reviewed

  2. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I; Pasculescu, Adrian; Poliakov, Alexei; Hsiung, Marilyn; Larsen, Brett; Wilkinson, David G; Linding, Rune; Pawson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Cells have self-organizing properties that control their behavior in complex tissues. Contact between cells expressing either B-type Eph receptors or their transmembrane ephrin ligands initiates bidirectional signals that regulate cell positioning. However, simultaneously investigating how...... information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2- and...... revealed that signaling between mixed EphB2- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells is asymmetric and that the distinct cell types use different tyrosine kinases and targets to process signals induced by cell-cell contact. We provide systems- and cell-specific network models of contact-initiated signaling between...

  3. CELL DETACHMENT BY PROLYL-SPECIFIC ENDOPEPTIDASE FROM WOLFIPORIA COCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Cierpka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As requirements for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP production differ from other production processes (e.g., therapeutic protein production, cell detachment is often a crucial step for the process success. In most cases, cell detachment is done enzymatically. Although many peptidases are established in cell culture in R&D, e.g., Trypsin as gold standard, many of them seem to be unsuitable in ATMP production processes. Therefore, the present study investigated a novel endopeptidase used in food biotechnology for its applicability in ATMP processes where cell detachment is needed. The Prolyl-specific Peptidase (PsP is of non-mammalian origin and considered as safe for humans. PsP was purified from the supernatant of the fungus Wolfiporia cocos. The isolation and purification resulted in an enzyme solution with 0.19 U mg-1 prolyl-specific activity. By in silico analysis it was confirmed that attachment-promoting proteins can be cleaved by PsP in a similar amount than with Trypsin. Further the proteolytic activity was determined for PsP and Trypsin by using the same enzymatic assay. Detachment with both enzymes was compared for cells used in typical therapeutic production processes namely a mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-TERT as a model for a cell therapeutic, Vero and MA104 cells used for viral therapeutic or vaccine production. The cell detachment experiments were performed with comparable enzyme activities (1.6 U mL-1. hMSC-TERT detachment was faster with PsP than with Trypsin. For Vero cells the detachment with PsP was not only faster but also more efficient. For MA104 cells the detachment rate with PsP was similar to Trypsin. For all cell types, detachment with PsP showed less influence on cell growth and metabolism compared to standard Trypsin.Thus, three cell types used in ATMP, viral therapeutics or vaccine production can be detached efficiently and gently with PsP. Therefore, PsP shows

  4. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  5. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (SDS-PAGE).

  6. Molecular targeting of intracellular compartments specifically in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells' nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein's intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells' nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  7. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivetal, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.piv@netcmail.com [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Royet, David [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Ciuta, Georgeta [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Frenea-Robin, Marie [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Haddour, Naoufel [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France); Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric [Univ Limoges, CNRS, SPCTS UMR 7513, 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges (France); Simonet, Pascal [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5005, Laboratoire Ampère, F-69134 Écully (France)

    2015-04-15

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology.

  8. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications. - Highlights: 1.We report a new approach to selectively micropattern bacterial cells individually upon micro-magnet arrays. 2.Permanent micro-magnets of a size approaching that of bacteria could be fabricated using a Thermo-Magnetic Patterning process. 3.Bacterial cells were labeled using two different magnetic labeling strategies providing flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology

  9. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  10. Programming of marginal zone B-cell fate by basic Kruppel-like factor (BKLF/KLF3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchinovich, Gleb; Vu, Thi Thanh; Frommer, Friederike; Kranich, Jan; Schmid, Sonja; Alles, Melanie; Loubert, Jean-Baptiste; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Schneider, Pascal; Bachl, Jürgen; Pearson, Richard; Crossley, Merlin; Agenès, Fabien; Kirberg, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells are a lineage distinct from follicular and peritoneal B1 B cells. They are located next to the marginal sinus where blood is released. Here they pick up antigens and shuttle the load onto follicular dendritic cells inside the follicle. On activation, MZ B cells rapidly differentiate into plasmablasts secreting antibodies, thereby mediating humoral immune responses against blood-borne type 2 T-independent antigens. As Krüppel-like factors are implicated in cell differentiation/function in various tissues, we studied the function of basic Krüppel-like factor (BKLF/KLF3) in B cells. Whereas B-cell development in the bone marrow of KLF3-transgenic mice was unaffected, MZ B-cell numbers in spleen were increased considerably. As revealed in chimeric mice, this occurred cell autonomously, increasing both MZ and peritoneal B1 B-cell subsets. Comparing KLF3-transgenic and nontransgenic follicular B cells by RNA-microarray revealed that KLF3 regulates a subset of genes that was similarly up-regulated/down-regulated on normal MZ B-cell differentiation. Indeed, KLF3 expression overcame the lack of MZ B cells caused by different genetic alterations, such as CD19-deficiency or blockade of B-cell activating factor-receptor signaling, indicating that KLF3 may complement alternative nuclear factor-κB signaling. Thus, KLF3 is a driving force toward MZ B-cell maturation. PMID:21297003

  11. Cell population-specific expression analysis of human cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpreting gene expression profiles obtained from heterogeneous samples can be difficult because bulk gene expression measures are not resolved to individual cell populations. We have recently devised Population-Specific Expression Analysis (PSEA, a statistical method that identifies individual cell types expressing genes of interest and achieves quantitative estimates of cell type-specific expression levels. This procedure makes use of marker gene expression and circumvents the need for additional experimental information like tissue composition. Results To systematically assess the performance of statistical deconvolution, we applied PSEA to gene expression profiles from cerebellum tissue samples and compared with parallel, experimental separation methods. Owing to the particular histological organization of the cerebellum, we could obtain cellular expression data from in situ hybridization and laser-capture microdissection experiments and successfully validated computational predictions made with PSEA. Upon statistical deconvolution of whole tissue samples, we identified a set of transcripts showing age-related expression changes in the astrocyte population. Conclusions PSEA can predict cell-type specific expression levels from tissues homogenates on a genome-wide scale. It thus represents a computational alternative to experimental separation methods and allowed us to identify age-related expression changes in the astrocytes of the cerebellum. These molecular changes might underlie important physiological modifications previously observed in the aging brain.

  12. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs and total cell membranes (MBs from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  13. Targeting vault nanoparticles to specific cell surface receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J; Moniz, Raymond J; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L; Kelly, Kathleen A; Rome, Leonard H

    2009-01-27

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 x 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino acid epitope tag, a 33 amino acid IgG-binding peptide, and the 55 amino acid epidermal growth factor (EGF). These modified vaults were produced using a baculovirus expression system. Our studies demonstrate that recombinant vaults assembled from MVPs containing C-terminal peptide extensions display these tags at the top and bottom of the vault on the outside of the particle and can be used to specifically bind the modified vaults to epithelial cancer cells (A431) via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), either directly (EGF modified vaults) or as mediated by a monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR) bound to recombinant vaults containing the IgG-binding peptide. The ability to target vaults to specific cells represents an essential advance toward using recombinant vaults as delivery vehicles. PMID:19206245

  14. Phytoplasmal infection derails genetically preprogrammed meristem fate and alters plant architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Wei; Davis, Robert Edward; Nuss, Donald L.; ZHAO Yan

    2013-01-01

    In higher plants, the destiny of apical meristems (stem cells) is specific organogenesis, which determines the pattern of plant growth, and therefore morphotype and fertility. We found that bacterial infection can derail the meristems from their genetically preprogrammed destiny, altering plant morphogenesis. We identified four abnormal growth patterns, symptoms, in tomato infected with a cell wall-less bacterium, and found that each symptom corresponds to a distinct phase in meristem fate de...

  15. Redirecting T Cell Specificity Using T Cell Receptor Messenger RNA Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sarene; Shimasaki, Noriko; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T lymphocytes genetically modified to express T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors have shown great promise in the treatment of several cancers, including melanoma and leukemia. In addition to tumor-associated antigens and tumor-specific neoantigens, tumors expressing viral peptides can also be recognized by specific T cells and are attractive targets for cell therapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells often have hepatitis B virus DNA integration and can be targeted by hepatitis B virus-specific T cells. Here, we describe a method to engineer hepatitis B virus-specific T cell receptors in primary human T lymphocytes based on electroporation of hepatitis B virus T cell receptor messenger RNA. This method can be extended to a large scale therapeutic T cell production following current good manufacturing practice compliance and is applicable to the redirection of T lymphocytes with T cell receptors of other virus specificities such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and chimeric receptors specific for other antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:27236807

  16. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27218453

  17. Potential cell-specific functions of CXCR4 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Döring, Yvonne; Noels, Heidi

    2016-05-10

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 form an important axis contributing to cellular functions in homeostasis and disease. In addition, the atypical CXCL12 receptor CXCR7 may shape the availability and function of CXCL12. Further to their role through progenitor cell mobilization, CXCL12 and CXCR4 may affect native atherogenesis by modifying atherosclerosis-relevant cellular functions. This short review intends to provide a concise summary of current knowledge with regards to cell-specific functions of CXCL12 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 with potential implications for the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25586789

  18. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  19. Targeting Vault Nanoparticles to Specific Cell Surface Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J.; Moniz, Raymond J.; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Kelly, Kathleen A.; Rome, Leonard H.

