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Sample records for cell expanding clinical

  1. Regulatory authorities and orthopaedic clinical trials on expanded mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Solá, Cristina Avendaño; Bunu, Carmen Painatescu

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal injuries requiring bone augmentation techniques are increasing in the context of avoiding or treating difficult cases with bone defects, bone healing problems, and bone regeneration limitations. Musculoskeletal severe trauma, osteoporosis-related fractures, and conditions where bone defect, bone collapse or insufficient bone regeneration occur are prone to disability and serious complications. Bone cell therapy has emerged as a promising technique to augment and promote bone regeneration. Interest in the orthopaedic community is considerable, although many aspects related to the research of this technique in specific indications may be insufficiently recognised by many orthopaedic surgeons. Clinical trials are the ultimate research in real patients that may confirm or refute the value of this new therapy. However, before launching the required trials in bone cell therapy towards bone regeneration, preclinical data is needed with the cell product to be implanted in patients to ensure safety and efficacy. These preclinical studies support the end-points that need to be evaluated in clinical trials. Orthopaedic surgeons are the ultimate players that, through their research, would confirm in clinical trials the benefit of bone cell therapies. To further foster this research, the pathway to eventually obtain authorisation from the National Competent Authorities and Research Ethics Committees under the European regulation is reviewed, and the experience of the REBORNE European project offers information and important clues about the current Voluntary Harmonization Procedure and other opportunities that need to be considered by surgeons and researchers on the topic.

  2. OCT Expanded Clinical Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Tafreshi, Ali; Patel, Nimesh; Young, Millennia; Mason, Sara; Otto, Christian; Samuels, Brian; Koslovsky, Matthew; Schaefer, Caroline; Taiym, Wafa; hide

    2017-01-01

    Vision changes identified in long duration space fliers has led to a more comprehensive clinical monitoring protocol. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was recently implemented on board the International Space Station in 2013. NASA is collaborating with Heidelberg Engineering to expand our current OCT data analysis capability by implementing a volumetric approach. Volumetric maps will be created by combining the circle scan, the disc block scan, and the radial scan. This assessment may provide additional information about the optic nerve and further characterize changes related microgravity exposure. We will discuss challenges with collection and analysis of OCT data, present the results of this reanalysis and outline the potential benefits and limitations of the additional data.

  3. Treatment of Crohn's-Related Rectovaginal Fistula With Allogeneic Expanded-Adipose Derived Stem Cells: A Phase I-IIa Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arranz, Mariano; Herreros, Maria Dolores; González-Gómez, Carolina; de la Quintana, Paloma; Guadalajara, Héctor; Georgiev-Hristov, Tihomir; Trébol, Jacobo; Garcia-Olmo, Damián

    2016-11-01

    : The aim of this clinical trial was to determine the safety and feasibility of expanded allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells to treat Crohn's-related rectovaginal fistula (CRRVF). We designed a phase I-II clinical trial (https://ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00999115) to treat 10 patients with CRRVF. Patients receiving biological therapy during follow-up were excluded. Curettage was performed, and a vaginal or rectal flap was added if the surgeon considered it necessary. The therapeutic protocol included intralesional injection of 20 million stem cells in the vaginal walls (submucosal area) and fistula tract. Healing was evaluated 12 weeks later. If the fistula had not healed, a second dose of 40 million stem cells was administered. Patient follow-up was 52 weeks from last cell injection. Healing was defined as re-epithelialization of both vaginal and rectal sides and absence of vaginal drainage. Cytokines and immunological blood tests were monitored. Serious adverse events or rejection issues were not observed. Five patients were excluded because biologic drugs were required to treat a Crohn's disease flare-up during follow-up. Cytokine profiles and immunotoxicity assays showed no statistically significant alterations. Sixty percent of the nonexcluded patients achieved a complete healing. Expanded allogeneic adipose-derived stem-cell injection is a safe and feasible therapy for treating CRRVF, and the healing success rate seems promising (60%). The results of this trial encourage further exploration into this therapy. This may be the first publication in which allogeneic stem cells to treat rectovaginal fistula in Crohn´s disease seem to be a feasible and safe treatment. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy profile of the allogeneic stem cells strategy in a controlled design. ©AlphaMed Press.

  4. Establishment of mouse expanded potential stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Ryan, David J; Wang, Wei; Tsang, Jason Cheuk-Ho; Lan, Guocheng; Masaki, Hideki; Gao, Xuefei; Antunes, Liliana; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Zhexin; Wang, Juexuan; Kolodziejczyk, Aleksandra A; Campos, Lia S; Wang, Cui; Yang, Fengtang; Zhong, Zhen; Fu, Beiyuan; Eckersley-Maslin, Melanie A; Woods, Michael; Tanaka, Yosuke; Chen, Xi; Wilkinson, Adam C; Bussell, James; White, Jacqui; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Reik, Wolf; Göttgens, Berthold; Teichmann, Sarah A; Tam, Patrick P L; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Zou, Xiangang; Lu, Liming; Liu, Pentao

    2017-10-19

    Mouse embryonic stem cells derived from the epiblast contribute to the somatic lineages and the germline but are excluded from the extra-embryonic tissues that are derived from the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm upon reintroduction to the blastocyst. Here we report that cultures of expanded potential stem cells can be established from individual eight-cell blastomeres, and by direct conversion of mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Remarkably, a single expanded potential stem cell can contribute both to the embryo proper and to the trophectoderm lineages in a chimaera assay. Bona fide trophoblast stem cell lines and extra-embryonic endoderm stem cells can be directly derived from expanded potential stem cells in vitro. Molecular analyses of the epigenome and single-cell transcriptome reveal enrichment for blastomere-specific signature and a dynamic DNA methylome in expanded potential stem cells. The generation of mouse expanded potential stem cells highlights the feasibility of establishing expanded potential stem cells for other mammalian species.

  5. PROFAM expands Mexican family planning clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Mexico's private, nonprofit social marketing company, known as PROFAM, intends to expand its family planning clinics to marginal urban areas. The clinics are part of PROFAM's push to diversify social marketing outlets for contraceptive products and other birth control methods. PROFAM expects to establish 3 new clinics, possibly including a pregnancy test laboratory, a small 1-doctor clinic, and a large clinic housing an operating room. 1 clinic will be located outside the Mexico City area, the program's traditional boundaries. The company currently runs 2 small clinics and a pregnancy testing laboratory in Ciudad Netzahualcoyti, a community of 3.5 million on Mexico City's outskirts. PROFAM recently obtaine d government approval to sell condoms in food stores, which should increase distribtuion and sales. Currently, the company sells over 1 million high quality, lubricated condoms each month, accounting for over half of the Mexican market. Distribution covers 85% of the country's drugstore. Program setbacks occurred in 1981, when the Mexican government cancelled PROFAM's sales permits for all contraceptive products except condoms. Cancelled products included an oral contraceptive and 3 vaginal spermicides. These 4 products had provided nearly 100,000 couple years of protection in 1979 and an estimated 120,000 CYP 1980. During 1979 and 1980, condoms provided about 27,000 and 60,000 CYP, respectively. PROFAM had relied heavily on the pill and spermicides because its early studies showed condoms had a negative image in Mexico, due largely to the product's association with extramarital affairs. To counter this, PROFAM launched a widespread, free product sampling program in 1979, along with a continuing educational and advertising drive. Subsequent consumer surveys revealed a marked increase in product acceptance, with PROFAM's condom becoming the most widely known brand available in Mexico.

  6. Expanding clinical empathy: an activist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Discussions of empathy in health care offer important ways of enabling communication and interpersonal connection that are therapeutic for the patient and satisfying for the physician. While the best of these discussions offer valuable insights into the patient-physician relationship, many of them lack an action component for alleviating the patient's suffering and emphasize the physician's experience of empathy rather than the patient's experience of illness. By examining educational methods, such as reflective writing exercises and the study of literary texts, and by analyzing theoretical approaches to empathy and suggestions for clinical practice, this article considers how to mindfully keep the focus on what the patient is going through. Clinical empathy can be improved by strategies that address (1) the patient's authority in providing first-person accounts of illness and disability, (2) expanding the concept of empathy to include an action component geared toward relieving patients' suffering, and (3) the potential value of extending empathy to include the social context of illness.

  7. Clinical-Grade-Expanded Regulatory T Cells Prevent Graft-versus-Host Disease While Allowing a Powerful T Cell-Dependent Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect in Murine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Papa, Beatrice; Ruggeri, Loredana; Urbani, Elena; Baldoni, Stefano; Cecchini, Debora; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Crescenzi, Barbara; Carotti, Alessandra; Pierini, Antonio; Sportoletti, Paolo; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; Falzetti, Franca; Mecucci, Cristina; Velardi, Andrea; Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro

    2017-11-01

    We developed a good manufacturing practices-compatible expansion protocol to improve number and purity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) available for clinical trials. Six clinical-grade separation procedures were performed, followed by expansion with high-dose interleukin (IL)-2, anti-CD3/anti-CD28 TCR stimulation, and rapamycin for 19 days achieving a median of 8.5-fold (range, 6.25 to 13.7) expansion. FOXP3 expression was stably maintained over the culture period, while the percentage of CD127 was significantly reduced. The in vitro suppression assay showed a strong Mixed Lymphocytes Reaction inhibition. In vitro amplification did not induce any karyotypic modification. To evaluate the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)/graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) bifunctional axis, expanded Tregs and conventional T cells (Tcons) were tested in NOD/SCID/IL2Rgnull mice injected with primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, AML cell line, acute lymphoid leukemia Philadelphia cell line, or Burkitt-like lymphoma cell line. All mice that received leukemia cells together with expanded Tregs and Tcons were rescued from leukemia and survived without GVHD, showing that Treg expansion procedure did not compromise GVHD control and the strong Tcon-mediated GVL activity. This report might represent the basis for treating high-risk leukemia and/or relapsed/refractory leukemia patients with high-dose Treg/Tcons. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expanded Stem Cells, Stromal-Vascular Fraction, and Platelet-Rich Plasma Enriched Fat: Comparing Results of Different Facial Rejuvenation Approaches in a Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, Gino; Charles-de-Sá, Luiz; Gontijo-de-Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Amable, Paola Romina; Borojevic, Radovan; Benati, Donatella; Bernardi, Paolo; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that treatment with expanded adipose-derived stem cells or stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-enriched fat modify the pattern of the dermis in human beings, representing a skin rejuvenation effect. Considering that expanded stem cells require a cell factor, the authors wanted to assess similar results by replacing them with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which is easier to obtain and for which an empirical regenerative effect has been already described. To determine if PRP injection could replace the cutaneous regenerative effect of adipose-derived stem cells. This study was performed in 13 patients who were candidates for facelift. The patients underwent sampling of fat by liposuction from the abdomen and submitted to one of three protocols: injection of SVF-enriched fat or expanded adipose-derived stem cells or fat plus PRP in the preauricular areas. Fragments of skin were removed before and 3 months after treatment and analyzed by optical and electron microscopy. The use of fat plus PRP led to the presence of more pronounced inflammatory infiltrates and a greater vascular reactivity, increasing in vascular permeability and a certain reactivity of the nervous component. The addition of PRP did not improve the regenerative effect. The use of PRP did not have significant advantages in skin rejuvenation over the use of expanded adipose-derived stem cells or SVF-enriched fat. The effect of increased vascular reactivity may be useful in pathological situations in which an intense angiogenesis is desirable, such as tissular ischemia. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-09-12

    Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one withdrawal due to immigration, with

  10. The expanding clinical spectrum of torpedo maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Richard; Kiani, Salma; Raveendranathan, Praneetha

    2014-04-01

    Torpedo maculopathy is an idiopathic, congenital, oval-shaped region of chorioretinal hypopigmentation located temporal to the macula. Torpedo lesions are typically unilateral, occasionally harbor an intraretinal cleft, and may be associated with varying degrees of hyperpigmentation. Visual acuity is usually normal, but the lesion may produce a scotoma in the visual field. There are no known associated systemic or ocular abnormalities. Diagnosis is based upon recognition of its characteristic shape and location. Because of its nonprogressive and generally benign nature, no treatment is required. Two cases of torpedo maculopathy associated with fundus excavation are presented. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported association of torpedo maculopathy with fundus excavation. In one case, the visual acuity remained unaffected and in the other case the visual acuity was reduced to 20/50. In both cases, optical coherence tomography clearly demonstrates the excavated nature of the torpedo lesions. In case 1, where the visual acuity was normal, the excavation is remote from the fovea but in case 2, where the visual acuity was 20/50, the excavation encroaches upon the fovea. In both cases, a scotoma corresponding to the excavated region could be demonstrated. Torpedo maculopathy is a usually benign condition associated with normal visual acuity and normal visual fields. Our cases demonstrate that torpedo maculopathy may be associated with excavation of the fundus and a corresponding scotoma in the visual field. Visual acuity may be compromised should the excavation encroach upon the central fovea. Knowledge of this previously unreported clinical manifestation of torpedo maculopathy may aid in advancing the understanding of this condition and the care of patients with the disorder.

  11. The expanding clinical spectrum of mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vivo, D C

    1993-01-01

    . This classification divides mitochondrial diseases into five categories. Primary and secondary deficiencies of carnitine are examples of a substrate transport defect. A lipid storage myopathy is often present. Disturbances of pyruvate or fatty acid metabolism are examples of substrate utilization defects. Only four defects of the Krebs cycle are known: fumarase deficiency, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase deficiency, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency, and combined defects of muscle succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase. Luft disease is the singular example of a defect in oxidation-phosphorylation coupling. Defects of respiratory chain function are manifold. Two clinical syndromes predominate, one involving limb weakness, and the other primarily affecting brain function. Leigh syndrome may result from different enzyme defects, most notably pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency, cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, complex I deficiency, and complex V deficiency associated with the recently described NARP point mutation. A new group of mitochondrial diseases has emerged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  12. Transplantation of Autologous Ex Vivo Expanded Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cells for Treatment of Pterygia: A Prospective Open-label Single Arm Multicentric Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasania, Viraf Sam; Hari, Aarya; Tandon, Radhika; Shah, Sanjay; Haldipurkar, Suhas; Shah, Smitesh; Sachan, Shailendra; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    To establish the efficacy and safety of ex vivo cultured autologous human conjunctival epithelial cell (hCjEC) transplantation for treatment of pterygia. Twenty-five patients with pterygia were recruited at different centers across the country. Autologous hCjEC grafts were prepared from conjunctival biopsy specimens excised from the healthy eye and cultured ex vivo on human amniotic membrane mounted on inserts using a unique mounting device. The hCjEC grafts were then transported in an in-house designed transport container for transplantation. Post-surgery, the patients were followed up on days 1, 7, 14, 30, 90, and 180 as per the approved study protocol. Clinical outcomes were assessed by slit lamp examination, visual acuity, imprint cytology, fluorescein/rose bengal staining, Schirmer's test, and photographic evaluation three and 6 months post-transplantation. Two patients were lost to follow-up and final analysis included 23 cases. No recurrence of pterygium was observed in 18 (78.3%) patients; all of these eyes showed a smooth conjunctival surface without epithelial defects. Recurrence was observed in 5 (21.7%) patients at 3 months post-treatment. No conjunctival inflammation, secondary infections or other complications were reported. Adequate goblet cells were present in 19 (82.6%) patients at the site of transplantation. We have, for the 1(st) time, standardized a protocol for preparing autologous hCjEC grafts that can be safely transported to multiple centers across the country for transplantation. The clinical outcome was satisfactory for treating pterygia.

  13. Expanded clinical spectrum of enhanced S-cone syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, Suzanne; Barbazetto, Irene; Allikmets, Rando; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Bergen, Arthur; Tsang, Stephen H.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    New funduscopic findings in patients with enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) may help clinicians in diagnosing this rare autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy. To expand the clinical spectrum of ESCS due to mutations in the NR2E3 gene. Retrospective, noncomparative case series of 31 patients examined

  14. Thrombopoietin expands hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Norma; Priestley, Greg; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), supporting their survival and proliferation in vitro. To determine whether TPO supports the impressive expansion of HSC observed following transplantation, we transplanted normal marrow cells into lethally irradiated Tpo–/– and Tpo+/+ mice and quantified HSC self-renewal and expansion and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing. Although essentially identical numbers of...

  15. Ex Vivo Expanded Human NK Cells Survive and Proliferate in Humanized Mice with Autologous Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Nham, Tina; Poznanski, Sophie M; Chew, Marianne V; Shenouda, Mira M; Lee, Dean; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-09-21

    Adoptive immune cell therapy is emerging as a promising immunotherapy for cancer. Particularly, the adoptive transfer of NK cells has garnered attention due to their natural cytotoxicity against tumor cells and safety upon adoptive transfer to patients. Although strategies exist to efficiently generate large quantities of expanded NK cells ex vivo, it remains unknown whether these expanded NK cells can persist and/or proliferate in vivo in the absence of exogenous human cytokines. Here, we have examined the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human cord blood-derived NK cells into humanized mice reconstituted with autologous human cord blood immune cells. We report that ex vivo expanded NK cells are able to survive and possibly proliferate in vivo in humanized mice without exogenous cytokine administration, but not in control mice that lack human immune cells. These findings demonstrate that the presence of autologous human immune cells supports the in vivo survival of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. These results support the application of ex vivo expanded NK cells in cancer immunotherapy and provide a translational humanized mouse model to test the lifespan, safety, and functionality of adoptively transferred cells in the presence of autologous human immune cells prior to clinical use.

  16. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxy...

  17. DNA damage in Human Limbal Epithelial Cells expanded ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Lorenzo Corrales

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Limbal stem cell deficiency, secondary to insults and diseases, may be treated by transplantation of ex vivo engineered epithelial grafts. We here present preliminary data on levels of cellular DNA damage in grafts produced in two different types of culture medium. Cultures were initiated using corneo-limbal donor tissue after removal of the central area for transplant purposes. Explants (approx. 2x2 mm were positioned epithelial side down on tissue culture treated polyester membranes and expanded for four weeks in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium F12 Nutrient Mixture (Ham [DMEM/F12 (1:1] with either (1 H. medium; 10% human serum or (2 COM; 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, insulin-transferrin-sodiumselenzine (ITS , cholera toxin-A, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and hydrocortisone. Cells were dissociated using Trypsin-EDTA (0.05% for 30 min., the enzyme activity was inhibited by medium and serum. The cell suspension was transferred to tubes on ice and processed using the Comet Assay. Duplicate samples from each culture were analyzed in each assay by visual scoring. Using a fluorescence microscope, 100 comets (50 from each gel were classified into five categories, 0-4, representing increasing relative tail intensities. Summing the scores (0-4 of 100 comets therefore gives an overall score of between 0 and 400 arbitrary units. Preliminary data show some levels of DNA damage in cells dissociated from the grafts regardless of the type of culture medium used. Anyway more experiments with other donors have to be done to have some conclusions. Recent studies have shown that medium with human serum equally support production of grafts containing differentiated as well as undifferentiated cells suitable for clinical transplantation. Preliminary data from our experiments indicate that levels of molecular damage to the DNA do not increase in cells cultured in H. medium despite its lacks of complexity.

  18. Clinical Staging of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Netherlands-Need for Improvement in an Era With Expanding Nonsurgical Treatment Options: Data From the Dutch Lung Surgery Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, David Jonathan; Ten Berge, Martijn Geert; Daniels, Johannes Marlene; Versteegh, Michaël Ignatius; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla Jacqueline; Wouters, Michael Wilhelmus; Schreurs, Wilhelmina Hendrika

    2016-11-01

    The clinical stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) determines the initial treatment, whereas the pathologic stage best determines prognosis and the need for adjuvant treatment. In an era in which stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become an alternative modality to surgical intervention, clinical staging is even more important, because pathologic staging is omitted in the case of SABR. The objective of this study was to determine the concordance between clinical and pathologic stage in routine clinical practice for patients with early-stage NSCLC. Prospective data were derived from the Dutch Lung Surgery Audit (DLSA) in 2013 and 2014. Patients with clinical stage I NSCLC who underwent surgical resection and had a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan in their clinical workup were selected. Clinical and pathologic TNM (cTNM and pTNM) stages were compared. From a total of 1,790 patients with clinical stage I, 1,555 (87%) patients were included in this analysis. Concordance between cTNM and pTNM was 59.9%. Of the patients with clinical stage I, 22.6% were upstaged to pathologic stage II or higher. In total, 14.9% of all patients with clinical stage I had nodal metastases, and 5.5% of all patients had unforeseen N2 disease. In patients with clinical stage T2a tumors, 21.3% had nodal metastases, 14.5% being N1 and 6.7% being N2 disease. Concordance between clinical and pathologic stage is 59.9%. In patients with clinical stage I NSCLC, 22.6% were upstaged to pathologic stage II or higher, which is an indication for adjuvant chemotherapy. Improvement in accuracy of staging is thus needed, particularly for these patients. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plastic compressed collagen as a novel carrier for expanded human corneal endothelial cells for transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J Levis

    Full Text Available Current treatments for reversible blindness caused by corneal endothelial cell failure involve replacing the failed endothelium with donor tissue using a one donor-one recipient strategy. Due to the increasing pressure of a worldwide donor cornea shortage there has been considerable interest in developing alternative strategies to treat endothelial disorders using expanded cell replacement therapy. Protocols have been developed which allow successful expansion of endothelial cells in vitro but this approach requires a supporting material that would allow easy transfer of cells to the recipient. We describe the first use of plastic compressed collagen as a highly effective, novel carrier for human corneal endothelial cells. A human corneal endothelial cell line and primary human corneal endothelial cells retained their characteristic cobblestone morphology and expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 and pump protein Na+/K+ ATPase α1 after culture on collagen constructs for up to 14 days. Additionally, ultrastructural analysis suggested a well-integrated endothelial layer with tightly opposed cells and apical microvilli. Plastic compressed collagen is a superior biomaterial in terms of its speed and ease of production and its ability to be manipulated in a clinically relevant manner without breakage. This method provides expanded endothelial cells with a substrate that could be suitable for transplantation allowing one donor cornea to potentially treat multiple patients.

  20. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan; Thakar, Rahul G; Lomax, Geoff; Gibbons, Don

    2011-05-10

    In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun.

  1. Improving washing strategies of human mesenchymal stem cells using negative mode expanded bed chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Bárbara; Silva, Ricardo J S; Aguiar, Tiago; Serra, Margarida; Daicic, John; Maloisel, Jean-Luc; Clachan, John; Åkerblom, Anna; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-15

    The use of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in clinical applications has been increasing over the last decade. However, to be applied in a clinical setting hMSC need to comply with specific requirements in terms of identity, potency and purity. This study reports the improvement of established tangential flow filtration (TFF)-based washing strategies, further increasing hMSC purity, using negative mode expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with a new multimodal prototype matrix based on core-shell bead technology. The matrix was characterized and a stable, expanded bed could be obtained using standard equipment adapted from what is used for conventional packed bed chromatography processes. The effect of different expansion rates on cell recovery yield and protein removal capacity was assessed. The best trade-off between cell recovery (89%) and protein clearance (67%) was achieved using an intermediate expansion bed rate (1.4). Furthermore, we also showed that EBA chromatography can be efficiently integrated on the already established process for the downstream processing (DSP) of hMSC, where it improved the washing efficiency more than 10-fold, recovering approximately 70% of cells after global processing. This strategy showed not to impact cell viability (>95%), neither hMSC's characteristics in terms of morphology, immunophenotype, proliferation, adhesion capacity and multipotent differentiation potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Novel Method to Generate and Expand Clinical-Grade, Genetically Modified, Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Marie-Andrée; Tavera, René J.; Haymaker, Cara; Ramachandran, Renjith; Malu, Shuti; Zhang, Minying; Wardell, Seth; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Chistopher Leroy; Gonzalez, Audrey M.; Thorsen, Shawne T.; Flores, Esteban; Wahl, Arely; Peng, Weiyi; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Hwu, Patrick; Bernatchez, Chantale

    2017-01-01

    Following the clinical success achieved with the first generation of adoptive cell therapy (ACT) utilizing in vitro expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), the second and third generations of TIL ACT are evolving toward the use of genetically modified TIL. TIL therapy generally involves the transfer of a high number of TIL, ranging from 109 to 1011 cells. One of the technical difficulties in genetically modifying TIL, using a retroviral vector, is the ability to achieve large expansion of transduced TIL, while keeping the technique suitable to a Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) environment. Consequently, we developed and optimized a novel method for the efficient production of large numbers of GMP-grade, gene-modified TIL for the treatment of patients with ACT. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 was used as the gene of interest for methodology development. The optimized procedure is currently used in the production of gene-modified TIL for two clinical trials for the treatment of metastatic melanoma at MD Anderson Cancer Center. PMID:28824634

  3. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Soares, Nelson C; Wiker, Harald G; de Souza, Gustavo A; Warren, Robin M

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis.

  4. Cryopreservation of human limbal stem cells ex vivo expanded on amniotic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Jung; Yao, Chao-Ling; Chen, Hsin-I; Cheng, Huey-Chuan; Hwang, Shiaw-Min

    2008-04-01

    After cornea transplantation, the donor's limbal zone is currently discarded as medical waste. However, the limbal zone is rich in limbal stem cells and can be used in therapeutic applications of limbus loss. This study aimed to increase the availability of limbal stem cells and develop the optimal conditions of cryopreservation for ex vivo expanded limbal stem cells. Pieces of the limbus were cultured on amniotic membrane (AM) to outgrow limbal stem cells as cell sheets for 3 weeks. Different formulas of cryoprotectants were tested to preserve the expanded cell sheets in liquid nitrogen. Before and after cryopreservation, expanded cell sheets were assessed for cellular characteristics by viability, histologic examination, and expression of ABCG2, vimentin, and keratin 3. Expanded cell sheets usually exhibited 3-6 stratified layers after 3-week culture on AM and expressed specific markers of ABCG2 and vimentin for limbal stem cells. The effects of cryopreservation with different cryoprotectants were analyzed by histopathology, stem cell markers, and cell viability. The results showed that the optimal formula of cryoprotectants for expanded limbal cell sheets was 60% Dulbecco modified Eagle medium, 30% fetal bovine serum, and 10% dimethyl sulfoxide. After 8-week cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, the characteristics of limbal stem cells were maintained, and the average viability of thawed cells was 53.8% +/- 5.8%. These results showed that limbal stem cells expanded on AM could be cryopreserved and provide a promising source without delay, if banking, for patients with limbal stem cell deficiency in the future.

  5. An Uncoupling of Canonical Phenotypic Markers and Functional Potency ofEx Vivo-Expanded Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Nicole A P; DeGolier, Kole; Haberthur, Kristen; Chinn, Harrison; Moyes, Kara W; Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Walker, Kirsti L; Capitini, Christian M; Crane, Courtney A

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in cellular therapies for patients with cancer, including checkpoint blockade and ex vivo -expanded, tumor-specific T cells, have demonstrated that targeting the immune system is a powerful approach to the elimination of tumor cells. Clinical efforts have also demonstrated limitations, however, including the potential for tumor cell antigenic drift and neoantigen formation, which promote tumor escape and recurrence, as well as rapid onset of T cell exhaustion in vivo . These findings suggest that antigen unrestricted cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, may be beneficial for use as an alternative to or in combination with T cell based approaches. Although highly effective in lysing transformed cells, to date, few clinical trials have demonstrated antitumor function or persistence of transferred NK cells. Several recent studies describe methods to expand NK cells for adoptive transfer, although the effects of ex vivo expansion are not fully understood. We therefore explored the impact of a clinically validated 12-day expansion protocol using a K562 cell line expressing membrane-bound IL-15 and 4-1BB ligand with high-dose soluble IL-2 on the phenotype and functions of NK cells from healthy donors. Following expansions using this protocol, we found expression of surface proteins that implicate preferential expansion of NK cells that are not fully mature, as is typically associated with highly cytotoxic NK cell subsets. Despite increased expression of markers associated with functional exhaustion in T cells, we found that ex vivo -expanded NK cells retained cytokine production capacity and had enhanced tumor cell cytotoxicity. The preferential expansion of an NK cell subset that is phenotypically immature and functionally pleiotropic suggests that adoptively transferred cells may persist better in vivo when compared with previous methods using this approach. Ex vivo expansion does not quell killer immunoglobulin-like receptor diversity, allowing

  6. Novel mutations expand the clinical spectrum of DYNC1H1-associated spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scoto, Mariacristina; Rossor, Alexander M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Cirak, Sebahattin; Calissano, Mattia; Robb, Stephanie; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Martínez Arroyo, Amaia; Rodriguez Sanz, Aida; Mansour, Sahar; Fallon, Penny; Hadjikoumi, Irene; Klein, Andrea; Yang, Michele; de Visser, Marianne; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C. G. Truus; Baas, Frank; Taylor, J. Paul; Benatar, Michael; Connolly, Anne M.; Al-Lozi, Muhammad T.; Nixon, John; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Foley, A. Reghan; Mcwilliam, Catherine; Pitt, Matthew; Sewry, Caroline; Phadke, Rahul; Hafezparast, Majid; Chong, W. K. Kling; Mercuri, Eugenio; Baloh, Robert H.; Reilly, Mary M.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    To expand the clinical phenotype of autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) due to mutations in the dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) gene. Patients with a phenotype suggestive of a motor, non-length-dependent neuronopathy

  7. PD-1 Blockade Expands Intratumoral Memory T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed by multi...

  8. Leukemia-associated activating mutation of Flt3 expands dendritic cells and alters T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Colleen M; Nish, Simone A; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Reiner, Steven L; Reizis, Boris

    2016-03-07

    A common genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) in FLT3, the receptor for cytokine FLT3 ligand (FLT3L). Constitutively active FLT3-ITD promotes the expansion of transformed progenitors, but also has pleiotropic effects on hematopoiesis. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD on dendritic cells (DCs), which express FLT3 and can be expanded by FLT3L administration. Pre-leukemic mice with the Flt3(ITD) knock-in allele manifested an expansion of classical DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs. The expansion originated in DC progenitors, was cell intrinsic, and was further enhanced in Flt3(ITD/ITD) mice. The mutation caused the down-regulation of Flt3 on the surface of DCs and reduced their responsiveness to Flt3L. Both canonical Batf3-dependent CD8(+) cDCs and noncanonical CD8(+) cDCs were expanded and showed specific alterations in their expression profiles. Flt3(ITD) mice showed enhanced capacity to support T cell proliferation, including a cell-extrinsic expansion of regulatory T (T reg) cells. Accordingly, these mice restricted alloreactive T cell responses during graft-versus-host reaction, but failed to control autoimmunity without T reg cells. Thus, the FLT3-ITD mutation directly affects DC development, indirectly modulating T cell homeostasis and supporting T reg cell expansion. We hypothesize that this effect of FLT3-ITD might subvert immunosurveillance and promote leukemogenesis in a cell-extrinsic manner. © 2016 Lau et al.

  9. Synthetic Immunology: Hacking Immune Cells to Expand Their Therapeutic Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2017-04-26

    The ability of immune cells to survey tissues and sense pathologic insults and deviations makes them a unique platform for interfacing with the body and disease. With the rapid advancement of synthetic biology, we can now engineer and equip immune cells with new sensors and controllable therapeutic response programs to sense and treat diseases that our natural immune system cannot normally handle. Here we review the current state of engineered immune cell therapeutics and their unique capabilities compared to small molecules and biologics. We then discuss how engineered immune cells are being designed to combat cancer, focusing on how new synthetic biology tools are providing potential ways to overcome the major roadblocks for treatment. Finally, we give a long-term vision for the use of synthetic biology to engineer immune cells as a general sensor-response platform to precisely detect disease, to remodel disease microenvironments, and to treat a potentially wide range of challenging diseases.

  10. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  11. Conditioned Medium from Placental Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Oxidative Stress during the Cryopreservation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadekar, Darshana; Rangole, Sonal; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    The limited cell dose in umbilical cord blood (UCB) necessitates ex vivo expansion of UCB. Further, the effective cryopreservation of these expanded cells is important in widening their use in the clinics. During cryopreservation, cells experience oxidative stress due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs-CM) has been shown to alleviate the oxidative stress during wound healing, Alzheimer's disease and ischemic disease. This premise prompted us to investigate the influence of MSCs-CM during cryopreservation of expanded UCB cells. CM-was collected from cord/placental MSCs(C-MSCs-CM, P-MSC-CM). UCB CD34+cells were expanded as suspension cultures in serum free medium containing cytokines for 10 days. Cells were frozen with/without C-MSCs-CM and or P-MSCs-CM in the conventional freezing medium containing 20%FCS +10%DMSO using a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. Upon revival, cells frozen with MSCs-CM were found to be superior to cells frozen in conventional medium in terms of viability, CD34+content and clonogenecity. Priming of revived cells for 48 hrs with MSCs-CM further improved their transplantation ability, as compared to those cultured without MSCs-CM. P-MSCs-CM radically reduced the oxidative stress in cryopreserved cells, resulting in better post thaw functionality of CD34+ cells than with C-MSCs-CM. The observed cryoprotective effect of MSCs-CM was primarily due to anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of the MSCs-CM and not because of the exosomes secreted by them. Our data suggest that MSCs-CM can serve as a valuable additive to the freezing or the priming medium for expanded UCB cells, which would increase their clinical applicability.

  12. Conditioned Medium from Placental Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Oxidative Stress during the Cryopreservation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Kadekar

    Full Text Available The limited cell dose in umbilical cord blood (UCB necessitates ex vivo expansion of UCB. Further, the effective cryopreservation of these expanded cells is important in widening their use in the clinics. During cryopreservation, cells experience oxidative stress due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs-CM has been shown to alleviate the oxidative stress during wound healing, Alzheimer's disease and ischemic disease. This premise prompted us to investigate the influence of MSCs-CM during cryopreservation of expanded UCB cells.CM-was collected from cord/placental MSCs(C-MSCs-CM, P-MSC-CM. UCB CD34+cells were expanded as suspension cultures in serum free medium containing cytokines for 10 days. Cells were frozen with/without C-MSCs-CM and or P-MSCs-CM in the conventional freezing medium containing 20%FCS +10%DMSO using a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. Upon revival, cells frozen with MSCs-CM were found to be superior to cells frozen in conventional medium in terms of viability, CD34+content and clonogenecity. Priming of revived cells for 48 hrs with MSCs-CM further improved their transplantation ability, as compared to those cultured without MSCs-CM. P-MSCs-CM radically reduced the oxidative stress in cryopreserved cells, resulting in better post thaw functionality of CD34+ cells than with C-MSCs-CM. The observed cryoprotective effect of MSCs-CM was primarily due to anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of the MSCs-CM and not because of the exosomes secreted by them.Our data suggest that MSCs-CM can serve as a valuable additive to the freezing or the priming medium for expanded UCB cells, which would increase their clinical applicability.

  13. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  14. Exploring the use of expanded erythroid cells for autologous transfusion for anemia of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabux, Chantal M; van Hensbergen, Yvette; Slot, Manon C; Bakker-Verweij, Margreet; Giordano, Piero C; Brand, Anneke

    2013-12-01

    Autologous cord blood (CB) red blood cells (RBCs) can partly substitute transfusion needs in premature infants suffering from anemia. To explore whether expanded CB cells could provide additional autologous cells suitable for transfusion, we set up a simple one-step protocol to expand premature CB cells. CB buffy coat cells and isolated CD34-positive (CD34(pos) ) cells from premature and full-term CB and adult blood were tested with several combinations of growth factors while omitting xenogeneic proteins from the culture medium. Cell differentiation was analyzed serially during 21 days using flow cytometry, progenitor assays, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Expanded CB buffy coat cells resulted in a threefold higher number of erythroblasts than the isolated CD34(pos) cells. However, the RBCs contaminating the buffy coat remained present during the culture with uncertain quality. Premature and full-term CB CD34(pos) cells had similar fold expansion capacity and erythroid differentiation. With the use of interleukin-3, stem cell factor, and erythropoietin, the fold increases of all CD34(pos) cell sources were similar: CB 3942 ± 1554, adult peripheral mobilized blood 4702 ± 1826, and bone marrow (BM) 4143 ± 1908. The proportion of CD235a expression indicating erythroblast presence on Day 21 was slightly higher in the adult CD34(pos) cell sources: peripheral blood stem cells (96.7 ± 0.8%) and BM (98.9 ± 0.5%) compared to CB (87.7 ± 2.7%; p = 0.002). We were not able to induce further erythroid maturation in vitro. This explorative study showed that fairly pure autologous erythroid-expanded cell populations could be obtained by a simple culture method, which should be optimized. Future challenges comprise obtaining ex vivo enucleation of RBCs with the use of a minimal manipulating approach, which can add up to autologous RBCs derived from CB in the treatment of anemia of prematurity. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  16. Fingolimod induces BAFF and expands circulating transitional B cells without activating memory B cells and plasma cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yusei; Niino, Masaaki; Takahashi, Eri; Suzuki, Masako; Mizuno, Masanori; Hisahara, Shin; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Amino, Itaru; Nakano, Fumihito; Nakamura, Masakazu; Akimoto, Sachiko; Minami, Naoya; Fujiki, Naoto; Doi, Shizuki; Shimohama, Shun; Terayama, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Seiji

    2018-02-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who are treated with fingolimod have an increased proportion of transitional B cells in the circulation, but the underlying mechanism is not known. We hypothesized that B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) is involved in the process. Compared with healthy controls and untreated MS patients, fingolimod-treated MS patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of BAFF, which positively correlated with the proportions and the absolute numbers of transitional B cells in blood. Despite the elevated concentrations of BAFF in fingolimod-treated MS patients, serum levels of soluble transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen were not elevated. Our results show that fingolimod induces BAFF in the circulation and expands transitional B cells, but does not activate memory B cells or plasma cells in MS, which is favorable for the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exergoeconomic analysis of vehicular PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell systems with and without expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayadi, Saeed; Tsatsaronis, George; Duelk, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we perform an exergoeconomic analysis to a PEM (proton exchange membrane) vehicular fuel cell system used in the latest generation of environmentally friendly cars. Two alternative configurations of a fuel cell system are considered (with and without an expander), and two alternative design concepts for each configuration: BoL (Begin of Life) and EoL (End of Life). The system including an expander generates additional power from the exhaust gases leaving the fuel cell stack, which might increase the system efficiency. However the total investment costs for this case are higher than for the other system configuration without an expander, due to the investment costs associated with the expander and its accessories. The fuel cell stack area in the EoL-sized systems is larger than in the BoL-sized systems. A larger stack area on one hand raises the investment costs, but on the other hand decreases the fuel consumption due to a higher cell efficiency. In this paper, exergoeconomic analyses have been implemented to consider a trade-off between positive and negative effects of using an expander in the system and to select the proper design concept. The results from the exergoeconomic analysis show that (a) an EoL-sized system with an expander is the most cost effective system, (b) the compression and humidification of air are very expensive processes, (c) the stack is by far the most important component from the economic viewpoint, and (d) the thermodynamic efficiency of almost all components must be improved to increase the cost effectiveness of the overall system. - Highlights: • Two vehicular PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell system configurations are studied in this paper. • Exergoeconomics has been performed to compare these two system configurations. • The compression and humidification of air are very expensive processes. • The stack is by far the most important component from the economic viewpoint. • The thermodynamic efficiencies

  18. Estrogen expands breast cancer stem-like cells through paracrine FGF/Tbx3 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fillmore, Christine M.; Gupta, Piyush B.; Rudnick, Jenny A.; Caballero, Silvia; Keller, Patricia J.; Lander, Eric S.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Many tumors contain heterogeneous populations of cells, only some of which exhibit increased tumorigenicity and resistance to anticancer therapies. Evidence suggests that these aggressive cancer cells, often termed “cancer stem cells” or “cancer stem-like cells” (CSCs), rely upon developmental signaling pathways that are important for survival and expansion of normal stem cells. Here we report that, in analogy to embryonic mammary epithelial biology, estrogen signaling expands the pool of fun...

  19. Impaired heat shock response in cells expressing full-length polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha M Chafekar

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms by which polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt causes neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD remain unclear. The malfunction of cellular proteostasis has been suggested as central in HD pathogenesis and also as a target of therapeutic interventions for the treatment of HD. We present results that offer a previously unexplored perspective regarding impaired proteostasis in HD. We find that, under non-stress conditions, the proteostatic capacity of cells expressing full length polyQ-expanded Htt is adequate. Yet, under stress conditions, the presence of polyQ-expanded Htt impairs the heat shock response, a key component of cellular proteostasis. This impaired heat shock response results in a reduced capacity to withstand the damage caused by cellular stress. We demonstrate that in cells expressing polyQ-expanded Htt the levels of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 are reduced, and, as a consequence, these cells have an impaired a heat shock response. Also, we found reduced HSF1 and HSP70 levels in the striata of HD knock-in mice when compared to wild-type mice. Our results suggests that full length, non-aggregated polyQ-expanded Htt blocks the effective induction of the heat shock response under stress conditions and may thus trigger the accumulation of cellular damage during the course of HD pathogenesis.

  20. PAX4 Defines an Expandable β-Cell Subpopulation in the Adult Pancreatic Islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Petra I; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Brun, Thierry; Cobo-Vuilleumier, Nadia; Jimenez-Moreno, Carmen María; G Herrera Gomez, Irene; López Noriega, Livia; Mellado-Gil, José Manuel; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Soria, Bernat; Gauthier, Benoit R

    2015-10-27

    PAX4 is a key regulator of pancreatic islet development whilst in adult acute overexpression protects β-cells against stress-induced apoptosis and stimulates proliferation. Nonetheless, sustained PAX4 expression promotes β-cell dedifferentiation and hyperglycemia, mimicking β-cell failure in diabetic patients. Herein, we study mechanisms that allow stringent PAX4 regulation endowing favorable β-cell adaptation in response to changing environment without loss of identity. To this end, PAX4 expression was monitored using a mouse bearing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cre recombinase construct under the control of the islet specific pax4 promoter. GFP was detected in 30% of islet cells predominantly composed of PAX4-enriched β-cells that responded to glucose-induced insulin secretion. Lineage tracing demonstrated that all islet cells were derived from PAX4(+) progenitor cells but that GFP expression was confined to a subpopulation at birth which declined with age correlating with reduced replication. However, this GFP(+) subpopulation expanded during pregnancy, a state of active β-cell replication. Accordingly, enhanced proliferation was exclusively detected in GFP(+) cells consistent with cell cycle genes being stimulated in PAX4-overexpressing islets. Under stress conditions, GFP(+) cells were more resistant to apoptosis than their GFP(-) counterparts. Our data suggest PAX4 defines an expandable β-cell sub population within adult islets.