    2009-01-01

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 × 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino a...

  20. Acetylation site specificities of lysine deacetylase inhibitors in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schölz, Christian; Weinert, Brian Tate; Wagner, Sebastian A;

    2015-01-01

    Lysine deacetylases inhibitors (KDACIs) are used in basic research, and many are being investigated in clinical trials for treatment of cancer and other diseases. However, their specificities in cells are incompletely characterized. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to obtain...... acetylation signatures for 19 different KDACIs, covering all 18 human lysine deacetylases. Most KDACIs increased acetylation of a small, specific subset of the acetylome, including sites on histones and other chromatin-associated proteins. Inhibitor treatment combined with genetic deletion showed that the...

  1. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  2. Cell reprogramming for the creation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells by defined factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqun YIN; Heng WANG; Hongguo CAO; Yunhai ZHANG; Yong TAO; Xiaorong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), characterized by being able to differentiate into various types of cells, are generally regarded as the most promising sources for cell replacement therapies. However, as typical PSCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are still far away from human clinics so far due to ethical issues and immune rejection response. One way to avoid such problems is to use stem cells derived from autologous somatic cells. Up to date, PSCs could be obtained by reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent state with approaches including somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), fusion with stem cells, coculture with cells' extracts, and induction with defined factors. Among these, through reprogramming somatic cells directly by retroviral transduction of transcription factors, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been successfully generated in both mouse and human recently. These iPS cells shared similar morphology and growth properties to ESCs, could express ESCs marker genes, and could produce adult or germline-competent chimaeras and differentiate into a variety of cell types, including germ cells. Moreover, with iPS technique, patient specific PSCs could be derived more easily from handful somatic cells in human without immune rejection responses innately connected to ESCs. Consequently, generation of iPS cells would be of great help to further understand disease mechanisms, drug screening, and cell transplantation therapies as well.In summary,the recent progress in the study of cell reprogramming for the creation of patientspecific pluripotent stem cells, some existing problems, and research perspectives were suggested.

  3. TNF-α respecifies human mesenchymal stem cells to a neural fate and promotes migration toward experimental glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ries, Christian; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Schichor, Christian; Berninger, Benedikt; Popp, Tanja; Neth, Peter; Goldbrunner, Roland; Kienast, Yvonne; Winkler, Frank; Jochum, Marianne; Egea, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have become valuable candidates for cell-based therapeutical applications including neuroregenerative and anti-tumor strategies. Yet, the molecular mechanisms that control hMSC transdifferentiation to neural cells and hMSC tropism toward glioma remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that hMSCs incubated with 50 ng/ml TNF-? acquired astroglial cell morphology without affecting proliferation which was increased at 5 ng/m...

  4. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  5. Outdoor fate and environmental impact of polymer solar cells through leaching and emission to rainwater and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinosa, Nieves; Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Reis Benatto, Dos Gisele A.; Lenz, Markus; Krebs, Frederik C.

    2016-01-01

    The emission of silver and zinc to the aqueous environment (rain, fog, dew) from polymer solar cells installed outdoors is presented. Studies included pristine solar cells and solar cells subjected to mechanical damage under natural weather conditions in Denmark. We find the emission of silver and z

  6. mgm 1, the earliest sex-specific germline marker in Drosophila, reflects expression of the gene esg in male stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Adrian; Bernasconi, Luca; Sergeev, Pavel; Cruz, Alex; Steinmann-Zwicky, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The pathway that controls sex in Drosophila has been well characterized. The elements of this genetic hierarchy act cell-autonomously in somatic cells. We have previously shown that the sex of germ cells is determined by a different mechanism and that somatic and autonomously acting elements interact to control the choice between spermatogenesis and oogenesis. A target for both types of signals is the enhancer-trap mgm1, which monitors male-specific gene expression in germ cells. Here we report that mgm1 reflects the expression of escargot (esg), a member of the snail gene family, which are transcription factors with zink finger motifs. Genes of this family partially redundantly control a number of processes involving cell fate choices. The regulation of gene expression in germ cells by sex-specific esg enhancers is already seen in embryos. Therefore, autonomous and non-autonomous sex-specific factors that participate in germline sex determination are already present at this early stage. esg is expressed in the male gonad, both in somatic cells and in germline stem cells. We show that esg expression in the male germline is not required for proper sex determination and spermatogenesis, as functional sperm is differentiated by mutant germ cells in wild type hosts. However, somatic esg expression is required for the maintenance of male germline stem cells. PMID:11902678

  7. Cell-specific regulation of apoptosis by designed enediynes.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolaou, K. C.; Stabila, P; Esmaeli-Azad, B; Wrasidlo, W; Hiatt, A

    1993-01-01

    The naturally occurring enediyne antibiotics are a unique class of antitumor drugs that combine reactive enediynes with additional structural features conferring affinity for DNA. Dynemicin A, in which an enediyne core is attached to an anthraquinone group capable of DNA intercalation, readily cleaves double-stranded DNA. This activity is thought to be the basis of its potent antitumor cytotoxicity. To investigate cell-specific mechanisms of cytotoxicity in the absence of DNA affinity, we hav...

  8. Anatomy of a new B-cell-specific enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, W; Benoist, C.; Mathis, D

    1989-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, like the immunoglobulins, are prominent B-lymphocyte markers. Herein, we describe a B-cell-specific enhancer associated with the murine class II gene, Ek alpha. This enhancer has a complex anatomy that suggests interactions between remotely spaced elements. Of particular interest is the finding that two CCAAT boxes spaced one kilobase apart are important for enhancer activity. Somewhat surprisingly, the E alpha and immunoglobulin enhanc...

  9. Outdoor fate and environmental impact of polymer solar cells through leaching and emission to rainwater and soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis;

    2016-01-01

    The emission of silver and zinc to the aqueous environment (rain, fog, dew) from polymer solar cells installed outdoors is presented. Studies included pristine solar cells and solar cells subjected to mechanical damage under natural weather conditions in Denmark. We find the emission of silver and...... zinc to the environment through precipitated water for damaged solar cells, and also observed failure and emission from an initially undamaged device in an experiment that endured for 6 months. In the case of the damaged cells, we found that the drinking water limits for Ag were only exceeded on a few...

  10. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  11. Specific inactivation of glucose metabolism from eucaryotic cells by pentalenolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszenko, M; Balla, H; Mecke, D

    1982-02-01

    Pentalenolactone, an antibiotic related to the class of the sesquiterpene-lactones and produced by the strain Streptomyces arenae Tü-469, inhibits specifically the glucose metabolism by inactivation of the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD oxidoreductase (phosphorylating) ED 1.2.1.1.2). The sensitivity of several eucaryotic cell-systems for pentalenolactone was shown under in vivo conditions. The glycolytic as well as the gluconeogenetic pathway of mammalian cells can be completely inhibited with low concentrations of the antibiotic. In all cases, the minimum inhibitory concentration is dependent on cell density. The inhibitory effect in vivo and in vitro does not seem to be species-specific. In erythrocytes from rats, in Ehrlich-ascites tumor cells and in Plasmodium vinckei infected erythrocytes from mice glycolysis can be inhibited with concentrations of 18--90 micrometers pentalenolactone. In hepatocytes, glycolysis as well as gluconeogenesis in prevented by the same concentrations. In contrast to these results, in yeast the inhibition depends on growth conditions. The inhibition in glucose medium is cancelled by precultivation on acetate-containing medium. PMID:7034785

  12. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with 125I, or metabolically with [35S] methionine or [3H] mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen

  13. Fate of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review is presented of the fate of pollutants in sediment and water systems. Topics of discussion include the following: modeling, observations, and general studies; chlorinated xenobiotic chemicals; nonchlorinated xenobiotic chemicals; pesticides; heavy metals; and radionuclides

  14. Thymic and Postthymic Regulation of Naïve CD4+ T-Cell Lineage Fates in Humans and Mice Models

    OpenAIRE

    Belizário, José E.; Wesley Brandão; Cristiano Rossato; Jean Pierre Peron

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how thymocytes differentiate into many subtypes has been increased progressively in its complexity. At early life, the thymus provides a suitable microenvironment with specific combination of stromal cells, growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines to induce the bone marrow lymphoid progenitor T-cell precursors into single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T effectors and CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs). At postthymic compartments, the CD4+ T-cells acquire distinct phenotypes w...

  15. Role of conserved non-coding DNA elements in the Foxp3 gene in regulatory T-cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Ye; Josefowicz, Steven; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Peng, Xiao P.; Forbush, Katherine; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2010-01-01

    Immune homeostasis is dependent on tight control over the size of a population of regulatory T (Treg) cells capable of suppressing over-exuberant immune responses. The Treg cell subset is comprised of cells that commit to the Treg lineage by upregulating the transcription factor Foxp3 either in the thymus (tTreg) or in the periphery (iTreg)1,2. Considering a central role for Foxp3 in Treg cell differentiation and function3,4, we proposed that conserved non-coding DNA sequence (CNS) elements a...

  16. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-04-11

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, which is probably one of the most exciting and yet enigmatic members of the POK/ZBTB family. PMID:23396304

  17. Outdoor fate and environmental impact of polymer solar cells through leaching and emission to rainwater and soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Lenz, Markus; Krebs, Frederik C

    2016-01-01

    zinc to the environment through precipitated water for damaged solar cells, and also observed failure and emission from an initially undamaged device in an experiment that endured for 6 months. In the case of the damaged cells, we found that the drinking water limits for Ag were only exceeded on a few...

  18. Recent advances in phytoplasma research: from genetic diversity and genome evolution to pathogenic redirection of plant stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasitizing phloem sieve cells and being transmitted by insects, phytoplasmas are a unique group of cell wall-less bacteria responsible for numerous plant diseases worldwide. Due to difficulties in establishing axenic culture of phytoplasmas, phenotypic characters suitable for conventional microbia...

  19. Restriction specificity of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells from thymectomised irradiated bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with thymus grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult-thymectomised lethally irradiated mice A that were reconstituted with T-cell-depleted bone marrow cells of (A X B)F1 origin plus fetal thymus grafts of (B X C)F1 origin generated virus-specific T cells restricted to B alone; adult-thymectomised and lethally irradiated (A X B)F1 mice that were reconstituted with T-cell depleted bone marrow cells of (A X B)F1 origin plus fetal thymus grafts of A and of B origin generated virus-specific T cells restricted to A or to B. These results do not reveal obvious suppressive influences of host or stem-cell origin that might have explained results obtained with various irradiated bone marrow or thymus chimeras, they indicate that the thymus' influence on maturing T cells is one of the limiting steps in the selection of T cells' restriction specificities. (Auth.)

  20. Chromatin “pre-pattern” and epigenetic modulation in the cell fate choice of liver over pancreas in the endoderm

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Cheng-Ran; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the basis for multipotency, whereby stem cells and other progenitors can differentiate into certain tissues and not others, provides insights into the mechanism of cell programming in development, homeostasis, and disease. We recently reported a screen of diverse chromatin marks to obtain clues about chromatin states in the multipotent embryonic endoderm. Genetic and pharmacologic tests of certain marks’ function demonstrated that the relevant chromatin modifying factors modulat...

  1. Cell and Tissue Organization in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems Volume 1 Signaling in Cell Organization, Fate, and Activity, Part A Cell Structure and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning.  The present volume is devoted to cellular events that allow adaptation to environmental conditions, particularly mechanotransduction. It begins with cell organization and a survey of cell types in the vasculatur...

  2. The different fate of satellite cells on conductive composite electrospun nanofibers with graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudifard, Matin; Soleimani, Masoud; Hatamie, Shadie; Zamanlui, Soheila; Ranjbarvan, Parviz; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Hosseinzadeh, Simzar

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning of composite polymer solutions provides fantastic potential to prepare novel nanofibers for use in a variety of applications. The addition of graphene (G) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to bioactive polymers was found to enhance their conductivity and biocompatibility. Composite conductive nanofibers of polyaniline (PANI) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) with G and GO nanosheets were prepared by an electrospinning process. The fabricated membranes were investigated by physical and chemical examinations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and tensile assay. The muscle satellite cells enriched by a pre-plating technique were cultured in the following and their proliferation and differentiation behavior studied by MTT, Real-Time PCR assays and 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The cultured cells on composite nanofibrous PAN/PANI-CSA/G confirmed a higher proliferation and differentiation value compared to other groups including PAN/PANI-CSA/GO and PAN/PANI-CSA scaffolds. Furthermore, the higher stiffness of the former scaffold showed a lower cell spreading as a function of stem cell activation into more proliferative cells. It is supposed that the enhanced conductivity value in addition to relative higher stiffness of the PAN/PANI-CSA/G composite nanofibers plays a favorable role for proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. PMID:26962722

  3. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  4. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  5. The determination of mother cell-specific mating type of switching in yeast by a specific regulator of HO transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nasmyth, Kim

    1987-01-01

    In haploid homothallic budding yeast, cell division gives rise to a mother cell which proceeds to switch its mating type and a daughter cell (the bud) which does not. Switching is initiated by a specific double strand cleavage of mating type DNA by an endonuclease encoded by the HO gene. Previous data suggest that the pattern of HO transcription is responsible for the mother cell specificity of switching. HO is transcribed transiently, at START, during the cell cycle of mother cells but not a...

  6. Interplay of Oct4 with Sox2 and Sox17: a molecular switch from stem cell pluripotency to specifying a cardiac fate.

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanovic, Sonia; Abboud, Nesrine; Désilets, Stéphanie; Nu, David; Cowan, Chad; Pucéat, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Oct4 exerts a dose-dependent dual action, as both a gatekeeper for stem cell pluripotency and in driving cells toward specific lineages. Here, we identify the molecular mechanism underlying this dual function. BMP2- or transgene-induced Oct4 up-regulation drives human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to become cardiac progenitors. When embryonic stem cell pluripotency is achieved, Oct4 switches from the Sox2 to the Sox17 promoter. This switch allows the cells to turn off the pluri...

  7. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klier Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. Methods We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. Results The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested could be observed. Conclusion Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These

  8. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  9. THE FATE OF MDACH1-EXPRESSING CELLS IN THE DORSAL PART OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLES FOLLOWING FOCAL CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anděrová, Miroslava; Pivoňková, Helena; Honsa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, Supplement 1 (2013), S125-S126. ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cell Function in Health and Disease /11./. 03.07.2013-06.07.2013, Berlin] Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cerebral ischemia * neuroscience * MDACH1 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. THE FATE OF MDACH1-EXPRESSING CELLS IN THE DORSAL PART OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLES FOLLOWING FOCAL CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butenko, Olena; Benešová, Jana; Mikešová, M.; Honsa, Pavel; Džamba, Dávid; Kriška, Ján; Rusňáková, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, Supplement 1 (2013), S207-S207. ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cell Function in Health and Disease /11./. 03.07.2013-06.07.2013, Berlin] Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : neuroscience * astrocyte Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Anionic Sites, Fucose Residues and Class I Human Leukocyte Antigen Fate During Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumbo Ana Carolina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii invades and proliferates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells where it resides in a parasitophorous vacuole. In order to analyze which components of the endothelial cell plasma membrane are internalized and become part of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, the culture of endothelial cells was labeled with cationized ferritin or UEA I lectin or anti Class I human leukocytte antigen (HLA before or after infection with T. gondii. The results showed no cationized ferritin and UEA I lectin in any parasitophorous vacuole membrane, however, the Class I HLA molecule labeling was observed in some endocytic vacuoles containing parasite until 1 h of interaction with T. gondii. After 24 h parasite-host cell interaction, the labeling was absent on the vacuolar membrane, but presents only in small vesicles near parasitophorous vacuole. These results suggest the anionic site and fucose residues are excluded at the time of parasitophorous vacuole formation while Class I HLA molecules are present only on a minority of Toxoplasma-containig vacuoles.

  12. Divalent metal transporter 1 regulates iron-mediated ROS and pancreatic ß cell fate in response to cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Tonnesen, Morten Fog; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Hagedorn, Peter; Friberg, Josefine; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Heller, R Scott; Nielsen, Anja Østergren; Størling, Joachim; Baeyens, Luc; Anker-Kitai, Leeat; Qvortrup, Klaus; Bouwens, Luc; Efrat, Shimon; Aalund, Mogens; Andrews, Nancy C; Billestrup, Nils; Karlsen, Allan E; Holst, Birgitte; Pociot, Flemming; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    knockout islets is defective, highlighting a physiological role of iron and ROS in the regulation of insulin secretion. Dmt1 knockout mice are protected against multiple low-dose streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance, models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Thus, ß cells...

  13. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E; Fugger, L; Engberg, J; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined......Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might...

  14. Kinetics of antigen specific and non-specific polyclonal B-cell responses during lethal Plasmodium yoelii malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Rolland

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the kinetics and composition of the polyclonal B-cell activation associated to malaria infection, antigen-specific and non-specific B-cell responses were evaluated in the spleens of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17 XL or injected with lysed erythrocytes or plasma from P. yoelii infected mice or with P. falciparum culture supernatants. Spleen/body weigth ratio, numbers of nucleated spleen cells and Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells increased progressively during the course of infection,in parallel to the parasitemia. A different pattern of kinetics was observed when anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell plaque forming cells response were studied: maximum values were observed at early stages of infection, whereas the number of total Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells were not yet altered. Conversely, at the end of infection, when these latter values reached their maximum, the anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell specific responses were normal or even infranormal. In mice injected with Plasmodium-derived material, a higher increase in antigen-specific PFC was observed, as compared to the increase of Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cell numbers. This suggested a "preferential" (antigen-plus mitogen-induced stimulation of antigen-specific cells rather than a generalized non-specific (mitogen-induced triggering of B-lymphocytes. On the basis of these and previous results, it is suggested that polyclonal B-cell activation that takes place during the course of infection appears as a result of successive waves of antigen-specific B-cell activation.