  1. In the Ethos of the Safety Net: An Expanded Role for Clinical Ethics Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Jolion

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ethics mediation is invaluable for resolving intractable disputes in the hospital. But it is also a critical day-to-day skill for clinicians, especially those who serve a disproportionate number of vulnerable patients. While mediation is typically reserved for intractable cases, there are two important opportunities to expand its use. First is preventative mediation, in which clinicians incorporate clinical ethics mediation into their daily routine in order to address value-laden conflicts before they reach the point at which outside consultation becomes necessary. Second is guided mediation, in which clinical teams resolve conflicts with patients or surrogates with guidance from an ethics consultant, who operates at some distance from the conflict and, rather than recommending a single action, counsels clinicians on the process they can use to resolve the conflict on their own. These approaches build the capacity of all clinicians to use clinical ethics mediation to improve the care of vulnerable patients. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  3. Engineered T Regulatory Type 1 Cells for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gregori

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory cells, a specialized subset of T cells, are key players in modulating antigen (Ag-specific immune responses in vivo. Inducible T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells are characterized by the co-expression of CD49b and lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3 and the ability to secrete IL-10, TGF-β, and granzyme (Gz B, in the absence of IL-4 and IL-17. The chief mechanisms by which Tr1 cells control immune responses are secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β and killing of myeloid cells via GzB. Tr1 cells, first described in peripheral blood of patients who developed tolerance after HLA-mismatched fetal liver hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, have been proven to modulate inflammatory and effector T cell responses in several immune-mediated diseases. The possibility to generate and expand Tr1 cells in vitro in an Ag-specific manner has led to their clinical use as cell therapy in patients. Clinical grade protocols to generate or to enrich and expand Tr1 cell medicinal products have been established. Proof-of-concept clinical trials with Tr1 cell products have demonstrated the safety and the feasibility of this approach and indicated some clinical benefit. In the present review, we provide an overview on protocols established to induce/expand Tr1 cells in vitro for clinical application and on results obtained in Tr1 cell-based clinical trials. Moreover, we will discuss a recently developed protocol to efficient convert human CD4+ T cells into a homogeneous population of Tr1-like cells by lentiviral vector-mediated IL-10 gene transfer.

  4. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacIsaac, Zoe Marie, E-mail: zmm4a@virgina.edu [University of Virginia (United States); Shang, Hulan, E-mail: shanghulan@gmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Agrawal, Hitesh, E-mail: hiteshdos@hotmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Yang, Ning, E-mail: ny6u@virgina.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Parker, Anna, E-mail: amp4v@virginia.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Katz, Adam J., E-mail: ajk2f@virginia.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States)

    2012-02-15

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non

  5. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIsaac, Zoe Marie; Shang, Hulan; Agrawal, Hitesh; Yang, Ning; Parker, Anna; Katz, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: ► Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. ► Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. ► Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. ► Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells undergo complete removal by one year.

  6. Expanded CD8 T-cell sharing between periphery and CNS in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salou, Marion; Garcia, Alexandra; Michel, Laure; Gainche-Salmon, Anne; Loussouarn, Delphine; Nicol, Bryan; Guillot, Flora; Hulin, Philippe; Nedellec, Steven; Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie; Nicot, Arnaud B; Degauque, Nicolas; Laplaud, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS), central nervous system (CNS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood display TCR clonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. These clones have been assumed – but never demonstrated – to be similar in the three compartments. Addressing this key question is essential to infer the implication of peripheral clonally expanded CD8+ T cells in the disease. Methods For the first time, TCR Vβ repertoire from paired blood (purified CD8+ and CD4+ T cells), CSF and CNS (22 lesions, various inflammatory and demyelination statuses) samples from three MS patients was studied using complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) spectratyping and high-throughput sequencing. In parallel, blood and CNS clonally expanded CD8+ T cells were characterized by fluorescent staining. Results TCR Vβ repertoire analysis revealed strong sharing of predominant T-cell clones between CNS lesions, CSF, and blood CD8+ T cells. In parallel, we showed that blood oligoclonal CD8+ T cells exhibit characteristics of pathogenic cells, as they displayed a bias toward a memory phenotype in MS patients, with increased expression of CCR5, CD11a and Granzyme B (GZM-B) compared to non oligoclonal counterparts. CNS-infiltrating T cells were mainly CD8 expressing CD11a and GZM-B. Interpretation This study highlights the predominant implication of CD8+ T cells in MS pathophysiology and demonstrates that potentially aggressive CD8+ T cells can be easily identified and characterized from blood and CSF samples. PMID:26125037

  7. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Skills Performed By Iranian Emergency Nurses: Perceived Competency Levels and Attitudes Toward Expanding Professional Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Hasanzadeh, Firooz; Powers, Kelly A; Dadash Zadeh, Abbas; Rajaie, Rouzbeh

    2018-03-01

    Emergency nurses play an important role in the care of critically ill and injured patients, and their competency to perform clinical skills is vital to safe and effective patient care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of clinical skills performed and perceived competency levels among Iranian emergency nurses. In addition, attitudes toward expanding the professional roles of Iranian emergency nurses were also assessed. In this descriptive correlational study, 319 emergency nurses from 30 hospitals in northwest Iran participated. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to present the findings. Overall competency of the emergency nurses was 73.31 ± 14.2, indicating a good level of perceived competence. The clinical skills most frequently performed were in the domains of organizational and workload competencies (3.43 ± 0.76), diagnostic function (3.25 ± 0.82), and the helping role (3.17 ± 0.83). A higher level of perceived competence was found for skills within these domains. Less frequently, participants performed skills within the domains of effective management of rapidly changing situations (2.70 ± 0.94) and administering and monitoring therapeutic interventions (2.60 ± 0.97); a lower perceived level of competence was noted for these clinical skills. There was a significant correlation between frequency of performing clinical skills and perceived competency level (r = 0.651, P skills. This has implications for nurse managers and educators who may consider offering more frequent experiential and educational opportunities to emergency nurses. Expansion of nurses' roles could also result in increased experience in clinical skills and higher levels of competency. Research is needed to investigate nurses' clinical competence using direct and observed measures. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, Paul

    2004-12-31

    In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

  10. Development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John D; Williams, Jonathan P; Barnes, Julie F; Greenlee, Katie M; Cardiology, Bcps-Aq; Leonard, Mandy C

    2017-07-15

    The development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services is described. In an effort to align with the initiatives proposed within the ASHP Practice Advancement Initiative, the department of pharmacy at Cleveland Clinic, a 1,400-bed academic, tertiary acute care medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, established a goal to provide decentralized clinical pharmacy services for 100% of patient care units within the hospital. Patient care units that previously had no decentralized pharmacy services were evaluated to identify opportunities for expansion. Metrics analyzed included number of medication orders verified per hour, number of pharmacy dosing consultations, and number of patient discharge counseling sessions. A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of this service and potential resident learning opportunities. A learning experience description was drafted, and feedback was solicited regarding the development of educational components utilized throughout the rotation. Pharmacists who were providing services to similar patient populations were identified to serve as preceptors. Staff pharmacists were deployed to previously uncovered patient care units, with pharmacy residents providing decentralized services on previously covered areas. A rotating preceptor schedule was developed based on geographic proximity and clinical expertise. An initial postimplementation assessment of this resident-driven service revealed that pharmacy residents provided a comparable level of pharmacy services to that of staff pharmacists. Feedback collected from nurses, physicians, and pharmacy staff also supported residents' ability to operate sufficiently in this role to optimize patient care. A learning experience developed for pharmacy residents in a large medical center enabled the expansion of decentralized clinical services without requiring additional pharmacist full-time equivalents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  11. TGFβ Pathway Inhibition Redifferentiates Human Pancreatic Islet β Cells Expanded In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginat Toren-Haritan

    Full Text Available In-vitro expansion of insulin-producing cells from adult human pancreatic islets could provide an abundant cell source for diabetes therapy. However, proliferation of β-cell-derived (BCD cells is associated with loss of phenotype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Nevertheless, BCD cells maintain open chromatin structure at β-cell genes, suggesting that they could be readily redifferentiated. The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ pathway has been implicated in EMT in a range of cell types. Here we show that human islet cell expansion in vitro involves upregulation of the TGFβ pathway. Blocking TGFβ pathway activation using short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFBR1, ALK5 transcripts inhibits BCD cell proliferation and dedifferentiation. Treatment of expanded BCD cells with ALK5 shRNA results in their redifferentiation, as judged by expression of β-cell genes and decreased cell proliferation. These effects, which are reproducible in cells from multiple human donors, are mediated, at least in part, by AKT-FOXO1 signaling. ALK5 inhibition synergizes with a soluble factor cocktail to promote BCD cell redifferentiation. The combined treatment may offer a therapeutically applicable way for generating an abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells following ex-vivo expansion.

  12. TIMP-3 recruits quiescent hematopoietic stem cells into active cell cycle and expands multipotent progenitor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Ito, Miyuki; Smookler, David S; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Morikawa, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Arai, Fumio; Suda, Toshio; Khokha, Rama; Kitamura, Toshio

    2010-11-25

    Regulating transition of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) between quiescent and cycling states is critical for maintaining homeostasis of blood cell production. The cycling states of HSCs are regulated by the extracellular factors such as cytokines and extracellular matrix; however, the molecular circuitry for such regulation remains elusive. Here we show that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous regulator of metalloproteinases, stimulates HSC proliferation by recruiting quiescent HSCs into the cell cycle. Myelosuppression induced TIMP-3 in the bone marrow before hematopoietic recovery. Interestingly, TIMP-3 enhanced proliferation of HSCs and promoted expansion of multipotent progenitors, which was achieved by stimulating cell-cycle entry of quiescent HSCs without compensating their long-term repopulating activity. Surprisingly, this effect did not require metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and was possibly mediated through a direct inhibition of angiopoietin-1 signaling, a critical mediator for HSC quiescence. Furthermore, bone marrow recovery from myelosuppression was accelerated by over-expression of TIMP-3, and in turn, impaired in TIMP-3-deficient animals. These results suggest that TIMP-3 may act as a molecular cue in response to myelosuppression for recruiting dormant HSCs into active cell cycle and may be clinically useful for facilitating hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy or ex vivo expansion of HSCs.

  13. GMP-compliant, large-scale expanded allogeneic natural killer cells have potent cytolytic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae Lim

    Full Text Available Ex vivo-expanded, allogeneic natural killer (NK cells can be used for the treatment of various types of cancer. In allogeneic NK cell therapy, NK cells from healthy donors must be expanded in order to obtain a sufficient number of highly purified, activated NK cells. In the present study, we established a simplified and efficient method for the large-scale expansion and activation of NK cells from healthy donors under good manufacturing practice (GMP conditions. After a single step of magnetic depletion of CD3(+ T cells, the depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were stimulated and expanded with irradiated autologous PBMCs in the presence of OKT3 and IL-2 for 14 days, resulting in a highly pure population of CD3(-CD16(+CD56(+ NK cells which is desired for allogeneic purpose. Compared with freshly isolated NK cells, these expanded NK cells showed robust cytokine production and potent cytolytic activity against various cancer cell lines. Of note, expanded NK cells selectively killed cancer cells without demonstrating cytotoxicity against allogeneic non-tumor cells in coculture assays. The anti-tumor activity of expanded human NK cells was examined in SCID mice injected with human lymphoma cells. In this model, expanded NK cells efficiently controlled lymphoma progression. In conclusion, allogeneic NK cells were efficiently expanded in a GMP-compliant facility and demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Expanding signaling-molecule wavefront model of cell polarization in the Drosophila wing primordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, Juliana C; Nahmad, Marcos; Zhang, Peng Cheng; Lander, Arthur D; Yu, Clare C

    2017-07-01

    In developing tissues, cell polarization and proliferation are regulated by morphogens and signaling pathways. Cells throughout the Drosophila wing primordium typically show subcellular localization of the unconventional myosin Dachs on the distal side of cells (nearest the center of the disc). Dachs localization depends on the spatial distribution of bonds between the protocadherins Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds), which form heterodimers between adjacent cells; and the Golgi kinase Four-jointed (Fj), which affects the binding affinities of Ft and Ds. The Fj concentration forms a linear gradient while the Ds concentration is roughly uniform throughout most of the wing pouch with a steep transition region that propagates from the center to the edge of the pouch during the third larval instar. Although the Fj gradient is an important cue for polarization, it is unclear how the polarization is affected by cell division and the expanding Ds transition region, both of which can alter the distribution of Ft-Ds heterodimers around the cell periphery. We have developed a computational model to address these questions. In our model, the binding affinity of Ft and Ds depends on phosphorylation by Fj. We assume that the asymmetry of the Ft-Ds bond distribution around the cell periphery defines the polarization, with greater asymmetry promoting cell proliferation. Our model predicts that this asymmetry is greatest in the radially-expanding transition region that leaves polarized cells in its wake. These cells naturally retain their bond distribution asymmetry after division by rapidly replenishing Ft-Ds bonds at new cell-cell interfaces. Thus we predict that the distal localization of Dachs in cells throughout the pouch requires the movement of the Ds transition region and the simple presence, rather than any specific spatial pattern, of Fj.

  15. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatosparaxis type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Tim; Colige, Alain; Syx, Delfien; Giunta, Cecilia; Lindert, Uschi; Rohrbach, Marianne; Aryani, Omid; Alanay, Yasemin; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Kroes, Hester Y; Devriendt, Koen; Thiry, Marc; Symoens, Sofie; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), dermatosparaxis type, is a recessively inherited connective tissue disorder caused by deficient activity of ADAMTS-2, an enzyme that cleaves the aminoterminal propeptide domain of types I, II, and III procollagen. Only 10 EDS dermatosparaxis patients have been reported, all presenting a recognizable phenotype with characteristic facial gestalt, extreme skin fragility and laxity, excessive bruising, and sometimes major complications due to visceral and vascular fragility. We report on five new EDS dermatosparaxis patients and provide a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of the natural history of this condition. We identified three novel homozygous loss-of-function mutations (c.2927_2928delCT, p.(Pro976Argfs*42); c.669_670dupG, p.(Pro224Argfs*24); and c.2751-2A>T) and one compound heterozygous mutation (c.2T>C, p.? and c.884_887delTGAA, p.(Met295Thrfs26*)) in ADAMTS2 in five patients from four unrelated families. Three of these displayed a phenotype that was strikingly milder than that of previously reported patients. This study expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of the dermatosparaxis type of EDS to include a milder phenotypic variant and stresses the importance of good clinical criteria. To address this, we propose an updated set of criteria that accurately captures the multisystemic nature of the dermatosparaxis type of EDS.Genet Med 18 9, 882-891.

  16. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  17. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  18. Clinical applications of gamma delta T cells with multivalent immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells hold promise for adoptive immunotherapy because of their reactivity to bacteria, viruses, and tumors. However, these cells represent a small fraction (1-5% of the peripheral T-cell pool and require activation and propagation to achieve clinical benefit. Aminobisphosphonates specifically expand the Vgamma9Vdelta2 subset of gamma delta T cells and have been used in clinical trials of cancer where objective responses were detected. The Vgamma9Vdelta2 TCR heterodimer binds multiple ligands and results in a multivalent attack by a monoclonal T cell population. Alternatively, populations of gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoire could be infused for broad-range specificity. However, this goal has been restricted by a lack of applicable expansion protocols for non-Vgamma9Vdelta2 cells. Recent advances using immobilized antigens, agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, tumor-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC, or combinations of activating mAbs and aAPC have been successful in expanding gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoires. Immobilized MHC Class-I chain-related A was a stimulus for gamma delta T cells expressing TCRdelta1 isotypes, and plate-bound activating antibodies have expanded Vdelta1 and Vdelta2 cells ex vivo. Clinically-sufficient quantities of TCRdelta1, TCRdelta2, and TCRdelta1negTCRdelta2neg have been produced following co-culture on aAPC, and these subsets displayed differences in memory phenotype and reactivity to tumors in vitro and in vivo. Gamma delta T cells are also amenable to genetic modification as evidenced by introduction of alpha beta TCRs, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, and drug-resistance genes. This represents a promising future for the clinical application of oligoclonal or polyclonal gamma delta T cells in autologous and allogeneic settings that builds on current trials testing the safety and efficacy of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells.

  19. Allogeneic lymphocyte-licensed DCs expand T cells with improved antitumor activity and resistance to oxidative stress and immunosuppressive factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer is a treatment strategy where T cells are isolated, activated, in some cases engineered, and expanded ex vivo before being reinfused to the patient. The most commonly used T-cell expansion methods are either anti-CD3/CD28 antibody beads or the “rapid expansion protocol” (REP, which utilizes OKT-3, interleukin (IL-2, and irradiated allogeneic feeder cells. However, REP-expanded or bead-expanded T cells are sensitive to the harsh tumor microenvironment and often short-lived after reinfusion. Here, we demonstrate that when irradiated and preactivated allosensitized allogeneic lymphocytes (ASALs are used as helper cells to license OKT3-armed allogeneic mature dendritic cells (DCs, together they expand target T cells of high quality. The ASAL/DC combination yields an enriched Th1-polarizing cytokine environment (interferon (IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-2 and optimal costimulatory signals for T-cell stimulation. When genetically engineered antitumor T cells were expanded by this coculture system, they showed better survival and cytotoxic efficacy under oxidative stress and immunosuppressive environment, as well as superior proliferative response during tumor cell killing compared to the REP protocol. Our result suggests a robust ex vivo method to expand T cells with improved quality for adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Redifferentiation of adult human β cells expanded in vitro by inhibition of the WNT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Lenz

    Full Text Available In vitro expansion of adult human islet β cells is an attractive solution for the shortage of tissue for cell replacement therapy of type 1 diabetes. Using a lineage tracing approach we have demonstrated that β-cell-derived (BCD cells rapidly dedifferentiate in culture and can proliferate for up to 16 population doublings. Dedifferentiation is associated with changes resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. The WNT pathway has been shown to induce EMT and plays key roles in regulating replication and differentiation in many cell types. Here we show that BCD cell dedifferentiation is associated with β-catenin translocation into the nucleus and activation of the WNT pathway. Inhibition of β-catenin expression in expanded BCD cells using short hairpin RNA resulted in growth arrest, mesenchymal-epithelial transition, and redifferentiation, as judged by activation of β-cell gene expression. Furthermore, inhibition of β-catenin expression synergized with redifferentiation induced by a combination of soluble factors, as judged by an increase in the number of C-peptide-positive cells. Simultaneous inhibition of the WNT and NOTCH pathways also resulted in a synergistic effect on redifferentiation. These findings, which were reproducible in cells derived from multiple human donors, suggest that inhibition of the WNT pathway may contribute to a therapeutically applicable way for generation of functional insulin-producing cells following ex-vivo expansion.

  1. Clinical results of carotid artery stenting with a nitinol self-expanding stent (SMART stent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert; Mathias, Klaus D.; Jaeger, Horst J.; Bockisch, Georg; Demirel, Eren; Gissler, Martin H.; Hauth, Elke [Department of Radiology, Staedtische Kliniken Dortmund, Beurhausstrasse 40, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University Witten/Herdecke (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Our objective was to assess the technical feasibility and the clinical results of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenting using a nitinol self-expanding stent (SMART stent). In 13 patients 13 high-grade stenoses of the internal carotid artery were treated via an implantation of a SMART stent. In all cases a predilation of the stenosis and a postdilation within the stent were performed. Follow-up examinations were carried out in all patients after a period of 6 months. In each case the implantation of the stent was performed without technical complications. In 12 of 13 cases the stent was placed in the patients' internal carotid artery, in 1 case from the internal to the common carotid artery (CCA). The average degree of stenosis of 78% (70-95%) was reduced to an average of 2.8% (0-21%). The 6-month follow-up angiography showed an average degree of restenosis of 11.8% (0-29%) in 8 of 13 patients. Duplex sonography in the remaining 5 patients demonstrated patent stents. One patient showed brief neurological symptoms during the intervention. No further complications occurred during follow-up time. Treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis with the SMART stent seems technically feasible, safe, and promises long-term patency. (orig.)

  2. Expanding the Spectrum of Genes Involved in Huntington Disease Using a Combined Clinical and Genetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Louise-Laure; Tesson, Christelle; Charles, Perrine; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Hahn, Valérie; Youssov, Katia; Freeman, Leorah; Grabli, David; Roze, Emmanuel; Noël, Sandrine; Peuvion, Jean-Noel; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD), a prototypic monogenic disease, is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the HTT gene exceeding 35 units. However, not all patients with an HD phenotype carry the pathological expansion in HTT, and the positive diagnosis rate is poor. To examine patients with HD phenotypes to determine the frequency of HD phenocopies with typical features of HD but without pathological CAG repeat expansions in HTT in an attempt to improve the positive diagnosis rate. Between January 1, 2004, and April 18, 2011, a total of 226 consecutive index patients with an HD phenotype were referred to specialized clinics of the French National Huntington Disease Reference Centre for Rare Diseases. They underwent detailed clinical examination and follow-up, as well as neuropsychological, biological, imaging, and genetic examinations. Nucleotide expansions in JPH3, ATN1, TBP, and C9ORF72 and mutations in PRNP, as well as acquired conditions commonly causing HD phenocopies, were first screened. The diagnostic rate of HD phenocopies and frequency of other etiologies using deep clinical phenotyping and next generation sequencing. Our goal was to improve the genetic diagnosis of HD phenocopies and to identify new HD related genes. One hundred ninety-eight patients carried a pathological CAG repeat expansion in HTT, whereas 28 patients (12 women and 16 men) did not. Huntington disease phenocopies accounted for 12.4%, and their mean (SD) age at onset was similar to those of the HD-HTT group (47.3 [12.7] years vs 50.3 [16.4] years, P = .29). We first identified 3 patients with abnormal CTG expansions in JPH3, a fourth patient with an antiphospholipid syndrome, and a fifth patient with B12 avitaminosis. A custom-made 63-gene panel was generated based on clinical evolution and exome sequencing. It contained genes responsible for HD phenocopies and other neurodegenerative conditions, as well as candidate genes from exome sequencing in 3 index cases with imaging features of brain

  3. Galectin-9 activates and expands human T-helper 1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes J M Gooden

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9 is known for induction of apoptosis in IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T-cells and amelioration of autoimmunity in murine models. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced IFN-γ positive T-cells in a sarcoma mouse model and in food allergy, suggesting that Gal-9 can have diametric effects on T-cell immunity. Here, we aimed to delineate the immunomodulatory effect of Gal-9 on human resting and ex vivo activated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of resting lymphocytes with low concentrations of Gal-9 (5-30 nM induced apoptosis in ∼60% of T-cells after 1 day, but activated the surviving T-cells. These viable T-cells started to expand after 4 days with up to 6 cell divisions by day 7 and an associated shift from naïve towards central memory and IFN-γ producing phenotype. In the presence of T-cell activation signals (anti-CD3/IL-2 Gal-9 did not induce T-cell expansion, but shifted the CD4/CD8 balance towards a CD4-dominated T-cell response. Thus, Gal-9 activates resting T-cells in the absence of typical T-cell activating signals and promotes their transition to a TH1/C1 phenotype. In the presence of T-cell activating signals T-cell immunity is directed towards a CD4-driven response by Gal-9. Thus, Gal-9 may specifically enhance reactive immunological memory.

  4. Psoriasis or not? Review of 51 clinically confirmed cases reveals an expanded histopathologic spectrum of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Thinh; Parsi, Kory K; Ogawa, Toru; Kiuru, Maija; Konia, Thomas; Li, Chin-Shang; Fung, Maxwell A

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis is usually diagnosed clinically, so only non-classic or refractory cases tend to be biopsied. Diagnostic uncertainty persists when dermatopathologists encounter features regarded as non-classic for psoriasis. Define and document classic and non-classic histologic features in skin biopsies from patients with clinically confirmed psoriasis. Minimal clinical diagnostic criteria were informally validated and applied to a consecutive series of biopsies histologically consistent with psoriasis. Clinical confirmation required 2 of the following criteria: (1) classic morphology, (2) classic distribution, (3) nail pitting, and (4) family history, with #1 and/or #2 as 1 criterion in every case RESULTS: Fifty-one biopsies from 46 patients were examined. Classic features of psoriasis included hypogranulosis (96%), club-shaped rete ridges (96%), dermal papilla capillary ectasia (90%), Munro microabscess (78%), suprapapillary plate thinning (63%), spongiform pustules (53%), and regular acanthosis (14%). Non-classic features included irregular acanthosis (84%), junctional vacuolar alteration (76%), spongiosis (76%), dermal neutrophils (69%), necrotic keratinocytes (67%), hypergranulosis (65%), neutrophilic spongiosis (61%), dermal eosinophils (49%), compact orthokeratosis (37%), papillary dermal fibrosis (35%), lichenoid infiltrate (25%), plasma cells (16%), and eosinophilic spongiosis (8%). Psoriasis exhibits a broader histopathologic spectrum. The presence of some non-classic features does not necessarily exclude the possibility of psoriasis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Penium margaritaceum as a model organism for cell wall analysis of expanding plant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydahl, Maja Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard

    2015-01-01

    organization of the polymeric networks of the cell wall around the protoplast also contributes to the direction of growth, the shape of the cell, and the proper positioning of the cell in a tissue. In essence, plant cell expansion represents the foundation of development. Most studies of plant cell expansion......The growth of a plant cell encompasses a complex set of subcellular components interacting in a highly coordinated fashion. Ultimately, these activities create specific cell wall structural domains that regulate the prime force of expansion, internally generated turgor pressure. The precise...... mechanics of the cell wall in a single plant cell....

  6. Melanotic MiT family translocation neoplasms: Expanding the clinical and molecular spectrum of this unique entity of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Rola M; Srigley, John R; Sweet, Joan; Doucet, Cedric; Royal, Virginie; Chen, Ying-Bei; Brimo, Fadi; Evans, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    MiT family translocation tumors are a group of neoplasms characterized by translocations involving MiT family transcription factors. The translocation renal cell carcinomas, TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB (t6;11) are known members of this family. Melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer is a more recently described entity. To date only 14 cases have been described. It is characterized by a distinct set of features including a nested epithelioid morphology, melanin pigmentation, labeling for markers of melanocytic differentiation, lack of labeling for markers of renal tubular differentiation, predominance in a younger age population and association with aggressive clinical behavior. There are noted similarities between that entity and TFE3 associated PEComas. There are no cases reported of equivalent melanotic TFEB translocation renal cancer. We report 2 rare cases of melanotic translocation renal neoplasms. The first is a melanotic TFE3 translocation renal cancer with an indolent clinical course, occurring in a patient more than 3-decades older than the usual average age in which such tumors have been described. The other case is, to our knowledge, the first reported melanotic TFEB translocation cancer of the kidney. Both cases exhibit the same H&E morphology as previously reported in melanotic translocation renal cancers and label accordingly with HMB45 and Melan-A. While the TFE3 melanotic tumor lacked any evidence of renal tubular differentiation, the TFEB melanotic cancer exhibited some staining for renal tubular markers. Based on the unique features noted above, these two cases expand the clinical and molecular spectrum of the melanotic translocation renal cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Expanding Role of T Cells in Human Autoimmune Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Pilli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is being increasingly recognized that a dysregulation of the immune system plays a vital role in neurological disorders and shapes the treatment of the disease. Aberrant T cell responses, in particular, are key in driving autoimmunity and have been traditionally associated with multiple sclerosis. Yet, it is evident that there are other neurological diseases in which autoreactive T cells have an active role in pathogenesis. In this review, we report on the recent progress in profiling and assessing the functionality of autoreactive T cells in central nervous system (CNS autoimmune disorders that are currently postulated to be primarily T cell driven. We also explore the autoreactive T cell response in a recently emerging group of syndromes characterized by autoantibodies against neuronal cell-surface proteins. Common methodology implemented in T cell biology is further considered as it is an important determinant in their detection and characterization. An improved understanding of the contribution of autoreactive T cells expands our knowledge of the autoimmune response in CNS disorders and can offer novel methods of therapeutic intervention.

  8. Clinical genomics expands the morbid genome of intellectual disability and offers a high diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anazi, S; Maddirevula, S; Faqeih, E; Alsedairy, H; Alzahrani, F; Shamseldin, H E; Patel, N; Hashem, M; Ibrahim, N; Abdulwahab, F; Ewida, N; Alsaif, H S; Al Sharif, H; Alamoudi, W; Kentab, A; Bashiri, F A; Alnaser, M; AlWadei, A H; Alfadhel, M; Eyaid, W; Hashem, A; Al Asmari, A; Saleh, M M; AlSaman, A; Alhasan, K A; Alsughayir, M; Al Shammari, M; Mahmoud, A; Al-Hassnan, Z N; Al-Husain, M; Osama Khalil, R; Abd El Meguid, N; Masri, A; Ali, R; Ben-Omran, T; El Fishway, P; Hashish, A; Ercan Sencicek, A; State, M; Alazami, A M; Salih, M A; Altassan, N; Arold, S T; Abouelhoda, M; Wakil, S M; Monies, D; Shaheen, R; Alkuraya, F S

    2017-04-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a measurable phenotypic consequence of genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we prospectively assessed the diagnostic yield of genomic tools (molecular karyotyping, multi-gene panel and exome sequencing) in a cohort of 337 ID subjects as a first-tier test and compared it with a standard clinical evaluation performed in parallel. Standard clinical evaluation suggested a diagnosis in 16% of cases (54/337) but only 70% of these (38/54) were subsequently confirmed. On the other hand, the genomic approach revealed a likely diagnosis in 58% (n=196). These included copy number variants in 14% (n=54, 15% are novel), and point mutations revealed by multi-gene panel and exome sequencing in the remaining 43% (1% were found to have Fragile-X). The identified point mutations were mostly recessive (n=117, 81%), consistent with the high consanguinity of the study cohort, but also X-linked (n=8, 6%) and de novo dominant (n=19, 13%). When applied directly on all cases with negative molecular karyotyping, the diagnostic yield of exome sequencing was 60% (77/129). Exome sequencing also identified likely pathogenic variants in three novel candidate genes (DENND5A, NEMF and DNHD1) each of which harbored independent homozygous mutations in patients with overlapping phenotypes. In addition, exome sequencing revealed de novo and recessive variants in 32 genes (MAMDC2, TUBAL3, CPNE6, KLHL24, USP2, PIP5K1A, UBE4A, TP53TG5, ATOH1, C16ORF90, SLC39A14, TRERF1, RGL1, CDH11, SYDE2, HIRA, FEZF2, PROCA1, PIANP, PLK2, QRFPR, AP3B2, NUDT2, UFC1, BTN3A2, TADA1, ARFGEF3, FAM160B1, ZMYM5, SLC45A1, ARHGAP33 and CAPS2), which we highlight as potential candidates on the basis of several lines of evidence, and one of these genes (SLC39A14) was biallelically inactivated in a potentially treatable form of hypermanganesemia and neurodegeneration. Finally, likely causal variants in previously published candidate genes were identified (ASTN1, HELZ, THOC6, WDR45B, ADRA

  9. Expand and Regularize Federal Funding for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Smith, Jason; Scott, Christopher Thomas; McCormick, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has sparked incredible scientific and public excitement, as well as significant controversy. hESCs are pluripotent, which means, in theory, that they can be differentiated into any type of cell found in the human body. Thus, they evoke great enthusiasm about potential clinical applications. They are…

  10. Clinical application of self-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weitao; Shi Haibin; Yang Zhengqiang; Liu Sheng; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Methods: Under general anesthesia the placement of self-expandable metallic stent was performed in 10 patients with malignant tracheal stenosis, the procedure was completed under fluoroscopic guidance in all patients. Results: Successful tracheal stenting was achieved in all 10 patients. In one patient, a Y-shaped stent was used as the tracheal carina was involved in the airway stenosis. The symptoms of dyspnea and asthma were markedly improved immediately after the implantation of stent in all patients. Conclusion: Tracheal implantation of self-expandable metallic stent under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance is a safe and effective treatment for malignant tracheal stenosis, it can promptly relieve various symptoms caused by malignant tracheal stenosis and obviously improve patient's living quality, therefore,t his technique is of great value in clinical practice. (authors)

  11. A multiple-scales model of the shock-cell structure of imperfectly expanded supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Jackson, J. A.; Seiner, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the development of an analytical model of the quasi-periodic shock-cell structure of an imperfectly expanded supersonic jet. The investigation represents a part of a program to develop a mathematical theory of broadband shock-associated noise of supersonic jets. Tam and Tanna (1982) have suggested that this type of noise is generated by the weak interaction between the quasi-periodic shock cells and the downstream-propagating large turbulence structures in the mixing layer of the jet. In the model developed in this paper, the effect of turbulence in the mixing layer of the jet is simulated by the addition of turbulent eddy-viscosity terms to the momentum equation. Attention is given to the mean-flow profile and the numerical solution, and a comparison of the numerical results with experimental data.

  12. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallstrom, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  13. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2015-08-12

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  14. Exploring the scope of expanding advanced nursing practice in nurse-led clinics: a multiple-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Ann T Y; Lee, Diana T F; Chau, Janita P C

    2012-08-01

    This article is a report on a study to explore the development of expanding advanced nursing practice in nurse-led clinics in Hong Kong. Nurse-led clinics serviced by advanced practice nurses, a common international practice, have been adopted in Hong Kong since 1990s. Evaluations consistently show that this practice has good clinical outcomes and contributes to containing healthcare cost. However, similar to the international literature, it remains unclear as to what the elements of good advanced nursing practice are, and which directions Hong Kong should adopt for further development of such practice. A multiple-case study design was adopted with six nurse-led clinics representing three specialties as six case studies, and including two clinics each from continence, diabetes and wound care. Each case had four embedded units of analysis. They included non-participant observation of nursing activities (9 days), nurse interviews (N = 6), doctor interviews (N = 6) and client interviews (N = 12). The data were collected in 2009. Within- and cross-case analyses were conducted. The cross-case analysis demonstrated six elements of good advanced nursing practice in nurse-led clinics, and showed a great potential to expand the practice by reshaping four categories of current boundaries, including community-hospital, wellness-illness, public-private and professional-practice boundaries. From these findings, we suggest a model to advance the scope of advanced nursing practice in nurse-led clinics. The six elements may be applied as audit criteria for evaluation of advanced nursing practice in nurse-led clinics, and the proposed model provides directions for expanding such practice in Hong Kong and beyond. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Effector T-cells are expanded in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with high disease activity and damage indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantoni, S; Regola, F; Zanola, A; Andreoli, L; Dall'Ara, F; Tincani, A; Airo', P

    2018-01-01

    Background and objectives T-cell activation may be one of the pathogenic mechanisms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). After repeated antigenic stimulation, T-cells undergo different modifications, leading to the differentiation into effector memory T-cells (CCR7-CD45RA-) and terminally differentiated effector memory (TDEM) T-cells (CCR7-CD45RA+). Similarly, down-modulation of CD28 may lead to the expansion of the CD28- T-cells, a subpopulation with peculiar effector activities. The aim of this study was the characterization of T-cell phenotype in a cohort of patients with SLE according to disease activity and damage index. Materials and methods Phenotypic analysis of peripheral blood T lymphocytes of 51 SLE patients and 21 healthy controls was done by flow-cytometry. SLE disease activity was evaluated by SLE Disease Activity Index-2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and damage by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SDI). The variations between different groups were evaluated by Mann-Whitney test. Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons ( p adj ). Spearman rank test was used to evaluate the correlations between quantitative variables. Results CD4+ lymphopenia was found among SLE patients. Patients showed a trend for a higher percentage of TDEM among the CD4+ T-cell subpopulation in comparison with healthy controls ( p = .04). SLE patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity: patients with SLEDAI-2K ≥ 6 ( n = 13) had a higher percentage of circulating CD4+ T-cells with CD28- phenotype ( p adj  = .005) as well as those with an effector memory ( p adj  = .004) and TDEM ( p adj  = .002) phenotype and a trend of decrease of regulatory T-cells (TREGs) ( p = .02), in comparison with patients with low disease activity ( n = 38). Patients with damage (SDI ≥ 1) tended to show an expansion of TDEM among CD4+ T-cells as compared with

  16. Cybersecurity in the Clinical Setting: Nurses' Role in the Expanding "Internet of Things".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Luanne; McKee, Shawn A

    2016-08-01

    Nurses face growing complexity in their work. The expanding "Internet of Things" with "smart" technologies can reduce the burden. However, equipment and devices that connect to patients, the network, or to the Internet can be exploited by hackers. Nurses should be able to identify, understand, and protect against cybersecurity risks to safeguard patients. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):347-349. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Molecular-clinical correlations in males with an expanded FMR1 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merenstein, S.A.; Sobesky, W.E.; Tran, H.X. [Children`s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by an expansion of a CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene. The CGG repeat number of the FMR1 mutation and the percentage of cells with methylation of the gene were studied in 218 male patients. Physical and cognitive measurements were also performed. Patients were divided into three groups; those with full mutation and complete methylation (n = 160), those with full mutation and partial methylation (n = 12), and those with a mosaic pattern (n = 46). Statistical comparisons were made between males with the fully methylated full mutation and those with a mosaic pattern. Males having full mutation with complete methylation had the lowest IQ scores and greatest physical involvement. These significant differences were seen only in ages after puberty. CGG repeat length did not correlate with IQ or the physical index score in any group. These findings suggest that a partial production of FMR1 protein may predict milder clinical involvement in some males with fragile X syndrome. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of G6PD deficiency: The occurrence of BCGitis and novel missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Taj Ali; Mazhar, Humaira; Nawaz, Mehboob; Kalsoom, Kalsoom; Ishfaq, Muhammad; Asif, Huma; Rahman, Hazir; Qasim, Muhammad; Naz, Farkhanda; Hussain, Mubashir; Khattak, Baharullah; Ullah, Waheed; Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Butt, Jawad; Iqbal, Asif

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway that ensures sufficient production of coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) by catalyzing the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Noteworthy, the latter mediates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytic cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. Therefore, patients with severe forms of G6PD deficiency may present impaired NADPH oxidase activity and become susceptible to recurrent infections. This fact, highlights the importance to characterize the immunopathologic mechanisms underlying the susceptibility to infections in patients with G6PD deficiency. Here we report the first two cases of G6PD deficiency with Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) adverse effect, besides jaundice, hemolytic anemia and recurrent infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The qualitative G6PD screening was performed and followed by oxidative burst analysis using flow cytometry. Genetic and in silico analyses were carried out by Sanger sequencing and mutation pathogenicity predicted using bioinformatics tools, respectively. Activated neutrophils and monocytes from patients displayed impaired oxidative burst. The genetic analysis revealed the novel missense mutation c.1157T>A/p.L386Q in G6PD. In addition, in silico analysis indicated that this mutation is pathogenic, thereby hampering the oxidative burst of neutrophils and monocytes from patients. Our data expand the clinical and genetic spectrum of G6PD deficiency, and suggest that impaired oxidative burst in this severe primary immune deficiency is an underlying immunopathologic mechanism that predisposes to mycobacterial infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanistic aspects of radioprotection by todralazine hydrochloride, a hematopoietic stem cell expanding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimri, Manali; Joshi, Jaidev; Jain, Sanjoli; Ghosh, Subhajit; Srivastva, Nitisha; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have reported todralazine hydrochloride, an antihypertensive drug, as a radioprotector and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expanding agent. The present study aims at unraveling mechanistic aspects of its radioprotective and HSC expanding potential. Zebrafish Tg (cmyb:GFP) embryos treated with 5 μM todralazine from 24-36 hours post fertilization (hpf), increased the number of HSCs (∼ 2 folds) at aorta gonad mesonephros (AGM) region. Similarly, the expression of HSC marker genes, runx1 (3.3 folds) and cMyb (1.4 folds) were also found to be increased. Further, todralazine also accelerated hematopoietic lineage production, erythropoiesis, as evaluated in chemical induced anemic model in zebrafish. Genome wide expression changes in todralazine treated embryos (from 24-36 hpf) using microarray, revealed up and down regulation of 645 and 429 genes respectively. Pathway analysis using DAVID database strongly suggested up regulation of wnt pathway (p<0.019253), which is known to involve in HSC expansion, in todralazine pre-treated embryos. NOS1, known to have its role in HSC expansion through wnt pathway, has been significantly upregulated (1.54 folds; q PCR) by todralazine treatment (from 24-36 hpf). Todralazine treatment (∼30 minutes; 20 Gy) led to a significant upregulation of antioxidant genes (SOD, catalase), DNA damage response genes (p53, p21, GADD45) and nucleotide excision repair genes (XPC, XPA, XPF, XPD) when compared to irradiated control. Immunohistochemical analysis of DNA damage marker (γH2AX) (30 minutes post irradiation), further supported radiation induced DNA damage and protection by todralazine pre-treatment. Corroborating these results, pre-irradiation treatment of todralazine reduced radiation induced apoptosis (caspase 3 assay). Overall, the results suggest that, todralazine protects zebrafish from radiation induced damages by upregulating antioxidant defense system, DNA damage recognition, DNA repair machinery and by reducing cell

  20. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  1. Isolation and characterization of ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells obtained from a surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Sha, Huifan; Wang, Guan; Bao, Guoliang; Lu, Shun; Luo, Qingquan; Tan, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics and pluripotent differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Bone marrow cells were isolated from a rib fragment of an adult surgical patient, hBMMSCs were isolated based on plastic adherence and expanded ex vivo and phenotyping was performed. Pluripotent differentiation assays for adipogenesis, myogenesis and osteogenesis were conducted. Hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated nude mice was performed by infusion of hBMMSCs. The gene expression profiles of early and late hBMMSCs were examined. The rate of CD31‑positive cells was 31.1% in passage (P)4 hBMMSCs and 18.6% in P10 hBMMSCs. CD105 and CD106 were expressed in 99 and 95% of P25 hBMMSCs, respectively. Lipid droplets appeared at day 18 post induction. For osteogenesis, palpable masses were grossly observed from day 35 post inoculation of hBMMSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining further revealed chondrocytes and bone tissues. For myogenesis, at day six post subcutaneous inoculation, hBMMSCs differentiated into myocytes and were positive for myoglobin and MyoD1. In irradiated nude mice reconstituted by hBMMSCs, the white blood cell count briefly decreased following irradiation; however, it gradually recovered. In the irradiated nude mice reconstituted with hBMMSCs, CD45‑ and CD34‑positive cells were detected 72 h post induction. Gene microarray analysis of P7 and P57 hBMMSCs demonstrated that 20 genes were upregulated >2 fold and 40 genes were downregulated >2 fold in P57 hBMMSCs. In conclusion, the isolated HBMMSCs possessed pluripotent differentiation potential and it was feasible and safe to use hBMMSCs within 30 passages.