  15. Profiling a gut microbiota-generated catechin metabolite's fate in human blood cells using a metabolomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mülek, Melanie; Fekete, Agnes; Wiest, Johannes; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Mueller, Martin J; Högger, Petra

    2015-10-10

    The microbial catechin metabolite δ-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-γ-valerolactone (M1) has been found in human plasma samples after intake of maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol). M1 has been previously shown to accumulate in endothelial and blood cells in vitro after facilitated uptake and to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of the present research approach was to systematically and comprehensively analyze the metabolism of M1 in human blood cells in vitro and in vivo. A metabolomic approach that had been successfully applied for drug metabolite profiling was chosen to detect 19 metabolite peaks of M1 which were subsequently further analyzed and validated. The metabolites were categorized into three levels of identification according to the Metabolomics Standards Initiative with six compounds each confirmed at levels 1 and 2 and seven putative metabolites at level 3. The predominant metabolites were glutathione conjugates which were rapidly formed and revealed prolonged presence within the cells. Although a formation of an intracellular conjugate of M1 and glutathione (M1-GSH) was already known two GSH conjugate isomers, M1-S-GSH and M1-N-GSH were observed in the current study. Additionally detected organosulfur metabolites were conjugates with oxidized glutathione and cysteine. Other biotransformation products constituted the open-chained ester form of M1 and a methylated M1. Six of the metabolites determined in in vitro assays were also detected in blood cells in vivo after ingestion of the pine bark extract by two volunteers. The present study provides the first evidence that multiple and structurally heterogeneous polyphenol metabolites can be generated in human blood cells. The bioactivity of the M1 metabolites and their contribution to the previously determined anti-inflammatory effects of M1 now need to be elucidated. PMID:26025814

  16. Hydrolytic Fate of 3/15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol in Humans: Specific Deacetylation by the Small Intestine and Liver Revealed Using in Vitro and ex Vivo Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajandouz, El Hassan; Berdah, Stéphane; Moutardier, Vincent; Bege, Thierry; Birnbaum, David Jérémie; Perrier, Josette; Di Pasquale, Eric; Maresca, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In addition to deoxynivalenol (DON), acetylated derivatives, i.e., 3-acetyl and 15-acetyldexynivalenol (or 3/15ADON), are present in cereals leading to exposure to these mycotoxins. Animal and human studies suggest that 3/15ADON are converted into DON after their ingestion through hydrolysis of the acetyl moiety, the site(s) of such deacetylation being still uncharacterized. We used in vitro and ex vivo approaches to study the deacetylation of 3/15ADON by enzymes and cells/tissues present on their way from the food matrix to the blood in humans. We found that luminal deacetylation by digestive enzymes and bacteria is limited. Using human cells, tissues and S9 fractions, we were able to demonstrate that small intestine and liver possess strong deacetylation capacity compared to colon and kidneys. Interestingly, in most cases, deacetylation was more efficient for 3ADON than 15ADON. Although we initially thought that carboxylesterases (CES) could be responsible for the deacetylation of 3/15ADON, the use of pure human CES1/2 and of CES inhibitor demonstrated that CES are not involved. Taken together, our original model system allowed us to identify the small intestine and the liver as the main site of deacetylation of ingested 3/15ADON in humans. PMID:27483321

  17. From Adult Bone Marrow Cells to Other Cell Lineages:Transdifferentiation or Cells Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation or local injection of bone marrow cells can induce unexpected changes of their fate. The results of these experiments showed that after transplantation or injecton, some of tissue specific somatic cells such as hepatocytes, skeleton, cardiac muscle cells and brain cells expressed the donor cell-specific genes, such as Y chromosome. There are two hypotheses that can explain this phenomenon. One is bone marrow stem cell transdifferentiation and the other is spontaneous cell fusion.

  18. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression

  19. A specific Fc gamma receptor on cultured rat mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesangial cells represent specialized pericytes in the renal glomerulus that contribute to the regulation of a variety of glomerular functions. Recently we and others have shown that cultured mesangial cells bind and take up immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner leading in turn to generation of PGE2, reactive oxygen, and platelet-activating factor. The present studies were designed to further characterize potential Fc-gamma R on mesangial cells. Binding assays with either monomeric or heat aggregated (HA) [125I] labeled rat subclass-specific IgG were performed at 4 degrees C for 2 h on subcultured rat mesangial cells. Monomeric rat IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG1 and HA IgG2a bound only nonspecifically. Saturable Fc-dependent binding occurred for HA IgG2b and HA IgG1 though maximal binding and affinity were much higher for IgG2b. The presence of an Fc-gamma R was confirmed by surface protein iodination of mesangial cells (MC) and immunoprecipitation with either a polyclonal or mAb 2.4G2 prepared against murine Fc-gamma R. Both antibodies precipitated a 45-kDa iodinated protein band from cultured rat MC that comigrated with that from murine macrophage J774 cells on SDS-PAGE. This protein band also reacted with the polyclonal anti Fc-gamma R antibody on immunoblots. In contrast rat renal papillary epithelial cells were negative. The 45-kDa protein recognized by the rat anti-Fc-gamma R antibody 2.4G2 probably represents the binding site for HA IgG2b, as the 2.4G2 antibody also blocked binding of HA IgG2b. By immunofluorescence microscopy all MC stained positively with the polyclonal anti-Fc-gamma R antibody. A cDNA probe for the Fc-gamma RII-alpha on murine macrophages hybridized to mRNA from cultured rat MC which was of the same size (though less abundant) as that from J774 macrophages

  20. A specific Fc gamma receptor on cultured rat mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, A.; Satriano, J.; DeCandido, S.; Holthofer, H.; Schreiber, R.; Unkeless, J.; Schlondorff, D. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1989-10-15

    Mesangial cells represent specialized pericytes in the renal glomerulus that contribute to the regulation of a variety of glomerular functions. Recently we and others have shown that cultured mesangial cells bind and take up immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner leading in turn to generation of PGE2, reactive oxygen, and platelet-activating factor. The present studies were designed to further characterize potential Fc-gamma R on mesangial cells. Binding assays with either monomeric or heat aggregated (HA) (125I) labeled rat subclass-specific IgG were performed at 4 degrees C for 2 h on subcultured rat mesangial cells. Monomeric rat IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG1 and HA IgG2a bound only nonspecifically. Saturable Fc-dependent binding occurred for HA IgG2b and HA IgG1 though maximal binding and affinity were much higher for IgG2b. The presence of an Fc-gamma R was confirmed by surface protein iodination of mesangial cells (MC) and immunoprecipitation with either a polyclonal or mAb 2.4G2 prepared against murine Fc-gamma R. Both antibodies precipitated a 45-kDa iodinated protein band from cultured rat MC that comigrated with that from murine macrophage J774 cells on SDS-PAGE. This protein band also reacted with the polyclonal anti Fc-gamma R antibody on immunoblots. In contrast rat renal papillary epithelial cells were negative. The 45-kDa protein recognized by the rat anti-Fc-gamma R antibody 2.4G2 probably represents the binding site for HA IgG2b, as the 2.4G2 antibody also blocked binding of HA IgG2b. By immunofluorescence microscopy all MC stained positively with the polyclonal anti-Fc-gamma R antibody. A cDNA probe for the Fc-gamma RII-alpha on murine macrophages hybridized to mRNA from cultured rat MC which was of the same size (though less abundant) as that from J774 macrophages.

  1. High-definition mapping of retroviral integration sites defines the fate of allogeneic T cells after donor lymphocyte infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Maruggi, Giulietta; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Malani, Nirav; Pellin, Danilo; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Magnani, Zulma; Ciceri, Fabio; Ambrosi, Alessandro; von Kalle, Christof; Bushman, Frederic D.; Bonini, Chiara; Schmidt, Manfred; MAVILIO, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and p...

  2. PGC-1 family coactivators and cell fate: roles in cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and retrograde mitochondria-nucleus signalling.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A W; Z. Yao; Vicencio, J. M.; Karkucinska-Wieckowska, A.; Szabadkai, G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a complex nuclear transcriptional machinery controlling mitochondrial biogenesis and function has been described. Central to this network are the PGC-1 family coactivators, characterised as master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recent literature has identified a broader role for PGC-1 coactivators in both cell death and cellular adaptation under conditions of stress, here reviewed in the context of the pathology associated with cancer, neurodegeneration and...

  3. Retinoic Acid Receptors Control Spermatogonia Cell-Fate and Induce Expression of the SALL4A Transcription Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Gely-Pernot

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA is instrumental to male germ cell differentiation, but its mechanism of action remains elusive. To address this question, we have analyzed the phenotypes of mice lacking, in spermatogonia, all rexinoid receptors (RXRA, RXRB and RXRG or all ATRA receptors (RARA, RARB and RARG. We demonstrate that the combined ablation of RXRA and RXRB in spermatogonia recapitulates the set of defects observed both upon ablation of RAR in spermatogonia. We also show that ATRA activates RAR and RXR bound to a conserved regulatory region to increase expression of the SALL4A transcription factor in spermatogonia. Our results reveal that this major pluripotency gene is a target of ATRA signaling and that RAR/RXR heterodimers are the functional units driving its expression in spermatogonia. They add to the mechanisms through which ATRA promote expression of the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor to trigger a critical step in spermatogonia differentiation. Importantly, they indicate also that meiosis eventually occurs in the absence of a RAR/RXR pathway within germ cells and suggest that instructing this process is either ATRA-independent or requires an ATRA signal originating from Sertoli cells.

  4. Naturally occurring tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell precursors in individuals with and without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, Vaios; Zamanakou, Maria; Soukou, Faye; Kerenidi, Theodora; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2010-07-01

    Boosting pre-existing, naturally occurring cytolytic CD8(+) T-cell (CTLs) responses directed against class-I MHC-restricted peptides of tumor antigens, represents a primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. The number of pre-existing antitumor CTLs and their impaired function has been incriminated as the most likely candidates for the reduced clinical efficacy of these trials. This study was scheduled to determine possible differences in the frequency and the function of naturally occurring CTL precursors (pCTLs) against multiple peptides derived from the cancer-testis antigens MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3, and the overexpressed antigen hTERT, in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients as compared with aged-matched healthy individuals. The cumulative frequency of circulating peptide-specific pCTLs was found significantly higher in the cancer patients, varied widely and was not affected by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Furthermore, this frequency was greatly different between the various tumor-antigen peptides. Under the light of recent evidence provided from animal models, these results indicate that the peptide-specific pCTL frequency might represent an important determinant for the fate of cancer immunotherapy. In addition, our results show that tumor-specific pCTLs of cancer patients can present functional differences regarding their proliferative capacity, intensity of multimer staining and lytic capacity, when compared with those of healthy individuals. Hence, our findings could have an important role for the design of improved immunotherapeutic approaches for lung cancer. PMID:20142837

  5. Abnormal hair follicle development and altered cell fate of follicular keratinocytes in transgenic mice expressing ΔNp63α

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Rose-Anne; Smalley, Kirsten; Liu, Song; Sinha, Satrajit

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 plays an essential role in epidermal morphogenesis. Animals lacking p63 fail to form many ectodermal organs, including the skin and hair follicles. Although the indispensable role of p63 in stratified epithelial skin development is well established, relatively little is known about this transcriptional regulator in directing hair follicle morphogenesis. Here, using specific antibodies, we have established the expression pattern of ΔNp63 in hair follicle developmen...

  6. The in vivo fate of nanoparticles and nanoparticle-loaded microcapsules after oral administration in mice: Evaluation of their potential for colon-specific delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yiming; Fuchs, Adrian V; Boase, Nathan R B; Rolfe, Barbara E; Coombes, Allan G A; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2015-08-01

    Anti-cancer drug loaded-nanoparticles (NPs) or encapsulation of NPs in colon-targeted delivery systems shows potential for increasing the local drug concentration in the colon leading to improved treatment of colorectal cancer. To investigate the potential of the NP-based strategies for colon-specific delivery, two formulations, free Eudragit® NPs and enteric-coated NP-loaded chitosan-hypromellose microcapsules (MCs) were fluorescently-labelled and their tissue distribution in mice after oral administration was monitored by multispectral small animal imaging. The free NPs showed a shorter transit time throughout the mouse digestive tract than the MCs, with extensive excretion of NPs in faeces at 5h. Conversely, the MCs showed complete NP release in the lower region of the mouse small intestine at 8h post-administration. Overall, the encapsulation of NPs in MCs resulted in a higher colonic NP intensity from 8h to 24h post-administration compared to the free NPs, due to a NP 'guarding' effect of MCs during their transit along mouse gastrointestinal tract which decreased NP excretion in faeces. These imaging data revealed that this widely-utilised colon-targeting MC formulation lacked site-precision for releasing its NP load in the colon, but the increased residence time of the NPs in the lower gastrointestinal tract suggests that it is still useful for localised release of chemotherapeutics, compared to NP administration alone. In addition, both formulations resided in the stomach of mice at considerable concentrations over 24h. Thus, adhesion of NP- or MC-based oral delivery systems to gastric mucosa may be problematic for colon-specific delivery of the cargo to the colon and should be carefully investigated for a full evaluation of particulate delivery systems. PMID:26117186

  7. Modeling the dynamics and migratory pathways of virus-specific antibody-secreting cell populations in primary influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Miao

    Full Text Available The B cell response to influenza infection of the respiratory tract contributes to viral clearance and establishes profound resistance to reinfection by related viruses. Numerous studies have measured virus-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC frequencies in different anatomical compartments after influenza infection and provided a general picture of the kinetics of ASC formation and dispersion. However, the dynamics of ASC populations are difficult to determine experimentally and have received little attention. Here, we applied mathematical modeling to investigate the dynamics of ASC growth, death, and migration over the 2-week period following primary influenza infection in mice. Experimental data for model fitting came from high frequency measurements of virus-specific IgM, IgG, and IgA ASCs in the mediastinal lymph node (MLN, spleen, and lung. Model construction was based on a set of assumptions about ASC gain and loss from the sampled sites, and also on the directionality of ASC trafficking pathways. Most notably, modeling results suggest that differences in ASC fate and trafficking patterns reflect the site of formation and the expressed antibody class. Essentially all early IgA ASCs in the MLN migrated to spleen or lung, whereas cell death was likely the major reason for IgM and IgG ASC loss from the MLN. In contrast, the spleen contributed most of the IgM and IgG ASCs that migrated to the lung, but essentially none of the IgA ASCs. This finding points to a critical role for regional lymph nodes such as the MLN in the rapid generation of IgA ASCs that seed the lung. Results for the MLN also suggest that ASC death is a significant early feature of the B cell response. Overall, our analysis is consistent with accepted concepts in many regards, but it also indicates novel features of the B cell response to influenza that warrant further investigation.

  8. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  9. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  10. Role of Pioneer Transcription Factors FOXA1 and FOXA2 during Pancreatic Specification of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Dieter Ka Yeung

    2015-01-01

    During pancreas development, undifferentiated cells must undergo stepwise progression toward particular cell fates. The emergence of the distinct cell types of the pancreas relies on the capacity of lineage intermediates to properly interpret and respond to environmental inductive cues, an ability termed developmental competence. Enhancers have been shown to be critical in spatiotemporal gene regulation during development. However, how enhancers acquire the ability to translate signals from...

  11. Cell-type-specific profiling of protein-DNA interactions without cell isolation using targeted DamID with next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Owen J; Southall, Tony D; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2016-09-01

    This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 2, 1467-1478 (2007); doi:10.1038/nprot.2007.148; published online 7 June 2007The ability to profile transcription and chromatin binding in a cell-type-specific manner is a powerful aid to understanding cell-fate specification and cellular function in multicellular organisms. We recently developed targeted DamID (TaDa) to enable genome-wide, cell-type-specific profiling of DNA- and chromatin-binding proteins in vivo without cell isolation. As a protocol extension, this article describes substantial modifications to an existing protocol, and it offers additional applications. TaDa builds upon DamID, a technique for detecting genome-wide DNA-binding profiles of proteins, by coupling it with the GAL4 system in Drosophila to enable both temporal and spatial resolution. TaDa ensures that Dam-fusion proteins are expressed at very low levels, thus avoiding toxicity and potential artifacts from overexpression. The modifications to the core DamID technique presented here also increase the speed of sample processing and throughput, and adapt the method to next-generation sequencing technology. TaDa is robust, reproducible and highly sensitive. Compared with other methods for cell-type-specific profiling, the technique requires no cell-sorting, cross-linking or antisera, and binding profiles can be generated from as few as 10,000 total induced cells. By profiling the genome-wide binding of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), TaDa can also identify transcribed genes in a cell-type-specific manner. Here we describe a detailed protocol for carrying out TaDa experiments and preparing the material for next-generation sequencing. Although we developed TaDa in Drosophila, it should be easily adapted to other organisms with an inducible expression system. Once transgenic animals are obtained, the entire experimental procedure-from collecting tissue samples to generating sequencing libraries-can be accomplished within 5 d. PMID:27490632

  12. [Sporulation or competence development? A genetic regulatory network model of cell-fate determination in Bacillus subtilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Yuling; Zhang, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Guimin

    2015-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) strain that has been widely used in industries including fodder, food, and biological control. In addition, B. subtilis expression system also plays a significant role in the production of industrial enzymes. However, its application is limited by its low sporulation frequency and transformation efficiency. Immense studies have been done on interpreting the molecular mechanisms of sporulation and competence development, whereas only few of them were focused on improving sporulation frequency and transformation efficiency of B. subtilis by genetic modification. The main challenge is that sporulation and competence development, as the two major developmental events in the stationary phase of B. subtilis, are regulated by the complicated intracellular genetic regulatory systems. In addition, mutual regulatory mechanisms also exist in these two developmental events. With the development of genetic and metabolic engineering, constructing genetic regulatory networks is currently one of the most attractive research fields, together with the genetic information of cell growth, metabolism, and development, to guide the industrial application. In this review, the mechanisms of sporulation and competence development of B. subtilis, their interactions, and the genetic regulation of cell growth were interpreted. In addition, the roles of these regulatory networks in guiding basic and applied research of B. subtilis and its related species were discussed. PMID:26939438

  13. Cardiomyocyte expression and cell-specific processing of procholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline;

    2015-01-01

    Heart muscle cells produce peptide hormones such as natriuretic peptides. Developing hearts also express the gene for the classic intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) in amounts similar to those in the intestine and brain. However, cardiac expression of peptides other than natriuretic peptides...... has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence......-specific pro-CCK assays, peptide purification, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the mammalian heart expresses pro-CCK in amounts comparable to natriuretic prohormones and processes it to a unique, triple-sulfated, and N-terminally truncated product distinct from intestinal and cerebral CCK peptides...