  2. Characterization of ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with malignant melanoma for clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials of adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to patients with advanced malignant melanoma have shown remarkable results with objective clinical responses in 50% of the treated patients. In order to initiate a clinical trial in melanoma, we have...

  3. Stem cell treatment for patients with autoimmune disease by systemic infusion of culture-expanded autologous adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra Jeong Chan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prolonged life expectancy, life style and environmental changes have caused a changing disease pattern in developed countries towards an increase of degenerative and autoimmune diseases. Stem cells have become a promising tool for their treatment by promoting tissue repair and protection from immune-attack associated damage. Patient-derived autologous stem cells present a safe option for this treatment since these will not induce immune rejection and thus multiple treatments are possible without any risk for allogenic sensitization, which may arise from allogenic stem cell transplantations. Here we report the outcome of treatments with culture expanded human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs of 10 patients with autoimmune associated tissue damage and exhausted therapeutic options, including autoimmune hearing loss, multiple sclerosis, polymyotitis, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment, we developed a standardized culture-expansion protocol for hAdMSCs from minimal amounts of fat tissue, providing sufficient number of cells for repetitive injections. High expansion efficiencies were routinely achieved from autoimmune patients and from elderly donors without measurable loss in safety profile, genetic stability, vitality and differentiation potency, migration and homing characteristics. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from the compassionate use treatments in terms of therapeutic efficacy are only preliminary, the data provide convincing evidence for safety and therapeutic properties of systemically administered AdMSC in human patients with no other treatment options. The authors believe that ex-vivo-expanded autologous AdMSCs provide a promising alternative for treating autoimmune diseases. Further clinical studies are needed that take into account the results obtained from case studies as those presented here.

  4. Intraluminal Palmaz stent implantation. First clinical case report on a balloon-expandable vessel prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmaz, J.C.; Richter, G.M.; Noeldge, G.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Wenz, W.

    1987-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient suffering from severe iliac artery stenosis and claudication was chosen to be the first candidate in the world to receive the Palmaz stent, a balloon-expandable intraluminal stent. This procedure was done in the Department of Radiology, University of Freiburg, FRG. The intervention and postprocedural course were uneventful. His walking distance improved from less than 100 m to unlimited walking capacity. The intra-arterial pressure gradient and ankle-arm pressure ratio also returned to normal.

  5. The DSF Family of Cell-Cell Signals: An Expanding Class of Bacterial Virulence Regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Ryan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria use cell-cell signaling systems involving the synthesis and perception of diffusible signal molecules to control virulence as a response to cell density or confinement to niches. Bacteria produce signals of diverse structural classes. Signal molecules of the diffusible signal factor (DSF family are cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. The paradigm is cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, which controls virulence in this plant pathogen. Although DSF synthesis was thought to be restricted to the xanthomonads, it is now known that structurally related molecules are produced by the unrelated bacteria Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, signaling involving these DSF family members contributes to bacterial virulence, formation of biofilms and antibiotic tolerance in these important human pathogens. Here we review the recent advances in understanding DSF signaling and its regulatory role in different bacteria. These advances include the description of the pathway/mechanism of DSF biosynthesis, identification of novel DSF synthases and new members of the DSF family, the demonstration of a diversity of DSF sensors to include proteins with a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain and the description of some of the signal transduction mechanisms that impinge on virulence factor expression. In addition, we address the role of DSF family signals in interspecies signaling that modulates the behavior of other microorganisms. Finally, we consider a number of recently reported approaches for the control of bacterial virulence through the modulation of DSF signaling.

  6. Biology and clinical utilization of mesenchymal progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Minguell

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex cellular arrangement found in the bone marrow stroma there exists a subset of nonhematopoietic cells referred to as mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC. These cells can be expanded ex vivo and induced, either in vitro or in vivo, to terminally differentiate into at least seven types of cells: osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, tenocytes, myotubes, astrocytes and hematopoietic-supporting stroma. This broad multipotentiality, the feasibility to obtain MPC from bone marrow, cord and peripheral blood and their transplantability support the impact that the use of MPC will have in clinical settings. However, a number of fundamental questions about the cellular and molecular biology of MPC still need to be resolved before these cells can be used for safe and effective cell and gene therapies intended to replace, repair or enhance the physiological function of the mesenchymal and/or hematopoietic systems.

  7. Expanding xylose metabolism in yeast for plant cell wall conversion to biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Vivian Yaci; Lin, Yuping; Chomvong, Kulika; Estrela, Raíssa; Park, Annsea; Liang, Julie M; Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Feehan, Joanna; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Glass, N Louise; Cate, Jamie HD

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable biofuel production from renewable biomass will require the efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the plant cell wall. Using the cellulolytic fungus Neurospora crassa as a model, we identified a xylodextrin transport and consumption pathway required for its growth on hemicellulose. Reconstitution of this xylodextrin utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that fungal xylose reductases act as xylodextrin reductases, producing xylosyl-xylitol oligomers as metabolic intermediates. These xylosyl-xylitol intermediates are generated by diverse fungi and bacteria, indicating that xylodextrin reduction is widespread in nature. Xylodextrins and xylosyl-xylitol oligomers are then hydrolyzed by two hydrolases to generate intracellular xylose and xylitol. Xylodextrin consumption using a xylodextrin transporter, xylodextrin reductases and tandem intracellular hydrolases in cofermentations with sucrose and glucose greatly expands the capacity of yeast to use plant cell wall-derived sugars and has the potential to increase the efficiency of both first-generation and next-generation biofuel production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05896.001 PMID:25647728

  8. Empirical Correlates and Expanded Interpretation of the MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (Cynicism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Paul B.; Kelso, Kristy M.; McCord, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The recent release of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has received much attention from the clinical psychology community. Particular concerns have focused on Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (RC3; Cynicism). This article briefly reviews the major criticisms and responses regarding the restructuring of…

  9. Expanding the "ports of entry" for speech-language pathologists: a relational and reflective model for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Elaine; Foley, Gilbert M

    2009-02-01

    To outline an expanded framework for clinical practice in speech-language pathology. This framework broadens the focus on discipline-specific knowledge and infuses mental health constructs within the study of communication sciences and disorders, with the objective of expanding the potential "ports or points of entry" (D. Stern, 1995) for clinical intervention with young children who are language impaired. Specific mental health constructs are highlighted in this article. These include relationship-based learning, attachment theory, working dyadically (the client is the child and parent), reflective practice, transference-countertransference, and the use of self. Each construct is explored as to the way it has been applied in traditional and contemporary models of clinical practice. The underlying premise in this framework is that working from a relationally based and reflective perspective augments change and growth in both client and parent(s). The challenge is for speech-language pathologists to embed mental health constructs within their discipline-specific expertise. This leads to paying attention to both observable aspects of clients' behaviors as well as their internal affective states.

  10. The clinical importance of expanded subarachnoid spaces detected by CT in early infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusche, S.

    1982-01-01

    It depends on the clinical course and on follow-jup CT findings whether expansions of the subarachnoid space should be considered as pathological changes or as normal. There is no direct correlation between the degree of severity of the clinical symptoms on the one hand and the CT changes on the other. The clinical course and the follow-up CT images are found to be uncorrelated, too. CT findings alone are insufficient in predicting children's development. Especially in the case of unspecific changes, e.g. slight expansions of the subarachnoid space, cranial CT can only provide further proof of a suspected clinical diagnosis. The ventricular indices frequently used for CT interpretation can rarely be used as decision aids or as factors providing new information. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Assessment of expanded polystyrene as a separator in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathuriya, Abhilasha Singh; Pant, Deepak

    2018-02-15

    Separators are considered as an important component in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to facilitate ion transport and to prevent electrode short circuiting. In the present study, expanded polystyrene (EPS) was evaluated for the first time as a separator in a single-chamber air cathode and dual chamber aqueous cathode MFCs. The characteristics and performance of EPS were analyzed and compared with other conventionally used separators used in MFCs and was found to be competitive. Initially, the EPS was less impermeable to protons, resulting in delayed process startup (17 days) and stabilization (57 days), but gradually exhibited improved and stable performance. In the air cathode MFC with the EPS as the separator and domestic wastewater as the substrate, power production was 391 mW/m 2 , while power output of the aqueous cathode MFC was 328 mW/m 2 . The characteristics and cost analysis of EPS indicate that it can be a potential candidate as a separator in scaled-up MFC applications.

  12. Transfer of in vitro-expanded naïve T cells after lymphodepletion enhances antitumor immunity through the induction of polyclonal antitumor effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Tanaka

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of effector T cells combined with lymphodepletion has demonstrated promising antitumor effects in mice and humans, although the availability of tumor-specific T cells is limited. We and others have also demonstrated that the transfer of polyclonal naïve T cells induces tumor-specific effector T cells and enhances antitumor immunity after lymphodepletion. Because tumors have been demonstrated to induce immunosuppressive networks and regulate the function of T cells, obtaining a sufficient number of fully functional naïve T cells that are able to differentiate into tumor-specific effector T cells remains difficult. To establish culture methods to obtain a large number of polyclonal T cells that are capable of differentiating into tumor-specific effector T cells, naïve T cells were activated with anti-CD3 mAbs in vitro. These cells were stimulated with IL-2 and IL-7 for the CD8 subset or with IL-7 and IL-23 for the CD4 subset. Transfer of these hyperexpanded T cells after lymphodepletion showed significant antitumor efficacy, and tumor-specific effector T cells were primed from these expanded T cells in tumor-bearing hosts. Moreover, these ex vivo-expanded T cells maintained T cell receptor diversity and showed long-term persistence of memory against specific tumors. Further analyses revealed that combination therapy consisting of vaccination with dendritic cells that were co-cultured with irradiated whole tumor cells and the transfer of ex vivo-expanded T cells significantly enhanced antitumor immunity. These results indicate that the transfer of ex vivo-expanded polyclonal T cells can be combined with other immunotherapies and augment antitumor effects.

  13. C9orf72-related disorders: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions primarily involving dementia, motor neuron disease and movement disorders. They are mostly related to different pathophysiological processes, notably in family forms in which the clinical and genetic heterogeneity are lush. In the last decade, much knowledge has been acumulated about the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases, making it essential in cases of motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia the repeat expansions of C9orf72 gene. This review analyzes the main clinical, radiological and genetic aspects of the phenotypes related to the hexanucleotide repeat expansions (GGGGCC of C9orf72 gene. Future studies will aim to further characterize the neuropsychological, imaging and pathological aspects of the extra-motor features of motor neuron disease, and will help to provide a new classification system that is both clinically and biologically relevant.

  14. In vivo infiltration of mononuclear cells in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck correlates with the ability to expand tumour-infiltrating T cells in vitro and with the expression of MHC class I antigens on tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, J; Rasmussen, N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1994-01-01

    -peptide-specific T cells in the patients. Eight out of ten expanded tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) cultures showed T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. "Promiscuous" cytotoxic T cell activity against the natural-killer-cell-sensitive K562 target cell line was observed in three out of ten TIL expansion...

  15. Inflammatory genes are upregulated in expanded ataxin-3-expressing cell lines and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evert, BO; Vogt, IR; Kindermann, C; Ozimek, L; de Vos, RAI; Brunt, ERP; Schmitt, [No Value; Klockgether, T; Wullner, U

    2001-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a polyglutamine disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of a gene encoding ataxin-3. To study putative alterations of gene expression induced by expanded ataxin-3, we performed PCR-based cDNA subtractive hybridization in a cell culture

  16. Growing complexity of (expanded) carrier screening: Direct-to-consumer, physician-mediated, and clinic-based offers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokoshvili, Davit; Vears, Danya F; Borry, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    Since the introduction of out-of-hospital health-related genetic tests more than a decade ago, the landscape of genetic testing services has grown in complexity. Although initially most genetic tests for health purposes were offered as direct-to-consumer services, that is, without the mediation of a medical professional, currently many commercial providers require that their tests be ordered by a licensed physician. At the same time, some commercially developed health-related genetic tests are gaining support from the professional medical community and are finding their way into clinical practice. Therefore, we differentiated between three types of genetic testing offers: direct-to-consumer, physician-mediated, and clinic-based genetic testing. Expanded carrier screening tests for recessive disorders are currently available through all the three models of genetic testing. Herein, we review the present landscape of expanded carrier screening offers by highlighting the distinct issues associated with each of the three types of genetic testing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Educational paper: The expanding clinical and immunological spectrum of severe combined immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Burg (Mirjam); A.R. Gennery (Andy R.)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSevere combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency characterized by absence of functional T lymphocytes. It is a paediatric emergency, which is life-threatening when recognized too late. The clinical presentation varies from the classical

  18. Expanding the clinical spectrum associated with defects in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann Reinhard

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterozygous copy-number and missense variants in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 have repeatedly been associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders such as developmental language and autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy and schizophrenia. Recently, homozygous or compound heterozygous defects in either gene were reported as causative for severe intellectual disability. Methods 99 patients with severe intellectual disability and resemblance to Pitt-Hopkins syndrome and/or suspected recessive inheritance were screened for mutations in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1. Molecular karyotyping was performed in 45 patients. In 8 further patients with variable intellectual disability and heterozygous deletions in either CNTNAP2 or NRXN1, the remaining allele was sequenced. Results By molecular karyotyping and mutational screening of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 in a group of severely intellectually disabled patients we identified a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1 in one patient and heterozygous splice-site, frameshift and stop mutations in CNTNAP2 in four patients, respectively. Neither in these patients nor in eight further patients with heterozygous deletions within NRXN1 or CNTNAP2 we could identify a defect on the second allele. One deletion in NRXN1 and one deletion in CNTNAP2 occurred de novo, in another family the deletion was also identified in the mother who had learning difficulties, and in all other tested families one parent was shown to be healthy carrier of the respective deletion or mutation. Conclusions We report on patients with heterozygous defects in CNTNAP2 or NRXN1 associated with severe intellectual disability, which has only been reported for recessive defects before. These results expand the spectrum of phenotypic severity in patients with heterozygous defects in either gene. The large variability between severely affected patients and mildly affected or asymptomatic carrier parents might suggest the presence of a second hit, not

  19. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    or progenitor cells presents an alternative approach, which aims at repairing the anatomical components of the urethral continence mechanism. In vitro expanded progenitor cells isolated from muscle biopsies have been most intensely investigated, and both preclinical trials and a few clinical trials have...

  20. Practicability of comprehensive care in clinical genetics in the brazilian unified health system: expanding the debate

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes-Júnior, Luís Carlos; Flória-Santos, Milena; Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de Faria; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Bomfim, Emiliana de Omena; Abrahão, Camila Aparecida; Silva, Sara da

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to highlight the discussions on the National Policy for Comprehensive Care in Clinical Genetics and reflect on its pending regulation when genomic discoveries change the model of health care. Nine of the ten causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide presents genetic/genomic predisposition. Based on strategic planning, this Policy proposes the organization of a network of referral services and specialized centers in genetics, with capacity to meet the needs of the populatio...

  1. Dendritic cells decreased the concomitant expanded Tregs and Tregs related IL-35 in cytokine-induced killer cells and increased their cytotoxicity against leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Pan

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are potent immunosuppressive cells and essential for inducing immune tolerance. Recent studies have reported that Tregs and Tregs related cytokines can inhibit the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells, but dendritic cells co-cultured CIK (DC-CIK cells can be used for induction of a specific immune response by blocking of Tregs and TGF-β, IL-10. As a novel identified cytokine, IL-35 is specially produced by Tregs and plays an essential role in immune regulation. However, it remains unknown whether IL-35 roles in tumor immunotherapy mediated by CIK and DC-CIK cells. In this study, we cultured CIK and DC-CIK cells from the same healthy adult samples, and investigated their phenotype, proliferation, cytotoxic activity against leukemia cell lines K562 and NB4 by FCM and CCK-8, measured IL-35, TGF-β and IL-10 protein by ELISA, detected Foxp3, IL-35 and IL-35 receptor mRNA by Real-time PCR, respectively. We found Tregs and IL-35 concomitantly expanded by a time-dependent way during the generation of CIK cells, but DC significantly down-regulated the expression of them and simultaneously up-regulated the proliferation ability as well as cytotoxic activity of CIK cells against leukemia cell lines. Therefore, our data suggested that DC decreased concomitant expanded Tregs and Tregs related IL-35 in CIK cells and might contribute to improve their cytotoxicity against leukemia cells in vitro.

  2. Babesiosis in dogs and cats--expanding parasitological and clinical spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Gallego, Laia; Baneth, Gad

    2011-09-08

    Canine babesiosis caused by different Babesia species is a protozoal tick-borne disease with worldwide distribution and global significance. Historically, Babesia infection in dogs was identified based on the morphologic appearance of the parasite in the erythrocyte. All large forms of Babesia were designated Babesia canis, whereas all small forms of Babesia were considered to be Babesia gibsoni. However, the development of molecular methods has demonstrated that other Babesia species such as Babesia conradae, Babesia microti like piroplasm, Theileria spp. and a yet unnamed large form Babesia spp. infect dogs and cause distinct diseases. Babesia rossi, B. canis and Babesia vogeli previously considered as subspecies are identical morphologically but differ in the severity of clinical manifestations which they induce, their tick vectors, genetic characteristics, and geographic distributions, and are therefore currently considered separate species. The geographic distribution of the causative agent and thus the occurrence of babesiosis are largely dependent on the habitat of relevant tick vector species, with the exception of B. gibsoni where evidence for dog to dog transmission indicates that infection can be transmitted among fighting dog breeds independently of the limitations of vector tick infestation. Knowledge of the prevalence and clinicopathological aspects of Babesia species infecting dogs around the world is of epidemiologic and medical interest. Babesiosis in domestic cats is less common and has mostly been reported from South Africa where infection is mainly due to Babesia felis, a small Babesia that causes anemia and icterus. In addition, Babesia cati was reported from India and sporadic cases of B. canis infection in domestic cats have been reported in Europe, B. canis presentii in Israel and B. vogeli in Thailand. Babesiosis caused by large Babesia spp. is commonly treated with imidocarb dipropionate with good clinical response while small Babesia spp

  3. Distinct and overlapping effector functions of expanded human CD4+, CD8α+ and CD4-CD8α- invariant natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent O'Reilly

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells have diverse immune stimulatory/regulatory activities through their ability to release cytokines and to kill or transactivate other cells. Activation of iNKT cells can protect against multiple diseases in mice but clinical trials in humans have had limited impact. Clinical studies to date have targeted polyclonal mixtures of iNKT cells and we proposed that their subset compositions will influence therapeutic outcomes. We sorted and expanded iNKT cells from healthy donors and compared the phenotypes, cytotoxic activities and cytokine profiles of the CD4(+, CD8α(+ and CD4(-CD8α(- double-negative (DN subsets. CD4(+ iNKT cells expanded more readily than CD8α(+ and DN iNKT cells upon mitogen stimulation. CD8α(+ and DN iNKT cells most frequently expressed CD56, CD161 and NKG2D and most potently killed CD1d(+ cell lines and primary leukemia cells. All iNKT subsets released Th1 (IFN-γ and TNF-α and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines. Relative amounts followed a CD8α>DN>CD4 pattern for Th1 and CD4>DN>CD8α for Th2. All iNKT subsets could simultaneously produce IFN-γ and IL-4, but single-positivity for IFN-γ or IL-4 was strikingly rare in CD4(+ and CD8α(+ fractions, respectively. Only CD4(+ iNKT cells produced IL-9 and IL-10; DN cells released IL-17; and none produced IL-22. All iNKT subsets upregulated CD40L upon glycolipid stimulation and induced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, subset composition of iNKT cells is a major determinant of function. Use of enriched CD8α(+, DN or CD4(+ iNKT cells may optimally harness the immunoregulatory properties of iNKT cells for treatment of disease.

  4. When are nursing students on clinical placements ready to expand their learning repertoire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Marlene; Stisen, Bente Kjærgaard; Grau, Sarah M.

    2018-01-01

    Learning styles indicate an individual’s preferred way of learning. Research suggests that it is important for students on clinical placements to begin the learning process with the preferred learning style and subsequently develop their ability to use other styles and become more balanced learners....... What is unknown is when baccalaureate nursing students are ready to develop the other learning styles, and what facilitates such an expansion in their learning style repertoire? This is important, because students need to develop the abilities to learn both by acting and by deepen their knowledge...

  5. Prevention of epidural scarring after microdiscectomy: a randomized clinical trial comparing gel and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Gerd M; Pink, Peter T; Schneider, Frank; Stuecker, Markus; Homann, Nicolaus C; Preidler, Klaus W

    2006-09-01

    A randomized clinical trial compared two materials used to prevent epidural scarring after microdiscectomy. To determine whether ADCON-L Gel (ALG) or Preclude Spinal Membrane (PSM) was more effective in preventing scarring, reducing pain, and improving quality of life postoperatively. Postdiscectomy syndrome may result from epidural scarring. Various materials have been used in attempts to prevent this problem, but none have provided optimal results. Previous laboratory and clinical studies have found ALG and PSM to be effective, but none compared the two materials. Thirty-one patients undergoing primary microdiscectomy were randomly assigned to receive either ALG or PSM. Postoperatively, patients were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with contrast, for volume and rostral-caudal extent of scar tissue and nerve root involvement. Back and leg pain and quality of life were assessed by neurologic examinations and standardized patient surveys. Findings at any reoperations were recorded. Results in the PSM (n = 18) and ALG (n = 13) groups were compared statistically. No operative or postoperative complications occurred. Two patients in each group required reoperation. MRI at 6 months showed no, mild or mild-moderate scarring in most patients, with no significant differences between the ALG and PSM groups in scar volume and extent or nerve root involvement. Neurologic examinations and patient surveys showed substantial reductions in pain over time in both groups but no significant differences between groups. PSM was easy to see and remove at reoperation. PSM and ALG are equally effective in preventing epidural scarring associated with postdiscectomy syndrome.

  6. Leveraging a Statewide Clinical Data Warehouse to Expand Boundaries of the Learning Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Christine B; Obeid, Jihad; Larsen, Rick; Fryar, Katrina M; Lenert, Leslie; Bjorn, Arik; Lyons, Genevieve; Moskowitz, Jay; Sanderson, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Learning Health Systems (LHS) require accessible, usable health data and a culture of collaboration-a challenge for any single system, let alone disparate organizations, with macro- and micro-systems. Recently, the National Science Foundation described this important setting as a cyber-social ecosystem. In 2004, in an effort to create a platform for transforming health in South Carolina, Health Sciences South Carolina (HSSC) was established as a research collaboration of the largest health systems, academic medical centers and research intensive universities in South Carolina. With work beginning in 2010, HSSC unveiled an integrated Clinical Data Warehouse (CDW) in 2013 as a crucial anchor to a statewide LHS. This CDW integrates data from independent health systems in near-real time, and harmonizes the data for aggregation and use in research. With records from over 2.7 million unique patients spanning 9 years, this multi-institutional statewide clinical research repository allows integrated individualized patient-level data to be used for multiple population health and biomedical research purposes. In the first 21 months of operation, more than 2,800 de-identified queries occurred through i2b2, with 116 users. HSSC has developed and implemented solutions to complex issues emphasizing anti-competitiveness and participatory governance, and serves as a recognized model to organizations working to improve healthcare quality by extending the traditional borders of learning health systems.

  7. Expanding the role of objectively structured clinical examinations in nephrology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Lisa K; Abbott, Kevin C; Green, Felicidad; Little, Dustin; Nee, Robert; Oliver, James D; Bohen, Erin M; Yuan, Christina M

    2014-06-01

    Objectively structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are widely used in medical education, but we know of none described that are specifically for nephrology fellowship training. OSCEs use simulation to educate and evaluate. We describe a technically simple, multidisciplinary, low-cost OSCE developed by our program that contains both examination and training features and focuses on management and clinical knowledge of rare hemodialysis emergencies. The emergencies tested are venous air embolism, blood leak, dialysis membrane reaction, and hemolysis. Fifteen fellows have participated in the OSCE as examinees and/or preceptors since June 2010. All have passed the exercise. Thirteen responded to an anonymous survey in July 2013 that inquired about their confidence in managing each of the 4 tested emergencies pre- and post-OSCE. Fellows were significantly more confident in their ability to respond to the emergencies after the OSCE. Those who subsequently saw such an emergency reported that the OSCE experience was somewhat or very helpful in managing the event. The OSCE tested and trained fellows in the recognition and management of rare hemodialysis emergencies. OSCEs and simulation generally deserve greater use in nephrology subspecialty training; however, collaboration between training programs would be necessary to validate such exercises. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Clinical evaluation of expanded mesh connective tissue graft in the treatment for multiple adjacent gingival recessions in the esthetic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple approaches have been used to replace lost, damaged or diseased gingival tissues. The connective tissue graft (CTG procedure is the golden standard method for root coverage. Although multiple sites often need grafting, the palatal mucosa supplies only a limited area of grafting material. To overcome this limitation, expanded mesh graft provides a method whereby a graft can be stretched to cover a large area. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and the predictability of expanded mesh CTG (e-MCTG in the treatment of adjacent multiple gingival recessions. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients aged 20-50 years contributed to 55 sites, each site falling into at least three adjacent Miller′s Class 1 or Class 2 gingival recession. The CTG obtained from the palatal mucosa was expanded to cover the recipient bed, which was 1.5 times larger than the graft. Clinical measurements were recorded at baseline and 3 months, 12 months postoperatively. Results: A mean coverage of 1.96 mm ± 0.66 mm and 2.22 mm ± 0.68 mm was obtained at the end of 3 rd and 12 th month, respectively. Twelve months after surgery a statistically significant increase in CAL (2.2 mm ± 0.68 mm, P < 0.001 and increasing WKT (1.75 ± 0.78, P < 0.001 were obtained. In 80% of the treated sites, 100% root coverage was achieved (mean 93.5%. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that multiple adjacent recessions were treated by using e-MCTG technique can be applied and highly predictable root coverage can be achieved.

  9. NUP98-HOXA10hd-expanded hematopoietic stem cells efficiently reconstitute bone marrow of mismatched recipients and induce tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Y; Bennett, J L; Sekulovic, S; So, L; Yi, L; McNagny, K; Humphries, R K; Rossi, F M V

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy as well as methods capable of returning cells to a pluripotent state (iPS) have enabled the correction of genetic deficiencies in syngenic adult progenitors, reducing the need for immunosuppression in cell therapy approaches. However, in diseases involving mutations that lead to the complete lack of a protein, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the main immunogens leading to rejection of transplanted cells are the therapeutic proteins themselves. In these cases even iPS cells would not circumvent the need for immunosuppression, and alternative strategies must be developed. One such potential strategy seeks to induce immune tolerance using hematopoietic stem cells originated from the same donor or iPS line from which the therapeutic progenitors are derived. However, donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are available in limiting numbers and embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived HSCs engraft poorly in adults. While these limitations have been circumvented by ectopic expression of HOXB4, overexpression of this protein is associated with inefficient lymphoid reconstitution. Here we show that adult HSCs expanded with a NUP98- HOXA10hd fusion protein sustain long-term engraftment in immunologically mismatched recipients and generate normal numbers of lymphoid cells. In addition, NUP98-HOXA10hd-expanded cells induce functional immune tolerance to a subsequent transplant of myogenic progenitors immunologically matched with the transplanted HSCs.

  10. About signs and symptoms: can semiotics expand the view of clinical medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessa, J

    1996-12-01

    Semiotics, the theory of sign and meaning, may help physicians complement the project of interpreting signs and symptoms into diagnoses. A sign stands for something. We communicate indirectly through signs, and make sense of our world by interpreting signs into meaning. Thus, through association and inference, we transform flowers into love, Othello into jealousy, and chest pain into heart attack. Medical semiotics is part of general semiotics, which means the study of life of signs within society. With special reference to a case story, elements from general semiotics, together with two theoreticians of equal importance, the Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure and the American logician Charles Sanders Peirce, are presented. Two different modes of understanding clinical medicine are contrasted to illustrate the external link between what we believe or suggest, on the one hand, and the external reality on the other hand.

  11. Expanding the scope and relevance of health interventions: Moving beyond clinical trials and behavior change models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khary K. Rigg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An overemphasis on clinical trials and behavior change models has narrowed the knowledge base that can be used to design interventions. The overarching point is that the process of overanalyzing variables is impeding the process of gaining insight into the everyday experiences that shape how people define health and seek treatment. This claim is especially important to health decision-making and behavior change because subtle interpretations often influence the decisions that people make. This manuscript provides a critique of traditional approaches to developing health interventions, and theoretically justifies what and why changes are warranted. The limited scope of these models is also discussed, and an argument is made to adopt a strategy that includes the perceptions of people as necessary for understanding health and health-related decision-making. Three practical strategies are suggested to be used with the more standard approaches to assessing the effectiveness and relevance of health interventions.

  12. An expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device for vertebral body replacement: the clinical experience on 14 consecutive cases with vertebral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, J J; Ramírez, J J; Chiquete, E; Gómez-Limón, E

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that an expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function can provide immediate and durable spine stabilization after corpectomy. We designed an expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device (JR-prosthesis). Anatomical studies were performed to design a titanium-made prosthesis. Cadaver assays were done with a stainless steal device to test fixation and adequacy to the human spine anatomy. Then, 14 patients with vertebral tumors (8 metastatic) underwent corpectomy and vertebral body replacement with the JR-prosthesis. All patients had neurological deficit, severe pain and spine instability (mean follow-up: 25.4 months). Mean pain score before surgery in a visual analog scale improved from 7.6 to 3.0 points after operation (P=0.002). All patients achieved at least one grade of improvement in the Frankel score (P=0.003), excepting the 3 patients with Frankel grade A presurgery. Two patients with renal cell carcinoma died during the following 4 days after surgery (renal failure and massive bleeding), the rest attained a painless and stable spine immediately and maintained for long periods. No significant infections or implant failures were registered. A non-fatal case of inferior vena cava surgical injury was observed (repaired during surgery without further complications). The JR-prosthesis stabilizes the spine immediately after surgery and for the rest of the patients' life. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the clinical experience of any expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device. These observations await confirmation in different scenarios.

  13. Impact of Carcinomatosis on Clinical Outcomes after Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Keol; Hong, Yun Soo; Kim, Eun Ran; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It is still unclear whether the peritoneal carcinomatosis had a negative effect on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Although carcinomatosis may be associated with the development of multifocal gastrointestinal (GI) tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement, previous studies investigated the occurrence of stent failure only and thus had limitation in evaluating clinical outcomes of patients with carcinomatosis. Between 2009 and 2013, 155 patients (88 patients without carcinomatosis and 67 patients with carcinomatosis) underwent endoscopic SEMS placement for malignant GOO. Factors affecting clinical success and obstructive symptom-free survival (time period between SEMS placement and the recurrence of obstructive symptoms due to multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement as well as stent failure) were assessed. Patients with carcinomatosis showed higher Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scale than those without carcinomatosis. Clinical success rates were 88.1% in patients with carcinomatosis and 97.7% in patients without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, only ECOG scale was identified as an independent predictor of clinical success. During follow-up period, patients with carcinomatosis showed significantly shorter obstructive symptom-free survival than those without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, the presence of carcinomatosis, chemotherapy or radiation therapy after SEMS placement, and obstruction site were identified as independent predictors of obstructive symptom-free survival. For patient without carcinomatosis, stent failure accounted for the recurrence of obstructive symptoms in 84.6% of cases. For patients with carcinomatosis, multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement accounted for 37.9% of cases with obstructive symptom recurrence and stent failure accounted for 44.8% of cases

  14. Impact of Carcinomatosis on Clinical Outcomes after Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Lee

    Full Text Available It is still unclear whether the peritoneal carcinomatosis had a negative effect on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO. Although carcinomatosis may be associated with the development of multifocal gastrointestinal (GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement, previous studies investigated the occurrence of stent failure only and thus had limitation in evaluating clinical outcomes of patients with carcinomatosis.Between 2009 and 2013, 155 patients (88 patients without carcinomatosis and 67 patients with carcinomatosis underwent endoscopic SEMS placement for malignant GOO. Factors affecting clinical success and obstructive symptom-free survival (time period between SEMS placement and the recurrence of obstructive symptoms due to multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement as well as stent failure were assessed.Patients with carcinomatosis showed higher Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG scale than those without carcinomatosis. Clinical success rates were 88.1% in patients with carcinomatosis and 97.7% in patients without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, only ECOG scale was identified as an independent predictor of clinical success. During follow-up period, patients with carcinomatosis showed significantly shorter obstructive symptom-free survival than those without carcinomatosis. In multivariate analysis, the presence of carcinomatosis, chemotherapy or radiation therapy after SEMS placement, and obstruction site were identified as independent predictors of obstructive symptom-free survival. For patient without carcinomatosis, stent failure accounted for the recurrence of obstructive symptoms in 84.6% of cases. For patients with carcinomatosis, multifocal GI tract obstruction or decreased bowel movement accounted for 37.9% of cases with obstructive symptom recurrence and stent failure accounted for 44.8% of

  15. Expanding the basic science debate: the role of physics knowledge in interpreting clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldszmidt, Mark; Minda, John Paul; Devantier, Sarah L; Skye, Aimee L; Woods, Nicole N

    2012-10-01

    Current research suggests a role for biomedical knowledge in learning and retaining concepts related to medical diagnosis. However, learning may be influenced by other, non-biomedical knowledge. We explored this idea using an experimental design and examined the effects of causal knowledge on the learning, retention, and interpretation of medical information. Participants studied a handout about several respiratory disorders and how to interpret respiratory exam findings. The control group received the information in standard "textbook" format and the experimental group was presented with the same information as well as a causal explanation about how sound travels through lungs in both the normal and disease states. Comprehension and memory of the information was evaluated with a multiple-choice exam. Several questions that were not related to the causal knowledge served as control items. Questions related to the interpretation of physical exam findings served as the critical test items. The experimental group outperformed the control group on the critical test items, and our study shows that a causal explanation can improve a student's memory for interpreting clinical details. We suggest an expansion of which basic sciences are considered fundamental to medical education.

  16. Expanding the Clinical Spectrum of SPG11 Gene Mutations in Recessive Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia with Thin Corpus Callosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alice Abdel; Abu-Shahba, Nourhan; Swistun, Dominika; Silhavy, Jennifer; Bielas, Stephanie L.; Sattar, Shifteh; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Zaki, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) represents a large group of neurological disorders characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. One subtype of HSP shows an autosomal recessive form of inheritance with this corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC), and displays genetic heterogeneity with four known loci. We identified a consanguineous Egyptian family with five affected individuals with ARHSP-TCC. We found linkage to the SPG11 locus and identified a novel homozygous p.Q498X stop codon mutation in exon 7 in the SPG11 gene encoding Spatacsin. Cognitive impairment and polyneuropathy, reported as frequent in SPG11, were not evident. This family supports the importance of SPG11 as a frequent cause for ARHSP-TCC, and expands the clinic SPG11 spectrum. PMID:20971220

  17. Challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation at rural clinics in Capricorn District, Limpopo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebogo M. Mothiba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunisation is the cornerstone of primary healthcare. Apart from the provision of safe water, immunisation remains the most cost-effective public health intervention currently available. Immunisation prevents infectious conditions that are debilitating, fatal and have the potential to cause huge public health burdens, both financially and socially, in South Africa.Aim: To determine the challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI at rural clinics in Capricorn District, Limpopo Province, South Africa.Setting: The study was conducted in selected primary healthcare clinics of Capricorn District, Limpopo Province.Methods: A qualitative explorative descriptive contextual research design was used to gather data related to the challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing EPI at rural clinics in Capricorn District.Results: The findings revealed that professional nurses had knowledge of the programme, but that they experienced several challenges during implementation of EPI that included staff shortages and problems related to maintenance of the vaccines’ potency.Conclusions: The Department of Health as well as the nursing administration should monitor policies and guidelines, and especially maintenance of a cold chain for vaccines, to ensure that they are practised throughout Limpopo Province. The problem of staff shortages also needs to be addressed so that the EPI can achieve its targeted objectives.Keywords: Professional nurse, knowledge, EPI-SA, immunisation

  18. Challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation at rural clinics in Capricorn District, Limpopo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebogo M. Mothiba

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunisation is the cornerstone of primary healthcare. Apart from the provision of safe water, immunisation remains the most cost-effective public health intervention currently available. Immunisation prevents infectious conditions that are debilitating, fatal and have the potential to cause huge public health burdens, both financially and socially, in South Africa. Aim: To determine the challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI at rural clinics in Capricorn District, Limpopo Province, South Africa. Setting: The study was conducted in selected primary healthcare clinics of Capricorn District, Limpopo Province. Methods: A qualitative explorative descriptive contextual research design was used to gather data related to the challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing EPI at rural clinics in Capricorn District. Results: The findings revealed that professional nurses had knowledge of the programme, but that they experienced several challenges during implementation of EPI that included staff shortages and problems related to maintenance of the vaccines’ potency. Conclusions: The Department of Health as well as the nursing administration should monitor policies and guidelines, and especially maintenance of a cold chain for vaccines, to ensure that they are practised throughout Limpopo Province. The problem of staff shortages also needs to be addressed so that the EPI can achieve its targeted objectives. Keywords: Professional nurse, knowledge, EPI-SA, immunisation

  19. Adaptive T cell responses induced by oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor therapy expanded by dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer cell adoptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Gwin, William R; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Hongyan; Jiang, Ni; Zhou, Lei; Agarwal, Pankaj; Hobeika, Amy; Crosby, Erika; Hartman, Zachary C; Morse, Michael A; H Eng, Kevin; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : Although local oncolytic viral therapy (OVT) may enhance tumor lysis, antigen release, and adaptive immune responses, systemic antitumor responses post-therapy are limited. Adoptive immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) synergizes with systemic therapies. We hypothesized that OVT with Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (HSV-GM-CSF) would induce adaptive T cell responses that could be expanded systemically with sequential DC-CIK therapy. Patients and Methods : We performed a pilot study of intratumoral HSV-GM-CSF OVT followed by autologous DC-CIK cell therapy. In addition to safety and clinical endpoints, we monitored adaptive T cell responses by quantifying T cell receptor (TCR) populations in pre-oncolytic therapy, post-oncolytic therapy, and after DC-CIK therapy. Results : Nine patients with advanced malignancy were treated with OVT (OrienX010), of whom seven experienced stable disease (SD). Five of the OVT treated patients underwent leukapheresis, generation, and delivery of DC-CIKs, and two had SD, whereas three progressed. T cell receptor sequencing of TCR β sequences one month after OVT therapy demonstrates a dynamic TCR repertoire in response to OVT therapy in the majority of patients with the systematic expansion of multiple T cell clone populations following DC-CIK therapy. This treatment was well tolerated and long-term event free and overall survival was observed in six of the nine patients. Conclusions : Strategies inducing the local activation of tumor-specific immune responses can be combined with adoptive cellular therapies to expand the adaptive T cell responses systemically and further studies are warranted.

  20. Expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition of ZnO:Al layers for CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Williams, B.L.; Mittal, A.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, N.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing

  1. Hypoxia Upregulates Mitotic Cyclins Which Contribute to the Multipotency of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Expanding Proliferation Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janet; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Su-Min; Kim, Dong-Ik; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2018-02-21

    Hypoxic culture is widely recognized as a method to efficiently expand human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without loss of stem cell properties. However, the molecular basis of how hypoxia priming benefits MSC expansion remains unclear. In this report, our systemic quantitative proteomic and RT-PCR analyses revealed the involvement of hypoxic conditioning activated genes in the signaling process of the mitotic cell cycle. Introduction of screened two mitotic cyclins, CCNA2 and CCNB1, significantly extended the proliferation lifespan of MSCs in normoxic condition. Our results provide important molecular evidence that multipotency of human MSCs by hypoxic conditioning is determined by the mitotic cell cycle duration. Thus, the activation of mitotic cyclins could be a potential strategy to the application of stem cell therapy.

  2. Analysis of the karyotype of expanded human adipose-derived stem cells for bone reconstruction of the maxillo-facial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, C; Stanco, D; Ragazzini, S; Romagnoli, L; Martella, E; Lazzati, S; Marchetti, C; Donati, D; Lucarelli, E

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) were recently proposed for bone maxillofacial reconstruction in association with biomaterials. For this application MSC must be ex-vivo expanded in order to obtain, for a given volume of implanted biomaterial, a relevant number of bone forming cells. Previously conducted pre-clinical studies suggested that a concentration of 6 x 10(8) ASC associated with 900 mg of anorganic bovine bone (ABB) could be effective for human maxillary sinus floor elevation. A keystone issue to guarantee the quality and safety of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products containing expanded MSC and ASC is their chromosome stability in culture: this topic has been widely investigated and conflicting results have been published. Abnormal karyotype of human ex-vivo expanded MSC and ASC was found by some authors, while, at the same time, several other studies showed the MSC and ASC karyotype to be normal. It is therefore important that all the results obtained on MSC and ASC karyotype analysis be published. Given this context, the aim of this manuscript, aim of this manuscript is to verify the karyotype stability of ASC in view of their applications in clinical trials. ASC obtained from the adipose tissue of 4 donors were expanded over extended culture time. Based on previous ASC expansions we hypothesized to be able to obtain 6 x 10(8) cells by passage 7. Karyotype analysis of 30 metaphases was planned to be investigated at passage 2, 7, and 15 in all the cultures. No abnormalities were found in the karyotype of two donors at all the passages tested, while a translocation was found in 2 metaphases of a donor at passage 7, but not at passage 15, and in the fourth donor in 5 metaphases a trisomy was found at passage 15. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected only after extended ASC expansion. Whether these anomalies can be related to risk for the patient's safety will have to be demonstrated by in-vivo studies.