  14. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  15. Common and cell type-specific responses of human cells to mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In yeast, mitochondrial dysfunction activates a specific pathway, termed retrograde regulation, which alters the expression of specific nuclear genes and results in increased replicative life span. In mammalian cells, the specific nuclear genes induced in response to loss of mitochondrial function are less well defined. This study characterizes responses in nuclear gene expression to loss of mitochondrial DNA sequences in three different human cell types: T143B, an osteosarcoma-derived cell line; ARPE19, a retinal pigment epithelium cell line; and GMO6225, a fibroblast cell population from an individual with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure gene expression of a selection of glycolysis, TCA cycle, mitochondrial, peroxisomal, extracellular matrix, stress response, and regulatory genes. Gene expression changes that were common to all three cell types included up-regulation of GCK (glucokinase), CS (citrate synthase), HOX1 (heme oxygenase 1), CKMT2 (mitochondrial creatine kinase 2), MYC (v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog), and WRN (Werner syndrome helicase), and down-regulation of FBP1 (fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase 1) and COL4A1 (collagen, type IV, alpha 1). RNA interference experiments show that induction of MYC is important in ρ0 cells for the up-regulation of glycolysis. In addition, a variety of cell type-specific gene changes was detected and most likely depended upon the differentiated functions of the individual cell types. These expression changes may help explain the response of different tissues to the loss of mitochondrial function due to aging or disease

  16. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  17. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi;

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  18. Transcription factor induction of human oligodendrocyte progenitor fate and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pol, Suyog U; Haberman, Alexa K; Wang, Chunming; O'Bara, Melanie A; Sim, Fraser J

    2014-07-15

    Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) specification and differentiation occurs slowly and limits the potential for cell-based treatment of demyelinating disease. In this study, using FACS-based isolation and microarray analysis, we identified a set of transcription factors expressed by human primary CD140a(+)O4(+) OPCs relative to CD133(+)CD140a(-) neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs). Among these, lentiviral overexpression of transcription factors ASCL1, SOX10, and NKX2.2 in NPCs was sufficient to induce Sox10 enhancer activity, OPC mRNA, and protein expression consistent with OPC fate; however, unlike ASCL1 and NKX2.2, only the transcriptome of SOX10-infected NPCs was induced to a human OPC gene expression signature. Furthermore, only SOX10 promoted oligodendrocyte commitment, and did so at quantitatively equivalent levels to native OPCs. In xenografts of shiverer/rag2 animals, SOX10 increased the rate of mature oligodendrocyte differentiation and axon ensheathment. Thus, SOX10 appears to be the principle and rate-limiting regulator of myelinogenic fate from human NPCs. PMID:24982138

  19. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of ESGP, an Embryonic Stem Cell and Germ Cell Specific Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Mei CHEN; Zhong-Wei DU; Zhen YAO

    2005-01-01

    Several putative Oct-4 downstream genes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been identified using the suppression-subtractive hybridization method. In this study, one of the novel genes encoding an ES cell and germ cell specific protein (ESGP) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.ESGP contains 801 bp encoding an 84 amino acid small protein and has no significant homology to any known genes. There is a signal peptide at the N-terminal of ESGP protein as predicted by SeqWeb (GCG)(SeqWeb version 2.0.2, http://gcg.biosino.org:8080/). The result of immunofluorescence assay suggested that ESGP might encode a secretory protein. The expression pattern of ESGP is consistent with the expression of Oct-4 during embryonic development. ESGP protein was detected in fertilized oocyte, from 3.5 day postcoital (dpc) blastocyst to 17.5 dpc embryo, and was only detected in testis and ovary tissues in adult. In vitro, ESGP was only expressed in pluripotent cell lines, such as embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic germ cells, but not in their differentiated progenies. Despite its specific expression,forced expression of ESGP is not indispensable for the effect of Oct-4 on ES cell self-renewal, and does not affect the differentiation to three germ layers.

  20. P2X7 Receptor as a Key Player in Oxidative Stress-Driven Cell Fate in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidences of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease parallels increase in the global obesity epidemic. NAFLD has been shown to be associated with risks of cardiometabolic disorders and kidney disturbances. It is accompanied by insulin and leptin resistance that complicate the diagnosis and treatment of this public health menace. Though significant research is underway for understanding the molecular mechanisms of NAFLD and its subsequent inflammatory and fibrotic manifestations like nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, the role of purinergic receptors has been unclear. It is increasingly being recognized that damage associated molecular patterns like NAD and ATP that are released from injured cells via hepatocellular injury either by oxidative stress or lipotoxicity from steatosis activate the purinergic receptor. Based on evidence from inflammatory responses in the airways and vasculature and autoimmune complications in humans and rodents, it is beyond doubt that hepatocellular inflammation such as that seen in NASH can result from the activation of purinergic receptors. This event can result in the formation of inflammasomes and can be an important pathway for the progression of NASH. The present review evaluates the current knowledge of the role of oxidative stress and its signaling via P2X7 receptors in hepatocellular injury that might contribute to the NASH pathophysiology.

  1. E3-ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 determines the fate of AID-associated RNA polymerase II in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Keim, Celia D; Wang, Jiguang; Kazadi, David; Oliver, Paula M; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-08-15

    Programmed mutagenesis of the immunoglobulin locus of B lymphocytes during class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation requires RNA polymerase II (polII) transcription complex-dependent targeting of the DNA mutator activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID deaminates cytidine residues on substrate sequences in the immunoglobulin (Ig) locus via a transcription-dependent mechanism, and this activity is stimulated by the RNA polII stalling cofactor Spt5 and the 11-subunit cellular noncoding RNA 3'-5' exonucleolytic processing complex RNA exosome. The mechanism by which the RNA exosome recognizes immunoglobulin locus RNA substrates to stimulate AID DNA deamination activity on its in vivo substrate sequences is an important question. Here we report that E3-ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 destabilizes AID-associated RNA polII by a ubiquitination event, leading to generation of 3' end free RNA exosome RNA substrates at the Ig locus and other AID target sequences genome-wide. We found that lack of Nedd4 activity in B cells leads to accumulation of RNA exosome substrates at AID target genes and defective CSR. Taken together, our study links noncoding RNA processing following RNA polII pausing with regulation of the mutator AID protein. Our study also identifies Nedd4 as a regulator of noncoding RNAs that are generated by stalled RNA polII genome-wide. PMID:23964096

  2. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  3. Investigating the Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Graphene Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hersam Laboratory at Northwestern University works with the Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study the toxicity and environmental fate of emergent nanomaterials, specifically carbon-based nanomate...

  4. Characterization of efferent T suppressor cells induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-specific afferent T suppressor cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-Finkel, B E; Murphy, J W

    1988-01-01

    Previously, we reported that Paracoccidioides brasiliensis culture filtrate antigen (Pb.Ag) when injected i.v. into mice induces antigen-specific suppressor cells which down-regulate the anti-P. brasiliensis delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. The suppressor cells are present in both spleens and lymph nodes of Pb.Ag-treated animals and suppress the afferent limb but not the efferent limb of the DTH response to P. brasiliensis. The suppressor cells induced by Pb.Ag are L3T4+ Lyt-1+2-...

  5. Quantitative live imaging of cancer and normal cells treated with Kinesin-5 inhibitors indicates significant differences in phenotypic responses and cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, James D; Tang, Yangzhong; Shi, Jade; Loy, Clement T; Amendt, Christiane; Wilm, Claudia; Zenke, Frank T; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2008-11-01

    Kinesin-5 inhibitors (K5I) are promising antimitotic cancer drug candidates. They cause prolonged mitotic arrest and death of cancer cells, but their full range of phenotypic effects in different cell types has been unclear. Using time-lapse microscopy of cancer and normal cell lines, we find that a novel K5I causes several different cancer and noncancer cell types to undergo prolonged arrest in monopolar mitosis. Subsequent events, however, differed greatly between cell types. Normal diploid cells mostly slipped from mitosis and arrested in tetraploid G(1), with little cell death. Several cancer cell lines died either during mitotic arrest or following slippage. Contrary to prevailing views, mitotic slippage was not required for death, and the duration of mitotic arrest correlated poorly with the probability of death in most cell lines. We also assayed drug reversibility and long-term responses after transient drug exposure in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Although many cells divided after drug washout during mitosis, this treatment resulted in lower survival compared with washout after spontaneous slippage likely due to chromosome segregation errors in the cells that divided. Our analysis shows that K5Is cause cancer-selective cell killing, provides important kinetic information for understanding clinical responses, and elucidates mechanisms of drug sensitivity versus resistance at the level of phenotype. PMID:18974392

  6. Recombinant scorpion insectotoxin AaIT kills specifically insect cells but not human cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence deduced from the amino acid sequence of the scorpion insectotoxin AaIT was chemically synthesized and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The authenticity of this in vitro expressed peptide was confirmed by N-terminal peptide sequencing. Two groups of bioassays, artificial diet incorporation assay and contact insecticidal effect assay, were carried out separately to verify the toxicity of this recombinant toxin. At the end of a 24 h experimental period, more than 60% of the testing diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae were killed in both groups with LCs0 value of 18.4 uM and 0.70 μM respectively. Cytotoxicity assay using cultured Sf9 insect cells and MCF-7 human cells demonstrated that the toxin AaIT had specific toxicity against insect cells but not human cells. Only 0.13 μM recombinant toxin was needed to kill 50% of cultured insect cells while as much as 1.3μM toxin had absolutely no effect on human cells. Insect cells produced obvious intrusions from their plasma membrane before broken up. We infer that toxin AaIT bind to a putative sodium channel in these insect cells and open the channel persistently, which would result in Na+ influx and finally cause destruction of insect cells.