  3. Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Katabira, Elly; Salata, Robert A; Costa, Marco A; Ddumba, Edward; Furlan, Anthony; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Kamya, Moses R; Kayima, James; Longenecker, Chris T; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mondo, Charles; Moore, Shirley; Pundik, Svetlana; Sewankambo, Nelson; Simon, Daniel I; Smyth, Kathleen A; Sajatovic, Martha

    2014-12-30

    Neurological disorders are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan African, but resources for their management are scarce. Collaborations between training institutions in developed and resource-limited countries can be a successful model for supporting specialty medical education and increasing clinical and research capacity. This report describes a US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) to enhance expertise in neurology, developed between Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Kampala, Uganda, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH, USA. This collaborative model is based on a successful medical education and research model that has been developed over the past two decades. The Ugandan and US teams have accumulated knowledge and 'lessons learned' that facilitate specialty expertise in neurological conditions, which are widespread and associated with substantial disability in resource-limited countries. Strengths of the model include a focus on community health care settings and a strong research component. Key elements include strong local leadership; use of remote technology, templates to standardize performance; shared exchanges; mechanisms to optimize sustainability and of dissemination activities that expand impact of the original initiative. Efficient collaborations are further enhanced by external and institutional support, and can be sequentially refined. Models such as the Makerere University College of Health Sciences - Case Western Reserve University partnership may help other groups initiate collaborative education programmes and establish successful partnerships that may provide the opportunity to expand to other chronic diseases. A benefit of collaboration is that learning is two-directional, and interaction with other international medical education collaborators is likely to be of benefit to the larger global health community.

  4. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W Scott; Woods, Erik J

    2009-07-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations to formulate guidelines and standards for the quality of stem cell collection, processing, testing, banking, packaging and distribution. Clinically applicable cryopreservation and banking of adult stem cells offers unique opportunities to advance the potential uses and widespread implementation of these cells in clinical applications. Most current cryopreservation protocols include animal serum proteins and potentially toxic cryoprotectant additives (CPAs) that prevent direct use of these cells in human therapeutic applications. Long term cryopreservation of adult stem cells under good manufacturing conditions using animal product free solutions is critical to the widespread clinical implementation of ex-vivo adult stem cell therapies. Furthermore, to avoid any potential cryoprotectant related complications, reduced CPA concentrations and efficient post-thaw washing to remove CPA are also desirable. The present review focuses on the current strategies and important aspects of adult stem cell banking for clinical applications. These include current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs), animal protein free freezing solutions, cryoprotectants, freezing & thawing protocols, viability assays, packaging and distribution. The importance and benefits of banking clinical grade adult stem cells are also discussed.

  5. Clear Cell Carcinoma Presented as a Large Polypoid Mass Expanding the Vaginal Fornix: Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Jae Ho

    2012-01-01

    Primary clear cell carcinoma of the vagina or uterine cervix is a very rare tumor. We report radiologic findings of two cases of clear cell carcinoma, arising in the vagina and uterine cervix in a 16-year-old and a 26-year-old female. These were presented as a large polypoid mass with a stalk and expanding the vaginal fornix. One case with ultrasonography showed relatively homogeneous echoic solid mass; the other case with a CT showed heterogeneously and strongly enhancing mass. All of the two cases showed non-specific signal intensity with heterogeneous and strong enhancement on MRI.

  6. Clear Cell Carcinoma Presented as a Large Polypoid Mass Expanding the Vaginal Fornix: Report of Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Primary clear cell carcinoma of the vagina or uterine cervix is a very rare tumor. We report radiologic findings of two cases of clear cell carcinoma, arising in the vagina and uterine cervix in a 16-year-old and a 26-year-old female. These were presented as a large polypoid mass with a stalk and expanding the vaginal fornix. One case with ultrasonography showed relatively homogeneous echoic solid mass; the other case with a CT showed heterogeneously and strongly enhancing mass. All of the two cases showed non-specific signal intensity with heterogeneous and strong enhancement on MRI.

  7. The expanding universe of transposon technologies for gene and cell engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivics Zoltán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of class II transposable elements (DNA transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest (be it a fluorescent marker, a small hairpin (shRNA expression cassette, a mutagenic gene trap or a therapeutic gene construct cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be used for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. This methodological paradigm opened up a number of avenues for genome manipulations in vertebrates, including transgenesis for the generation of transgenic cells in tissue culture, the production of germline transgenic animals for basic and applied research, forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in model species, and therapy of genetic disorders in humans. Sleeping Beauty (SB was the first transposon shown to be capable of gene transfer in vertebrate cells, and recent results confirm that SB supports a full spectrum of genetic engineering including transgenesis, insertional mutagenesis, and therapeutic somatic gene transfer both ex vivo and in vivo. The first clinical application of the SB system will help to validate both the safety and efficacy of this approach. In this review, we describe the major transposon systems currently available (with special emphasis on SB, discuss the various parameters and considerations pertinent to their experimental use, and highlight the state of the art in transposon technology in diverse genetic applications.

  8. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. Latexin (Lxn is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1 was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit. : In this article, Liang and colleagues show that loss of latexin in vivo expands the HSC population and increases their survival and engraftment. Latexin regulates HSC function and hematopoiesis via the Thbs1 signaling pathway. Keywords: latexin, hematopoietic stem cell, repopulating advantage, expansion, survival, thrombospondin 1

  9. Lack of huntingtin promotes neural stem cells differentiation into glial cells while neurons expressing huntingtin with expanded polyglutamine tracts undergo cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Paola; Camnasio, Stefano; Mutti, Cesare; Valenza, Marta; Thompson, Morgan; Fossale, Elisa; Zeitlin, Scott; MacDonald, Marcy E; Zuccato, Chiara; Cattaneo, Elena

    2013-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects muscle coordination and diminishes cognitive abilities. The genetic basis of the disease is an expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (Htt) gene. Here we aimed to generate a series of mouse neural stem (NS) cell lines that carried varying numbers of CAG repeats in the mouse Htt gene (Hdh CAG knock-in NS cells) or that had Hdh null alleles (Hdh knock-out NS cells). Towards this end, Hdh CAG knock-in mouse ES cell lines that carried an Htt gene with 20, 50, 111, or 140 CAG repeats or that were Htt null were neuralized and converted into self-renewing NS cells. The resulting NS cell lines were immunopositive for the neural stem cell markers NESTIN, SOX2, and BLBP and had similar proliferative rates and cell cycle distributions. After 14 days in vitro, wild-type NS cells gave rise to cultures composed of 70% MAP2(+) neurons and 30% GFAP(+) astrocytes. In contrast, NS cells with expanded CAG repeats underwent neuronal cell death, with only 38%±15% of the MAP2(+) cells remaining at the end of the differentiation period. Cell death was verified by increased caspase 3/7 activity on day 14 of the neuronal differentiation protocol. Interestingly, Hdh knock-out NS cells treated using the same neuronal differentiation protocol showed a dramatic increase in the number of GFAP(+) cells on day 14 (61%±20% versus 24%±10% in controls), and a massive decrease of MAP2(+) neurons (30%±11% versus 64%±17% in controls). Both Hdh CAG knock-in NS cells and Hdh knock-out NS cells showed reduced levels of Bdnf mRNA during neuronal differentiation, in agreement with data obtained previously in HD mouse models and in post-mortem brain samples from HD patients. We concluded that Hdh CAG knock-in and Hdh knock-out NS cells have potential as tools for investigating the roles of normal and mutant HTT in differentiated neurons and glial cells of the brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion for a phase I clinical trial in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Sarah M; Lingas, Karen T; Reese Koç, Jane; Hooper, Brittney M; Maitra, Basabi; Fox, Robert M; Imrey, Peter B; Drake, Kylie M; Aldred, Micheala A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system for which therapeutic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is under study. Published experience of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical trials is limited. To determine the feasibility of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use. In a phase I trial, autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from 25 trial participants with multiple sclerosis and eight matched controls, and culture-expanded to a target single dose of 1-2 × 10 6 cells/kg. Viability, cell product identity and sterility were assessed prior to infusion. Cytogenetic stability was assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from 18 multiple sclerosis patients and five controls. One patient failed screening. Mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion was successful for 24 of 25 multiple sclerosis patients and six of eight controls. The target dose was achieved in 16-62 days, requiring two to three cell passages. Growth rate and culture success did not correlate with demographic or multiple sclerosis disease characteristics. Cytogenetic studies identified changes on one chromosome of one control (4.3%) after extended time in culture. Culture expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple sclerosis patients as donors is feasible. However, culture time should be minimized for cell products designated for therapeutic administration.

  11. Preferentially expanding Vγ1+γδ T cells are associated with protective immunity against Plasmodium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Niikura, Mamoru; Asahi, Hiroko; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Kawakami, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Fumie

    2017-04-01

    γδ T cells play a crucial role in controlling malaria parasites. Dendritic cell (DC) activation via CD40 ligand (CD40L)-CD40 signaling by γδ T cells induces protective immunity against the blood-stage Plasmodium berghei XAT (PbXAT) parasites in mice. However, it is unknown which γδ T-cell subset has an effector role and is required to control the Plasmodium infection. Here, using antibodies to deplete TCR Vγ1 + cells, we saw that Vγ1 + γδ T cells were important for the control of PbXAT infection. Splenic Vγ1 + γδ T cells preferentially expand and express CD40L, and both Vγ1 + and Vγ4 + γδ T cells produce IFN-γ during infection. Although expression of CD40L on Vγ1 + γδ T cells is maintained during infection, the IFN-γ positivity of Vγ1 + γδ T cells is reduced in late-phase infection due to γδ T-cell dysfunction. In Plasmodium-infected IFN-γ signaling-deficient mice, DC activation is reduced, resulting in the suppression of γδ T-cell dysfunction and the dampening of γδ T-cell expansion in the late phase of infection. Our data suggest that Vγ1 + γδ T cells represent a major subset responding to PbXAT infection and that the Vγ1 + γδ T-cell response is dependent on IFN-γ-activated DCs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pathogen-expanded CD11b+ invariant NKT cells feedback inhibit T cell proliferation via membrane-bound TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Jiang, Zhengping; Chen, Zhubo; Gu, Yan; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiang; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-04-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are effector cells, but also regulator of immune response, which either promote or suppress immune response through production of different cytokines. However, the subsets of NKT cells with definite phenotype and regulatory function need to be further identified. Furthermore, the mechanisms for NKT cells to regulate immune response remain to be fully elucidated. Here we identified CD11b(+) invariant NKT (CD11b(+) iNKT) cells as a new subset of regulatory NKT cells in mouse models with infection. αGalCer:CD1d complex(+)TCRβ(+)NK1.1(+) NKT cells could be categorized to CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) subsets. NKT cells are enriched in liver. During Listeria monocytogenes infection, hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells were significantly induced and expanded, with peak expansion on day 8. CD11b(+) iNKT cells were also expanded significantly in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. As compared to CD11b(-) iNKT cells, CD11b(+) iNKT cells expressed higher levels of CD27, FasL, B7H1, CD69, and particularly higher level of membrane-bound TGF-β1 (mTGF-β1), but produced less IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells suppressed antigen-nonspecific and OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation through mTGF-β1 both in vitro and in vivo, meanwhile, they did not interfere with activation of CD4 T cells and cytotoxicity of the activated CD8 T cells. Thus, we have identified a new subset of pathogen-expanded CD11b(+) invariant NKT cells which can feedback inhibit T cell response through cell-to-cell contact via cell surface (membrane-bound) TGF-β1, especially at the late stage of immune response against infection. CD11b(+) regulatory iNKT cells may contribute to protect host from pathological injure by preventing immune overactivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tissue expander stimulated lengthening of arteries (TESLA) induces early endothelial cell proliferation in a novel rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potanos, Kristina; Fullington, Nora; Cauley, Ryan; Purcell, Patricia; Zurakowski, David; Fishman, Steven; Vakili, Khashayar; Kim, Heung Bae

    2016-04-01

    We examine the mechanism of aortic lengthening in a novel rodent model of tissue expander stimulated lengthening of arteries (TESLA). A rat model of TESLA was examined with a single stretch stimulus applied at the time of tissue expander insertion with evaluation of the aorta at 2, 4 and 7day time points. Measurements as well as histology and proliferation assays were performed and compared to sham controls. The aortic length was increased at all time points without histologic signs of tissue injury. Nuclear density remained unchanged despite the increase in length suggesting cellular hyperplasia. Cellular proliferation was confirmed in endothelial cell layer by Ki-67 stain. Aortic lengthening may be achieved using TESLA. The increase in aortic length can be achieved without tissue injury and results at least partially from cellular hyperplasia. Further studies are required to define the mechanisms involved in the growth of arteries under increased longitudinal stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expanding the Tissue Toolbox : Deriving Colon Tissue from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruens, Lotte; Snippert, Hugo J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Organoid technology holds great potential for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Múnera et al. (2017) establish the generation of pluripotent stem cell-derived colon organoids that upon transplantation in mice, resembling human colon to a large extent,

  15. Tumor associated antigen specific T-cell populations identified in ex vivo expanded TIL cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Kvistborg, Pia; Køllgaard, Tania

    2012-01-01

    T-cell clones and functionality persists through out expansion among an oligoclonal composition of T-cells. Our findings mirror prior results on the oligoclonal composition of TIL cultures, further indicating a potential for a broader repertoire of specific effector cells recognizing...

  16. Pooled Human Serum Increases Regenerative Potential of In Vitro Expanded Stem Cells from Human Extracted Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Nazmul; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2017-07-21

    In regenerative therapy, in vitro expansion of stem cells is critical to obtain a significantly higher number of cells for successful engraftment after transplantation. However, stem cells lose its regenerative potential and enter senescence during in vitro expansion. In this study, the influence of foetal bovine serum (FBS) and pooled human serum (pHS) on the proliferation, morphology and migration of stem cells from human extracted deciduous teeth (SHED) was compared. SHED (n = 3) was expanded in KnockOut DMEM supplemented with either pHS (pHS-SM) or FBS (FBS-SM). pHS was prepared using peripheral blood serum of six healthy male adults, aged between 21 and 35 years old. The number of live SHED was significantly higher, from passage 5 to 7, when cultured in pHS-SM compared to those cultured in FBS-SM ( p cells having flattened morphology, characteristics of partially differentiated and senescent cells, was significantly lower ( p cells and support directional migration of cells.

  17. Expanded human blood-derived γδT cells display potent antigen-presentation functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Wajid Ali Khan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC, most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists (phosphoantigens and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC, termed γδT-APC, within 1-3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>107 cells/ml blood when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77±21% and 56±26%, respectively. They resembled effector-memory αβT (TEM cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8+ αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1 and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of

  18. Spheroid Coculture of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Monolayer Expanded Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Polydimethylsiloxane Microwells Modestly Improves In Vitro Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrega, Kathryn; Atkinson, Kerry; Lott, William B; Doran, Michael R

    2017-04-01

    While two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to enhance hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion in vitro, expanded cells do not engraft long term in human recipients. This outcome is attributed to the failure of 2D culture to recapitulate the bone marrow (BM) niche signal milieu. Herein, we evaluated the capacity of a novel three-dimensional (3D) coculture system to support HSPC expansion in vitro. A high-throughput polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell platform was used to manufacture thousands of uniform 3D multicellular coculture spheroids. Relative gene expression in 3D spheroid versus 2D adherent BM-derived MSC cultures was characterized and compared with literature reports. We evaluated coculture spheroids, each containing 25-400 MSCs and 10 umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived CD34 + progenitor cells. At low exogenous cytokine concentrations, 2D and 3D MSC coculture modestly improved overall hematopoietic cell and CD34 + cell expansion outcomes. By contrast, a substantial increase in CD34 + CD38 - cell yield was observed in PDMS microwell cultures, regardless of the presence or absence of MSCs. This outcome indicated that CD34 + CD38 - cell culture yield could be increased using the microwell platform alone, even without MSC coculture support. We found that the increase in CD34 + CD38 - cell yield observed in PDMS microwell cultures did not translate to enhanced engraftment in NOD/SCID gamma (NSG) mice or a modification in the relative human hematopoietic lineages established in engrafted mice. In summary, there was no statistical difference in CD34 + cell yield from 2D or 3D cocultures, and MSC coculture support provided only modest benefit in either geometry. While the high-throughput 3D microwell platform may provide a useful model system for studying cells in coculture, further optimization will be required to generate HSPC yields suitable for use in clinical applications.

  19. Culture Environment-Induced Pluripotency of SACK-Expanded Tissue Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Paré

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous efforts to improve the efficiency of cellular reprogramming for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have focused mainly on transcription factors and small molecule combinations. Here, we report the results of our focus instead on the phenotype of the cells targeted for reprogramming. We find that adult mouse pancreatic tissue stem cells derived by the method of suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK acquire increased potency simply by culture under conditions for the production and maintenance of pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, supplementation with the SACK agent xanthine, which promotes symmetric self-renewal, significantly increases the efficiency and degree of acquisition of pluripotency properties. In transplantation analyses, clonal reprogrammed pancreatic stem cells produce slow-growing tumors with tissue derivative of all three embryonic germ layers. This acquisition of pluripotency, without transduction with exogenous transcription factors, supports the concept that tissue stem cells are predisposed to cellular reprogramming, particularly when symmetrically self-renewing.

  20. An Evaluation of the Stemness, Paracrine, and Tumorigenic Characteristics of Highly Expanded, Minimally Passaged Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

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    Oula El Atat

    Full Text Available The use of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC in regenerative medicine is rising due to their plasticity, capacity of differentiation and paracrine and trophic effects. Despite the large number of cells obtained from adipose tissue, it is usually not enough for therapeutic purposes for many diseases or cosmetic procedures. Thus, there is the need for culturing and expanding cells in-vitro for several weeks remain. Our aim is to investigate if long- term proliferation with minimal passaging will affect the stemness, paracrine secretions and carcinogenesis markers of ADSC. The immunophenotypic properties and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity of the initial stromal vascular fraction (SVF and serially passaged ADSC were observed by flow cytometry. In parallel, the telomerase activity and the relative expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were assessed by q-PCR. We also assessed the cytokine secretion profile of passaged ADSC by an ELISA. The expanded ADSC retain their morphological and phenotypical characteristics. These cells maintained in culture for up to 12 weeks until P4, possessed stable telomerase and ALDH activity, without having a TP53 mutation. Furthermore, the relative expression levels of TP53, RB, and MDM2 were not affected while the relative expression of c-Myc decreased significantly. Finally, the levels of the secretions of PGE2, STC1, and TIMP2 were not affected but the levels of IL-6, VEGF, and TIMP 1 significantly decreased at P2. Our results suggest that the expansion of passaged ADSC does not affect the differentiation capacity of stem cells and does not confer a cancerous state or capacity in vitro to the cells.

  1. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther [Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich, E-mail: Guenther.Eissner@med.uni-muenchen.d [Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptors T Cell Therapy in Solid Tumor: Challenges and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. Mirzaei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACT employing engineered T lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs has demonstrated promising antitumor effects in advanced hematologic cancers, such as relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, supporting the translation of ACT to non-hematological malignancies. Although CAR T cell therapy has made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematological cancers, in solid tumors success has been limited likely due to heterogeneous antigen expression, immunosuppressive networks in the tumor microenvironment limiting CAR T cell function and persistence, and suboptimal trafficking to solid tumors. Here, we outline specific approaches to overcome barriers to CAR T cell effectiveness in the context of the tumor microenvironment and offer our perspective on how expanding the use of CAR T cells in solid tumors may require modifications in CAR T cell design. We anticipate these modifications will further expand CAR T cell therapy in clinical practice.

  3. Expanding roles for CD4 T cells and their subpopulations in tumor immunity and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dobrzanski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of CD4 T cells in orchestrating the immune system and their role in inducing effective T cell-mediated therapies for the treatment of patients with select established malignancies are undisputable. Through a complex and balanced array of direct and indirect mechanisms of cellular activation and regulation, this functionally diverse family of lymphocytes can potentially promote tumor eradication, long-term tumor immunity and aid in establishing and/or rebalancing immune cell homeostasis through interaction with other immune cell populations within the highly dynamic tumor environment. However, recent studies have uncovered additional functions and roles for CD4 T cells, some of which are independent of other lymphocytes, that can not only influence and contribute to tumor immunity but paradoxically promote tumor growth and progression. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the various CD4 T cell lineages and their signature cytokines in disease progression and/or regression. We discuss their direct and indirect mechanistic interplay among themselves and with other responding cells of the antitumor response, their potential roles and abilities for "plasticity" and memory cell generation within the hostile tumor environment and their potentials in cancer treatment and adoptive immunotherapies.

  4. Expanded CD4(+) Effector/Memory T Cell Subset in APECED Produces Predominantly Interferon Gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Nelli; Laakso, Sini M; Mannerström, Helga; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jarva, Hanna; Arstila, Tommi P

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare human autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in the AIRE (autoimmune regulator) gene. Loss of AIRE disrupts thymic negative selection and gives rise to impaired cytotoxic and regulatory T cell populations. To date, CD4(+) T helper (Th) cells remain little studied. This study aims to elucidate their role in APECED pathogenesis. Th cells were explored in ten APECED patients and ten healthy controls using cell culture assays, multiparameter flow cytometry, and transcriptome analysis. The proportions of effector/memory populations were increased while the fraction of naive cells was diminished. The naive population was abnormally activated, with an increased number of cells expressing characteristic Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines. No clear deviation to any Th subclass was observed, but transcriptome analysis suggested abnormalities in the Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) pathway and flow cytometry showed that INF-γ had the highest expression. The augmented INF-γ signaling may promote the function of the putative pathogenic CD8(+) cytotoxic population in the patients. In addition, the frequency of CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) was decreased in the patients, and RTEs also contained cytokine-producing cells at an increased frequency. These data reveal abnormalities in the Th population and suggest that they may in part be traced to premature activation already in the thymus.

  5. Stem cell research as innovation: expanding the ethical and policy conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Research using human embryonic stem cells raises an array of complex ethical issues, including, but by no means limited to, the moral status of developing human life. Unfortunately much of the public discussion fails to take into account this complexity. Advocacy for liberal and conservative positions on human embryonic stem cell research can be simplistic and misleading. Ethical concepts such as truth-telling, scientific integrity, and social justice should be part of the debate over federal support for human embryonic stem cell research. Moreover, the debate should be conducted in accord with principles of deliberative democracy, including respect for people holding competing views.

  6. No increase in brain cancer rates during period of expanding cell phone use

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a new examination of United States cancer incidence data, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) reported that incidence trends have remained roughly constant for glioma, the main type of brain cancer hypothesized to be related to cell ph

  7. Expanded cryopreserved mesenchymal stromal cells as an optimal source for graft-versus-host disease treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, M.; Lysák, D.; Vlas, T.; Vannucci, Luca; Jindra, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2014), s. 139-144 ISSN 1045-1056 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mesenchymal stromal cells * Cryopreservation * Immunomodulation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.209, year: 2014

  8. Islet and Stem Cell Encapsulation for Clinical Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster 3rd, Clarence E.; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  9. Expanding primary cells from mucoepidermoid and other salivary gland neoplasms for genetic and chemosensitivity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Alamri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Restricted availability of cell and animal models is a rate-limiting step for investigation of salivary gland neoplasm pathophysiology and therapeutic response. Conditionally reprogrammed cell (CRC technology enables establishment of primary epithelial cell cultures from patient material. This study tested a translational workflow for acquisition, expansion and testing of CRC-derived primary cultures of salivary gland neoplasms from patients presenting to an academic surgical practice. Results showed that cultured cells were sufficient for epithelial cell-specific transcriptome characterization to detect candidate therapeutic pathways and fusion genes, and for screening for cancer risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and driver gene mutations through exome sequencing. Focused study of primary cultures of a low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma demonstrated amphiregulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin-protein kinase B (AKT; AKT1 pathway activation, identified through bioinformatics and subsequently confirmed as present in primary tissue and preserved through different secondary 2D and 3D culture media and xenografts. Candidate therapeutic testing showed that the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK2206 reproducibly inhibited cell survival across different culture formats. By contrast, the cells appeared resistant to the adenosine triphosphate competitive AKT inhibitor GSK690693. Procedures employed here illustrate an approach for reproducibly obtaining material for pathophysiological studies of salivary gland neoplasms, and other less common epithelial cancer types, that can be executed without compromising pathological examination of patient specimens. The approach permits combined genetic and cell-based physiological and therapeutic investigations in addition to more traditional pathologic studies, and can be used to build sustainable bio-banks for future inquiries. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first

  10. Differential 3’ processing of specific transcripts expands regulatory and protein diversity across neuronal cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, Saša; Hwang, Hun-Way; Van Otterloo, Eric; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Fak, John J; Yuan, Yuan; Hatten, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) regulates mRNA translation, stability, and protein localization. However, it is unclear to what extent APA regulates these processes uniquely in specific cell types. Using a new technique, cTag-PAPERCLIP, we discovered significant differences in APA between the principal types of mouse cerebellar neurons, the Purkinje and granule cells, as well as between proliferating and differentiated granule cells. Transcripts that differed in APA in these comparisons were enriched in key neuronal functions and many differed in coding sequence in addition to 3’UTR length. We characterize Memo1, a transcript that shifted from expressing a short 3’UTR isoform to a longer one during granule cell differentiation. We show that Memo1 regulates granule cell precursor proliferation and that its long 3’UTR isoform is targeted by miR-124, contributing to its downregulation during development. Our findings provide insight into roles for APA in specific cell types and establish a platform for further functional studies. PMID:29578408

  11. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  12. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  13. Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Expanding the Horizon for Hematologic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faizan Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of targeted therapies and novel agents, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative modality in the management of hematologic disorders. The necessity to find an HLA-matched related donor is a major obstacle that compromises the widespread application and development of this field. Matched unrelated donors and umbilical cord blood have emerged as alternative sources of donor stem cells; however, the cost of maintaining donor registries and cord blood banks is very high and even impractical in developing countries. Almost every patient has an HLA haploidentical relative in the family, meaning that haploidentical donors are potential sources of stem cells, especially in situations where cord blood or matched unrelated donors are not easily available. Due to the high rates of graft failure and graft-versus-host disease, haploidentical transplant was not considered a feasible option up until the late 20th century, when strategies such as “megadose stem cell infusions” and posttransplantation immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide showed the ability to overcome the HLA disparity barrier and significantly improve the rates of engraftment and reduce the incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease. Newer technologies of graft manipulation have also yielded the same effects in addition to preserving the antileukemic cells in the donor graft.

  14. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinica...

  15. Non-cell-autonomous effects yield lower clonal diversity in expanding tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Tazzio; Thomas, Frédéric; Roche, Benjamin

    2017-09-11

    Recent cancer research has investigated the possibility that non-cell-autonomous (NCA) driving tumor growth can support clonal diversity (CD). Indeed, mutations can affect the phenotypes not only of their carriers ("cell-autonomous", CA effects), but also sometimes of other cells (NCA effects). However, models that have investigated this phenomenon have only considered a restricted number of clones. Here, we designed an individual-based model of tumor evolution, where clones grow and mutate to yield new clones, among which a given frequency have NCA effects on other clones' growth. Unlike previously observed for smaller assemblages, most of our simulations yield lower CD with high frequency of mutations with NCA effects. Owing to NCA effects increasing competition in the tumor, clones being already dominant are more likely to stay dominant, and emergent clones not to thrive. These results may help personalized medicine to predict intratumor heterogeneity across different cancer types for which frequency of NCA effects could be quantified.

  16. Identification of expanded T-cell clones by spectratyping in nonfunctioning kidney transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappuccilli M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cappuccilli,1 Gabriele Donati,1 Giorgia Comai,1 Olga Baraldi,1 Diletta Conte,1 Irene Capelli,1 Valeria Aiello,1 Andrea Pession,2 Gaetano La Manna1 1Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES, Nephrology, Dialysis, and Renal Transplant Unit, 2Molecular Laboratory of Pediatrics, Hematology–Oncology Unit, St Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Background: The aim of this study was the application of complementarity-determining region-3 spectratyping analysis to determine T-cell-repertoire complexity and to detect T-cell-clone expansion, as a measure of immune response in nonfunctioning kidney transplants (group hemodialysis-transplant [HD-Tx], nontransplanted dialysis patients (group hemodialysis [HD], and normal subjects as controls (group C.Patients and methods: Analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR diversity by spectratyping was applied to peripheral blood samples collected from 21 subjects: eight in group HD-Tx, seven in group HD, and six in group C.Results: Considering the extent of the skew in TCR variable region repertoires as a measure of clonal T cells, we found that the number of altered spectra showed a progressive increase from normal subjects to dialysis patients and to nonfunctioning kidney transplants, respectively. Healthy subjects had the lowest number of altered spectra, and patients with nonfunctioning kidney transplants the highest. Differences were significant for group HD-Tx vs group C (P=0.017 and group HD vs group C (P=0.015, but not between nonfunctioning kidney-transplant recipients and dialysis patients (group HD-Tx vs group HD.Conclusion: Although dialysis appears to be a weaker trigger for clonal expansion of T cells, our data suggest that the utilization of complementarity-determining region-3 spectratyping analysis of the TCR repertoire might be useful to monitor specific immunoactivation in patients before and after kidney transplantation. Keywords: dialysis

  17. Liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand in response to liver metastases in mice and inhibit the anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CEA CAR-T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burga, Rachel A.; Thorn, Mitchell; Point, Gary R.; Guha, Prajna; Nguyen, Cang T.; Licata, Lauren A.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ayala, Alfred; Espat, N. Joseph; Junghans, Richard P.; Katz, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor modified T cell (CAR-T) technology, a promising immunotherapeutic tool, has not been applied specifically to treat liver metastases (LM). While CAR-T delivery to LM can be optimized by regional intrahepatic infusion, we propose that liver CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (L-MDSC) will inhibit the efficacy of CAR-T in the intrahepatic space. We studied anti-CEA CAR-T in a murine model of CEA+ LM and identified mechanisms through which L-MDSC expand and inhibit CAR-T function. We established CEA+ LM in mice and studied purified L-MDSC and responses to treatment with intrahepatic anti-CEA CAR-T infusions. L-MDSC expanded three-fold in response to LM and their expansion was dependent on GM-CSF, which was produced by tumor cells. L-MDSC utilized PD-L1 to suppress anti-tumor responses through engagement of PD-1 on CAR-T. GM-CSF, in cooperation with STAT3, promoted L-MDSC PD-L1 expression. CAR-T efficacy was rescued when mice received CAR-T in combination with MDSC depletion, GM-CSF neutralization to prevent MDSC expansion, or PD-L1 blockade. As L-MDSC suppressed anti-CEA CAR-T, infusion of anti-CEA CAR-T in tandem with agents targeting L-MDSC is a rational strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25850344

  18. Influence of ipilimumab on expanded tumour derived T cells from patients with metastatic melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Jon; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte; Andersen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tumour infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) based adoptive cell therapy (ACT) is a promising treatment for patients with advanced melanoma. Retrospective studies suggested an association between previous treatment with anti-CTLA-4 antibodies and long term survival after subsequent ACT. Thu...

  19. Bone tissue engineering with a collagen–hydroxyapatite scaffold and culture expanded bone marrow stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Max M.; Wang, Liping; Huang, Jianping; Rowe, David W.; Wei, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprogenitor cells combined with supportive biomaterials represent a promising approach to advance the standard of care for bone grafting procedures. However, this approach faces challenges, including inconsistent bone formation, cell survival in the implant, and appropriate biomaterial degradation. We have developed a collagen–hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold that supports consistent osteogenesis by donor derived osteoprogenitors, and is more easily degraded than a pure ceramic scaffold. Herein, the material properties are characterized as well as cell attachment, viability, and progenitor distribution in vitro. Furthermore, we examined the biological performance in vivo in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect. To aid in the evaluation of the in-house collagen–HA scaffold, the in vivo performance was compared with a commercial collagen–HA scaffold (Healos®, Depuy). The in-house collagen–HA scaffold supported consistent bone formation by predominantly donor-derived osteoblasts, nearly completely filling a 3.5 mm calvarial defect with bone in all samples (n=5) after 3 weeks of implantation. In terms of bone formation and donor cell retention at 3 weeks postimplantation, no statistical difference was found between the in-house and commercial scaffold following quantitative histomorphometry. The collagen–HA scaffold presented here is an open and well-defined platform that supports robust bone formation and should facilitate the further development of collagen–hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24909953

  20. Expandable and Rapidly Differentiating Human Induced Neural Stem Cell Lines for Multiple Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Cairns

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Limited availability of human neurons poses a significant barrier to progress in biological and preclinical studies of the human nervous system. Current stem cell-based approaches of neuron generation are still hindered by prolonged culture requirements, protocol complexity, and variability in neuronal differentiation. Here we establish stable human induced neural stem cell (hiNSC lines through the direct reprogramming of neonatal fibroblasts and adult adipose-derived stem cells. These hiNSCs can be passaged indefinitely and cryopreserved as colonies. Independently of media composition, hiNSCs robustly differentiate into TUJ1-positive neurons within 4 days, making them ideal for innervated co-cultures. In vivo, hiNSCs migrate, engraft, and contribute to both central and peripheral nervous systems. Lastly, we demonstrate utility of hiNSCs in a 3D human brain model. This method provides a valuable interdisciplinary tool that could be used to develop drug screening applications as well as patient-specific disease models related to disorders of innervation and the brain.

  1. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n = 363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients.

  2. CD8αα expression marks terminally differentiated human CD8+ T cells expanded in chronic viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Jane Walker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell co-receptor CD8αβ enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen, however studies indicate CD8αα has the converse effect and acts as a co-repressor. Using a combination of Thymic Leukaemia antigen (TL tetramer, which directly binds CD8αα, anti-CD161 and anti-Vα7.2 antibodies we have been able for the first time to clearly define CD8αα expression on human CD8 T cells subsets. In healthy controls CD8αα is most highly expressed by CD161 bright (CD161++ mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT cells, with CD8αα expression highly restricted to the TCR Vα7.2+ cells of this subset. We also identified CD8αα-expressing populations within the CD161 mid (CD161+ and negative (CD161- non-MAIT CD8 T cell subsets and show TL-tetramer binding to correlate with expression of CD8β at low levels in the context of maintained CD8α expression (CD8α+CD8βlow. In addition, we found CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations to be significantly expanded in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 and hepatitis B (mean of 47% and 40% of CD161- T cells respectively infected individuals. Such CD8αα expressing T cells are an effector-memory population (CD45RA-, CCR7-, CD62L- that express markers of activation and maturation (HLA-DR+, CD28-, CD27-, CD57+ and are functionally distinct, expressing greater levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ on stimulation and perforin at rest than their CD8α+CD8βhigh counterparts. Antigen-specific T cells in HLA-B*4201+HIV-1 infected patients are found within both the CD161-CD8α+CD8βhigh and CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations. Overall we have clearly defined CD8αα expressing human T cell subsets using the TL-tetramer, and have demonstrated CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations, highly expanded in disease settings, to co-express CD8αβ and CD8αα. Co-expression of CD8αα on CD8αβ T cells may impact on their overall function in-vivo and contribute to the distinctive phenotype of highly differentiated populations in HBV and HIV-1 infection.

  3. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subjects with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. Methods To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Results Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. Conclusions For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an

  4. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberg, Uri; Meng, Wenzhao; Zhang, Bochao; Haff, Nancy; St Clair, E William; Cohen, Philip L; McNair, Patrice D; Li, Ling; Levesque, Marc C; Luning Prak, Eline T

    2014-02-11

    Subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an expanded clone may provide a novel means

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia have altered capacity to expand differentiated hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Priya; Le, Yevgeniya; Li, Yuhua; Sabloff, Mitchell; Mehic, Jelica; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Allan, David S

    2015-04-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment may be permissive to the emergence and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studying interactions between the microenvironment and leukemia cells should provide new insight for therapeutic advances. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are central to the maintenance of the hematopoietic niche. Here we compared the functions and gene expression patterns of MSCs derived from bone marrow aspirates of healthy donors and patients with AML. MSCs expanded from AML patients had heterogeneous morphology and displayed a wide range of proliferation capacity compared to MSCs from healthy controls. The ability of AML-MSCs to support the expansion of committed hematopoietic progenitors from umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells may be impaired while the expression of genes associated with maintaining hematopoietic quiescence appeared to be increased in AML-MSCs compared to healthy donors. These results highlight important potential differences in the biologic profile of MSCs from AML patients compared to healthy donors that may contribute to the emergence or progression of leukemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Protein Content of Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Expanded Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived CD133+ and Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Partially Explains Why both Sources are Advantageous for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulski, Addeli B B; Capriglione, Luiz G; Batista, Michel; Marcon, Bruna H; Senegaglia, Alexandra C; Stimamiglio, Marco A; Correa, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    Adult stem cells have beneficial effects when exposed to damaged tissue due, at least in part, to their paracrine activity, which includes soluble factors and extracellular vesicles (EVs). Given the multiplicity of signals carried by these vesicles through the horizontal transfer of functional molecules, human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) and CD133 + cell-derived EVs have been tested in various disease models and shown to recover damaged tissues. In this study, we profiled the protein content of EVs derived from expanded human CD133 + cells and bone marrow-derived hMSCs with the intention of better understanding the functions performed by these vesicles/cells and delineating the most appropriate use of each EV in future therapeutic procedures. Using LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 623 proteins for expanded CD133 + -EVs and 797 proteins for hMSCs-EVs. Although the EVs from both origins were qualitatively similar, when protein abundance was considered, hMSCs-EVs and CD133 + -EVs were different. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis in CD133 + -EVs revealed proteins involved in a variety of angiogenesis-related functions as well proteins related to the cytoskeleton and highly implicated in cell motility and cellular activation. In contrast, when overrepresented proteins in hMSCs-EVs were analyzed, a GO cluster of immune response-related genes involved with immune response-regulating factors acting on phagocytosis and innate immunity was identified. Together our data demonstrate that from the point of view of protein content, expanded CD133 + -EVs and hMSCs-EVs are in part similar but also sufficiently different to reflect the main beneficial paracrine effects widely reported in pre-clinical studies using expanded CD133 + cells and/or hBM-MSCs.

  7. Clinical Outcome after the Use of a New Craniocaudal Expandable Implant for Vertebral Compression Fracture Treatment: One Year Results from a Prospective Multicentric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Noriega, David; Kr?ger, Antonio; Ardura, Francisco; Hansen-Algenstaedt, Nils; Hassel, Frank; Barreau, Xavier; Beyerlein, J?rg

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective multicentric observational study was to confirm the safety and clinical performance of a craniocaudal expandable implant used in combination with high viscosity PMMA bone cement for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Thirty-nine VCFs in 32 patients were treated using the SpineJack minimally invasive surgery protocol. Outcome was determined by using the Visual Analogue Scale for measuring pain, the Oswestry Disability Index for scoring functional ...

  8. Expanding Empathy in Our Clinical Work: A Response to Wickramasekera II's (2015) "Mysteries of Hypnosis and the Self Are Revealed by the Psychology and Neuroscience of Empathy.".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaklauskas, Francis J; Clements, Carla June

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is a central tenet of psychotherapeutic process. This article builds upon Wickramasekera II's (2015) "Mysteries of Hypnosis and the Self are Revealed by the Psychology and Neuroscience of Empathy," with particular focus on "empathetic involvement theory." A brief transtheoretical and research review of empathy is provided. A couple's therapy case illustration is provided to elucidate how one can expand "empathetic involvement theory" into clinical practice. Emphasis is placed upon the dimensions of sensation and body/mind connectedness.

  9. Final results of the European Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Sorafenib (EU-ARCCS) expanded-access study: a large open-label study in diverse community settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, J.; Procopio, G.; Bajetta, E.; Keilholz, U.; Negrier, S.; Szczylik, C.; Bokemeyer, C.; Bracarda, S.; Richel, D. J.; Staehler, M.; Strauss, U. P.; Mersmann, S.; Burock, K.; Escudier, B.

    2011-01-01

    The European Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Sorafenib (EU-ARCCS) expanded-access study provided sorafenib to advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in whom previous systemic therapy had failed. The study assessed the safety and use of sorafenib for the treatment of advanced RCC in a large

  10. A new methodological sequence to expand and transdifferentiate human umbilical cord blood derived CD133+ cells into a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yu-Xin; Kafienah, Wael; Suleiman, M-S; Ascione, Raimondo

    2013-06-01

    Transplantation of antigenic-separated stem cells for human cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction needs to be supported by experimental studies that allow refinement of the procedure. In this study we investigated optimising a protocol for the expansion and subsequent differentiation of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) derived CD133(+) stem cells into a cardiomyocyte-like lineage. CD133(+) cells from HUCB were selected first by immunomagnetic separation and their purity was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis. For expansion and differentiation we developed a novel culture medium recipe that involves sequential signalling factors. Briefly, CD133(+) cells were expanded for 6 days under optimal serum-free conditions in combination with fibronectin and assessed by microscopy and AlamarBlue proliferation assay. Expanded CD133(+) cells were then plated in a cardiac differentiation promoting medium and cultured up to 4 weeks. With this protocol HUCB-CD133(+) cells can be regularly expanded in serum-free medium to obtain recovery and growth in vitro up to 6 folds. The addition of recombinant human thrombopoietin to the remaining factors of the expanding medium was associated with larger cell expansion. Expanded UCB CD133(+) cells showed a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype following differentiation in vitro through expressing intracellular cardiac specific markers including cardiac-specific α-actin, myosin heavy chain and troponin I. This change in phenotype was associated with the expression of cardiac-specific transcription factors Gata-4 and MEF2C. In addition, the change in phenotype was associated with an upregulation of nuclear receptor transcription factors including PPAR α, PPARγ, RXR α and RXRβ. We believe our protocol represents a significant advancement and overcome the technical hurdle of deriving cardiomyogenic-like cells from HUCB CD133(+) stem cells. In addition, it has the required attributes of simplicity and consistency. This will

  11. Clinical outcomes of secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placement for primary stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Chul; Park, Jae Jun; Cheoi, Kungseok; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Hyuk; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan

    2012-12-01

    Although a substantial number of patients require secondary stents insertion due to primary stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction, data on the outcomes of secondary self-expanding metal stents are sparse. To investigate clinical outcomes and factors related with secondary stent malfunction in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction given secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent insertion. For this retrospective study, a total 77 patients who underwent secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placement for primary stent malfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction were enrolled. We compared the effectiveness and complications of secondary covered and uncovered stents and explored the predictive factors for stent malfunction. Stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placements were technically successful in all patients. Both groups also had comparable clinical success rates (covered stent, 87.2% and uncovered stent, 90.0%, P = 1.000). Stent malfunction rates (31.9% and 36.7% respectively, P = 0.805) and median patency time of stent (165 [95% confidence interval: 112-218] and 165 [95% confidence interval: 126-204] days, respectively, P = 0.358) were similar between secondary covered and uncovered stents. Longer patients' survival time (≥ 100 days) was associated with increased risk of stent malfunction (odds ratio: 4.598; 95% confidence interval: 1.473-14.355; P = 0.009). Secondary stent-in-stent self-expanding metal stent placement is feasible and effective treatment for primary stent malfunctions in malignant gastric outlet obstruction. Covered and uncovered stent are equally acceptable in terms of stent-related complications and stent patency, regardless of primary stent type. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical treatment of degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases with expandable screws in patients with osteoporosis: 2-year follow-up clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Roperto, Raffaelino; Fiore, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pullout, and fixation failure. A variety of techniques have been used clinically to improve pedicle screw fixation in the presence of compromised bone. Pedicle screws may be augmented with cement, but this may lead to cement leakage and result in disastrous consequences. To avoid these complications, a multiaxial expandable pedicle screw has been developed. This was a prospective, single-center study designed to evaluate the clinical results of patients with osteoporosis with traumatic and degenerative spinal diseases treated with expandable pedicle screws. METHODS Thirty-three patients (mean age 61.4 years) with osteoporosis and traumatic or degenerative spinal diseases underwent spinal posterior fixation with expandable screws. Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire scores were obtained. The immediate postoperative screw position was measured and compared with the final position on lateral plain radiographs and axial CT scans at the 1- and 2-year follow-up examinations. RESULTS A total of 182 pedicle screws were used, including 174 expandable and 8 regular screws. The mean preoperative patient VAS score improved from 8.2 to 3.6 after surgery. The mean ODI score improved from 83.7% before surgery to 29.7% after the operation and to 36.1% at the final follow-up. No screw migration had occurred at the 1-year follow-up, but 1 screw breakage/migration was visualized on spinal radiography at the 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study show that the multiaxial expandable pedicle screw is a safe and practical technique for patients with osteoporosis and various spinal diseases and adds a valuable tool to the armamentarium of spinal instrumentation.

  13. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool...... to understanding, especially but not exclusively in observational and interview-based studies. Psychodynamic or psychoanalytic approaches to research add an emphasis on unconscious motivational processes in both researchers and research participants that impact research experience and data. Building upon Anglo......-Saxon and continental traditions, this special issue provides examples of the use of researcher subjectivity, informed by psychoanalytic thinking, in expanding research understanding....

  14. miR-34a expands myeloid-derived suppressor cells via apoptosis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Anfei, E-mail: huang_anfei@163.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Haitao, E-mail: zhanghtjp@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215021, Jiangsu Province (China); Chen, Si, E-mail: chensisdyxb@126.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Xia, Fei, E-mail: xiafei87@gmail.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Yang, Yi, E-mail: 602744364@qq.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Dong, Fulu, E-mail: adiok0903@126.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Di, E-mail: dongfl@suda.edu.cn [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Xiong, Sidong, E-mail: sdxiong@suda.edu.cn [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Jinping, E-mail: j_pzhang@suda.edu.cn [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-08-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population and show significant expansion under pathological conditions. microRNA plays important roles in many biological processes, whether microRNAs have a function in the expansion of MDSCs is still not very clear. In this study, miR-34a overexpression can induce the expansion of MDSCs in bone marrow chimera and transgenic mice model. The experimental results suggest that miR-34a inhibited the apoptosis of MDSCs but did not affect the proliferation of MDSCs. The distinct mRNA microarray profiles of MDSCs of wild type and miR-34a over-expressing MDSCs combined with the target prediction of miR-34a suggest that miR-34a may target genes such as p2rx7, Tia1, and plekhf1 to inhibit the apoptosis of MDSCs. Taken together, miR-34a contributes to the expansion of MDSCs by inhibiting the apoptosis of MDSCs. - Highlights: • Over-expression of miR-34a increases the number of MDSCs. • miR-34a inhibits the apoptosis of MDSCs, but does not affects their proliferation. • miR-34a may inhibit the apoptosis of MDSCs via targeting the p2rx7, Tia1 and plekhf1.

  15. The expanding roles of ITAM adapters FcRγ and DAP12 in myeloid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerman, Jessica A.; Ni, Minjian; Killebrew, Justin R.; Chu, Ching-Liang; Lowell, Clifford A

    2011-01-01

    Summary The adapter proteins DAP12 and FcRγ associate with a wide spectrum of receptors in a variety of innate immune cells to mediate intracellular signaling pathways when their cognate receptor is engaged. These adapter proteins are coupled to their receptors through charged residues within the transmembrane regions of the adapter and receptor. DAP12 and FcRγ contain specific protein domains (referred to as ITAM domains) that serve as the substrates and docking sites for kinases allowing amplification of intracellular signaling reactions. Recent research has broadened the repertoire of receptors that utilize these adapters for signaling to include not only novel Ig-superfamily members but also cytokine receptors, integrins and other adhesion molecules. Even more amazing, there is abundant evidence that these multifunctional signaling adapters also mediate inhibitory activity, downmodulating signaling from TLRs and other heterologous receptors. In this review, we discuss the newly described receptors that utilize DAP12 and/or FcRγ adapters to modulate innate immune responses. PMID:19909355

  16. PD-1 blockade restores impaired function of ex vivo expanded CD8+ T cells and enhances apoptosis in mismatch repair deficient EpCAM+PD-L1+ cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar R

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rajeev Kumar,1,2 Fang Yu,1 Yuan-Huan Zhen,3 Bo Li,2 Jun Wang,1 Yuan Yang,1,2 Hui-Xin Ge,4 Ping-Sheng Hu,1,2 Jin Xiu1,2 1Clinical Research Centre, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Centre, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, People’s Republic of China Background: Adoptive T cell therapy has been proven to be a promising modality for the treatment of cancer patients in recent years. However, the increased expression of inhibitory receptors could negatively regulate the function and persistence of transferred T cells which mediates T cell anergy, exhaustion, and tumor regression. In this study, we investigated increased cytotoxic activity after the blockade of PD-1 for effective immunotherapy.Methods: The cytotoxic function of expanded CD8+ CTLs and interactions with tumor cells investigated after blocking of PD-1. Ex vivo expanded CD8+ CTLs were co-cultured with mismatch repair (MMR stable or deficient (high microsatellite instability [MSI-H] EpCAM+ tumor cells. The levels of IFN-γ and GrB were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy were used to assess CD107a mobilization, cytosolic uptake, and cell migration. Results: A dramatic increase in PD-1 expression on the surface of CD8+ CTLs during ex vivo expansion was observed. PD-1 level was downregulated by approximately 40% after incubation of the CD8+ CTLs with monoclonal antibody which enhanced the secretion of IFN-γ, GrB, and CD107a. Additionally, PD-1 blockade enhanced cell migration and cytosolic exchange between CD8+ CTLs and MMR deficient (MSI-H EpCAM+PD-L1+ tumor

  17. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP, have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA.

  18. Study of stem cell homing & self-renewal marker gene profile of ex vivo expanded human CD34+ cells manipulated with a mixture of cytokines & stromal cell-derived factor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kode

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Cocktail of cytokines and SDF1 showed good potential to successfully expand HSPC which exhibited enhanced ability to generate multilineage cells in short-term and long-term repopulation assay. This cocktail-mediated stem cell expansion has potential to obviate the need for longer and large volume apheresis procedure making it convenient for donors.

  19. Chondroitin sulfate activates B cells in vitro, expands CD138(+) cells in vivo, and interferes with established humoral immune responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruhl, H.; Cihak, J.; Goebel, N.; Talke, Y.; Renner, K.; Hermann, F.; Rodriguez-Gomez, M.; Reich, B.; Plachý, Jiří; Stangassinger, M.; Mack, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2014), 65-72 ISSN 0741-5400 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : glycosaminoglycans * plasma cells * collagen-induced arthritis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.289, year: 2014

  20. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  1. Culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells attenuate cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat osteoarthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mei

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based cell therapy is a promising avenue for osteoarthritis (OA treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of intra-articular injections of culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT induced rat OA model. The paracrine effects of major histocompatibility complex (MHC-unmatched ADSCs on chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Rats were divided into an OA group that underwent ACLT surgery and a sham-operated group that did not undergo ACLT surgery. Four weeks after surgery mild OA was induced in the OA group. Subsequently, the OA rats were randomly divided into ADSC and control groups. A single dose of 1 × 106 ADSCs suspended in 60 μL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS was intra-articularly injected into the rats of the ADSC group. The control group received only 60 μL PBS. OA progression was evaluated macroscopically and histologically at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. ADSC treatment did not cause any adverse local or systemic reactions. The degeneration of articular cartilage was significantly weaker in the ADSC group compared to that in the control group at both 8 and 12 weeks. Chondrocytes were co-cultured with MHC-unmatched ADSCs in trans-wells to assess the paracrine effects of ADSCs on chondrocytes. Co-culture with ADSCs counteracted the IL-1β-induced mRNA upregulation of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes MMP-3 and MMP-13 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in chondrocytes. Importantly, ADSCs increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in chondrocytes. The results of this study indicated that the intra-articular injection of culture-expanded allogenic ADSCs attenuated cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat OA model without inducing any adverse reactions. MHC-unmatched ADSCs protected chondrocytes from inflammatory factor-induced damage. The paracrine effects

  2. Culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells attenuate cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li; Shen, Bojiang; Ling, Peixue; Liu, Shaoying; Xue, Jiajun; Liu, Fuyan; Shao, Huarong; Chen, Jianying; Ma, Aibin; Liu, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based cell therapy is a promising avenue for osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of intra-articular injections of culture-expanded allogenic adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) induced rat OA model. The paracrine effects of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unmatched ADSCs on chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Rats were divided into an OA group that underwent ACLT surgery and a sham-operated group that did not undergo ACLT surgery. Four weeks after surgery mild OA was induced in the OA group. Subsequently, the OA rats were randomly divided into ADSC and control groups. A single dose of 1 × 106 ADSCs suspended in 60 μL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was intra-articularly injected into the rats of the ADSC group. The control group received only 60 μL PBS. OA progression was evaluated macroscopically and histologically at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. ADSC treatment did not cause any adverse local or systemic reactions. The degeneration of articular cartilage was significantly weaker in the ADSC group compared to that in the control group at both 8 and 12 weeks. Chondrocytes were co-cultured with MHC-unmatched ADSCs in trans-wells to assess the paracrine effects of ADSCs on chondrocytes. Co-culture with ADSCs counteracted the IL-1β-induced mRNA upregulation of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes MMP-3 and MMP-13 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in chondrocytes. Importantly, ADSCs increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in chondrocytes. The results of this study indicated that the intra-articular injection of culture-expanded allogenic ADSCs attenuated cartilage degeneration in an experimental rat OA model without inducing any adverse reactions. MHC-unmatched ADSCs protected chondrocytes from inflammatory factor-induced damage. The paracrine effects of ADSCs on

  3. [Pooled Umbilical Cord Blood Plasma for Culturing UCMSC and Ex Vivo Expanding Umbilical Cord Blood CD34⁺ Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie-Ying; Lu, Yan; Chen, Jin-Song; Wu, Shao-Qing; Tang, Xue-Wei; Li, Yan

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of umbilical cord blood plasma (UCP) as a replacement for fetal bovine serum (FBS) for culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from umbilical cord, and to observe the supporting effects of these cells (served as a feeder layer) on ex vivo expanding of human umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) units were suitable if the Guangzhou cord blood bank donor selection criteria strictly were fulfilled. UCP were ready to use after the collection from the plasma depletion/reduction during the processing and pooling of suitable UCB units (at least 30 units were screened for pathogens and microorganisms, and qualified). Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) were harvested from the umbilical cord tissue of health full-term newborns after delivery by enzyme digestion and divided into 3 groups: group 1 and 2 were cultured in the presence of DMEM/F12 containing either FBS or UCP; and group 3 was cultured in serum-free medium (StemPro® MSC SFM CTS™). Morphology, proliferation and surface marker expression were examined by flow cytometry, and the differentiation toward adipogenic and osteogenic lineages was used for investigating the effect of media on UCMSC after 3-5 passages. Next, the cells cultured in the three different media were cryopreserved and thawed, then prepared as feeder layers with the name of UCMSC(FBS), UCMSC(UCP), and UCMSC(SFM), respectively. The CD34⁺ cells were separated from UCB by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and divided into 4 groups cultured in StemPro(-34) SFM medium added with hematopoietic cytokine combination (StemSpan® CC100). The control group included only CD34⁺ cells as group A (blank control) and experimental groups included UCMSC(FBS) + CD34⁺ cells as group B, UCMSC(UCP) + CD34⁺ cells as group C, UCMSC(SFM) + CD34⁺ cells as group D, and cells in all groups were cultured ex vivo for 7 days. The nucleated cell (NC) number was counted by cell counter, CD34

  4. Tetramer guided, cell sorter assisted production of clinical grade autologous NY-ESO-1 specific CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Seth M; Jones, Robin L; Farrar, Erik A; Lai, Ivy P; Lee, Sylvia M; Cao, Jianhong; Pillarisetty, Venu G; Hoch, Benjamin L; Gullett, Ashley; Bleakley, Marie; Conrad, Ernest U; Eary, Janet F; Shibuya, Kendall C; Warren, Edus H; Carstens, Jason N; Heimfeld, Shelly; Riddell, Stanley R; Yee, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy represents an attractive modality for the treatment of patients with cancer. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been used as a source of antigen specific T cells but the very low frequency of T cells recognizing commonly expressed antigens such as NY-ESO-1 limit the applicability of this approach to other solid tumors. To overcome this, we tested a strategy combining IL-21 modulation during in vitro stimulation with first-in-class use of tetramer-guided cell sorting to generate NY-ESO-1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL generation was evaluated in 6 patients with NY-ESO-1 positive sarcomas, under clinical manufacturing conditions and characterized for phenotypic and functional properties. Following in vitro stimulation, T cells stained with NY-ESO-1 tetramer were enriched from frequencies as low as 0.4% to >90% after single pass through a clinical grade sorter. NY-ESO-1 specific T cells were generated from all 6 patients. The final products expanded on average 1200-fold to a total of 36 billion cells, were oligoclonal and contained 67-97% CD8(+), tetramer(+) T cells with a memory phenotype that recognized endogenous NY-ESO-1. This study represents the first series using tetramer-guided cell sorting to generate T cells for adoptive therapy. This approach, when used to target more broadly expressed tumor antigens such as WT-1 and additional Cancer-Testis antigens will enhance the scope and feasibility of adoptive T cell therapy.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  6. Dectin-1 Positive Dendritic Cells Expand after Infection with Leishmania major Parasites and Represent Promising Targets for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Zimara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistant mouse strains mount a protective T cell-mediated immune response upon infection with Leishmania (L. parasites. Healing correlates with a T helper (Th cell-type 1 response characterized by a pronounced IFN-γ production, while susceptibility is associated with an IL-4-dependent Th2-type response. It has been shown that dermal dendritic cells are crucial for inducing protective Th1-mediated immunity. Additionally, there is growing evidence that C-type lectin receptor (CLR-mediated signaling is involved in directing adaptive immunity against pathogens. However, little is known about the function of the CLR Dectin-1 in modulating Th1- or Th2-type immune responses by DC subsets in leishmaniasis. We characterized the expression of Dectin-1 on CD11c+ DCs in peripheral blood, at the site of infection, and skin-draining lymph nodes of L. major-infected C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and in peripheral blood of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL. Both mouse strains responded with an expansion of Dectin-1+ DCs within the analyzed tissues. In accordance with the experimental model, Dectin-1+ DCs expanded as well in the peripheral blood of CL patients. To study the role of Dectin-1+ DCs in adaptive immunity against L. major, we analyzed the T cell stimulating potential of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs in the presence of the Dectin-1 agonist Curdlan. These experiments revealed that Curdlan induces the maturation of BMDCs and the expansion of Leishmania-specific CD4+ T cells. Based on these findings, we evaluated the impact of Curdlan/Dectin-1 interactions in experimental leishmaniasis and were able to demonstrate that the presence of Curdlan at the site of infection modulates the course of disease in BALB/c mice: wild-type BALB/c mice treated intradermally with Curdlan developed a protective immune response against L. major whereas Dectin-1−/− BALB/c mice still developed the fatal course of disease after Curdlan treatment

  7. Click chemistry-based tracking reveals putative cell wall-located auxin binding sites in expanding cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mravec, J.; Kračun, S. K.; Zemlyanskaya, E.; Rydahl, M. G.; Guo, X.; Pičmanová, M.; Sørensen, K.; Růžička, Kamil; Willats, W.G.T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV 22 (2017), č. článku 15988. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : MEMBRANE H+-ATPASE * BIOLOGICAL-ACTIVITY * AZIDO AUXINS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  8. The impact of postoperative expansion initiation timing on breast expander capsular characteristics: a prospective combined clinical and scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Laurence S; Giot, Jean-Philippe; Tétreault-Paquin, Jean-Olivier; St-Jacques, Samuel; Nelea, Monica; Danino, M Alain

    2015-04-01

    In the first stage of expander-to-implant breast reconstruction, postoperative expansion is classically initiated at 10 to 14 days (conventional approach). The authors hypothesized that it may be beneficial to wait 6 weeks postoperatively before initiating serial expansion (delayed approach). Clinical and ultrastructural periprosthetic capsule analysis is first required before determining whether a delayed approach ultimately improves capsular tissue adherence and expansion process predictability. Patients undergoing two-stage implant-based breast reconstruction were enrolled prospectively in this study. During expander-to-implant exchange, the clinical presence of "Velcro" effect, biofilm, and double capsule was noted. Periprosthetic capsule samples were also sent for scanning electron microscopic observation of three parameters: surface relief, cellularity, and biofilm. Samples were divided into four groups for data analysis (group 1, conventional/Biocell; group 2, delayed/Biocell; group 3, conventional/Siltex; and group 4, delayed/Siltex). Fifty-six breast reconstructions were included. Each group comprised between 13 and 15 breasts. In group 1, no cases exhibited the Velcro effect and there was a 53.8 percent incidence of both biofilm and double capsule. In group 2, all cases demonstrated the Velcro effect and there were no incidences of biofilm or double capsule. Group 3 and group 4 cases did not exhibit a Velcro effect or double-capsule formation; however, biofilm was present in up to 20.0 percent. All group 2 samples revealed more pronounced three-dimensional relief on scanning electron microscopy. Variations in expansion protocols can lead to observable modifications in periprosthetic capsular architecture. There may be real benefits to delaying expander inflation until 6 weeks postoperatively with Biocell expanders.

  9. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    or progenitor cells presents an alternative approach, which aims at repairing the anatomical components of the urethral continence mechanism. In vitro expanded progenitor cells isolated from muscle biopsies have been most intensely investigated, and both preclinical trials and a few clinical trials have...... provided proof of concept for the idea. An initial enthusiasm caused by positive results from early clinical trials has been dampened by the recognition of scientific irregularities. At the same time, the safety issue for cell-based therapy has been highlighted by the appearance of new and comprehensive......Stress urinary incontinence is a common disorder affecting the quality of life for millions of women worldwide. Effective surgical procedures involving synthetic permanent meshes exist, but significant short- and long-term complications occur. Cell-based therapy using autologous stem cells...

  10. Sources of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells and Methods to Optimize Yields for Clinical Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R; Szymanski, James; Savani, Bipin N; Stroncek, David F

    2017-08-01

    Bone marrow (BM) aspirates, mobilized peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood (UCB) have developed as graft sources for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for stem cell transplantation and other cellular therapeutics. Individualized techniques are necessary to enhance graft HSPC yields and cell quality from each graft source. BM aspirates yield adequate CD34 + cells but can result in relative delays in engraftment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed BM HSPCs may facilitate faster engraftment while minimizing graft-versus-host disease in certain patient subsets. The levels of circulating HSPCs are enhanced using mobilizing agents, such as G-CSF and/or plerixafor, which act via the stromal cell-derived factor 1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 axis. Alternate niche pathway mediators, including very late antigen-4/vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, parathyroid hormone, and coagulation cascade intermediates, may offer promising alternatives for graft enhancement. UCB grafts have been expanded ex vivo with cytokines, notch-ligand, or mesenchymal stromal cells, and most studies demonstrated greater quantities of CD34 + cells ex vivo and improved short-term engraftment. No significant changes were observed in long-term repopulating potential or in patient survival. Early phase clinical trials using nicotinamide and StemReginin1 may offer improved short- and long-term repopulating ability. Breakthroughs in genome editing and stem cell reprogramming technologies may hasten the generation of pooled, third-party HSPC grafts. This review elucidates past, present, and potential future approaches to HSPC graft optimization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Bioethics of Clinical Applications of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo

    2017-04-12

    The clinical applications of stem cells pose a multitude of problems, including safety, efficacy, information and consent, the right to unproven treatments, the "right to try", costs, access, sustainability, scientific scrupulousness, patents and regulatory aspects, to name but a few. This article does not address individual issues, but rather introduces and discusses some of the possible approaches to solving the problems. The first part compares the consequentialist and deontological approaches, offering an overview of "top-down" and "bottom-up" models and proposing the principles of personalism as applied in clinical settings. The second part of the article suggests practical frameworks for organising the ethical issues, focusing in particular on the medical indications, patient preferences, quality of life, and contextual features.

  12. An expanded model of HIV cell entry phenotype based on multi-parameter single-cell data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozek Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 into the host cell involves interactions between the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env and the cellular receptor CD4 as well as a coreceptor molecule (most importantly CCR5 or CXCR4. Viral preference for a specific coreceptor (tropism is in particular determined by the third variable loop (V3 of the Env glycoprotein gp120. The approval and use of a coreceptor antagonist for antiretroviral therapy make detailed understanding of tropism and its accurate prediction from patient derived virus isolates essential. The aim of the present study is the development of an extended description of the HIV entry phenotype reflecting its co-dependence on several key determinants as the basis for a more accurate prediction of HIV-1 entry phenotype from genotypic data. Results Here, we established a new protocol of quantitation and computational analysis of the dependence of HIV entry efficiency on receptor and coreceptor cell surface levels as well as viral V3 loop sequence and the presence of two prototypic coreceptor antagonists in varying concentrations. Based on data collected at the single-cell level, we constructed regression models of the HIV-1 entry phenotype integrating the measured determinants. We developed a multivariate phenotype descriptor, termed phenotype vector, which facilitates a more detailed characterization of HIV entry phenotypes than currently used binary tropism classifications. For some of the tested virus variants, the multivariant phenotype vector revealed substantial divergences from existing tropism predictions. We also developed methods for computational prediction of the entry phenotypes based on the V3 sequence and performed an extrapolating calculation of the effectiveness of this computational procedure. Conclusions Our study of the HIV cell entry phenotype and the novel multivariate representation developed here contributes to a more detailed

  13. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudo randomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  14. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudorandomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  15. Thoracic lateral extracavitary corpectomy for anterior column reconstruction with expandable and static titanium cages: clinical outcomes and surgical considerations in a consecutive case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher M; Bass, David I; Gary, Matthew F; Howard, Brian M; Refai, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Many surgical interventions have emerged as effective means of restoring mechanical stability of the anterior column of the spine. The lateral extracavitary approach (LECA) allows for broad visualization and circumferential reconstruction of the spinal column. However, early reports demonstrated significant complication rates, protracted operative times, and prolonged hospitalizations. More recent reports have highlighted concerns for subsidence, particularly with expandable cages. Our work seeks to describe a single-surgeon consecutive series of patients undergoing LECA for thoracic corpectomy. Specifically, the objective was to explore the surgical considerations, clinical and radiographic outcomes, and complication profile of this approach. A retrospective study examined data from 17 consecutive patients in whom single or multi-level corpectomy was performed via a LECA by a single surgeon. Vertebral body replacement was achieved with either a static or expandable titanium cage. The Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) was utilized to assess patient functional status before and after surgery. Radiographic outcomes, particularly footplate-to-body ratio and subsidence, were assessed on CT imaging at 6 weeks after surgery and at follow-up of at least 6 months. The majority of patients had post-operative KPS scores consistent with functional independence (≥70, 12/17 patients, 71%). Fourteen patients had improved or maintained function by last follow-up. In both groups, all patients had a favorable footplate-to-body ratio, and rates of subsidence were similar at both time points. Notably, the overall complication rate (24%) was significantly lower than that published in the literature, and no patient suffered a pneumothorax that required placement of a thoracostomy tube. The LECA approach for anterior column reconstruction with static or expandable cages is an important surgical consideration with favorable surgical parameters and complication rates. Further, use of

  16. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  17. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiao

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  18. Concise review: animal substance-free human embryonic stem cells aiming at clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovatta, Outi; Rodin, Sergey; Antonsson, Liselotte; Tryggvason, Karl

    2014-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have been considered the gold standard as a cell source for regenerative medicine since they were first cultured in 1998. They are pluripotent and can form principally all the cells types in the body. They are obtained from supernumerary human in vitro fertilization embryos that cannot be used for infertility treatment. Following studies on factors regulating pluripotency and differentiation, we now have techniques to establish and effectively expand these cells in animal substance-free conditions, even from single cells biopsied from eight-cell stage embryos in chemically defined feeder-free cultures. The genetic stability and absence of tumorigenic mutations can be determined. There are satisfactory animal tests for functionality and safety. The first clinical trials are ongoing for two indications: age-related macular degeneration and spinal cord injury. ©AlphaMed Press.

  19. Safety and efficacy of sunitinib in patients from Latin America: subanalysis of an expanded access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Carlos H; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Chacón, Matías; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula; Sajben, Peter; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is an approved treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The safety profile and efficacy of sunitinib were confirmed in a global expanded access trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00130897). This report presents a subanalysis of the final trial data from patients in Latin America. Treatment-naïve or previously treated mRCC patients aged ≥18 years received oral sunitinib at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off schedule. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. Safety was assessed regularly, and tumor measurements were scheduled per local practice (using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). In total, 348 patients from Latin America received sunitinib. Overall, 75% of patients had two or more sites of metastatic disease, 28% were aged ≥65 years, 14% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2, 9% had brain metastases, 9% had no prior nephrectomy, and 5% had non-clear cell RCC. Median treatment duration was 8 months, and median follow-up was 15.1 months. In total, 326 patients (94%) discontinued treatment, primarily due to death (41%) or lack of efficacy (22%). Most treatment-related adverse events were of mild to moderate severity (grade 1/2). Mucosal inflammation (reported in 54% of patients), diarrhea (53%), and asthenia (41%) were the most common any-grade treatment-related adverse events. Asthenia (12%), neutropenia (10%), and fatigue and thrombocytopenia (both 9%) were the most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events. In total, 311 patients were included for tumor response, of whom eight (3%) had a complete response and 46 (15%) a partial response, yielding an objective response rate of 17%. Median duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 26.7, 12.1, and 16.9 months, respectively. The efficacy and safety profile of sunitinib in patients with mRCC from Latin America was comparable to

  20. Leishmania-specific T cells expressing interferon-¿(IFN-¿) and IL-10 upon activation are expanded in individuals cured of visceral leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Kemp, M; Kharazmi, A

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients who have recovered from visceral leishmaniasis often respond to Leishmania antigens in vitro by production of both IL-4, IFN-gamma and IL-10. In order to establish the cellular sources of these cytokines, we activated cells from individuals...... in Leishmania-activated PBMC cultures from the previous patients and from individuals living in a village where leishmaniasis does not occur. The percentage of IL-10- and IFN-gamma-containing cells was significantly higher in the previous patients than in the controls, indicating that Leishmania-specific T...... cells producing IL-10 and/or IFN-gamma had been expanded as a result of the infection. The cytokine-producing cells in the previous patients could be divided into three types: (i) cells producing IFN-gamma only; (ii) cells producing IL-4 only; and (iii) cells producing IFN-gamma and IL-10 simultaneously...

  1. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  2. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingshan; Song, Yongping; Liu, Delong

    2017-10-23

    Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  3. Radiofrequency ablation of large size liver tumours using novel plan-parallel expandable bipolar electrodes: Initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijerink, Martijn R., E-mail: mr.meijerink@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tol, Petrousjka van den [Department of Surgical Oncology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tilborg, Aukje A.J.M. van; Waesberghe, Jan Hein T.M. van [Department of Radiology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Sybren [Department of Surgical Oncology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijk, Cornelis van [Department of Radiology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Although radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a promising method for local treatment of liver malignancies, with conventional monopolar systems recurrence rates for large size tumours ({>=}3.5 cm) remain high. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility and local effectiveness of a novel bipolar plan-parallel expandable system for these larger tumours. Methods and materials: Eight consecutive patients with either unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM in 6 patients), carcinoid liver metastases (1 patient) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in 1 patient) of {>=}3.5 cm were treated with bipolar RFA during laparotomy with ultrasound guidance. Early and late, major and minor complications were recorded. Local success was determined on 3-8 month follow-up CT scans of the upper abdomen. Results: Nine CRLM, one carcinoid liver metastases and one HCC (3.5-6.6 cm) were ablated with bipolar RFA. Average ablation time was 16 min (range 6-29 min.). Two patients developed a liver abscess which required re-laparotomy. In both cases bowel surgery during the same session probably caused bacterial spill. There were no mortalities. The patients were released from hospital between 5 and 29 days after the procedure (median 12 days). The 6-12 month follow-up PET-CT scans showed signs for marginal RFA-site tumour recurrence in three patients with CRLM (3/11 lesions). Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest bipolar RFA to be a reasonably safe, fast and feasible technique which seems to improve local control for large size hepatic tumour ablations.

  4. Expanding Local Cancer Clinical Trial Options: Analysis of the Economic Impact of the Midwest Cancer Alliance in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, J Atlee; Gurley-Calvez, Tami; Krebill, Hope; Lai, Sue Min; Christiadi; Doolittle, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Patients benefit from receiving cancer treatment closer to home when possible and at high-volume regional centers when specialized care is required. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the economic impact of retaining more patients in-state for cancer clinical trials and care, which might offset some of the costs of establishing broader cancer trial and treatment networks. Kansas Cancer Registry data were used to estimate the number of patients retained in-state for cancer care following the expansion of local cancer clinical trial options through the Midwest Cancer Alliance based at the University of Kansas Medical Center. The 2014 economic impact of this enhanced local clinical trial network was estimated in four parts: Medical spending was estimated on the basis of National Cancer Institute cost-of-care estimates. Household travel cost savings were estimated as the difference between in-state and out-of-state travel costs. Trial-related grant income was calculated from administrative records. Indirect and induced economic benefits to the state were estimated using an economic impact model. The authors estimated that the enhanced local cancer clinical trial network resulted in approximately $6.9 million in additional economic activity in the state in 2014, or $362,000 per patient retained in-state. This estimate includes $3.6 million in direct spending and $3.3 million in indirect economic activity. The enhanced trial network also resulted in 45 additional jobs. Retaining patients in-state for cancer care and clinical trial participation allows patients to remain closer to home for care and enhances the state economy.

  5. Feasibility and safety of treating non-unions in tibia, femur and humerus with autologous, expanded, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells associated with biphasic calcium phosphate biomaterials in a multicentric, non-comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Rosset, Philippe; Gebhard, Florian; Hernigou, Philippe; Baldini, Nicola; Rouard, Helène; Sensebé, Luc; Gonzalo-Daganzo, Rosa M; Giordano, Rosaria; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma; García-Rey, Eduardo; Cordero-Ampuero, José; Rubio-Suárez, Juan Carlos; Stanovici, Julien; Ehrnthaller, Christian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Chevallier, Nathalie; Donati, Davide Maria; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Fleury, Sandrine; Fernandez, Manuel-Nicolás; Cabrera, José-Rafael; Avendaño-Solá, Cristina; Montemurro, Tiziana; Panaitescu, Carmen; Veronesi, Elena; Rojewski, Markus Thomas; Lotfi, Ramin; Dominici, Massimo; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Layrolle, Pierre

    2018-03-19

    ORTHO-1 is a European, multicentric, first in human clinical trial to prove safety and feasibility after surgical implantation of commercially available biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramic granules associated during surgery with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from bone marrow (BM-hMSC) under good manufacturing practices, in patients with long bone pseudarthrosis. Twenty-eight patients with femur, tibia or humerus diaphyseal or metaphyso-diaphyseal non-unions were recruited and surgically treated in France, Germany, Italy and Spain with 100 or 200 million BM-hMSC/mL associated with 5-10 cc of bioceramic granules. Patients were followed up during one year. The investigational advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) was expanded under the same protocol in all four countries, and approved by each National Competent Authority. With safety as primary end-point, no severe adverse event was reported as related to the BM-hMSC. With feasibility as secondary end-point, the participating production centres manufactured the BM-hMSC as planned. The ATMP combined to the bioceramic was surgically delivered to the non-unions, and 26/28 treated patients were found radiologically healed at one year (3 out of 4 cortices with bone bridging). Safety and feasibility were clinically proven for surgical implantation of expanded autologous BM-hMSC with bioceramic. EU-FP7-HEALTH-2009, REBORNE Project (GA: 241876). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. The presence of lytic HSV-1 transcripts and clonally expanded T cells with a memory effector phenotype in human sensory ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfuss, Tobias; Arbusow, Viktor; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latent persistence in human trigeminal ganglia (TG) is accompanied by a chronic CD8 T-cell infiltration. Thus far, during HSV-1 latency only a single transcript, namely the latency-associated transcript (LAT), has been identified to be synthesized but not translated into a protein. In contrast, the chronic CD8 T-cell infiltration suggests that an antigen trigger must be present. The focus of the current work was to look for HSV-1 transcription activity as a potential trigger of the immune response and to demonstrate whether the immune cells are clonally expanded and have a phenotype that suggests that they have been triggered by viral antigen. By combining in situ hybridization, laser cutting microscopy, and single-cell real time RT-PCR, we demonstrated expression of the HSV-1 immediate early (IE) genes ICP0 and ICP4 in human trigeminal neurons. Using CDR3 spectratyping, we showed that the infiltrating T cells are clonally expanded, indicating an antigen-driven immune response. Moreover, the persisting CD8(+) T cells had prominent features of the memory effector phenotype. Chemokines CCL5 and CXCL10 were expressed by a subpopulation of infiltrating cells and the corresponding chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 were co-expressed on virtually all T cells bearing the CD8 phenotype. Thus, HSV-1 IE genes are expressed in human TG, and the infiltrating T cells bear several characteristics that suggest viral antigenic stimulation.

  7. Expanding horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Friends, The debate of whether Stem Cell Therapy is a hype or hope has been raging for quite some time and has been rekindled in the current year. Stem Cell Scientists have been particularly enthused by the bold standard taken by Barack Obama in passing an Executive Order that lifted the ban on federal funding of Research on Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC lines created after August 9, 2001. With the lifting of the ban more money is expected to be poured into ESC and Stem Cell Research in general and this augurs well for this emerging science. This is hope. Amariglio et al have reported the occurrence of a multifocal brain tumor in a boy with ataxia telengectasia four years after he was treated with intracerebella and intrathecal injection of human fetal neural stem cells. Molecular and Cytogenetic studies showed that the tumor was of non host origin raising the possibility of it being derived from transplanted neural stem cell. This is the first report of a donor-derived brain tumor in neural stem cell therapy and opens a Pandora’s Box of questions about the safety of such therapies. This signifies the hype surrounding the therapy. However controversies are a part of any emerging science. Our goals should be to march forward conducting our research under strict ethical principles and rigorous oversight, ironing out even minor flaws, always being on the lookout for adverse events and identifying ways and means of preventing their occurrence in future. JSRM has been in receipt of six articles, which speaks well for the interest people have for stem cell science in general and our journal in particular. The articles we have received for this edition of JSRM cover all aspects necessary for a science. Rosen et al have described the percentage variation of adipose stromal cells isolated from two different inbred mouse strains and Bhonde et al have reported the existence of multipotent stem cells in human fallopian tube. If cells can be identified

  8. Antimelanoma Differentiation-associated Gene 5 Antibody: Expanding the Clinical Spectrum in North American Patients with Dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Oddis, Chester V; Sato, Shinji; Kuwana, Masataka; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2017-03-01

    To determine the clinical features associated with the antimelanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody (anti-MDA5) in US patients with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) and classic DM. Patients with CADM were consecutively selected from the University of Pittsburgh Myositis Database from 1985 to 2013. CADM was defined by a typical DM rash without objective muscle weakness and no or minimal abnormalities of muscle enzymes, electromyography, or muscle biopsy. DM was defined by Bohan and Peter criteria and was 1:1 matched (sex and age ± 5 yrs) to patients with CADM. Anti-MDA5 autoAb levels were determined using ELISA. Clinical features were compared between CADM and DM and between MDA5-positive and MDA5-negative subjects, using chi-squared and/or Mann-Whitney U tests as appropriate. We identified 61 patients with CADM who were matched to 61 DM controls (female 62% vs 64%; mean age 44.8 yrs vs 48.2, p < 0.5). Anti-MDA5 frequency was the same in both cohorts (13.1%), and anti-MDA5 was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of cutaneous ulcers, digital tip ulcerations, and puffy fingers as well as interstitial lung disease (ILD). Most patients with ILD had rapidly progressive ILD (RPILD) leading to early death. Patients with CADM were more likely to have dysphagia, but there were no other clinical differences seen associated with CADM as compared to classic DM. Anti-MDA5 positivity had a similar frequency in US patients with CADM and DM and is associated with ILD, RPILD, cutaneous ulcers, digital tip ulceration, and poor survival.

  9. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells in liver diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Kojima, Yuichi; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Seino, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kawata, Yuzo; Terai, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapies have been used in clinical trials in various fields. These cells are easily expanded, show low immunogenicity, can be acquired from medical waste, and have multiple functions, suggesting their potential applications in a variety of diseases, including liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease. MSCs help prepare the microenvironment, in response to inflammatory cytokines, by producing immunoregulatory factors that modulate the progression of inflammation by affecting dendritic cells, B cells, T cells, and macrophages. MSCs also produce a large amount of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, including exosomes that stimulate angiogenesis, prevent apoptosis, block oxidation reactions, promote remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and induce differentiation of tissue stem cells. According to ClinicalTrials.gov, more than 680 clinical trials using MSCs are registered for cell therapy of many fields including liver diseases (more than 40 trials) and inflammatory bowel diseases (more than 20 trials). In this report, we introduce background and clinical studies of MSCs in liver disease and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Psychosis in Machado-Joseph Disease: Clinical Correlates, Pathophysiological Discussion, and Functional Brain Imaging. Expanding the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Neto, Pedro; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gadelha, Ary; Laureano, Maura Regina; de Souza Noto, Cristiano; Garrido, Griselda Jara; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide with a broad range of clinical manifestations, but psychotic symptoms were not previously characterized. We investigated the psychiatric manifestations of a large cohort of Brazilian patients with MJD in an attempt to characterize the presence of psychotic symptoms. We evaluated 112 patients with clinical and molecular diagnosis of MJD from February 2008 to November 2013. Patients with psychotic symptoms were referred to psychiatric evaluation and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis. A specific scale-Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-was used to characterize psychotic symptoms in MJD patients. We also performed an autopsy from one of the patients with MJD and psychotic symptoms. Five patients presented psychotic symptoms. Patients with psychotic symptoms were older and had a late onset of the disease (p < 0.05). SPECT results showed that MJD patients had significant regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) decrease in the cerebellum bilaterally and vermis compared with healthy subjects. No significant rCBF differences were found in patients without psychotic symptoms compared to patients with psychotic symptoms. The pathological description of a patient with MJD and psychotic symptoms revealed severe loss of neuron bodies in the dentate nucleus and substantia nigra. MJD patients with a late onset of the disease and older ones are at risk to develop psychotic symptoms during the disease progression. These clinical findings may be markers for an underlying cortical-cerebellar disconnection or degeneration of specific cortical and subcortical regions that may characterize the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome.

  11. Brain Malformations Associated with Knobloch Syndrome – Review of Literature, Expanding Clinical Spectrum and Identification of Novel Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Aktar, Fesih; Han, Wengi; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Guzel, Aslan; Guclu, Bulent; Kaymakcalan, Hande; Aktekin, Berrin; Akgumus, Gozde Tugce; Murray, Phillip B.; Omay, E. Zeynep Erson; Caglar, Caner; Bakircioglu, Mehmet; Sakalar, Yildirim Bayezit; Guzel, Ebru; Demir, Nihat; Tuncer, Oguz; Senturk, Senem; Ekici, Baris; Minja, Frank J.; Šestan, Nenad; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Bilguvar, Kaya; Caksen, Huseyin; Gunel, Murat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Knobloch syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, developmental disorder characterized by stereotyped ocular abnormalities with or without occipital skull deformities (encephalocele, bone defects, cutis aplasia). Although there is clear heterogeneity in clinical presentation, central nervous system malformations, aside from the characteristic encephalocele, have not typically been considered a component of the disease phenotype. METHODS Four patients originally presented for genetic evaluation of symptomatic structural brain malformations. Whole-genome genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, and confirmatory Sanger sequencing were performed. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we investigated the protein expression pattern of COL18A1 in the mid-fetal and adult human cerebral cortex and then analyzed the spatial and temporal changes in the expression pattern of COL18A1 during human cortical development using the Human Brain Transcriptome database. RESULTS We identified two novel homozygous deleterious frame-shift mutations in the COL18A1 gene. Upon further investigation of these patients and their families, we found that many exhibited certain characteristics of Knobloch syndrome, including pronounced ocular defects. Our data strongly support an important role for COL18A1 in brain development and this report contributes to an enhanced characterization of the brain malformations that can result from deficiencies of collagen XVIII. CONCLUSIONS This case series highlights the diagnostic power and clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing technology – allowing clinicians and physician scientists to better understand the pathophysiology and presentations of rare diseases. We suggest that patients who are clinically diagnosed with Knobloch syndrome and/or found to have COL18A1 mutations via genetic screening should be investigated for potential structural brain abnormalities even in the absence of encephaloceles. PMID:25456301

  12. Expanding the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network to address the management of substance use disorders in general medical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai, Steven Sparenborg, Udi E Ghitza, David Liu Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Abstract: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010 and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (2008 expand substance use disorder (SUD care services in the USA into general medical settings. Care offered in these settings will engage substance-using patients in an integrated and patient-centered environment that addresses physical and mental health comorbidities and follows a chronic care model. This expansion of SUD services presents a great need for evidence-based practices useful in general medical settings, and reveals several research gaps to be addressed. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse can serve an important role in this endeavor. High-priority research gaps are highlighted in this commentary. A discussion follows on how the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network can transform to address changing patterns in SUD care to efficiently generate evidence to guide SUD treatment practice within the context of recent US health care legislation. Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, substance use disorders, practice-based research network, electronic health records

  13. A Multicentric, Open-Label, Randomized, Comparative Clinical Trial of Two Different Doses of Expanded hBM-MSCs Plus Biomaterial versus Iliac Crest Autograft, for Bone Healing in Nonunions after Long Bone Fractures: Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gómez-Barrena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ORTHOUNION is a multicentre, open, comparative, three-arm, randomized clinical trial (EudraCT number 2015-000431-32 to compare the efficacy, at one and two years, of autologous human bone marrow-derived expanded mesenchymal stromal cell (hBM-MSC treatments versus iliac crest autograft (ICA to enhance bone healing in patients with diaphyseal and/or metaphysodiaphyseal fracture (femur, tibia, and humerus status of atrophic or oligotrophic nonunion (more than 9 months after the acute fracture, including recalcitrant cases after failed treatments. The primary objective is to determine if the treatment with hBM-MSCs combined with biomaterial is superior to ICA in obtaining bone healing. If confirmed, a secondary objective is set to determine if the dose of 100 × 106 hBM-MSCs is noninferior to that of 200 × 106 hBM-MSCs. The participants (n=108 will be randomly assigned to either the experimental low dose (n=36, the experimental high dose (n=36, or the comparator arm (n=36 using a central randomization service. The trial will be conducted in 20 clinical centres in Spain, France, Germany, and Italy under the same clinical protocol. The confirmation of superiority for the proposed ATMP in nonunions may foster the future of bone regenerative medicine in this indication. On the contrary, absence of superiority may underline its limitations in clinical use.