  7. GATA-3 promotes T-cell specification by repressing B-cell potential in pro-T cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. García (Marcos); R.G.J. Klein Wolterink (Roel); F. Lemâitre (Fabrice); C. Le Goff (Carine); M. Hasan (Milena); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); A. Cumano (Ana); J.P. di Santo (James)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTranscription factors orchestrate T-lineage differentiation in the thymus. One critical checkpoint involves Notch1 signaling that instructs T-cell commitment at the expense of the B-lineage program. While GATA-3 is required for T-cell specification, its mechanism of action is poorly unde

  8. Tissue-specific stem cells: friend or foe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joerg Huelsken

    2009-01-01

    @@ In the face of a hostile environ-ment, the integrity of many tissues in the adult organism is maintained by a constant replacement of cells. This involves a hierarchical organization of the tissue with rare multi-potent stem cells giving rise to proliferating cells of limited proliferative capacity which in turn produce differentiating cells.

  9. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo. PMID:26111522

  10. Species-specific transformation of T cells by HVMNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HVMNE is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-like lymphocryptovirus (LCV) originally isolated from a Macaca nemestrina with CD8+ T cell mycosis fungoides/cutaneous T cell lymphoma (Blood 98 (2001), 2193). HVMNE transforms rabbit T cells in vitro and causes T cell lymphoma in New Zealand white rabbits. Here we demonstrate that HVMNE also immortalizes T cells from mustached tamarins but not those from owl monkeys, common marmosets, squirrel monkeys, black-capped capuchins, and humans. Cytogenetic and FACS analysis revealed the true origin and T cell lineage of the transformed tamarin T cell lines. Tamarin T cells contained HVMNE DNA sequence and displayed a decreased requirement for the IL-2 cytokine for growth. Thus, this EBV-like virus from M. nemestrina differs from the other EBV-like viruses found in nonhuman primates inasmuch as it appears to preferentially transform T cells

  11. Radionuclide fate and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies reported here deal with the full range of contaminant behavior and fate, from the initial physicochemical factors that govern radionuclide availability in terrestrial and aquatic environments to studies of contaminant transport by biological means. By design, we focus more on the biologically and chemically mediated transport processes and food-chain pathways than on the purely physical forms of contaminant transport, such as transport by wind and water

  12. ACE2 is required for daughter cell-specific G1 delay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Laabs, Tracy L.; Markwardt, David D.; Slattery, Matthew G.; Newcomb, Laura L.; Stillman, David J.; Heideman, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reproduce by budding to yield a mother cell and a smaller daughter cell. Although both mother and daughter begin G1 simultaneously, the mother cell progresses through G1 more rapidly. Daughter cell G1 delay has long been thought to be due to a requirement for attaining a certain critical cell size before passing the commitment point in the cell cycle known as START. We present an alternative model in which the daughter cell-specific Ace2 ...

  13. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in quiesc

  14. Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Danish RERTR Program, three fuel elements with LEU U3O8-Al fuel and three fuel elements with LEU U3Si2-Al fuel were manufactured by NUKEM for irradiation testing in the DR-3 reactor at the Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark. The specifications for the elements with U3O8-Al fuel are presented here as an illustration only. Specifications for the elements with U3Si2-Al fuel were very similar. In this example, materials, material numbers, documents numbers, and drawing numbers specific to a single fabricator have been deleted. (author)

  15. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  16. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. PMID:27453500

  17. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4+ T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To track epitope-specific CD4+ T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA323-339 epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVAII, replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4+ T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4+ T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA323-339 epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4+ T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection

  18. Uroplakins, specific membrane proteins of urothelial umbrella cells, as histological markers of metastatic transitional cell carcinomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, R.; Wu, X. R.; Lin, J.H.; Sun, T. T.

    1995-01-01

    Uroplakins (UPs) Ia, Ib, II, and III, transmembrane proteins constituting the asymmetrical unit membrane of urothelial umbrella cells, are the first specific urothelial differentiation markers described. We investigated the presence and localization patterns of UPs in various human carcinomas by applying immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method), using rabbit antibodies against UPs II and III, to paraffin sections. Positive reactions for UP III (sometimes very focal) were...

  19. Enhanced cell-permeant Cre protein for site-specific recombination in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruley H Earl

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-permeant Cre DNA site-specific recombinases provide an easily controlled means to regulate gene structure and function in living cells. Since recombination provides a stable and unambiguous record of protein uptake, the enzyme may also be used for quantitative studies of cis- and trans-acting factors that influence the delivery of proteins into cells. Results In the present study, 11 recombinant fusion proteins were analyzed to characterize sequences and conditions that affect protein uptake and/or activity and to develop more active cell-permeant enzymes. We report that the native enzyme has a low, but intrinsic ability to enter cells. The most active Cre proteins tested contained either an N-terminal 6xHis tag and a nuclear localization sequence from SV40 large T antigen (HNC or the HIV Tat transduction sequence and a C-terminal 6xHis tag (TCH6. The NLS and 6xHis elements separately enhanced the delivery of the HNC protein into cells; moreover, transduction sequences from fibroblast growth factor 4, HIV Tat or consisting of the (KFF3K sequence were not required for efficient protein transduction and adversely affected enzyme solubility. Transduction of the HNC protein required 10 to 15 min for half-maximum uptake, was greatly decreased at 4°C and was inhibited by serum. Efficient recombination was observed in all cell types tested (a T-cell line, NIH3T3, Cos7, murine ES cells, and primary splenocytes, and did not require localization of the enzyme to the nucleus. Conclusions The effects of different sequences on the delivery and/or activity of Cre in cultured cells could not be predicted in advance. Consequently, the process of developing more active cell-permeant recombinases was largely empirical. The HNC protein, with an excellent combination of activity, solubility and yield, will enhance the use of cell-permeant Cre proteins to regulate gene structure and function in living cells.

  20. Generation of Human Lens Epithelial-Like Cells From Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Qiu, Xiaodi; Yang, Jin; Liu, Tianjin; Luo, Yi; Lu, Yi

    2016-12-01

    Cataractogenesis begins from the dynamic lens epithelial cells (LECs) and adjacent fiber cells. LECs derived from cell lines cannot maintain the crystalline expression as the primary LECs. The current study aimed to efficiently generate large numbers of human LECs from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Anterior lens capsules were collected from cataract surgery and were used to culture primary hLECs. iPSCs were induced from these primary hLECs by lentiviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Then, the generated iPSCs were re-differentiated into hLECs by the 3-step addition of defined factor combinations (Noggin, BMP4/7, bFGF, and EGF) modified from an established method. During the re-differentiation process, colonies of interest were isolated using a glass picking tool and cloning cylinders based on the colony morphology. After two steps of isolation, populations of LEC-like cells (LLCs) were generated and identified by the expression of lens marker genes by qPCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. The study introduced a modified protocol to isolate LLCs from iPSCs by defined factors in a short time frame. This technique could be useful for mechanistic studies of lens-related diseases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2555-2562, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991066

  1. HLA-DP specific responses in allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Caroline Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrated that HLA-DPB1 mismatched stem cell transplantation (SCT) is associated with a decreased risk of disease relapse and an increased risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD) compared to HLA-DPB1 matched SCT. In T-cell depleted SCT, mismatching of HLA-DPB1 was not associated

  2. Fate in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Gaardsting, O; Hougaard Jensen, K;

    1986-01-01

    The fate of 257 consecutive patients (100 women) aged 36-85 years (mean 65) first seen with intermittent claudication in 1977 was analysed after a mean of 6.5 (SD 0.5) years. When first seen none of the patients complained of rest pain or had ulcers or gangrenous lesions on the feet. At follow up...... 113 of the patients (44%) had died. Causes of death were no different from those in the general population. Mortality was twice that of the general population matched for age and sex. Mortality among the men was twice that among the women. In men under 60 mortality was four times that expected. The...

  3. Fate of adsorbable micropollutants through sludge drying and composting processes

    OpenAIRE

    Besnault, S.; Martin Ruel, S.; Choubert, JM.; Budzinski, H.; Miege, C.; Esperanza, M.; Noyon, N.; Garnaud, S.; Coquery, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the paper was to evaluate the fate of 79 adsorbed micropollutants through 9 sludge treatment processes. A specific sampling strategy was applied to follow a “batch” of sludge through the treatment (inlet and outlet sludge, intermediary mixture for some processes such as composting and condensates). Mass balances were established to calculate micropollutants removal efficiencies and the fate of the substances through these facilities was evaluated. In order to limi...

  4. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  5. Antigen-specific murine T cell clones produce soluble interleukin 2 receptor on stimulation with specific antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, monoclonal antibodies were used to the murine IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) termed 3C7 and 7D4, which bind to different epitopes on the murine IL 2R, to develop an ELISA to measure soluble murine IL 2R. Surprisingly, stimulated murine spleen cells not only expressed cell-associated IL 2R, but also produced a considerable level of cellfree IL 2R in the culture supernatant fluid. To assess the fine specificity of this response, myoglobin-immune murine T cell clones were stimulated with appropriate or inappropriate antigen and syngeneic or allogeneic presenting cells. Proliferation, measured by [3H] thymidine incorporation, and levels of soluble IL 2R were determined at day 4. The production of soluble IL2R displayed the same epitope fine specificity, genetic restriction, and antigen dose-response as the proliferative response. Indeed, in some cases there was sharper discrimination of epitope specificity and genetic restriction with the soluble IL 2R levels. There was also reproducible clone-to-clone variation in the amount of soluble receptor produced in response to antigen among 12 T cell clones and lines tested. In time course experiments, proliferation was greatest at day 3, whereas soluble IL 2R levels continued to rise in subsequent days. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of release of secretion of soluble IL 2R by murine T cells, and the first demonstration of the fine specificity and genetic restriction of the induction of soluble IL 2R by specific antigen

  6. Kidney Specific Protein-Positive Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Reproduce Tubular Structures In Vitro and Differentiate into Renal Tubular Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuji Morizane; Toshiaki Monkawa; Shizuka Fujii; Shintaro Yamaguchi; Koichiro Homma; Yumi Matsuzaki; Hideyuki Okano; Hiroshi Itoh

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be...

  7. Branch-specific heterosynaptic facilitation in Aplysia siphon sensory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Gregory A.; Kandel, Eric R.

    1984-01-01

    Aplysia siphon sensory cells exhibit heterosynaptic facilitation of transmitter release during both sensitization and classical conditioning of the siphon withdrawal response. In the present study, we asked whether facilitation must invariably enhance transmission at all terminals of a neuron or whether facilitation can instead occur at one set of terminals without also occurring at other terminals of the same cell. To examine this question, we compared effects of local application of seroton...

  8. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibi...

  9. Specifications and schedule of a fuel cell test railway vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, T.; Ogawa, K.; Furuya, T.; Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T. [Railway Technical Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    This paper described a fuel cell test railway vehicle designed at a research institute in Japan. A proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was used as the on-board power source of the railway vehicle traction system. Use of the fuel cell was expected to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions as well as overall energy consumption when combined with the use of a regenerative brake. During the experiment, 100 kW class fuel cells were constructed, and pure hydrogen was supplied from a hydrogen cylinder. A composite cylinder made from an aluminum liner wrapped in carbon fiber was selected as a hydrogen storage tank. An existing rapid service train body was modified to test the new system. The train was comprised of a motive bogie with 2 motors, and a trailing bogie without motors. The fuel cells and the traction inverter were installed inside the car, while hydrogen cylinders were installed under the floor to avoid leaks. The motor was operated at the limit of the fuel cell's power of 120 kW. Train performance curves of the test track were measured. A high-speed test drive of the system will be conducted in the near future. Details of the test schedule were provided. 1 ref., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  10. Pathogen-specific regulatory T cells delay the arrival of effector T cells in the lung during early tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiani, Shahin; Tucker-Heard, Glady’s; Kariyone, Ai; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Urdahl, Kevin B.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of the adaptive immune system to restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is impeded by activated Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells. The importance of pathogen-specific T reg cells in this process has not been addressed. We show that T reg cell expansion after aerosol Mtb infection does not occur until Mtb is transported to the pulmonary lymph node (pLN), and Mtb-specific T reg cells have an increased propensity to proliferate. Even small numbers of Mtb-specific T reg cells are c...

  11. MicroRNA Profiling Reveals Unique miRNA Signatures in IGF-1 Treated Embryonic Striatal Stem Cell Fate Decisions in Striatal Neurogenesis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is considered to be the central processing unit of the basal ganglia in locomotor activity and cognitive function of the brain. IGF-1 could act as a control switch for the long-term proliferation and survival of EGF + bFGF-responsive cultured embryonic striatal stem cell (ESSC, while LIF imposes a negative impact on cell proliferation. The IGF-1-treated ESSCs also showed elevated hTERT expression with demonstration of self-renewal and trilineage commitment (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. In order to decipher the underlying regulatory microRNA (miRNAs in IGF-1/LIF-treated ESSC-derived neurogenesis, we performed in-depth miRNA profiling at 12 days in vitro and analyzed the candidates using the Partek Genome Suite software. The annotated miRNA fingerprints delineated the differential expressions of miR-143, miR-433, and miR-503 specific to IGF-1 treatment. Similarly, the LIF-treated ESSCs demonstrated specific expression of miR-326, miR-181, and miR-22, as they were nonsignificant in IGF-treated ESSCs. To elucidate the possible downstream pathways, we performed in silico mapping of the said miRNAs into ingenuity pathway analysis. Our findings revealed the important mRNA targets of the miRNAs and suggested specific interactomes. The above studies introduced a new genre of miRNAs for ESSC-based neuroregenerative therapeutic applications.

  12. Multiple Effector Functions Mediated by Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Philip J.; Sumaroka, Marina; Brander, Christian; Moffett, Howell F.; Boswell, Steven L.; Nguyen, Tam; Sykulev, Yuri; Walker, Bruce D; Rosenberg, Eric S.

    2001-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-specific T helper cells contribute to effective antiviral control, but their functional characteristics and the precise epitopes targeted by this response remain to be defined. In this study, we generated CD4+ T-cell clones specific for Gag from HIV-1-infected persons with vigorous Gag-specific responses detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Multiple peptides containing T helper epitopes were identifie...

  13. Defining cell-type specificity at the transcriptional level in human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Wenjun; Greene, Casey S; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Bitzer, Markus; Lee, Young-Suk; Zhu, Qian; Kehata, Masami; Li, Min; Jiang, Song; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Cohen, Clemens D; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cell-lineage–specific transcripts are essential for differentiated tissue function, implicated in hereditary organ failure, and mediate acquired chronic diseases. However, experimental identification of cell-lineage–specific genes in a genome-scale manner is infeasible for most solid human tissues. We developed the first genome-scale method to identify genes with cell-lineage–specific expression, even in lineages not separable by experimental microdissection. Our machine-learning–based approa...

  14. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Deirdre C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition towards constructing the bilaterian body plan. These cells give rise to the visceral mesoderm in virtually all spiralians examined and in many species they also contribute to the endodermal intestine. Hence, the 4d lineage is an ideal one for studying the evolution and diversification of the bipotential endomesodermal germ layer in protostomes at the level of individual cells. Little is known of how division patterns are controlled or how mesodermal and endodermal sublineages diverge in spiralians. Detailed modern fate maps for 4d exist in only a few species of clitellate annelids, specifically in glossiphoniid leeches and the sludge worm Tubifex. We investigated the 4d lineage in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata, an established model system for spiralian biology, and in a closely related direct-developing species, C. convexa. Results High-resolution cell lineage tracing techniques were used to study the 4d lineage of C. fornicata and C. convexa. We present a new nomenclature to name the progeny of 4d, and report the fate map for the sublineages up through the birth of the first five pairs of teloblast daughter cells (when 28 cells are present in the 4d sublineage, and describe each clone’s behavior during gastrulation and later stages as these undergo differentiation. We identify the precise origin of the intestine, two cells of the larval kidney complex, the larval retractor muscles and the presumptive germ cells, among others. Other tissues that arise

  15. Perforin and Fas in murine gammaherpesvirus-specific CD8(+) T cell control and morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topham, D J; Cardin, R C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard;

    2001-01-01

    The immune system uses both virus-specific T cells and B cells to control the acute and latent phases of respiratory infection with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68). We sought to further define the important effector mechanisms for CD8(+) T cells. First, depletion of the CD4(+) T cells...

  16. Choice of pesticide fate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of a pesticide fate model at field scale is linked to the available input data. The article describes the available pesticide fate models at a field scale and the guidelines for the choice of the suitable model as function of the data input requested

  17. Spatio-temporal model of endogenous ROS and raft-dependent WNT/{beta}-catenin signaling driving cell fate commitment in human neural progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haack, F.; Lemcke, H.; Ewald, R.(Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Germany); Rharass, T.; Uhrmacher, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical WNT/{beta}-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/{beta}-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experiment...

  18. Cell type-specific neuroprotective activity of untranslocated prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Restelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A key pathogenic role in prion diseases was proposed for a cytosolic form of the prion protein (PrP. However, it is not clear how cytosolic PrP localization influences neuronal viability, with either cytotoxic or anti-apoptotic effects reported in different studies. The cellular mechanism by which PrP is delivered to the cytosol of neurons is also debated, and either retrograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum or inefficient translocation during biosynthesis has been proposed. We investigated cytosolic PrP biogenesis and effect on cell viability in primary neuronal cultures from different mouse brain regions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mild proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of an untranslocated form of cytosolic PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, but not in cerebellar granules. A cyclopeptolide that interferes with the correct insertion of the PrP signal sequence into the translocon increased the amount of untranslocated PrP in cortical and hippocampal cells, and induced its synthesis in cerebellar neurons. Untranslocated PrP boosted the resistance of cortical and hippocampal neurons to apoptotic insults but had no effect on cerebellar cells