  14. A Multicentric, Open-Label, Randomized, Comparative Clinical Trial of Two Different Doses of Expanded hBM-MSCs Plus Biomaterial versus Iliac Crest Autograft, for Bone Healing in Nonunions after Long Bone Fractures: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma G; Avendaño-Solá, Cristina; Payares-Herrera, Concepción; Velasco-Iglesias, Ana; Torres, Ferran; Rosset, Philippe; Gebhard, Florian; Baldini, Nicola; Rubio-Suarez, Juan C; García-Rey, Eduardo; Cordero-Ampuero, José; Vaquero-Martin, Javier; Chana, Francisco; Marco, Fernando; García-Coiradas, Javier; Caba-Dessoux, Pedro; de la Cuadra, Pablo; Hernigou, Philippe; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Gouin, François; Mainard, Didier; Laffosse, Jean Michel; Kalbitz, Miriam; Marzi, Ingo; Südkamp, Norbert; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Donati, Davide Maria; Zagra, Luigi; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Zarattini, Guido; Capanna, Rodolfo; Catani, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    ORTHOUNION is a multicentre, open, comparative, three-arm, randomized clinical trial (EudraCT number 2015-000431-32) to compare the efficacy, at one and two years, of autologous human bone marrow-derived expanded mesenchymal stromal cell (hBM-MSC) treatments versus iliac crest autograft (ICA) to enhance bone healing in patients with diaphyseal and/or metaphysodiaphyseal fracture (femur, tibia, and humerus) status of atrophic or oligotrophic nonunion (more than 9 months after the acute fracture, including recalcitrant cases after failed treatments). The primary objective is to determine if the treatment with hBM-MSCs combined with biomaterial is superior to ICA in obtaining bone healing. If confirmed, a secondary objective is set to determine if the dose of 100 × 10 6 hBM-MSCs is noninferior to that of 200 × 10 6 hBM-MSCs. The participants ( n = 108) will be randomly assigned to either the experimental low dose ( n = 36), the experimental high dose ( n = 36), or the comparator arm ( n = 36) using a central randomization service. The trial will be conducted in 20 clinical centres in Spain, France, Germany, and Italy under the same clinical protocol. The confirmation of superiority for the proposed ATMP in nonunions may foster the future of bone regenerative medicine in this indication. On the contrary, absence of superiority may underline its limitations in clinical use.

  15. Expanding the Clinical and Genetic Spectrum of KRT1, KRT2 and KRT10 Mutations in Keratinopathic Ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Alrun; Oji, Vinzenz; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Jonca, Nathalie; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Betz, Regina C; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Stieler, Karola; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Schönbuchner, Ines; Markus, Susanne; Schlipf, Nina; Fischer, Judith

    2016-05-01

    Twenty-six families with keratinopathic ichthyoses (epidermolytic ichthyosis, superficial epidermolytic ichthyosis or congenital reticular ichthyosiform erythroderma) were studied. Epidermolytic ichthyosis is caused by mutations in the genes KRT1 or KRT10, mutations in the gene KRT2 lead to superficial epidermolytic ichthyosis, and congenital reticular ichthyosiform erythroderma is caused by frameshift mutations in the genes KRT10 or KRT1, which lead to the phenomenon of revertant mosaicism. In this study mutations were found in KRT1, KRT2 and KRT10, including 8 mutations that are novel pathogenic variants. We report here the first case of a patient with congenital reticular ichthyosiform erythroderma carrying a mutation in KRT10 that does not lead to an arginine-rich reading frame. Novel clinical features found in patients with congenital reticular ichthyosiform erythroderma are described, such as mental retardation, spasticity, facial dysmorphisms, symblepharon and malposition of the 4th toe.

  16. Expanding the clinical phenotype of the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome and characterization of the reciprocal microduplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Christopher A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial deletions of 3q29 have been recently described as a microdeletion syndrome mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats resulting in an ~1.6 Mb common-sized deletion. Given the molecular mechanism causing the deletion, the reciprocal duplication is anticipated to occur with equal frequency, although only one family with this duplication has been reported. Results In this study we describe 14 individuals with microdeletions of 3q29, including one family with a mildly affected mother and two affected children, identified among 14,698 individuals with idiopathic mental retardation who were analyzed by array CGH. Eleven individuals had typical 1.6-Mb deletions. Three individuals had deletions that flank, span, or partially overlap the commonly deleted region. Although the clinical presentations of individuals with typical-sized deletions varied, several features were present in multiple individuals, including mental retardation and microcephaly. We also identified 19 individuals with duplications of 3q29, five of which appear to be the reciprocal duplication product of the 3q29 microdeletion and 14 of which flank, span, or partially overlap the common deletion region. The clinical features of individuals with microduplications of 3q29 also varied with few common features. De novo and inherited abnormalities were found in both the microdeletion and microduplication cohorts illustrating the need for parental samples to fully characterize these abnormalities. Conclusion Our report demonstrates that array CGH is especially suited to identify chromosome abnormalities with unclear or variable presentations.

  17. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor presenting as a parotid gland mass: Expanding the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions in salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT are rare benign soft tissue tumors affecting mostly young adults. The most common affected sites include the knee, ankle, elbow, shoulder, and fingers. The temporomandibular joint is occasionally affected. Herein, we report a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian male who presented clinically with a parotid gland mass. The initial clinical and radiological work-up failed to reveal any involvement of the adjacent temporomandibular joint. Fine-needle aspiration revealed a cellular tumor composed of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells with fibrosis and hemosiderin deposition. This was subsequently found to be a TGCT arising from the temporomandibular joint. Giant cell-rich lesions are uncommon in salivary glands. Herein, we describe the cytomorphology and clinico-radiographic features of this tumor with emphasis on the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions presenting in salivary glands. Despite its rare occurrence, this entity should be considered when giant cells are prominent in specimens acquired from this location.

  19. Human adipose stromal cells expanded in human serum promote engraftment of human peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells in NOD/SCID mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyun Hwa; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Seo, Su Yeong; Kim, Han Na; Lee, Jae Bong; Kim, Jae Ho; Chung, Joo Seop; Jung, Jin Sup

    2005-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), that have been reported to be present in bone marrow, adipose tissues, dermis, muscles, and peripheral blood, have the potential to differentiate along different lineages including those forming bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, and neuron. Therefore, hMSC are attractive candidates for cell and gene therapy. The optimal conditions for hMSC expansion require medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Some forms of cell therapy will involve multiple doses, raising a concern over immunological reactions caused by medium-derived FBS proteins. In this study, we cultured human adipose stromal cells (hADSC) and bone marrow stroma cells (HBMSC) in human serum (HS) during their isolation and expansion, and demonstrated that they maintain their proliferative capacity and ability for multilineage differentiation and promote engraftment of peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) cells mobilized from bone marrow in NOD/SCID mice. Our results indicate that hADSC and hBMSC cultured in HS can be used for clinical trials of cell and gene therapies, including promotion of engraftment after allogeneic HSC transplantation

  20. Radical prostatectomy for clinical T3 disease: expanding indications while optimizing cancer control and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jennifer R; Fine, Samson W; Zhang, Jingbo; Eastham, James A

    2007-08-01

    A 61-year-old male presented with a history of gradually rising PSA over several years. His PSA had increased from 3.3 to 7 ng/ml over 3 years. Digital rectal examination, prostate biopsy, bone scan, and endorectal MRI were carried out to confirm the diagnosis and evaluate the extent of the cancer, with subsequent histopathologic examination of the radical prostatectomy specimen. Preoperative clinical stage (based on the digital rectal examination alone) was cT3a. Biopsy demonstrated extraprostatic extension in one core (Gleason 9 [4 + 5]). Endorectal MRI suggested a large volume cancer with probable extraprostatic extension in the posterior midline at the apex. Examination of the radical prostatectomy specimen demonstrated a pT3aN0 prostate cancer (Gleason 4 + 3 = 7 with a minor component of Gleason pattern 5). Extraprostatic extension was seen in the right posterior apex in the area of the dominant tumor mass. Surgical margins and seminal vesicles were negative for cancer. Radical retropubic prostatectomy with preservation of both neurovascular bundles plus bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection was performed. Postoperative PSA has been nondetectable. The patient is continent and, with the aid of vardenafil HCl, has erections sufficient for intercourse.

  1. Evaluation of patients with multiple sclerosis using reverse nutech functional score and expanded disability status scale after human embryonic stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Background The expanded disability status scale (EDSS) is a validated and reliable tool to assess the extent of disabilities in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the use of this tool has been found to be limited in assessing various symptoms of MS that are important. Our study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a new scoring system, reverse nutech functional score (RNFS) as compared to EDSS in assessing patients with MS treated with human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy. Met...

  2. Liver Engraftment and Repopulation by In Vitro Expanded Adult Derived Human Liver Stem Cells in a Child with Ornithine Carbamoyltransferase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sokal, Etienne M; Stéphenne, Xavier; Ottolenghi, Chris; Jazouli, Nawal; Clapuyt, Philippe; Lacaille, Florence; Najimi, Mustapha; de Lonlay, Pascale; Smets, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    A 3-year-old girl suffering from ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC) deficiency was poorly equilibrated under conventional diet and scavenger treatment. Following unsuccessful cryopreserved hepatocyte transplantation, she received two infusions of Adult Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells (ADHLSCs) expanded in vitro under GMP settings, the quantity being equivalent to 0.75% of her calculated liver mass. Using FISH immunostaining for the Y chromosome, the initial biopsy did not detect a...

  3. Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome: The Expanding Clinical Picture, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, and Update on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Hall

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a progressive degenerative movement disorder characterized by kinetic tremor, cerebellar gait ataxia, parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. This disorder occurs in both males and females, frequently in families with children who have fragile X syndrome. The clinical features of this disorder, both classic and newly described, are summarized in this paper. In screening studies, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene premutation (55–200 CGG expansions are most frequently seen in men with ataxia who have tested negative for spinocerebellar ataxias. Since the original description, the classic FXTAS phenotype has now been reported in females and in carriers of smaller (45–54 CGG and larger (>200 CGG expansions in FMR1. Premutation carriers may present with a Parkinson disease phenotype or hypotension, rather than with tremor and/or ataxia. Parkinsonism and gait ataxia may also be seen in individuals with gray zone (41–54 CGG expansions. Studies regarding medication to treat the symptoms in FXTAS are few in number and suggest that medications targeted to specific symptoms, such as kinetic tremor or gait ataxia, may be most beneficial. Great progress has been made in regards to FXTAS research, likely given the readily available gene test and the screening of multiple family members, including parents and grandparents, of fragile X syndrome children. Expansion of genotypes and phenotypes in the disorder may suggest that a broader disease definition might be necessary in the future.

  4. Automated Manufacturing of Potent CD20-Directed Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Dominik; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Drechsel, Katharina; Barth, Carola; Mauer, Daniela; Schaser, Thomas; Kolbe, Carolin; Al Rawashdeh, Wael; Brauner, Janina; Hardt, Olaf; Pflug, Natali; Holtick, Udo; Borchmann, Peter; Assenmacher, Mario; Kaiser, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The clinical success of gene-engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), as manifested in several clinical trials for the treatment of B cell malignancies, warrants the development of a simple and robust manufacturing procedure capable of reducing to a minimum the challenges associated with its complexity. Conventional protocols comprise many open handling steps, are labor intensive, and are difficult to upscale for large numbers of patients. Furthermore, extensive training of personnel is required to avoid operator variations. An automated current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant process has therefore been developed for the generation of gene-engineered T cells. Upon installation of the closed, single-use tubing set on the CliniMACS Prodigy™, sterile welding of the starting cell product, and sterile connection of the required reagents, T cells are magnetically enriched, stimulated, transduced using lentiviral vectors, expanded, and formulated. Starting from healthy donor (HD) or lymphoma or melanoma patient material (PM), the robustness and reproducibility of the manufacturing of anti-CD20 specific CAR T cells were verified. Independent of the starting material, operator, or device, the process consistently yielded a therapeutic dose of highly viable CAR T cells. Interestingly, the formulated product obtained with PM was comparable to that of HD with respect to cell composition, phenotype, and function, even though the starting material differed significantly. Potent antitumor reactivity of the produced anti-CD20 CAR T cells was shown in vitro as well as in vivo. In summary, the automated T cell transduction process meets the requirements for clinical manufacturing that the authors intend to use in two separate clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and B cell lymphoma.

  5. A hybrid of B and T lymphoblastic cell line could potentially substitute dendritic cells to efficiently expand out Her-2/neu-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes from advanced breast cancer patients in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs holds promises to cure cancer. However, this treatment is hindered by lacking a robust way to specifically expand out CTLs. Here, we developed a hybrid of B lymphoblastic cell line and T lymphoblastic cell line (T2 cells as a substitute of dendritic cells, together with irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC as feeder cells and rhIL-2, to activate and expand Her-2/neu-specific CD8+ T cells from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her-2/neu and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A2 double positive advanced breast cancer patients in vitro. These Her-2/neu-loaded T2 cells reproducibly activated and expanded out Her-2/neu-specific CD8+ T cells to 107 in 8 weeks. Furthermore, these Her-2/neu-specific CD8+ T cells had good sensitivity of recognition and killing Her-2/neu-overexpressed breast cancer cell line SK.BR.3. This technique gives us another insight on how to rapidly obtain sufficient CTLs for adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Role of Nursing Competencies for Accelerating Clinical Trials in Stem Cell Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Mary; Kim, Teresa; Stan, Rodica; Giesie, Pamela; Tabor, Jason; Le Verche, Virginia; Johnson, Shirley; Lomax, Geoffrey P; Zaia, John A

    2018-01-01

    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has formed a group of clinics called the Alpha Stem Cell Clinics Network. Its goal is to accelerate clinical trials of stem cell-based therapies for diseases with unmet medical needs. In this report, we describe our experience in establishing an Alpha Stem Cell Clinic at City of Hope. Implementation and integration of the clinic into the existing institutional structures required collaboration and cooperation with clinical trial units, nursing administration, and creation of new positions. The highlight of this process and the centerpiece to our success has been the definition of the role of the "hybrid nurse," a person with nursing competencies in both clinical care and research. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:6-10 Abstract Video Link: https://youtu.be/WOeZrNyXkGU. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  7. Stem cells: Biology and clinical potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... stem cells that may be utilized in this way, their pattern of development, their plasticity in terms of differentiation and ..... under pathological condition or injury, and the study of these stem cells appeared to be unrelated to .... structure harboring ependymal cells and astrocytes that play a role very similar to ...

  8. CD8+ T cells with characteristic T cell receptor beta motif are detected in blood and expanded in synovial fluid of ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komech, Ekaterina A; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Egorov, Evgeniy S; Britanova, Olga V; Rebrikov, Denis V; Bochkova, Anna G; Shmidt, Evgeniya I; Shostak, Nadejda A; Shugay, Mikhail; Lukyanov, Sergey; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Lebedev, Yuriy B; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Zvyagin, Ivan V

    2018-02-22

    The risk of AS is associated with genomic variants related to antigen presentation and specific cytokine signalling pathways, suggesting the involvement of cellular immunity in disease initiation/progression. The aim of the present study was to explore the repertoire of TCR sequences in healthy donors and AS patients to uncover AS-linked TCR variants. Using quantitative molecular-barcoded 5'-RACE, we performed deep TCR β repertoire profiling of peripheral blood (PB) and SF samples for 25 AS patients and 108 healthy donors. AS-linked TCR variants were identified using a new computational approach that relies on a probabilistic model of the VDJ rearrangement process. Using the donor-agnostic probabilistic model, we reveal a TCR β motif characteristic for PB of AS patients, represented by eight highly homologous amino acid sequence variants. Some of these variants were previously reported in SF and PB of patients with ReA and in PB of AS patients. We demonstrate that identified AS-linked clones have a CD8+ phenotype, present at relatively low frequencies in PB, and are significantly enriched in matched SF samples of AS patients. Our results suggest the involvement of a particular antigen-specific subset of CD8+ T cells in AS pathogenesis, confirming and expanding earlier findings. The high similarity of the clonotypes with the ones found in ReA implies common mechanisms for the initiation of the diseases.

  9. T regulatory cell separation for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Mauro; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Cantelmi, Maria Grazia; Baldoni, Stefano; Sportoletti, Paolo; Cavalli, Laura; Carotti, Alessandra; Pierini, Antonio; Falini, Brunangelo; Martelli, Massimo F; Falzetti, Franca

    2012-10-01

    We selected T regulatory cells (Tregs) from standard leukapheresis using double-negative selection (anti-CD8 and anti-CD19) followed by positive selection (anti-CD25) and 72 procedures were performed. A median of 263×10(6)cells (range 143-470×10(6)) were recovered with a mean of CD4(+)/CD25(+) cells of 94.5±2.4% (36.5±18.6% CD4(+)/CD25(+hi)). FoxP3(+) cells were equal to 79.8%±22.2. CD127(+) cells were 12.5%±8.2. The inhibition assay showed an inhibition rate of 67±22. Cells isolated by means of this approach can be used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to reduce the incidence and severity of GvHD without bystander inhibition of general immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical outcome after the use of a new craniocaudal expandable implant for vertebral compression fracture treatment: one year results from a prospective multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, David; Krüger, Antonio; Ardura, Francisco; Hansen-Algenstaedt, Nils; Hassel, Frank; Barreau, Xavier; Beyerlein, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective multicentric observational study was to confirm the safety and clinical performance of a craniocaudal expandable implant used in combination with high viscosity PMMA bone cement for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Thirty-nine VCFs in 32 patients were treated using the SpineJack minimally invasive surgery protocol. Outcome was determined by using the Visual Analogue Scale for measuring pain, the Oswestry Disability Index for scoring functional capacity, and the self-reporting European Quality of Life scores for the quality of life. Safety was evaluated by reporting all adverse events. The occurrence of cement leakages was assessed by either radiographs or CT scan or both. Statistically significant improvements were found regarding pain, function, and quality of life. The global pain score reduction at 1 year was 80.9% compared to the preoperative situation and the result of the Oswestry Disability Index showed a decrease from 65.0% at baseline to 10.5% at 12 months postoperatively. The cement leakage rate was 30.8%. No device- or surgery-related complications were found. This observational study demonstrates promising and persistent results consisting of immediate and sustained pain relief and durable clinical improvement after the procedure and throughout the 1-year follow-up period.

  11. Comparison of shunt patency and clinical outcomes between bare stents and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Woo; Weon, Young Cheol; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Kang, Byeong Seong; Kwon, Woon Jung; Shin, Shang Hun; Nam, Mi Jeong; Yang, Chi Youn; Choi, Seong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare shunt patency and clinical outcomes between bare stents and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) covered stents in patients who had undergone transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation. M43 consecutive patients with active gastroesophageal variceal bleeding who had undergone de novo TIPS creation were included in this study. For TIPS creation, bare stents were placed in twenty patients (Group 1) from January 2001 to December 2003, while ePTFE-covered stents were placed in twenty-three patients (Group 2) from January 2004 to December 2007. The primary and secondary patency rates of TIPS along with the clinical outcome were assessed, and a comparison was made between the two groups. The technical success rate was 100%. Cumulative primary shunt patency rate in Group 1 was 78.5%, 55.8%, and 45.8% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, and in Group 2, 91.1%, 86.0%, and 79.9%, respectively (p = 0.009). Cumulative secondary shunt patency rate in Group 1 was 86.3%, 70.7%, and 64.3%, respectively, and in Group 2, 91.1%, 91.1%, and 85.0%, respectively (p = 0.022). The use of ePTFE-covered stents particularly designed to spare the juxtacaval segment of the hepatic vein resulted in an improved patency of shunts compared to using bare stents.

  12. Clinical Outcome after the Use of a New Craniocaudal Expandable Implant for Vertebral Compression Fracture Treatment: One Year Results from a Prospective Multicentric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Noriega

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this prospective multicentric observational study was to confirm the safety and clinical performance of a craniocaudal expandable implant used in combination with high viscosity PMMA bone cement for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Thirty-nine VCFs in 32 patients were treated using the SpineJack minimally invasive surgery protocol. Outcome was determined by using the Visual Analogue Scale for measuring pain, the Oswestry Disability Index for scoring functional capacity, and the self-reporting European Quality of Life scores for the quality of life. Safety was evaluated by reporting all adverse events. The occurrence of cement leakages was assessed by either radiographs or CT scan or both. Statistically significant improvements were found regarding pain, function, and quality of life. The global pain score reduction at 1 year was 80.9% compared to the preoperative situation and the result of the Oswestry Disability Index showed a decrease from 65.0% at baseline to 10.5% at 12 months postoperatively. The cement leakage rate was 30.8%. No device- or surgery-related complications were found. This observational study demonstrates promising and persistent results consisting of immediate and sustained pain relief and durable clinical improvement after the procedure and throughout the 1-year follow-up period.

  13. Clinical and Radiographic Results of Indirect Decompression and Posterior Cervical Fusion for Single-Level Cervical Radiculopathy Using an Expandable Implant with 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, Kris; Janusz, Piotr; Phillips, Frank M; Youssef, Jim A; Isaacs, Robert; Tyrakowski, Marcin; McCormack, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Background  Indirect posterior cervical nerve root decompression and fusion performed by placing bilateral posterior cervical cages in the facet joints from a posterior approach has been proposed as an option to treat select patients with cervical radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to report 2-year clinical and radiologic results of this treatment method. Methods  Patients who failed nonsurgical management for single-level cervical radiculopathy were recruited. Surgical treatment involved a posterior approach with decortication of the lateral mass and facet joint at the treated level followed by placement of the DTRAX Expandable Cage (Providence Medical Technology, Lafayette, California, United States) into both facet joints. Iliac crest bone autograft was mixed with demineralized bone matrix and used in all cases. The Neck Disability Index (NDI), visual analog scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain, and SF-12 v.2 questionnaire were evaluated preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Segmental (treated level) and overall C2-C7 cervical lordosis, disk height, adjacent segment degeneration, and fusion were assessed on computed tomography scans and radiographs acquired preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Results  Overall, 53 of 60 enrolled patients were available at 2-year follow-up. There were 35 females and 18 males with a mean age of 53 years (range: 40-75 years). The operated level was C3-C4 ( N  = 3), C4-C5 ( N  = 6), C5-C6 ( N  = 36), and C6-C7 ( N  = 8). The mean preoperative and 2-year scores were NDI: 32.3 versus 9.1 ( p  cervical fusion using an expandable intervertebral cage may be an effective tissue-sparing option in select patients with single-level cervical radiculopathy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Percutaneous treatment of adult isthmic aortic coarctation: acute and long-term clinical and imaging outcome with a self-expandable uncovered nitinol stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kische, Stephan; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Stoeckicht, Yannik; Ortak, Jasmin; Elsässer, Albrecht; Ince, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    To present perioperative and long-term results of percutaneous treatment of adult isthmic coarctation of the aorta by means of a self-expandable closed-web uncovered nitinol stent (Sinus-XL, Optimed, Esslingen, Germany). Preoperative, perioperative, and long-term clinical and computed tomographic angiography data were collected and analyzed prospectively. A total of 52 consecutive patients were treated with the Sinus-XL stent. Mean age was 36.6 (21-67) years, peak invasive trans-coarctation of the aorta gradient was 54.7 ± 9.9 mm Hg, and upper body hypertension unresponsive to medical treatment was present in all patients. Mean stent diameter and length were 24.2 mm (22-28 mm) and 70.4 mm (40-80 mm), respectively. Eight patients (15.4%) required coarctation of the aorta predilatation. All patients underwent poststent dilatation with a noncompliant balloon. Postoperative peak gradient (3.3 ± 2.5 mm Hg) was reduced significantly (P aortic diameter was increased significantly (4.6 ± 1.9 versus 18.6 ± 2.5 mm; P Aortic computed tomography confirmed the absence of stent collapse and secondary migration and documented stability in aortic diameter (18.3 ± 2.7 mm). Thirty patients (57.7%) were completely weaned-off antihypertensive medications and their use dropped from 2.6 to 0.9 drugs/patient (P coarctation of the aorta treatment by means of a self-expandable uncovered stent is safe and durable. The peculiar stent design maintains adequate localized radial strength over time with minimal trauma on the adjacent aortic wall and negligible device-related complications. Blood pressure control optimization is immediate and persistent even at long-term follow-up. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Romidepsin alone or in combination with anti-CD20 chimeric antigen receptor expanded natural killer cells targeting Burkitt lymphomain vitroand in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yaya; Yahr, Ashlin; Huang, Brian; Ayello, Janet; Barth, Matthew; S Cairo, Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    Facilitating the development of alternative targeted therapeutic strategies is urgently required to improve outcome or circumvent chemotherapy resistance in children, adolescents, and adults with recurrent/refractory de novo mature B-cell (CD20) non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Romidepsin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), has been used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We have demonstrated the significant anti-tumor effect of anti-CD20 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified expanded peripheral blood natural killer (exPBNK) against rituximab-sensitive and -resistant BL. This study examined the anti-tumor activity of romidepsin alone and in combination with anti-CD20 CAR exPBNKs against rituximab-sensitive and -resistant BL in vitro and in vivo . We found that romidepsin significantly inhibited both rituximab-sensitive and -resistant BL cell proliferation in vitro (P cell death in rituximab-sensitive Raji (P cell cycle arrest in rituximab-resistant Raji-2R and Raji-4RH (P NSG mice. We also demonstrated that romidpesin significantly induced the expression of Natural Killer Group 2, Member D (NKG2D) ligands MICA/B in both rituximab-sensitive and -resistant BL cells (P cell death in BL cells in vitro , reduced tumor burden and enhanced survival in humanized BL xenografted NSG mice (p < 0.05). Our data suggests that romidepsin is an active HDAC inhibitor that also potentiates expanded NK and anti-CD20 CAR exPBNK activity against rituximab-sensitive and -resistant BL.

  16. US stem cell clinics, patient safety, and the FDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2015-05-01

    Scholarship on patients accessing unproven stem cell interventions is dominated by research addressing 'stem cell tourism' to such countries as China, India, Mexico, and the Ukraine. However, clinics marketing 'adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatments' are proliferating across the USA. These businesses typically claim to operate in compliance with federal regulations, but careful review of their commercial practices suggests that such clinics are marketing unapproved and noncompliant biological drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    OpenAIRE

    Bingshan Liu; Yongping Song; Delong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous...

  18. Galectin-9 prolongs the survival of septic mice by expanding Tim-3-expressing natural killer T cells and PDCA-1+ CD11c+ macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Takashi; Morishita, Asahiro; Niki, Toshiro; Hara, Junko; Sato, Miwa; Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Hattori, Toshio; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Hirashima, Mitsuomi

    2013-12-09

    Galectin-9 ameliorates various inflammatory conditions including autoimmune diseases by regulating T cell and macrophage/dendritic cell (DC) functions. However, the effect of galectin-9 on polymicrobial sepsis has not been assessed. We induced polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice. The survival rate was compared between galectin-9- and PBS-treated CLP mice. An ELISA was used to compare the levels of various cytokines in the plasma and culture supernatants. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was further performed to compare the frequencies of subpopulations of spleen cells. Galectin-9 exhibited a protective effect in polymicrobial sepsis as demonstrated in galetin-9 transgenic mice and therapeutic galectin-9 administration. In contrast, such effect was not observed in nude mice, indicating the involvement of T cells in galectin-9-mediated survival prolongation. Galectin-9 decreased TNFα, IL-6, IL-10 and, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and increased IL-15 and IL-17 plasma and spleen levels. Galectin-9 increased the frequencies of natural killer T (NKT) cells and PDCA-1+ CD11c+ macrophages (pDC-like macrophages) but did not change the frequency of CD4 or CD8 T cells, γδT cells or conventional DC. As expected, galectin-9 decreased the frequency of Tim-3+ CD4 T cells, most likely Th1 and Th17 cells. Intriguingly, many spleen NK1.1+ NKT cells and pDC-like macrophages expressed Tim-3. Galectin-9 increased the frequency of Tim-3-expressing NK1.1+ NKT cells and pDC-like macrophages. Galectin-9 further increased IL-17+ NK1.1+ NKT cells. These data suggest that galectin-9 exerts therapeutic effects on polymicrobial sepsis, possibly by expanding NKT cells and pDC-like macrophages and by modulating the production of early and late proinflammatory cytokines.

  19. Clinical utility of circulating tumor cell counting through CellSearch®: the dilemma of a concept suspended in Limbo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondi C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Raimondi,1 Angela Gradilone,1 Giuseppe Naso,2 Enrico Cortesi,2 Paola Gazzaniga1 1Dipartimento Medicina Molecolare, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Oncologiche e Anatomopatologiche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy Abstract: To date, 10 years after the first demonstration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer using the US Food and Drug Administration–cleared system CellSearch®, the potential utility of CTCs in early clinical development of drugs, their role as a surrogate marker of response to therapy, and their molecular analysis for patient stratification for targeted therapies are still major unsolved questions. Great expectations are pinned on the ongoing interventional trials aimed to demonstrate that CTCs might be of value for guiding treatment of patients and predicting cancer progression. To fill the gap between theory and practice with regard to the clinical utility of CTCs, a bridge is needed, taking into account innovative design for clinical trials, a revised definition of traditional CTCs, next-generation CTC technology, the potential clinical application of CTC analysis in non-validated settings of disease, and finally, expanding the number of patients enrolled in the studies. In this regard, the results of the first European pooled analysis definitely validated the independent prognostic value of CTC counting in metastatic breast cancer patients. Keywords: CTC, clinical trials, prognosis

  20. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pleumeekers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. This study evaluated the performance of culture-expanded human chondrocytes from ear (EC, nose (NC and articular joint (AC, as well as bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. All cells (≥ 3 donors per source were culture-expanded, encapsulated in alginate and cultured for 5 weeks. Subsequently, constructs were implanted subcutaneously for 8 additional weeks. Before and after implantation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen content were measured using biochemical assays. Mechanical properties were determined using stress-strain-indentation tests. Hypertrophic differentiation was evaluated with qRT-PCR and subsequent endochondral ossification with histology. ACs had higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other cell sources, as assessed by gene expression and GAG content (p < 0.001. However, after implantation, ACs did not further increase their matrix. In contrast, ECs and NCs continued producing matrix in vivo leading to higher GAG content (p < 0.001 and elastic modulus. For NC-constructs, matrix-deposition was associated with the elastic modulus (R2 = 0.477, p = 0.039. Although all cells – except ACs – expressed markers for hypertrophic differentiation in vitro, there was no bone formed in vivo. Our work shows that cartilage formation and functionality depends on the cell source used. ACs possess the highest chondrogenic capacity in vitro, while ECs and NCs are most potent in vivo, making them attractive cell sources for cartilage repair.

  1. Radiotherapy enhances natural killer cell cytotoxicity and localization in pre-clinical canine sarcomas and first-in-dog clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Canter, Robert J.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Foltz, Jennifer A.; Sturgill, Ian R.; Park, Jiwon S.; Luna, Jesus I.; Kent, Michael S.; Culp, William T. N.; Chen, Mingyi; Modiano, Jaime F.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Lee, Dean A.; Murphy, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that radiotherapy (RT) augments natural killer (NK) functions in pre-clinical models of human and mouse cancers, including sarcomas. Since dogs are an excellent outbred model for immunotherapy studies, we sought to assess RT plus local autologous NK transfer in canine sarcomas. Methods Dog NK cells (CD5dim, NKp46+) were isolated from PBMCs and expanded with irradiated K562-C9-mIL21 feeder cells and 100 IU/mL recombinant human IL-2. NK homing and cytotoxicit...

  2. Hematopoietic Support Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Orduña, Guadalupe R; Mayani, Héctor; Montesinos, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the physiology and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Because MSCs generate most of the stromal cells present in the bone marrow (BM), form part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche, and produce various molecules regulating hematopoiesis, their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity has been demonstrated. In the last decade, BM-MSCs have been proposed to be useful in some ex vivo protocols for HSC expansion, with the aim of expanding their numbers for transplant purposes (HSC transplant, HSCT). Furthermore, application of MSCs has been proposed as an adjuvant cellular therapy for promoting rapid hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Although the MSCs used in preliminary clinical trials have come from the BM, isolation of MSCs from far more accessible sources such as neonatal tissues has now been achieved, and these cells have been found to possess similar biological characteristics to those isolated from the BM. Therefore, such tissues are now considered as a potential alternative source of MSCs for clinical applications. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the biological characteristics of MSCs as related to their capacity to support the formation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We also describe MSC manipulation for ex vivo HSC expansion protocols used for transplants and their clinical relevance for hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations...... interventions for neurologic disease, based primarily on the new Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research in May 2016. Important considerations in the ethical translation of stem cells to clinical practice include regulatory...... oversight, conflicts of interest, data sharing, the nature of investigation (e.g., within vs outside of a clinical trial), informed consent, risk-benefit ratios, the therapeutic misconception, and patient vulnerability. To help guide the translation of stem cells from the laboratory into the neurosurgical...

  4. Liver engraftment and repopulation by in vitro expanded adult derived human liver stem cells in a child with ornithine carbamoyltransferase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Etienne M; Stéphenne, Xavier; Ottolenghi, Chris; Jazouli, Nawal; Clapuyt, Philippe; Lacaille, Florence; Najimi, Mustapha; de Lonlay, Pascale; Smets, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    A 3-year-old girl suffering from ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC) deficiency was poorly equilibrated under conventional diet and scavenger treatment. Following unsuccessful cryopreserved hepatocyte transplantation, she received two infusions of Adult Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells (ADHLSCs) expanded in vitro under GMP settings, the quantity being equivalent to 0.75% of her calculated liver mass. Using FISH immunostaining for the Y chromosome, the initial biopsy did not detect any male nuclei in the recipient liver. Two liver biopsies taken 100 days after ADHLSC transplantation showed 3% and 5% of male donor cells in the recipient liver, thus suggesting repopulation by donor cells. Although limited follow-up did not allow us to draw conclusions on long-term improvement, these results provide a promising proof of concept that this therapy is feasible in an OTC patient.

  5. Effect of filler content on the properties of expanded- graphite-based composite bipolar plates for application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Aakash; Borah, Munu; Pathak, Abhishek K.; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2017-09-01

    Minimization of the weight and volume of a hydrogen-based PEM fuel cell stack is an essential area of research for the development and commercialization of PEMFCs for various applications. Graphite-based composite bipolar plates have significant advantages over conventional metallic bipolar plates due to their corrosion resistivity and low cost. On the other hand, expanded graphite is seen to be a potential candidate for facilitating the required electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of bipolar plates with a low density. Therefore, in the present study, the focus is on minimization of the high loading of graphite and optimizes its composition to meet the target properties of bipolar plates as per the USDOE target. Three types of expanded graphite (EG)-phenolic-resin-based composite bipolar plates were developed by partially replacing the expanded graphite content with natural graphite (NG) and carbon black as an additional filler. The three types of composite plate with the reinforcing constituent ratio EG:NG:R (25:25:50) give a bending strength of 49 MPa, a modulus of ~6 GPa, electrical conductivity  >100 S cm-1, a shore hardness of 55 and a bulk density of 1.55 g/cc. The 50 wt% loading of resin is sufficient to wet the 50 wt% filler content in the composite plate. This study gives an insight into using hybrid reinforcements in order to achieve the desired properties of bipolar plates.

  6. Clinical Outcome Prediction Using Single-Cell Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Jindal, Vasu; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    Single-cell technologies like flow cytometry (FCM) provide valuable biological data for knowledge discovery in complex cellular systems like tissues and organs. FCM data contains multi-dimensional information about the cellular heterogeneity of intricate cellular systems. It is possible to correlate single-cell markers with phenotypic properties of those systems. Cell population identification and clinical outcome prediction from single-cell measurements are challenging problems in the field of single cell analysis. In this paper, we propose a hybrid learning approach to predict clinical outcome using samples' single-cell FCM data. The proposed method is efficient in both i) identification of cellular clusters in each sample's FCM data and ii) predict clinical outcome (healthy versus unhealthy) for each subject. Our method is robust and the experimental results indicate promising performance.

  7. CD4+ natural regulatory T cells prevent experimental cerebral malaria via CTLA-4 when expanded in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraful Haque

    Full Text Available Studies in malaria patients indicate that higher frequencies of peripheral blood CD4(+ Foxp3(+ CD25(+ regulatory T (Treg cells correlate with increased blood parasitemia. This observation implies that Treg cells impair pathogen clearance and thus may be detrimental to the host during infection. In C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, depletion of Foxp3(+ cells did not improve parasite control or disease outcome. In contrast, elevating frequencies of natural Treg cells in vivo using IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes resulted in complete protection against severe disease. This protection was entirely dependent upon Foxp3(+ cells and resulted in lower parasite biomass, impaired antigen-specific CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses that would normally promote parasite tissue sequestration in this model, and reduced recruitment of conventional T cells to the brain. Furthermore, Foxp3(+ cell-mediated protection was dependent upon CTLA-4 but not IL-10. These data show that T cell-mediated parasite tissue sequestration can be reduced by regulatory T cells in a mouse model of malaria, thereby limiting malaria-induced immune pathology.

  8. Cultivation and phenotypic characterization of rabbit epithelial cells expanded ex vivo from fresh and cryopreserved limbal and oral mucosal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promprasit, Daranee; Bumroongkit, Kanokkan; Tocharus, Chainarong; Mevatee, Umnat; Tananuvat, Napaporn

    2015-03-01

    To compare the morphology of cultured rabbit epithelial sheets and the expression of stem cells with differentiated cell markers of cultivated epithelial cells from fresh and cryopreserved limbal and oral mucosal biopsies. Six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups of three, from which limbal and oral mucosal biopsies were taken. Harvested tissues from each rabbit were brought to immediate cultivation, while another set of tissues was cryopreserved. Cultivation was performed by the explant culture technique using human amniotic membrane as a culture substrate, co-culturing with 3T3 fibroblasts and using the air-lifting method. Cells were cultured for three weeks; then cultured epithelial sheets were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and examined for expression patterns of p63, keratin 3 (K3) and connexin 43 (Cx43). Cryopreservation was carried out using the vitrification method. Tissues were preserved in liquid nitrogen using 25% dimethyl sulfoxide combined with 25% propylene glycol in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium containing 20% fetal bovine serum. After two months, the tissues were warmed, cultured and stained using the same processes as for fresh tissue cultures. Cultivation of fresh limbal and fresh oral mucosal tissues showed epithelial stratification, with two to five cell layers. Immunohistochemical staining showed p63-positive cells in basal and intermediate cell layers. K3 staining was observed in cells in the suprabasal layer, while expression of Cx43 was scattered throughout all layers of the epithelia. All culture sheets expressed p63, K3 and Cx43 with the exception of one sheet from the oral mucosal culture that was p63-negative. Cultured epithelial sheets from cryopreserved tissues showed results similar to those from fresh tissue culture. This study found that cells in cultivated fresh limbal and oral mucosal tissues had similar morphology to cells in cultivated cryopreserved limbal and oral mucosal tissues, both containing a

  9. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y.; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Summary To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM+ cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM+ cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM+ cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. PMID:26365514

  10. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  11. Management of malignant biliary obstruction: Technical and clinical results using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent after 6-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Bezzi, Mario; Rossi, Plinio; Allegritti, Massimiliano; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-fluorinated ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction. Eighty consecutive patients with malignant common bile duct strictures were treated by placement of 83 covered metallic stents. The stent-graft consists of an inner ePTFE/FEP lining and an outer supporting structure of nitinol wire. Clinical evaluation, assessment of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels were analyzed before biliary drainage, before stent-graft placement and during the follow-up period at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Technical success was obtained in all cases. After a mean follow-up of 6.9{+-}4.63 months, the 30-day mortality rate was 14.2%. Survival rates were 40% and 20.2% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Stent-graft patency rates were 95.5%, 92.6% and 85.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications occurred in five patients (6.4%); among these, acute cholecystitis was observed in three patients (3.8%). A stent-graft occlusion rate of 9% was observed. The percentage of patients undergoing lifetime palliation (91%) and the midterm patency rate suggest that placement of this ePTFE/FEP-covered stent-graft is safe and highly effective in achieving biliary drainage in patients with malignant strictures of the common bile duct. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of TGFbR2 down-regulation in expanded HSCs on MBA/DBM scaffolds coated by UCB stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Zahra Sadat; Moghadam, Mehdi Forouzandeh; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-05-01

    Bone marrow transplants (BMTs) are mainly limited by a low number of CD34(+) cells. The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway downregulation is a key factor that increases cell self-renewal. In nature, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in a microenvironment, surrounded by cells in a three-dimensional (3D) configuration. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between a 3D culture and the delivery ratio of downregulation. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and mineralized bone allograft (MBA) scaffolds were coated using unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) as the feeder layer. Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-CD34(+) cells were then ex vivo expanded in them and transfected by small interfering RNA (siRNA) against TGFbR2, a type 2 receptor in the TGF-β pathway. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR, flow cytometry, and clonogenic assay were performed. In a global comparison, we observed that the highest expansion ratio, lowest expression level, and the highest CD34 marker belonged to the simple 2D culture transfected group. This suggests that TGFbR2 downregulation in a 2D culture can be done more effectively. The siRNA delivery system and the transfection ratio in an ex vivo environment, which mimicks in vivo conditions, have low efficiency. Genetic modification of the cells needs free 3D spaces to enable better transfection.

  13. Valproic acid affects the engraftment of TPO-expanded cord blood cells in NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Barca, Alessandra; Agostini, Francesca; Altieri, Ilaria; Macioce, Giampiero; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Screnci, Maria; De Felice, Lidia; Giampaolo, Adele; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2012-02-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) can improve the long-term outcome of transplanted individuals and reduce the relapse rate. Valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, when combined with different cytokine cocktails, induces the expansion of CD34+ cell populations derived from cord blood (CB) and other sources. We evaluated the effect of VPA, in combination with thrombopoietin (TPO), on the viability and expansion of CB-HSPCs and on short- and long-term engraftability in the NOD/SCID mouse model. In vitro, VPA+TPO inhibited HSPC differentiation and preserved the CD34+ cell fraction; the self-renewal of the CD34+ TPO+VPA-treated cells was suggested by the increased replating efficiency. In vivo, short- and long-term engraftment was determined after 6 and 20 weeks. After 6 weeks, the median chimerism percentage was 13.0% in mice transplanted with TPO-treated cells and only 1.4% in those transplanted with TPO+VPA-treated cells. By contrast, after 20 weeks, the engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells was three times more effective than that induced by TPO alone, and over ten times more effective compared to the short-term engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells. The in vivo results are consistent with the higher secondary plating efficiency of the TPO+VPA-treated cells in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy; Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris; Wilmer, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  15. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Hepatology, Leuven (Belgium); Wilmer, Alexander [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  16. Flt3 ligand expands lymphoid progenitors prior to recovery of thymopoiesis and accelerates T cell reconstitution after bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wils, Evert-Jan; Braakman, Eric; Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Rombouts, Elwin J. C.; Broers, Annoek E. C.; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Wagemaker, Gerard; Staal, Frank J. T.; Lowenberg, Bob; Spits, Hergen; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2007-01-01

    Deficient thymopoiesis and retarded recovery of newly developed CD4(+) T cells is one of the most important determinants of impaired immunocompetence after hemopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we evaluated whether Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3) ligand (FL) alone or combined with IL-7

  17. NFM Cross-Reactivity to MOG Does Not Expand a Critical Threshold Level of High-Affinity T Cells Necessary for Onset of Demyelinating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchfield, Lori; Sabatino, Joseph J; Lawrence, Laurel; Evavold, Brian D

    2017-10-15

    Of interest to the etiology of demyelinating autoimmune disease is the potential to aberrantly activate CD4 + T cells due to cross-recognition of multiple self-epitopes such as has been suggested for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein epitope 35-55 (MOG 35-55 ) and neurofilament medium protein epitope 15-35 (NFM 15-35 ). NFM 15-35  is immunogenic in C57BL/6 mice but fails to induce demyelinating disease by polyclonal T cells despite having the same TCR contact residues as MOG 35-55 , a known encephalitogenic Ag. Despite reported cross-reactivity with MOG-specific T cells, the polyclonal response to NFM 15-35 did not expand threshold numbers of MOG 38-49 tetramer-positive T cells. Furthermore, NFM lacked functional synergy with MOG to promote experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis because NFM-deficient synonymous with knockout mice developed an identical disease course to wild-type mice after challenge with MOG 35-55 Single-cell analysis of encephalitogenic T cells using the peptide:MHC monomer-based two-dimensional micropipette adhesion frequency assay confirmed that NFM was not a critical Ag driving demyelinating disease because NFM 18-30 -specific T cells in the CNS were predominantly reactive to MOG 38-49 The absence of NFM contribution to disease allowed mapping of the amino acids required for encephalitogenicity and expansion of high-affinity, MOG-specific T cells that defined the polyclonal response. Alterations of N-terminal residues outside of the NFM 15-35 core nonamer promoted expansion of high-affinity, MOG 38-49 tetramer-positive T cells and promoted consistent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction, unlike mice challenged with NFM 15-35 Although NFM 15-35 is immunogenic and cross-reactive with MOG at the polyclonal level, it fails to expand a threshold level of encephalitogenic, high-affinity MOG-specific T cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Systemic BCG immunization induces persistent lung mucosal multifunctional CD4 T(EM cells which expand following virulent mycobacterial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryan A Kaveh

    Full Text Available To more closely understand the mechanisms of how BCG vaccination confers immunity would help to rationally design improved tuberculosis vaccines that are urgently required. Given the established central role of CD4 T cells in BCG induced immunity, we sought to characterise the generation of memory CD4 T cell responses to BCG vaccination and M. bovis infection in a murine challenge model. We demonstrate that a single systemic BCG vaccination induces distinct systemic and mucosal populations of T effector memory (T(EM cells in vaccinated mice. These CD4+CD44(hiCD62L(loCD27⁻ T cells concomitantly produce IFN-γ and TNF-α, or IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α and have a higher cytokine median fluorescence intensity MFI or 'quality of response' than single cytokine producing cells. These cells are maintained for long periods (>16 months in BCG protected mice, maintaining a vaccine-specific functionality. Following virulent mycobacterial challenge, these cells underwent significant expansion in the lungs and are, therefore, strongly associated with protection against M. bovis challenge. Our data demonstrate that a persistent mucosal population of T(EM cells can be induced by parenteral immunization, a feature only previously associated with mucosal immunization routes; and that these multifunctional T(EM cells are strongly associated with protection. We propose that these cells mediate protective immunity, and that vaccines designed to increase the number of relevant antigen-specific T(EM in the lung may represent a new generation of TB vaccines.

  19. CD34-based enrichment of genetically engineered human T cells for clinical use results in dramatically enhanced tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell, Håkan; Zhang, Yi; McCracken, James; Martins da Palma, Telma; Lesher, Aaron; Liu, Yueying; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Temple, Anquanette; Callender, Glenda G; Clay, Timothy; Orentas, Rimas; Guevara-Patiño, José; Nishimura, Michael I

    2010-06-01

    Objective clinical responses can be achieved in melanoma patients by infusion of T cell receptor (TCR) gene transduced T cells. Although promising, the therapy is still largely ineffective, as most patients did not benefit from treatment. That only a minority of the infused T cells were genetically modified and that these were extensively expanded ex vivo may have prevented their efficacy. We developed novel and generally applicable retroviral vectors that allow rapid and efficient selection of T cells transduced with human TCRs. These vectors encode two TCR chains and a truncated CD34 molecule (CD34t) in a single mRNA transcript. Transduced T cells were characterized and the effects of CD34-based enrichment of redirected T cells were evaluated. Both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells could be transduced and efficiently co-expressed all introduced transgenes on their surface. Importantly, more than fivefold enrichment of both the frequency of transduced cells and the specific anti-tumor reactivity of the effector population could be achieved by magnetic beads-based enrichment procedures readily available for clinical grade hematopoietic stem cell isolation. This CD34-based enrichment technology will improve the feasibility of adoptive transfer of clinically relevant effectors. In addition to their enhanced tumor recognition, the enriched redirected T cells may also show superior reactivity and persistence in vivo due to the high purity of transduced cells and the shortened ex vivo culture.

  20. Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Christof; Klose, Kristin; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    Regenerative medicine encompasses "tissue engineering" - the in vitro fabrication of tissues and/or organs using scaffold material and viable cells - and "cell therapy" - the transplantation or manipulation of cells in diseased tissue in vivo. In the cardiovascular system, tissue engineering strategies are being pursued for the development of viable replacement blood vessels, heart valves, patch material, cardiac pacemakers and contractile myocardium. Anecdotal clinical applications of such vessels, valves and patches have been described, but information on systematic studies of the performance of such implants is not available, yet. Cell therapy for cardiovascular regeneration, however, has been performed in large series of patients, and numerous clinical studies have produced sometimes conflicting results. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical experience with cell therapy for diseases of the cardiovascular system, and to analyse possible factors that may influence its outcome.

  1. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Shuo Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2−/− mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1–p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  2. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  4. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signalling pathway promotes erythroid differentiation and reduces HSCs engraftment in ex vivo expanded haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Morteza; Afzal, Elaheh; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Mohammad, Monireh; Es, Hamidreza Aboulkheyr; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2018-03-01

    The MEK/ERK pathway is found to be important in regulating different biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation and survival in a wide variety of cells. However, its role in self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells is controversial and remains to be clarified. The aim of this study was to understand the role of MEK/ERK pathway in ex vivo expansion of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and purified CD34 + cells, both derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB). Based on our results, culturing the cells in the presence of an inhibitor of MEK/ERK pathway-PD0325901 (PD)-significantly reduces the expansion of CD34 + and CD34 +  CD38 - cells, while there is no change in the expression of stemness-related genes (HOXB4, BMI1). Moreover, in vivo analysis demonstrates that PD reduces engraftment capacity of ex vivo expanded CD34 + cells. Notably, when ERK pathway is blocked in UCB-MNCs, spontaneous erythroid differentiation is promoted, found in concomitant with increasing number of burst-forming unit-erythroid colony (BFU-E) as well as enhancement of erythroid glycophorin-A marker. These results are in total conformity with up-regulation of some erythroid enhancer genes (TAL1, GATA2, LMO2) and down-regulation of some erythroid repressor genes (JUN, PU1) as well. Taken together, our results support the idea that MEK/ERK pathway has a critical role in achieving the correct balance between self-renewal and differentiation of UCB cells. Also, we suggest that inhibition of ERK signalling could likely be a new key for erythroid induction of UCB-haematopoietic progenitor cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Models to Study NK Cell Biology and Possible Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Anthony E; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Aguilar, Ethan G; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes that is due to the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge, indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells, and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models, and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Histological, Immunohistological, and Clinical Features of Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Correlation to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin with high rates of metastasis and poor survival. Its incidence rate rises and is currently about 0.6/100000/year. Clinical differential diagnoses include basal cell carcinoma, cyst, amelanotic melanoma, lymphoma and atypical fibroxanthoma. In this review article clinical, histopathological and immunhistochemical features of Merkel cell carcinoma are reported. In addition, the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus is discussed.

  7. Stem Cell Therapies in Clinical Trials: Progress and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan; McDonald, Courtney

    2015-07-02

    Clinical investigations using stem cell products in regenerative medicine are addressing a wide spectrum of conditions using a variety of stem cell types. To date, there have been few reports of safety issues arising from autologous or allogeneic transplants. Many cells administered show transient presence for a few days with trophic influences on immune or inflammatory responses. Limbal stem cells have been registered as a product for eye burns in Europe and mesenchymal stem cells have been approved for pediatric graft versus host disease in Canada and New Zealand. Many other applications are progressing in trials, some with early benefits to patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...

  9. CD34-Based Enrichment of Genetically-Engineered Human T Cells for Clinical Use Results in Dramatically Enhanced Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell, Håkan; Zhang, Yi; McCracken, James; da Palma, Telma Martins; Lesher, Aaron; Liu, Yueying; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J.; Temple, Anquanette; Callender, Glenda G.; Clay, Timothy; Orentas, Rimas; Guevara-Patiño, José; Nishimura, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective clinical responses can be achieved in melanoma patients by infusion of T cell receptor (TCR) gene transduced T cells (1, 2). Although encouraging, the therapy is still largely ineffective as most patients were unable to benefit from treatment. That only a minority of the infused T cells were genetically modified and that these were extensively expanded ex vivo may have prevented their efficacy (3). Here, we developed a novel selection technology that allows rapid and efficient enrichment of genetically engineered cells for clinical use. Both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells transduced with retrovirus encoding two TCR chains and a truncated CD34 (CD34t) molecule efficiently co-expressed all the transgenes on the cell surface. Importantly, over 5-fold enrichment of both the frequency of transduced cells and the specific anti-tumor reactivity of the effector population could be achieved by the magnetic beads-based enrichment procedures readily available for hematopoietic stem cell isolation. This CD34t-based technology will improve the feasibility of adoptive transfer of clinically relevant effectors. The effectiveness of the enriched redirected T cells may further be superior due both to their higher reactivity and the reduced ex vivo culture period necessary, resulting in less exhausted cells better capable of persisting in vivo. PMID:20052466

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells in multiple sclerosis - translation to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulamea, A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by an aberrant activation of the immune system and combining demyelination with neurodegeneration. Studies on experimental models of multiple sclerosis revealed immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells therapy in multiple sclerosis patients showed tolerability, safety on short term, some immunomodulatory properties reducing the Th1 proinflammatory response and the inflammatory MRI parameters. The author reviews the data about experimental studies and clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  11. [Atypical presentation of a clinical case of giant cell arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló Aubach, L L; Torres Cortada, G; Cabau Rúbies, J; Aragón Sanz, M A; Oncins Torres, R

    2006-06-01

    We present a very unusual clinical case of giant cell arteritis with uterus involvement, in a women of 66 years old, that began clinical features of pain and functional limitation of shoulders and hip 3 mouth before been operated of uterus prolapse with hysterectomy. Biopsy of uterus found affected arterial vesels with wall sclerosis and granulomatous inflamation with giant cells, without necrosis, involving media and perivascular portions suggesting giant cell arteritis. In a previous reports review, we only found ten similar clinical cases. In that cases, clinical features were no suggestif of the disease. Although the well known tendency of arteritis to involve some specific vascular areas, the case we present is an example of the systemic course of the disease and his difficulty to diagnose.

  12. Enrichment of autologous fat grafts with ex-vivo expanded adipose tissue-derived stem cells for graft survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting is increasingly used in reconstructive surgery. However, resorption rates ranging from 25% to 80% have been reported. Therefore, methods to increase graft viability are needed. Here, we report the results of a triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare the survival ...... of fat grafts enriched with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) versus non-enriched fat grafts....

  13. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  14. Clinical Trials With Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillaro, Tiziana; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    In the last year, the promising features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including their regenerative properties and ability to differentiate into diverse cell lineages, have generated great interest among researchers whose work has offered intriguing perspectives on cell-based therapies for various diseases. Currently the most commonly used adult stem cells in regenerative medicine, MSCs, can be isolated from several tissues, exhibit a strong capacity for replication in vitro, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. However, heterogeneous procedures for isolating and cultivating MSCs among laboratories have prompted the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to issue criteria for identifying unique populations of these cells. Consequently, the isolation of MSCs according to ISCT criteria has produced heterogeneous, nonclonal cultures of stromal cells containing stem cells with different multipotent properties, committed progenitors, and differentiated cells. Though the nature and functions of MSCs remain unclear, nonclonal stromal cultures obtained from bone marrow and other tissues currently serve as sources of putative MSCs for therapeutic purposes, and several findings underscore their effectiveness in treating different diseases. To date, 493 MSC-based clinical trials, either complete or ongoing, appear in the database of the US National Institutes of Health. In the present article, we provide a comprehensive review of MSC-based clinical trials conducted worldwide that scrutinizes biological properties of MSCs, elucidates recent clinical findings and clinical trial phases of investigation, highlights therapeutic effects of MSCs, and identifies principal criticisms of the use of these cells. In particular, we analyze clinical trials using MSCs for representative diseases, including hematological disease, graft-versus-host disease, organ transplantation, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and diseases in the liver, kidney

  15. In vitro models of cancer stem cells and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Franco, Sara; Szczesna, Karolina; Iliou, Maria S; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed; Mobasheri, Ali; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2016-09-30

    Cancer cells, stem cells and cancer stem cells have for a long time played a significant role in the biomedical sciences. Though cancer therapy is more effective than it was a few years ago, the truth is that still none of the current non-surgical treatments can cure cancer effectively. The reason could be due to the subpopulation called "cancer stem cells" (CSCs), being defined as those cells within a tumour that have properties of stem cells: self-renewal and the ability for differentiation into multiple cell types that occur in tumours.The phenomenon of CSCs is based on their resistance to many of the current cancer therapies, which results in tumour relapse. Although further investigation regarding CSCs is still needed, there is already evidence that these cells may play an important role in the prognosis of cancer, progression and therapeutic strategy. Therefore, long-term patient survival may depend on the elimination of CSCs. Consequently, isolation of pure CSC populations or reprogramming of cancer cells into CSCs, from cancer cell lines or primary tumours, would be a useful tool to gain an in-depth knowledge about heterogeneity and plasticity of CSC phenotypes and therefore carcinogenesis. Herein, we will discuss current CSC models, methods used to characterize CSCs, candidate markers, characteristic signalling pathways and clinical applications of CSCs. Some examples of CSC-specific treatments that are currently in early clinical phases will also be presented in this review.

  16. Lentiviral Transfer of γ-Globin with Fusion Gene NUP98-HOXA10HD Expands Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Ameliorates Murine β-Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui Fen; Abraham, Allistair; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wang, Yong-Dong; Pestina, Tamara; Zhan, Jun; Humphries, Keith; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Persons, Derek A

    2017-03-01

    Recently, an engineered Homeobox-nucleoporin fusion gene, NUP98-HOXA10HD or NA10HD, was reported to expand and maintain murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We postulated that NA10HD would increase the number of human γ-globin-expressing cells to therapeutic levels. We developed a double gene lentiviral vector encoding both human γ-globin and NA10HD, which was used to transduce human peripheral blood CD34 + cells and increased engraftment 2- to 2.5-fold at 15 weeks post-transplantation in immunodeficient mice. In β-thalassemic mice transplanted with β-thalassemic HSCs transduced with the γ-globin/NA10HD vector, the number of fetal hemoglobin (HbF)-expressing cells was significantly increased after 3 months, leading to resolution of the anemia. Furthermore, the increases in HbF were maintained at 6 months and persisted after secondary transplantation. In addition, NA10HD enrichment of transduced HSCs led to HbF increases without affecting homeostasis of the white blood cell lineages. Our results suggest that NA10HD increases the number of γ-globin-transduced HSCs that engraft, leading to an elevated number of fetal hemoglobin-containing red cells. These effects of NA10HD provide an improved platform for testing of the therapeutic efficacy of novel globin vectors and provide further impetus to develop safe and effective methods for selective expansion of genetically modified cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bütof, Rebecca; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  18. Considerations for pre-clinical models and clinical trials of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Stillitano, Francesca; Salem, Joe Elie; Kovacic, Jason C; Fuster, Valentin; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-01-09

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an appealing source from which to develop cell replacement therapies. Different initiatives have been launched to promote their development toward clinical applications. This article will review the main questions that should be considered before translating PSC-derived cardiomyocytes into clinical investigations, including the development of good manufacturing practice-level PSC lines, the development of efficient protocols to generate pure populations of cardiac myocytes, and the development of techniques to improve the retention and survival rate of transplanted cells.

  19. Grafted functional groups on expanded tetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) support for fuel cell and water transport membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Timothy J.; Jiang, Ruichun

    2017-01-24

    A method for forming a modified solid polymer includes a step of contacting a solid fluorinated polymer with a sodium sodium-naphthalenide solution to form a treated fluorinated solid polymer. The treated fluorinated solid polymer is contacted with carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or sulfur trioxide to form a solid grafted fluorinated polymer. Characteristically, the grafted fluorinated polymer includes appended CO.sub.2H or SO.sub.2H or SO.sub.3H groups. The solid grafted fluorinated polymer is advantageously incorporated into a fuel cell as part of the ion-conducting membrane or a water transport membrane in a humidifier.

  20. Stem cells in clinical trials for treatment of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Henry

    2016-01-01

    After decades of basic science research involving the testing of regenerative strategies in animal models of retinal degenerative diseases, a number of clinical trials are now underway, with additional trials set to begin shortly. These efforts will evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of cell-based products in the eyes of patients with a number of retinal conditions, notably including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt's disease. This review considers the scientific work and early trials with fetal cells and tissues that set the stage for the current clinical investigatory work, as well the trials themselves, specifically those either now completed, underway or close to initiation. The cells of interest include retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells, undifferentiated neural or retinal progenitors or cells from the vascular/bone marrow compartment or umbilical cord tissue. Degenerative diseases of the retina represent a popular target for emerging cell-based therapeutics and initial data from early stage clinical trials suggest that short-term safety objectives can be met in at least some cases. The question of efficacy will require additional time and testing to be adequately resolved.

  1. Clinicopathologic analysis of extracapsular extension in prostate cancer: Should the clinical target volume be expanded posterolaterally to account for microscopic extension?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, K. Kenneth; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Vargas, Carlos E.; Ghilezan, Michel I.; Korman, Howard J.; Kernen, Kenneth M.; Hollander, Jay B.; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a complete pathologic analysis examining extracapsular extension (ECE) and microscopic spread of malignant cells beyond the prostate capsule to determine whether and when clinical target volume (CTV) expansion should be performed. Methods and Materials: A detailed pathologic analysis was performed for 371 prostatectomy specimens. All slides from each case were reviewed by a single pathologist (N.S.G.). The ECE status and ECE distance, defined as the maximal linear radial distance of malignant cells beyond the capsule, were recorded. Results: A total of 121 patients (33%) were found to have ECE (68 unilateral, 53 bilateral). Median ECE distance = 2.4 mm [range: 0.05-7.0 mm]. The 90th-percentile distance = 5.0 mm. Of the 121 cases with ECE, 55% had ECE distance ≥2 mm, 19% ≥4 mm, and 6% ≥6 mm. ECE occurred primarily posterolaterally along the neurovascular bundle in all cases. Pretreatment prostrate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy Gleason, pathologic Gleason, clinical stage, bilateral involvement, positive margins, percentage of gland involved, and maximal tumor dimension were associated with presence of ECE. Both PSA and Gleason score were associated with ECE distance. In all 371 patients, for those with either pretreatment PSA ≥10 or biopsy Gleason score ≥7, 21% had ECE ≥2 mm and 5% ≥4 mm beyond the capsule. For patients with both of these risk factors, 49% had ECE ≥2 mm and 21% ≥4 mm. Conclusions: For prostate cancer with ECE, the median linear distance of ECE was 2.4 mm and occurred primarily posterolaterally. Although only 5% of patients demonstrate ECE >4 to 5 mm beyond the capsule, this risk may exceed 20% in patients with PSA ≥10 ng/ml and biopsy Gleason score ≥7. As imaging techniques improve for prostate capsule delineation and as radiotherapy delivery techniques increase in accuracy, a posterolateral CTV expansion should be considered for patients at high risk

  2. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    of them in transferring gene into different cells. Today, this method have had considerable progress in the treatment of many disease. In this review study, some aspect of stem cells like types and characteristic, origin, derivation techniques, storage conditions and differentiation to target tissues, current clinical usage and their therapeutic capabilities will be discussed.

  3. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dusko; Devito, Liani; Miere, Cristian; Codognotto, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC and hiPSC) have tremendous potential for clinical implementation. In spite of all hurdles and controversy, clinical trials in treatment of spinal cord injury, macular degeneration of retina, type 1 diabetes and heart failure are already ongoing. ClinicalTrials.gov database, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, PubMed and press releases and websites of companies and institutions working on hESC- and iPSC-based cellular therapy. The initial results from multiple clinical trials demonstrate that hESC-based therapies are safe and promising. Are iPSC cells safe in the clinical application? Is there a room for both hESC and iPSC in the future clinical applications? Increasing number of new clinical trials. Development of hESC- and/or iPSC-based cellular therapy for other diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The first decade of advanced cell therapy clinical trials using perinatal cells (2005-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Pedro S; Bersenev, Alexey; Verter, Frances

    2017-12-01

    The first review of advanced cell therapy trials with perinatal cells. We compiled 281 clinical trials of advanced cell therapy with perinatal cells that were registered in 2005-2015. The most common cell source in these trials is cord blood, but the cell type that provides the mechanism of action in the majority of trials is mesenchymal stem/stromal cells. We analyze trends among the 15 parameters we compiled for these trials. Advanced cell therapy with perinatal cells is a new field that covers a wide range of diagnoses but where most of the trials are early Phase. Researchers in different countries tend to work with a preferred cell source and cell type.

  5. Breast cancer stem cells: current advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Clouthier, Shawn G; Deol, Yadwinder; Liu, Suling; Nagrath, Sunitha; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, are driven by a population of cells that display stem cell properties. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells, not only drive tumor initiation and growth but also mediate tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. In this chapter, we summarize current advances in CSC research with a major focus on breast CSCs (BCSCs). We review the prevailing methods to isolate and characterize BCSCs and recent evidence documenting their cellular origins and phenotypic plasticity that enables them to transition between mesenchymal and epithelial-like states. We describe in vitro and clinical evidence that these cells mediate metastasis and treatment resistance in breast cancer, the development of novel strategies to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that contain CSCs and the use of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in preclinical breast cancer research. Lastly, we highlight several signaling pathways that regulate BCSC self-renewal and describe clinical implications of targeting these cells for breast cancer treatment. The development of strategies to effectively target BCSCs has the potential to significantly improve the outcomes for patients with breast cancer.

  6. TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 stimulation induces chondrogenesis in expanded human articular chondrocytes and marrow-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K; Huey, Daniel J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-03-01

    Replacement of degenerated cartilage with cell-based cartilage products may offer a long-term solution to halt arthritis' degenerative progression. Chondrocytes are frequently used in cell-based FDA-approved cartilage products; yet human marrow-derived stromal cells (hMSCs) show significant translational potential, reducing donor site morbidity and maintaining their undifferentiated phenotype with expansion. This study sought to investigate the effects of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) during postexpansion chondrogenesis in human articular chondrocytes (hACs) and to compare chondrogenesis in passaged hACs with that of passaged hMSCs. Through serial expansion, chondrocytes dedifferentiated, decreasing expression of chondrogenic genes while increasing expression of fibroblastic genes. However, following expansion, 10 ng/mL TGF-β1, 100 ng/mL GDF-5, or 100 ng/mL BMP-2 supplementation during three-dimensional aggregate culture each upregulated one or more markers of chondrogenic gene expression in both hACs and hMSCs. Additionally, in both cell types, the combination of TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 induced the greatest upregulation of chondrogenic genes, that is, Col2A1, Col2A1/Col1A1 ratio, SOX9, and ACAN, and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix, that is, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and ratio of collagen II/I. Finally, TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 stimulation yielded mechanically robust cartilage rich in collagen II and GAGs in both cell types, following 4 weeks maturation. This study illustrates notable success in using the self-assembling method to generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage constructs using expanded hACs and hMSCs. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Neural stem cell differentiation by electrical stimulation using a cross-linked PEDOT substrate: Expanding the use of biocompatible conjugated conductive polymers for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Filipa; Ferreira, Quirina; Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Morgado, Jorge; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-06-01

    The use of conjugated polymers allows versatile interactions between cells and flexible processable materials, while providing a platform for electrical stimulation, which is particularly relevant when targeting differentiation of neural stem cells and further application for therapy or drug screening. Materials were tested for cytotoxicity following the ISO10993-5. PSS was cross-linked. ReNcellVM neural stem cells (NSC) were seeded in laminin coated surfaces, cultured for 4 days in the presence of EGF (20 ng/mL), FGF-2 (20 ng/mL) and B27 (20 μg/mL) and differentiated over eight additional days in the absence of those factors under 100Hz pulsed DC electrical stimulation, 1V with 10 ms pulses. NSC and neuron elongation aspect ratio as well as neurite length were assessed using ImageJ. Cells were immune-stained for Tuj1 and GFAP. F8T2, MEH-PPV, P3HT and cross-linked PSS (x PSS) were assessed as non-cytotoxic. L929 fibroblast population was 1.3 higher for x PSS than for glass control, while F8T2 presents moderate proliferation. The population of neurons (Tuj1) was 1.6 times higher with longer neurites (73 vs 108 μm) for cells cultured under electrical stimulus, with cultured NSC. Such stimulus led also to longer neurons. x PSS was, for the first time, used to elongate human NSC through the application of pulsed current, impacting on their differentiation towards neurons and contributing to longer neurites. The range of conductive conjugated polymers known as non-cytotoxic was expanded. x PSS was introduced as a stable material, easily processed from solution, to interface with biological systems, in particular NSC, without the need of in-situ polymerization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Basal cell carcinoma. Molecular genetics and unusual clinical features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenberger, J

    2007-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Its incidence is steadily increasing. The development of basal cell carcinoma is linked to genetic factors, including the individual skin phototype, as well as the cumulative exposure to UVB. The vast majority of basal cell carcinomas are sporadic tumors, while familial cases associated with certain hereditary syndromes are less common. At the molecular level, basal cell carcinomas are characterized by aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog signaling, usually due to mutations either in the ptch or smoh genes. In addition, about half of the cases carry mutations in the tp53 tumor suppressor gene, which are often UVB-associated C-->T transition mutations. Clinically, basal cell carcinomas may show a high degree of phenotypical variability. In particular, tumors occurring in atypical locations, showing an unusual clinical appearance, or imitating other skin diseases may cause diagnostic problems. This review article summarizes the current state of the art concerning the etiology, predisposition and molecular genetics of basal cell carcinoma. In addition, examples of unusual clinical manifestations are illustrated.

  9. Clinical Application of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindita Chatterjea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard in the repair of bony defects is autologous bone grafting, even though it has drawbacks in terms of availability and morbidity at the harvesting site. Bone-tissue engineering, in which osteogenic cells and scaffolds are combined, is considered as a potential bone graft substitute strategy. Proof-of-principle for bone tissue engineering using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs has been demonstrated in various animal models. In addition, 7 human clinical studies have so far been conducted. Because the experimental design and evaluation parameters of the studies are rather heterogeneous, it is difficult to draw conclusive evidence on the performance of one approach over the other. However, it seems that bone apposition by the grafted MSCs in these studies is observed but not sufficient to bridge large bone defects. In this paper, we discuss the published human clinical studies performed so far for bone-tissue regeneration, using culture-expanded, nongenetically modified MSCs from various sources and extract from it points of consideration for future clinical studies.

  10. Long-term Renewable Human Intestinal Epithelial Stem Cells as Monolayers: A Potential for Clinical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew; Rouch, Joshua D; Jabaji, Ziyad; Khalil, Hassan A; Solorzano, Sergio; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G.; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current culture schema for human intestinal stem cells (hISCs) frequently rely on a 3D culture system using Matrigel™, a laminin-rich matrix derived from murine sarcoma that is not suitable for clinical use. We have developed a novel 2D culture system for the in vitro expansion of hISCs as an intestinal epithelial monolayer without the use of Matrigel. Methods Cadaveric duodenal samples were processed to isolate intestinal crypts from the mucosa. Crypts were cultured on a thin coat of type I collagen or laminin. Intestinal epithelial monolayers were supported with growth factors to promote self-renewal or differentiation of the hISCs. Proliferating monolayers were sub-cultured every 4–5 days. Results Intestinal epithelial monolayers were capable of long-term cell renewal. Less differentiated monolayers expressed high levels of gene marker LGR5, while more differentiated monolayers had higher expressions of CDX2, MUC2, LYZ, DEF5, and CHGA. Furthermore, monolayers were capable of passaging into a 3D culture system to generate spheroids and enteroids. Conclusion This 2D system is an important step to expand hISCs for further experimental studies and for clinical cell transplantation. PMID:26995514

  11. Establishing a stem cell culture laboratory for clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Elíseo Joji; Forte, Andresa; Kühn, Telma Ingrid Borges de Bellis; Janz, Felipe; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo; Alves, Adelson

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem/progenitor cells are found in different human tissues. An in vitro cell culture is needed for their isolation or for their expansion when they are not available in a sufficient quantity to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The level of complexity of these new technologies requires adequate facilities, qualified personnel with experience in cell culture techniques, assessment of quality and clear protocols for cell production. The rules for the implementation of cell therapy centers involve national and international standards of good manufacturing practices. However, such standards are not uniform, reflecting the diversity of technical and scientific development. Here standards from the United States, the European Union and Brazil are analyzed. Moreover, practical solutions encountered for the implementation of a cell therapy center appropriate for the preparation and supply of cultured cells for clinical studies are described. Development stages involved the planning and preparation of the project, the construction of the facility, standardization of laboratory procedures and development of systems to prevent cross contamination. Combining the theoretical knowledge of research centers involved in the study of cells with the practical experience of blood therapy services that manage structures for cell transplantation is presented as the best potential for synergy to meet the demands to implement cell therapy centers. PMID:23049427

  12. Dentoskeletal outcomes of a rapid maxillary expander with differential opening in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate: A prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Daniela; Lauris, Rita De Cássia Moura Carvalho; Calil, Louise Resti; Alves, Arthur César De Medeiros; Janson, Guilherme; De Almeida, Araci Malagodi; Cevidanes, Lúcia Helena Soares; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this 2-arm parallel study was to evaluate the dentoskeletal effects of rapid maxillary expansion with differential opening (EDO) compared with the hyrax expander in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. A sample of patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate was prospectively and consecutively recruited. Eligibility criteria included participants in the mixed dentition with lip and palate repair performed during early childhood and maxillary arch constriction with a need for maxillary expansion before the alveolar bone graft procedure. The participants were consecutively divided into 2 study groups. The experimental and control groups comprised patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion using EDO and the hyrax expander, respectively. Cone-beam computed tomography examinations and digital dental models of the maxillary dental arches were obtained before expansion and 6 months postexpansion. Standardized cone-beam computed tomography coronal sections were used for measuring maxillary transverse dimensions and posterior tooth inclinations. Digital dental models were used for assessing maxillary dental arch widths, arch perimeters, arch lengths, palatal depths, and posterior tooth inclinations. Blinding was used only during outcome assessment. The chi-square test was used to compare the sex ratios between groups (P variables before expansion. No significant differences were found between the EDO and the hyrax expander groups regarding skeletal changes. The EDO promoted significantly greater increases of intercanine width (difference, 3.63 mm) and smaller increases in canine buccal tipping than the conventional hyrax expander. No serious harm was observed other than transitory variable pressure sensations on the maxillary alveolar process in both groups. The EDO produced skeletal changes similar to the conventional hyrax expander. The differential expander is an adequate alternative to conventional rapid maxillary

  13. Dentoskeletal outcomes of a rapid maxillary expander with differential opening in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate: A prospective clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Daniela; De Cássia Moura Carvalho Lauris, Rita; Calil, Louise Resti; De Medeiros Alves, Arthur César; Janson, Guilherme; De Almeida, Araci Malagodi; Cevidanes, Lúcia Helena Soares; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this 2-arm parallel study was to evaluate the dentoskeletal effects of rapid maxillary expansion with differential opening (EDO) compared with the hyrax expander in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. Methods A sample of patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate was prospectively and consecutively recruited. Eligibility criteria included participants in the mixed dentition with lip and palate repair performed during early childhood and maxillary arch constriction with a need for maxillary expansion before the alveolar bone graft procedure. The participants were consecutively divided into 2 study groups. The experimental and control groups comprised patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion using EDO and the hyrax expander, respectively. Cone-beam computed tomography examinations and digital dental models of the maxillary dental arches were obtained before expansion and 6 months postexpansion. Standardized cone-beam computed tomography coronal sections were used for measuring maxillary transverse dimensions and posterior tooth inclinations. Digital dental models were used for assessing maxillary dental arch widths, arch perimeters, arch lengths, palatal depths, and posterior tooth inclinations. Blinding was used only during outcome assessment. The chi-square test was used to compare the sex ratios between groups (P <0.05). Intergroup comparisons were performed using independent t tests with the Bonferroni correction for multiple tests. Results Fifty patients were recruited and analyzed in their respective groups. The experimental group comprised 25 patients (mean age, 8.8 years), and the control group comprised 25 patients (mean age, 8.6 years). No intergroup significant differences were found for age, sex ratio, and dentoskeletal variables before expansion. No significant differences were found between the EDO and the hyrax expander groups regarding skeletal changes. The EDO promoted significantly

  14. Establishment of clinically relevant radioresistant cell lines and their characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Manabu; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic modalities for eradicating malignant tumors, the existence of radioresistant cells remains one of the most critical obstacles. Standard radiotherapy consists of fractionated radiation (FR) of 2-Gy X-rays once a day, 5 days a week, over 60 Gy in total. To understand the characteristics of radioresistant cells and to develop more effective radiotherapy, we have established novel radioresistant cell lines by long-term (> 5 years) exposure to moderate doses of fractionated X-rays. While all the parental human cancer cells ceased, their radioresistant derivatives continue to proliferate with daily exposure to 2-Gy FR for more than 30 days. We have coined those cells as 'clinically relevant radioresistant' (CRR) cells. Transplanted tumors into nude mice were also CRR, indicating that CRR cell lines are powerful tools to improve cancer radiotherapy. We have shown that the suppression of autophagic cell death but not apoptosis was mainly involved in cellular radioresistance. An inhibitor of the mTOR pathway which enhances autophagy was effective to overcome CRR tumors induced in nude mice. But the underlined mechanism was not through the inhibition of autophagy. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein 1 (GBP1) over expression was necessary for maintaining the CRR phenotype, but radioresistant cells were not necessarily cancer stem cells (CSCs). Targeting GBP1 positive cancer cells may be a more efficient method in conquering cancer than targeting CSCs. Slight but significant radioresistance was acquired by 0.5 Gy/12 hrs of long-term FR exposures to parental cells for more than 31 days in accordance with cyclinD1 over expression. This acquired radioresistance (ARR) was stably maintained in the tumor cells even on 31 days after the cessation of 0.5-Gy FR. Present observations give a mechanistic insight for ARR of tumor cells through long-term FR exposure, and provide novel therapeutic targets for radiosensitization

  15. The global landscape of stem cell clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Matthew D; Atkins, Harold; Bubela, Tania

    2014-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive analysis of clinical trials (CTs) listed in worldwide registries involving new applications for stem cell-based treatments and account for the role of industry. We developed a data set of 4749 stem cell CTs up to 2013 in worldwide registries. We defined 1058 novel CTs (i.e., trials that were not observational in nature; did not involve an established stem cell therapy for an established indication, such as hematopoietic stem cells for leukemia; and did not investigate supportive measures). Based on trial descriptions, we manually coded these for eight additional elements. Our analysis details the characteristics of novel stem cell CTs (e.g., stem cell types being tested, disease being targeted, and whether interventions were autologous or allogeneic), geotemporal trends, and private sector involvement as sponsor or collaborator. The field is progressing at a steady pace with emerging business models for stem cell therapeutics. However, therapeutic rhetoric must be tempered to reflect current clinical and research realities.

  16. Cancer stem cells and immunoresistance: clinical implications and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codony-Servat, Jordi; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells can be contained, but not eliminated, by traditional cancer therapies. A cell minor subpopulation is able to evade attack from therapies and may have cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics, including self-renewal, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation (tumor initiating cells, or TICs). Thus, CSCs/TICs, aided by the microenvironment, produce more differentiated, metastatic cancer cells which the immune system detects and interacts with. There are three phases to this process: elimination, equilibrium and escape. In the elimination phase the immune system recognizes and destroys most of the tumor cells. Then the latency phase begins, consisting of equilibrium between immunological elimination and tumor cell growth. Finally, a minor attack-resistant subpopulation escapes and forms a clinically detectable tumor mass. Herein we review current knowledge of immunological characterization of CSCs/TICs. Due to the correlation between CTCs/TICs and drug resistance and metastasis, we also comment on the crucial role of key molecules involved in controlling CSCs/TICs properties; such molecules are essential to detect and destroy CSCs/TICs. Monoclonal antibodies, antibody constructs and vaccines have been designed to act against CSCs/TICs, with demonstrated efficacy in human cancer xenografts and some antitumor activity in human clinical studies. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs/TICs warrant further investigation. Better understanding of the interaction between CSCs and tumor immunology may help to identify strategies to eradicate the minor subpopulation that escapes conventional therapy attack, thus providing a solution to the problem of drug resistance and metastasis.

  17. Engineering Therapeutic T Cells: From Synthetic Biology to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esensten, Jonathan H; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Lim, Wendell A

    2017-01-24

    Engineered T cells are currently in clinical trials to treat patients with cancer, solid organ transplants, and autoimmune diseases. However, the field is still in its infancy. The design, and manufacturing, of T cell therapies is not standardized and is performed mostly in academic settings by competing groups. Reliable methods to define dose and pharmacokinetics of T cell therapies need to be developed. As of mid-2016, there are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved T cell therapeutics on the market, and FDA regulations are only slowly adapting to the new technologies. Further development of engineered T cell therapies requires advances in immunology, synthetic biology, manufacturing processes, and government regulation. In this review, we outline some of these challenges and discuss the contributions that pathologists can make to this emerging field.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Clinical Applications in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Wu, Kun-Chi; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation. Chondrocytes in the matrix have a relatively slow turnover rate, and the tissue itself lacks a blood supply to support repair and remodeling. Researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating osteoarthritis. All sources of stem cells, including embryonic, induced pluripotent, fetal, and adult stem cells, have potential use in stem cell therapy, which provides a permanent biological solution. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord show considerable promise for use in cartilage repair. MSCs can be sourced from any or all joint tissues and can modulate the immune response. Additionally, MSCs can directly differentiate into chondrocytes under appropriate signal transduction. They also have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory paracrine effects. This article reviews the current clinical applications of MSCs and future directions of research in osteoarthritis.

  19. Clinical and genetic aspects of testicular germ cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzik, Martijn F. Lutke; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we review clinical and genetic aspects of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs). TGCT is the most common type of malignant disorder in men aged 15-40 years. Its incidence has increased sharply in recent years. Fortunately, survival of patients with TGCT has improved enormously, which

  20. Somatic cell count distributions during lactation predict clinical mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M.J.; Green, L.E.; Schukken, Y.H.; Bradley, A.J.; Peeler, E.J.; Barkema, H.W.; Haas, de Y.; Collis, V.J.; Medley, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigated somatic cell count (SCC) records during lactation, with the purpose of identifying distribution characteristics (mean and measures of variation) that were most closely associated with clinical mastitis. Three separate data sets were used, one containing quarter SCC (n =

  1. Sickle cell disease clinical phenotypes in children from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More children with a history of asthma had ACS. Furthermore, high steady.state white blood cell count was associated with severe disease. Conclusion: The clinical phenotypes of SCD in children from South.Western Nigeria are highly variable with the disease manifesting very early and about 10% having significant ...

  2. Potential and clinical utility of stem cells in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korff Krause

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Korff Krause, Carsten Schneider, Kai Jaquet, Karl-Heinz KuckHanseatic Heart Center Hamburg, Department of Cardiology, Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: The recent identification of bone marrow-derived adult stem cells and other types of stem cells that could improve heart function after transplantation have raised high expectations. The basic mechanisms have been studied mostly in murine models. However, these experiments revealed controversial results on transdifferentiation vs transfusion of adult stem cells vs paracrine effects of these cells, which is still being debated. Moreover, the reproducibility of these results in precisely translated large animal models is still less well investigated. Despite these weaknesses results of several clinical trials including several hundreds of patients with ischemic heart disease have been published. However, there are no solid data showing that any of these approaches can regenerate human myocardium. Even the effectiveness of cell therapy in these approaches is doubtful. In future we need in this important field of regenerative medicine: i more experimental data in large animals that are closer to the anatomy and physiology of humans, including data on dose effects, comparison of different cell types and different delivery routes; ii a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the fate of transplanted cells; iii more intensive research on genuine regenerative medicine, applying genetic regulation and cell engineering.Keywords: stem cells, cardiovascular disease

  3. Safety and complications reporting update on the re-implantation of culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cells using autologous platelet lysate technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Christopher J; Schultz, John R; Cheever, Michelle; Freeman, Michael; Faulkner, Stephen; Robinson, Brent; Hanson, Ronald

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise as therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Numerous animal studies have documented the multipotency of MSCs, showing their capabilities for differentiating into orthopedic tissues such as muscle, bone, cartilage, and tendon. However, the safety of culture expanded MSC's for human use has only just begun to be reported. Between 2006 and 2010, two groups of patients were treated for various orthopedic conditions with culture-expanded, autologous, bone marrow-derived MSCs (group 1: n=50; group 2: n=290-one patient in both groups). Cells were cultured in monolayer culture flasks using an autologous platelet lysate technique and re-injected into peripheral joints or into intervertebral discs with use of c-arm fluoroscopy. While both groups had prospective surveillance for complications, Group 1 additionally underwent 3.0T MRI tracking of the re-implant sites. The mean age of patients treated was 53 +/- 13.85 years; 214 were males and 125 females with mean follow-up time from any procedure being 435 days +/- 261 days. Number of contacts initiated based on time from first procedure was 482 at 3 months, 433 at 6 months, 316 contacts at 12 months, 110 contacts at 24 months, and 22 contacts at 36 months. For Group 1, 50 patients underwent 210 MRI surveillance procedures at 3 months, 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years which failed to demonstrate any tumor formation at the re-implant sites. Formal disease surveillance for adverse events based on HHS criteria documented significantly less morbidity than is commonly reported for more invasive surgical procedures, all of which were either self-limited or were remedied with therapeutic measures. Two patients were diagnosed with cancer out of 339 patients treated since study inception; however, this was almost certainly unrelated to the MSC therapy and the neoplasm rate in similar to that seen in the U.S. Caucasian population. Knee outcome data was collected on a subset of patients

  4. [Adhesion of clinical Candida albicans isolate to buccal epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A

    1999-01-01

    Mucosal adherence and germ tube formation are considered to be important virulence factors of C. albicans. Adherence is a precondition for colonisation and invasion. We investigated 11 clinical isolates (among them 5 cases recovered from oesophageal thrush) for quantification of the two characteristics and correlated the results with clinical data. Adherence was measured on buccal epithelial cells and the continuous flow culture was used for quantification of germ tube formation. Adherence of strains recovered from clinically, culturally and serologically confirmed oesophageal thrush adhered stronger to buccal epithelial cells than isolates from patients with heavy colonisation without signs of candidosis. Strains with stronger adherence showed a significantly faster and an increased germ tube formation in the continuous flow culture. Strains from oesophageal thrush therefore show a more marked expression of the investigated virulence factors. Therefore a good adherence is a necessity for infection of the oesophagus by C. albicans. The preferential isolation of C. albicans from oesophageal thrush (> 90%) supports this assumption.

  5. Imaging: Guiding the Clinical Translation of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Lan, Feng; Wang, Yongming; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been touted as the holy grail of medical therapy with promises to regenerate cardiac tissue, but it appears the jury is still out on this novel therapy. Using advanced imaging technology, scientists have discovered that these cells do not survive nor engraft long-term. In addition, only marginal benefit has been observed in large animal studies and human trials. However, all is not lost. Further application of advanced imaging technology will help scientists unravel the mysteries of stem cell therapy and address the clinical hurdles facing its routine implementation. In this review, we will discuss how advanced imaging technology will help investigators better define the optimal delivery method, improve survival and engraftment, and evaluate efficacy and safety. Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:21960727

  6. A Sound Therapy-Based Intervention to Expand the Auditory Dynamic Range for Loudness among Persons with Sensorineural Hearing Losses: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Craig; Hawley, Monica L.; Sherlock, LaGuinn P.; Gold, Susan; Payne, JoAnne; Brooks, Rebecca; Parton, Jason M.; Juneau, Roger; Desporte, Edward J.; Siegle, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the validity, efficacy, and generalization of principles underlying a sound therapy–based treatment for promoting expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The basic sound therapy principles, originally devised for treatment of hyperacusis among patients with tinnitus, were evaluated in this study in a target sample of unsuccessfully fit and/or problematic prospective hearing aid users with diminished DRs (owing to their elevated audiometric thresholds and reduced sound tolerance). Secondary aims included: (1) delineation of the treatment contributions from the counseling and sound therapy components to the full-treatment protocol and, in turn, the isolated treatment effects from each of these individual components to intervention success; and (2) characterization of the respective dynamics for full, partial, and control treatments. Thirty-six participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing losses and reduced DRs, which affected their actual or perceived ability to use hearing aids, were enrolled in and completed a placebo-controlled (for sound therapy) randomized clinical trial. The 2 × 2 factorial trial design was implemented with or without various assignments of counseling and sound therapy. Specifically, participants were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (nine participants per group), including: (1) group 1—full treatment achieved with scripted counseling plus sound therapy implemented with binaural sound generators; (2) group 2—partial treatment achieved with counseling and placebo sound generators (PSGs); (3) group 3—partial treatment achieved with binaural sound generators alone; and (4) group 4—a neutral control treatment implemented with the PSGs alone. Repeated measurements of categorical loudness judgments served as the primary outcome measure. The full-treatment categorical-loudness judgments for group 1, measured at treatment termination, were

  7. Development of a surrogate potency assay to determine the angiogenic activity of Stempeucel®, a pooled, ex-vivo expanded, allogeneic human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cell product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thej, Charan; Ramadasse, Balamurugan; Walvekar, Ankita; Majumdar, Anish S; Balasubramanian, Sudha

    2017-02-28

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have emerged as a more beneficial alternative to conventional therapy and may offer a potential cure for unmet medical needs. MSCs are known to possess strong immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Moreover, they promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration through the secretion of trophic factors. For these reasons, the past decade witnessed a sharp increase in the number of clinical trials conducted with stem cells for various vascular diseases requiring angiogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro angiogenic potency of Stempeucel®, which is an allogeneic pooled human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (phBMMSC) product. We previously established the safety of Stempeucel® in our pre-clinical studies, and clinical trials conducted for critical limb ischaemia and acute myocardial infarction. Because the proposed mechanism of action of phBMMSCs is mainly through the secretion of pro-angiogenic cytokines, we developed a surrogate potency assay by screening various batches of large-scale expanded phBMMSCs for the expression of angiogenic factors and cytokines through gene expression and growth factor analyses, followed by in vitro functional assays. The well characterized angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was selected and quantified in twenty six manufactured batches of phBMMSCs to establish consistency following the United States Food and Drug Administration recommendations. According to recommendations 21 CFR 211.165(e) and 211.194(a)(2), we also established and documented the specificity and reproducibility of the test methods employed through validation. Moreover, we also attempted to elucidate the mechanism of action of the cell population to ensure appropriate biological activity. The functional role of VEGF has been established through in vitro angiogenic assays and a dose-dependent correlation was observed with in vitro functional results. The data generated from this study

  8. Clinical Relevance of Natural Killer Cells Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M Palmer, Kamalakannan Rajasekaran, Monica S Thakar, Subramaniam Malarkannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are one of the first cells to recover following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and are believed to play an important role in facilitating engraftment or preventing post-transplant infection and tumor recurrence. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the mechanisms by which NK cells mediate these highly clinically relevant immunological functions. In particular, the ability of NK cells to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD and increase the graft versus leukemia effect (GVL in the setting of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical HSCT highlights their clinical potentials. NK cells also mediate anti-viral protection, in particular against cytomegalovirus (CMV, an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality following transplant. Another crucial function of NK cells is providing protection against bacterial infections at the mucosal barriers. NK cells achieve this by promoting anti-microbial defenses and regeneration of epithelial cells. These recent exciting findings provide a strong basis for the formulation of novel NK cell-based immunotherapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances related to the mechanisms, functions, and future clinical prospects of NK cells that can impact post-transplant outcomes.

  9. Translation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: From Clinical Trial in a Dish to Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Nazish; Liu, Chun; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-05-10

    The prospect of changing the plasticity of terminally differentiated cells toward pluripotency has completely altered the outlook for biomedical research. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a new source of therapeutic cells free from the ethical issues or immune barriers of human embryonic stem cells. iPSCs also confer considerable advantages over conventional methods of studying human diseases. Since its advent, iPSC technology has expanded with 3 major applications: disease modeling, regenerative therapy, and drug discovery. Here we discuss, in a comprehensive manner, the recent advances in iPSC technology in relation to basic, clinical, and population health. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety Profile of Good Manufacturing Practice Manufactured Interferon γ-Primed Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Adam J; Daneault, Beth; Wang, Rongzhang; Bradbury, Hillary; La Perle, Krista M D; Fitch, James; Hedrick, Sheri L; Hamelberg, Elizabeth; Astbury, Caroline; White, Peter; Overolt, Kathleen; Rangarajan, Hemalatha; Abu-Arja, Rolla; Devine, Steven M; Otsuru, Satoru; Dominici, Massimo; O'Donnell, Lynn; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2017-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are widely studied by both academia and industry for a broad array of clinical indications. The collective body of data provides compelling evidence of the clinical safety of MSC therapy. However, generally accepted proof of therapeutic efficacy has not yet been reported. In an effort to generate a more effective therapeutic cell product, investigators are focused on modifying MSC processing protocols to enhance the intrinsic biologic activity. Here, we report a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant two-step MSC manufacturing protocol to generate MSCs or interferon γ (IFNγ) primed MSCs which allows freshly expanded cells to be infused in patients on a predetermined schedule. This protocol eliminates the need to infuse cryopreserved, just thawed cells which may reduce the immune modulatory activity. Moreover, using (IFNγ) as a prototypic cytokine, we demonstrate the feasibility of priming the cells with any biologic agent. We then characterized MSCs and IFNγ primed MSCs prepared with our protocol, by karyotype, in vitro potential for malignant transformation, biodistribution, effect on engraftment of transplanted hematopoietic cells, and in vivo toxicity in immune deficient mice including a complete post-mortem examination. We found no evidence of toxicity attributable to the MSC or IFNγ primed MSCs. Our data suggest that the clinical risk of infusing MSCs or IFNγ primed MSCs produced by our two-step protocol is not greater than MSCs currently in practice. While actual proof of safety requires phase I clinical trials, our data support the use of either cell product in new clinical studies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1868-1879. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  11. Immunomodulatory Effects of Hemagglutinin- (HA- Modified A20 B-Cell Lymphoma Expanded as a Brain Tumor on Adoptively Transferred HA-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin P. Shichkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the mouse A20 B-cell lymphoma engineered to express hemagglutinin (HA antigen (A20HA was used as a systemic tumor model. In this work, we used the A20HA cells as a brain tumor. HA-specific CD4+ T cells were transferred intravenously in a tail vein 5 days after A20HA intracranial inoculation and analyzed on days 2, 9, and 16 after the adoptive transfer by different methods. The transferred cells demonstrated state of activation as early as day 2 after the adoptive transfer and most the of viable HA-specific cells became anergic on day 16. Additionally, symptoms of systemic immunosuppression were observed in mice with massive brain tumors at a late stage of the brain tumor progression (days 20–24 after the A20HA inoculation. Despite that, a deal of HA-specific CD4+ T cells kept the functional activity even at the late stage of A20HA tumor growth. The activated HA-specific CD4+ T cells were found also in the brain of brain-tumor-bearing mice. These cells were still responding to reactivation with HA-peptide in vitro. Our data support an idea about sufficient role of both the tumor-specific and -nonspecific mechanisms inducing immunosuppression in cancer patients.

  12. Seminal Fluid Regulates Accumulation of FOXP3(+) Regulatory T Cells in the Preimplantation Mouse Uterus Through Expanding the FOXP3(+) Cell Pool and CCL19-Mediated Recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerin, Leigh R.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Prins, Jelmer R.; Bromfield, John J.; Hayball, John D.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells facilitate maternal immune tolerance of the semiallogeneic conceptus in early pregnancy, but the origin and regulation of these cells at embryo implantation is unclear. During the preimplantation period, factors in the seminal fluid delivered at coitus cause expansion of a

  13. Synergistic Toxicity of Polyglutamine-Expanded TATA-Binding Protein in Glia and Neuronal Cells: Therapeutic Implications for Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Su; Guo, Jifeng; Cui, Yiting; Tang, Beisha; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2017-09-20

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17) is caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansion in the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and is among a family of neurodegenerative diseases in which polyQ expansion leads to preferential neuronal loss in the brain. Although previous studies have demonstrated that expression of polyQ-expanded proteins in glial cells can cause neuronal injury via noncell-autonomous mechanisms, these studies investigated animal models that overexpress transgenic mutant proteins. Since glial cells are particularly reactive to overexpressed mutant proteins, it is important to investigate the in vivo role of glial dysfunction in neurodegeneration when mutant polyQ proteins are endogenously expressed. In the current study, we generated two conditional TBP-105Q knock-in mouse models that specifically express mutant TBP at the endogenous level in neurons or in astrocytes. We found that mutant TBP expression in neuronal cells or astrocytes alone only caused mild neurodegeneration, whereas severe neuronal toxicity requires the expression of mutant TBP in both neuronal and glial cells. Coculture of neurons and astrocytes further validated that mutant TBP in astrocytes promoted neuronal injury. We identified activated inflammatory signaling pathways in mutant TBP-expressing astrocytes, and blocking nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling in astrocytes ameliorated neurodegeneration. Our results indicate that the synergistic toxicity of mutant TBP in neuronal and glial cells plays a critical role in SCA17 pathogenesis and that targeting glial inflammation could be a potential therapeutic approach for SCA17 treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mutant TBP with polyglutamine expansion preferentially affects neuronal viability in SCA17 patients. Whether glia, the cells that support and protect neurons, contribute to neurodegeneration in SCA17 remains mostly unexplored. In this study, we provide both in vivo and in vitro evidence arguing that endogenous expression of mutant

  14. The synergistic immunoregulatory effects of culture-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells and CD4(+25(+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells on skin allograft rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are seen as an ideal source of cells to induce graft acceptance; however, some reports have shown that MSCs can be immunogenic rather than immunosuppressive. We speculate that the immunomodulatory effects of regulatory T cells (Tregs can aid the maintenance of immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy can have synergistic immunomodulatory effects on allograft rejection. After preconditioning with Fludarabine, followed by total body irradiation and anti-asialo-GM-1(ASGM-1, tail skin grafts from C57BL/6 (H-2k(b mice were grafted onto the lateral thoracic wall of BALB/c (H-2k(d mice. Group A mice (control group, n = 9 did not receive any further treatment after preconditioning, whereas groups B and C (n = 9 received cell therapy with MSCs or Tregs, respectively, on days -1, +6 and +13 relative to the skin transplantation. Group D (n = 10 received cell therapy with MSCs and Tregs on days -1, +6 and +13. Cell suspensions were obtained from the spleens of five randomly chosen mice from each group on day +7, and the immunomodulatory effects of the cell therapy were evaluated by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Our results show that allograft survival was significantly longer in group D compared to the control group (group A. Flow cytometric analysis and real-time PCR for splenocytes revealed that the Th2 subpopulation in group D increased significantly compared to the group B. Also, the expression of Foxp3 and STAT 5 increased significantly in group D compared to the conventional cell therapy groups (B and C. Taken together, these data suggest that a combined cell therapy approach with MSCs and Tregs has a synergistic effect on immunoregulatory function in vivo, and might provide a novel strategy for improving survival in allograft transplantation.

  15. Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew T Czyż

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

  16. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  17. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  18. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Zhenyu; Wang, Chi; Jia, Jianhang; Gao, Tianyan; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Zhou, Daohong; Bondada, Subbarao; Ji, Peng; St Clair, Daret; Liu, Jinze; Zhan, Changguo; Geiger, Hartmut; Wang, Shuxia; Liang, Ying

    2017-04-11

    Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. Latexin (Lxn) is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1) was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. New technology for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.

    1995-04-01

    A high-speed, 11-parameter, 6-color fluorescence, laser flow cytometer/cell sorter with a number of special and unique features has been built for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. The software for real-time data acquisition and sort control, written as C++ programming language modules with a WindowsTM graphical user interface, runs on a 66-MHz 80486 computer joined by an extended bus to 23 sophisticated multi-layered boards of special data acquisition and sorting electronics. Special features include: high-speed (> 100,000 cells/sec) real-time data classification module (U.S. Patent 5,204,884 (1993)); real-time principal component cell sorting; multi-queue signal-processing system with multiple hardware and software event buffers to reduce instrument dead time, LUT charge-pulse definition, high-resolution `flexible' sorting for optimal yield/purity sort strategies (U.S. Patent 5,199,576); pre-focusing optical wavelength correction for a second laser beam; and two trains of three fluorescence detectors-- each adjustable for spatial separation to interrogate only one of two laser beams, syringe- driven or pressure-driven fluidics, and time-windowed parameters. The system has been built to be both expandable and versatile through the use of LUT's and a modular hardware and software design. The instrument is especially useful at detection and isolation of rare cell subpopulations for which our laboratory is well-known. Cell subpopulations at frequencies as small as 10-7 have been successfully studied with this system. Current applications in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics include detection and isolation of (1) fetal cells from material blood for prenatal diagnosis of birth defects, (2) hematopoietic stem and precursor cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation, (3) metastatic breast cancer cells for molecular characterization, and (4) HIV-infected maternal cells in newborn blood to study mother

  20. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50 and also in metastases (6 out of 10 and recurrences (2 out of 3, but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells.

  1. CD133-enriched Xeno-Free human embryonic-derived neural stem cells expand rapidly in culture and do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Haus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Common methods for the generation of human embryonic-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs result in cells with potentially compromised safety profiles due to maintenance of cells in conditions containing non-human proteins (e.g. in bovine serum or on mouse fibroblast feeders. Additionally, sufficient expansion of resulting hNSCs for scaling out or up in a clinically relevant time frame has proven to be difficult. Here, we report a strategy that produces hNSCs in completely “Xeno-Free” culture conditions. Furthermore, we have enriched the hNSCs for the cell surface marker CD133 via magnetic sorting, which has led to an increase in the expansion rate and neuronal fate specification of the hNSCs in vitro. Critically, we have also confirmed neural lineage specificity upon sorted hNSC transplantation into the immunodeficient NOD-scid mouse brain. The future use or adaptation of these protocols has the potential to better facilitate the advancement of pre-clinical strategies from the bench to the bedside.

  2. Expanded Host Cell Tropism and Cytopathic Properties of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Strain PPR Subsequent to Passage through Interleukin-2-Independent T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lerner, Danica L.; Elder, John H.

    2000-01-01

    A cytopathic variant of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) strain PPR emerged after passage of wild-type virus on an interleukin-2-independent cell line. The virus, termed FIV-PPRglial, displayed a phenotype markedly different from the parental virus, including the ability to productively infect previously refractory cell lines, induction of large syncytia, and accelerated kinetic properties. A chimeric molecular clone, FIV-PPRchim42, containing the FIV-PPRglial envelope within the backbone ...

  3. [Clinical applications of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth in stem cell therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoxia, Li; Jiaozi, Fangteng; Shi, Yu; Yuming, Zhao; Lihong, Ge

    2017-10-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are one category of dental stem cells. They belong to ectodermal mesenchymal stem cells. As an ideal stem cell source, SHED possess great potential in stem cell therapy. This review demonstrates the biological characteristics and advantages of SHED in stem cell therapy and discusses its multiple functions in tissue regeneration and repair, including multiple differentiation potentiality, cell secretion of cytokines, and immunomodulatory ability. Furthermore, this article introduces the main findings regarding the potential clinical applications of SHED to a variety of diseases. This article demonstrates research progress in dentin-pulp regeneration, maxillofacial bone regeneration, and treatment of nervous system and immune system diseases with SHED for stem cell transplantation.

  4. Expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of human CD40L deficiency: the occurrence of paracoccidioidomycosis and other unusual infections in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Schimke, Lena-Friederike; Pereira, Paulo Vítor Soeiro; Falcai, Angela; de Oliveira, João Bosco; Hackett, Mary J; Errante, Paolo Ruggero; Weber, Cristina Worm; Ferreira, Janaíra Fernandes; Kuntze, Gisele; Rosário-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares Costa; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L) deficiency or X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (X-HIGM) is a well-described primary immunodeficiency in which Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a common clinical feature. We have identified an unusual high incidence of fungal infections and other not yet described infections in a cohort of 11 X-HIGM patients from nine unrelated Brazilian families. Among these, we describe the first case of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) in X-HIGM. The molecular genetic analysis of CD40L was performed by gene sequencing and evaluation of CD40L protein expression. Nine of these 11 patients (82%) had fungal infections. These included fungal species common to CD40L deficiency (P. jiroveci and Candida albicans) as well as Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. One patient presented with PCM at age 11 years and is now doing well at 18 years of age. Additionally, one patient presented with a simultaneous infection with Klebsiella and Acinetobacter, and one with condyloma caused by human papilloma virus. Molecular analysis revealed four previously described CD40L mutations, two novel missense mutations (c.433 T > G and c.476 G > C) resulting in the absence of CD40L protein expression by activated CD4(+) cells and one novel insertion (c.484_485insAA) within the TNFH domain leading to a frame shift and premature stop codon. These observations demonstrated that the susceptibility to fungal infections in X-HIGM extends beyond those typically associated with X-HIGM (P. jiroveci and C. albicans) and that these patients need to be monitored for those pathogens.

  5. Pulp regeneration by transplantation of dental pulp stem cells in pulpitis: a pilot clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Misako; Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Sato, Yayoi; Ariji, Yoshiko; Matsushita, Kenji

    2017-03-09

    Experiments have previously demonstrated the therapeutic potential of mobilized dental pulp stem cells (MDPSCs) for complete pulp regeneration. The aim of the present pilot clinical study is to assess the safety, potential efficacy, and feasibility of autologous transplantation of MDPSCs in pulpectomized teeth. Five patients with irreversible pulpitis were enrolled and monitored for up to 24 weeks following MDPSC transplantation. The MDPSCs were isolated from discarded teeth and expanded based on good manufacturing practice (GMP). The quality of the MDPSCs at passages 9 or 10 was ascertained by karyotype analyses. The MDPSCs were transplanted with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in atelocollagen into pulpectomized teeth. The clinical and laboratory evaluations demonstrated no adverse events or toxicity. The electric pulp test (EPT) of the pulp at 4 weeks demonstrated a robust positive response. The signal intensity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the regenerated tissue in the root canal after 24 weeks was similar to that of normal dental pulp in the untreated control. Finally, cone beam computed tomography demonstrated functional dentin formation in three of the five patients. Human MDPSCs are safe and efficacious for complete pulp regeneration in humans in this pilot clinical study.

  6. Single cell analysis contemporary research and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cossarizza, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the current state of the art in single cell analysis, an area that involves many fields of science – from clinical hematology, functional analysis and drug screening, to platelet and microparticle analysis, marine biology and fundamental cancer research. This book brings together an eclectic group of current applications, all of which have a significant impact on our current state of knowledge. The authors of these chapters are all pioneering researchers in the field of single cell analysis. The book will not only appeal to those readers more focused on clinical applications, but also those interested in highly technical aspects of the technologies. All of the technologies identified utilize unique applications of photon detection systems.

  7. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  8. Intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells with and without addition of platelet-rich plasma are safe and effective for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Ricardo; Mathias, Marcelo; Andrade, Renato; Bastos, Raquel; Balduino, Alex; Schott, Vinicius; Rodeo, Scott; Espregueira-Mendes, João

    2018-03-06

    To compare the effectiveness and safety of intra-articular injections of autologous expanded mesenchymal stromal stem cells alone (MSCs), or in combination with platelet-rich plasma (MSCs + PRP), in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Eighteen patients (57.6 ± 9.6 years) with radiographic symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (Dejour grades II-IV) were randomized to receive intra-articular injections of MSCs (n = 9) or MSCs + PRP (n = 9). Injections were performed 2-3 weeks after bone marrow aspiration (± 80-100 ml) which was obtained from both posterior iliac crests. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) improved significantly throughout the 12 months for both groups (p osteoarthritis. Adding PRP to the MSCs injections did not provide additional benefit. These results are encouraging and support the recommendation of this minimally invasive procedure in patients with knee osteoarthritis, without requiring hospitalization. The CFU-F results may be used as reference for future research. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  9. Radiotherapy enhances natural killer cell cytotoxicity and localization in pre-clinical canine sarcomas and first-in-dog clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Foltz, Jennifer A; Sturgill, Ian R; Park, Jiwon S; Luna, Jesus I; Kent, Michael S; Culp, William T N; Chen, Mingyi; Modiano, Jaime F; Monjazeb, Arta M; Lee, Dean A; Murphy, William J

    2017-12-19

    We have previously shown that radiotherapy (RT) augments natural killer (NK) functions in pre-clinical models of human and mouse cancers, including sarcomas. Since dogs are an excellent outbred model for immunotherapy studies, we sought to assess RT plus local autologous NK transfer in canine sarcomas. Dog NK cells (CD5 dim , NKp46+) were isolated from PBMCs and expanded with irradiated K562-C9-mIL21 feeder cells and 100 IU/mL recombinant human IL-2. NK homing and cytotoxicity ± RT were evaluated using canine osteosarcoma tumor lines and dog patient-derived xenografts (PDX). In a first-in-dog clinical trial for spontaneous osteosarcoma, we evaluated RT and intra-tumoral autologous NK transfer. After 14 days, mean NK expansion and yield were 19.0-fold (±8.6) and 258.9(±76.1) ×10 6 cells, respectively. Post-RT, NK cytotoxicity increased in a dose-dependent fashion in vitro reaching ~ 80% at effector:target ratios of ≥10:1 (P PDX models, allogeneic NK cells were cytotoxic in ex vivo killing assays and produced significant PDX tumor growth delay (P osteosarcoma treated with focal RT and autologous NK transfer, 5 remain metastasis-free at the 6-month primary endpoint with resolution of suspicious pulmonary nodules in one patient. We also observed increased activation of circulating NK cells after treatment and persistence of labelled NK cells in vivo. NK cell homing and cytotoxicity are increased following RT in canine models of sarcoma. Results from a first-in-dog clinical trial are promising, including possible abscopal effects.

  10. Biology and clinical application of CAR T cells for B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Marco L; Sadelain, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have generated broad interest in oncology following a series of dramatic clinical successes in patients with chemorefractory B cell malignancies. CAR therapy now appears to be on the cusp of regulatory approval as a cell-based immunotherapy. We review here the T cell biology and cell engineering research that led to the development of second generation CARs, the selection of CD19 as a CAR target, and the preclinical studies in animal models that laid the foundation for clinical trials targeting CD19+ malignancies. We further summarize the status of CD19 CAR clinical therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including their efficacy, toxicities (cytokine release syndrome, neurotoxicity and B cell aplasia) and current management in humans. We conclude with an overview of recent pre-clinical advances in CAR design that argues favorably for the advancement of CAR therapy to tackle other hematological malignancies as well as solid tumors.

  11. Cells exposed to a huntingtin fragment containing an expanded polyglutamine tract show no sign of ion channel formation: results arguing against the ion channel hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørremølle, Anne; Grunnet, Morten; Hasholt, Lis

    2003-01-01

    Ion channels formed by expanded polyglutamine tracts have been proposed to play an important role in the pathological processes leading to neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease and other CAG repeat diseases. We tested the capacity of a huntingtin fragment containing an expanded polyglutamine...

  12. Crosstalk between clinical orthodontics and bone cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 泰浩

    2003-01-01

    The recent discovery of receptor activator of nuclear factor k B ligand (RANKL)-RANK interaction confirms the well-known hypothesis that osteoblasts play an essential role in osteoclast differentiation. Osteoblasts express RANKL as a membrane-associated factor in response to various factors such as 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D_3, parathyroid hormone, prostaglandin E_2 and Interluekin-11. The recent progress of bone cell biology has been exploring the mechanism of tooth movement for clinical ortho...

  13. Clinical and laboratory profile of patients with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelipe Gabriel dos Santos Sant'Ana

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This study aimed to describe and analyze clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with sickle cell anemia treated at the Hemominas Foundation, in Divinópolis, Brazil. Furthermore, this study aimed to compare the clinical and laboratory outcomes of the group of patients treated with hydroxyurea with those patients that were not treated with hydroxyurea. Methods: Clinical and laboratorial data were obtained by analyzing medical records of patients with sickle cell anemia. Results: Data from the medical records of 50 patients were analyzed. Most of the patients were female (56%, aged between 20 and 29 years old. Infections, transfusions, cholecystectomy, splenectomy and systemic arterial hypertension were the most common clinical adverse events of the patients. The most frequent cause of hospitalization was painful crisis. The majority of patients had reduced values of hemoglobin and hematocrit (8.55 ± 1.33 g/dL and 25.7 ± 4.4%, respectively and increased fetal hemoglobin levels (12 ± 7%. None of the clinical variables was statistically significant on comparing the two groups of patients. Among hematological variables only hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were statistically different between patients treated with hydroxyurea and untreated patients (p-value = 0.005 and p-value = 0.001, respectively. Conclusion: Sickle cell anemia requires treatment and follow-up by a multiprofessional team. A current therapeutic option is hydroxyurea. This drug reduces complications and improves laboratorial parameters of patients. In this study, the use of the drug increased the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels of patients.

  14. In a patient with biclonal Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia only one clone expands in three-dimensional culture and includes putative cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Julia; Thulien, Kyle J; Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2011-02-01

    A small percentage of cases of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) present with biclonality, defined here as the rearrangement of two distinct VDJ gene segments. Here we investigated the expansion of two clones from a patient with WM expressing molecularly detectable clonotypic gene rearrangements, one V(H)3 and one V(H)4. Biclonality was determined in blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells using real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). V(H)4 expressing cells but not V(H)3 expressing cells underwent clonal expansion in 3-D culture of reconstructed WM bone marrow. After 3-D culture, secondary culture in a colony forming unit assay, and RQ-PCR, only the V(H)4 clone was shown to harbor a subpopulation with characteristics of cancer stem cells, including proliferative quiescence, self-regeneration, and the ability to generate clonotypic progeny, suggesting that the V(H)4, but not the V(H)3, clone is clinically significant. Enrichment of potential WM stem cells in 3-D cultures holds promise for monitoring their response to treatment and for testing new therapies.

  15. The Adolescent "Expanded Medical Home": School-Based Health Centers Partner with a Primary Care Clinic to Improve Population Health and Mitigate Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Laurie, Anna R; Plegue, Melissa A; Richarson, Caroline R

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality health care is a crucial social determinant of health. We describe the implementation of an "expanded medical home" partnering a primary care practice (the Ypsilanti Health Center [YHC]) with local school-based health centers (the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools [RAHS]), and to assess whether this model improves access to and quality of care for shared patients. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, we define the steps in, barriers to, and facilitating factors in implementing the expanded medical home model. Visits and quality measures were assessed for patients seen by YHC only versus YHC/RAHS at baseline and during the intervention. At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P partnership between primary care physicians and school-based health centers increases the number of shared high-risk adolescent patients. Shared patients have improved compliance with quality measures, which may lead to long-term improved health equity. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Tracking the implementation of NCCLS M100-S12 expanded-spectrum cephalosporin MIC breakpoints for nonmeningeal isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae by clinical laboratories in the United States during 2002 and 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornsberry Clyde

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Twelfth Informational Supplement, M100-S12, published by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS in January 2002 introduced distinct minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC interpretative breakpoints for ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and cefepime for nonmeningeal isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Previously, a single set of interpretative breakpoints was used for both meningeal and nonmeningeal isolates. Methods To estimate the rate of adoption of the M100-S12 interpretive breakpoints by clinical laboratories, antimicrobial susceptibility test results for ceftriaxone and cefotaxime from nonmeningeal S. pneumoniae isolates were studied using data collected from January 2002 to June 2003 by The Surveillance Network® Database – USA (TSN®, an electronic surveillance database. Results Of the 262 laboratories that provided data that could be evaluated, 67.6% had adopted the M100-S12 breakpoints one and one-half years after they were published. Conclusions The NCCLS M100-S12 recommendation to interpret MICs to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins using two distinct sets of breakpoints for meningeal and nonmeningeal isolates of S. pneumoniae was steadily implemented by clinical microbiology laboratories in the United States following their initial publication in January 2002. The use of these new breakpoints more accurately reflects the clinical activities of expanded-spectrum cephalosporins than did the single set of interpretative breakpoints previously used for both meningeal and nonmeningeal isolates.

  17. Clinical potential of human-induced pluripotent stem cells : Perspectives of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Anand, Taruna; Kues, Wilfried A

    2017-04-01

    The recent establishment of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells promises the development of autologous cell therapies for degenerative diseases, without the ethical concerns associated with human embryonic stem (ES) cells. Initially, iPS cells were generated by retroviral transduction of somatic cells with core reprogramming genes. To avoid potential genotoxic effects associated with retroviral transfection, more recently, alternative non-viral gene transfer approaches were developed. Before a potential clinical application of iPS cell-derived therapies can be planned, it must be ensured that the reprogramming to pluripotency is not associated with genome mutagenesis or epigenetic aberrations. This may include direct effects of the reprogramming method or "off-target" effects associated with the reprogramming or the culture conditions. Thus, a rigorous safety testing of iPS or iPS-derived cells is imperative, including long-term studies in model animals. This will include not only rodents but also larger mammalian model species to allow for assessing long-term stability of the transplanted cells, functional integration into the host tissue, and freedom from undifferentiated iPS cells. Determination of the necessary cell dose is also critical; it is assumed that a minimum of 1 billion transplantable cells is required to achieve a therapeutic effect. This will request medium to long-term in vitro cultivation and dozens of cell divisions, bearing the risk of accumulating replication errors. Here, we review the clinical potential of human iPS cells and evaluate which are the most suitable approaches to overcome or minimize risks associated with the application of iPS cell-derived cell therapies.

  18. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  19. Layouts of Expander Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Dujmović, Vida; Sidiropoulos, Anastasios; Wood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Bourgain and Yehudayoff recently constructed $O(1)$-monotone bipartite expanders. By combining this result with a generalisation of the unraveling method of Kannan, we construct 3-monotone bipartite expanders, which is best possible. We then show that the same graphs admit 3-page book embeddings, 2-queue layouts, 4-track layouts, and have simple thickness 2. All these results are best possible.

  20. Phenotypic and Functional Attributes of Lentivirus Modified CD19-specific Human CD8+ Central Memory T Cells Manufactured at Clinical Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiuli; Naranjo, Araceli; Brown, Christine E.; Bautista, Cherrilyn; Wong, ChingLam W.; Chang, Wen-Chung; Aguilar, Brenda; Ostberg, Julie R.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    A key determinant of the therapeutic potency of adoptive T cell transfer is the extent to which infused cells can persist and expand in vivo. Ex vivo propagated virus-specific and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) redirected anti-tumor CD8+ effector T cells derived from CD45RA−CD62L+ central memory (TCM) precursors engraft long-term and reconstitute functional memory following adoptive transfer. Here, we describe a clinical-scale, closed system, immunomagnetic selection method to isolate CD8+ T...

  1. Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary progress in understanding several key features of stem cells has been made in the last ten years, including definition of the niche, and identification of signals regulating mobilization and homing as well as partial understanding of the mechanisms controlling self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation. This progress produced invaluable tools for the development of rational cell therapy protocols that have yielded positive results in preclinical models of genetic and acquired diseases and, in several cases, have entered clinical experimentation with positive outcome. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic cells with multilineage potential to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. They can be isolated from bone marrow and other tissues and have the capacity to extensively proliferate in vitro. Moreover, MSCs have also been shown to produce anti-inflammatory molecules which can modulate humoral and cellular immune responses. Considering their regenerative potential and immunoregulatory effect, MSC therapy is a promising tool in the treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. It is obvious that much work remains to be done to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development, homeostasis, and tissue repair and thus to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials.

  2. 2015 Clinical trials update in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Natasha; Galacteros, Frédéric; Brugnara, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Polymerization of HbS and cell sickling are the prime pathophysiological events in sickle cell disease (SCD). Over the last 30 years, a substantial understanding at the molecular level has been acquired on how a single amino acid change in the structure of the beta chain of hemoglobin leads to the explosive growth of the HbS polymer and the associated changes in red cell morphology. O2 tension and intracellular HbS concentration are the primary molecular drivers of this process, and are obvious targets for developing new therapies. However, polymerization and sickling are driving a complex network of associated cellular changes inside and outside of the erythrocyte, which become essential components of the inflammatory vasculopathy and result in a large range of potential acute and chronic organ damages. In these areas, a multitude of new targets for therapeutic developments have emerged, with several ongoing or planned new therapeutic interventions. This review outlines the key points of SCD pathophysiology as they relate to the development of new therapies, both at the pre-clinical and clinical levels. PMID:26178236

  3. Umbilical cord blood–derived T regulatory cells to prevent GVHD: kinetics, toxicity profile, and clinical effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey S.; McKenna, David H.; Hippen, Keli L.; DeFor, Todd E.; Sumstad, Darin; Curtsinger, Julie; Verneris, Michael R.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Levine, Bruce L.; Riley, James L.; June, Carl H.; Le, Chap; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; McGlave, Philip B.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wagner, John E.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the safety and clinical outcomes of patients treated with umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) that expanded in cultures stimulated with K562 cells modified to express the high-affinity Fc receptor (CD64) and CD86, the natural ligand of CD28 (KT64/86). Eleven patients were treated with Treg doses from 3-100 × 106 Treg/kg. The median proportion of CD4+FoxP3+CD127– in the infused product was 87% (range, 78%-95%), and we observed no dose-limiting infusional adverse events. Clinical outcomes were compared with contemporary controls (n = 22) who received the same conditioning regimen with sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil immune suppression. The incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at 100 days was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0-25) vs 45% (95% CI, 24-67) in controls (P = .05). Chronic GVHD at 1 year was zero in Tregs and 14% in controls. Hematopoietic recovery and chimerism, cumulative density of infections, nonrelapse mortality, relapse, and disease-free survival were similar in the Treg recipients and controls. KT64/86-expanded UCB Tregs were safe and resulted in low risk of acute GVHD. PMID:26563133

  4. Umbilical cord blood-derived T regulatory cells to prevent GVHD: kinetics, toxicity profile, and clinical effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein, Claudio G; Miller, Jeffrey S; McKenna, David H; Hippen, Keli L; DeFor, Todd E; Sumstad, Darin; Curtsinger, Julie; Verneris, Michael R; MacMillan, Margaret L; Levine, Bruce L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Le, Chap; Weisdorf, Daniel J; McGlave, Philip B; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E

    2016-02-25

    We studied the safety and clinical outcomes of patients treated with umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) that expanded in cultures stimulated with K562 cells modified to express the high-affinity Fc receptor (CD64) and CD86, the natural ligand of CD28 (KT64/86). Eleven patients were treated with Treg doses from 3-100 × 10(6) Treg/kg. The median proportion of CD4(+)FoxP3(+)CD127(-) in the infused product was 87% (range, 78%-95%), and we observed no dose-limiting infusional adverse events. Clinical outcomes were compared with contemporary controls (n = 22) who received the same conditioning regimen with sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil immune suppression. The incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at 100 days was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0-25) vs 45% (95% CI, 24-67) in controls (P = .05). Chronic GVHD at 1 year was zero in Tregs and 14% in controls. Hematopoietic recovery and chimerism, cumulative density of infections, nonrelapse mortality, relapse, and disease-free survival were similar in the Treg recipients and controls. KT64/86-expanded UCB Tregs were safe and resulted in low risk of acute GVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  6. Strategy Escalation: An emerging paradigm for safe clinical development of T cell gene therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghans Richard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy techniques are being applied to modify T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs for therapeutic ends. The versatility of this platform has spawned multiple options for their application with new permutations in strategies continually being invented, a testimony to the creative energies of many investigators. The field is rapidly expanding with immense potential for impact against diverse cancers. But this rapid expansion, like the Big Bang, comes with a somewhat chaotic evolution of its therapeutic universe that can also be dangerous, as seen by recently publicized deaths. Time-honored methods for new drug testing embodied in Dose Escalation that were suitable for traditional inert agents are now inadequate for these novel "living drugs". In the following, I propose an approach to escalating risk for patient exposures with these new immuno-gene therapy agents, termed Strategy Escalation, that accounts for the molecular and biological features of the modified cells and the methods of their administration. This proposal is offered not as a prescriptive but as a discussion framework that investigators may wish to consider in configuring their intended clinical applications.

  7. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  8. Stem cell clonality -- theoretical concepts, experimental techniques, and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauche, Ingmar; Bystrykh, Leonid; Eaves, Connie; Roeder, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Here we report highlights of discussions and results presented at an International Workshop on Concepts and Models of Stem Cell Organization held on July 16th and 17th, 2012 in Dresden, Germany. The goal of the workshop was to undertake a systematic survey of state-of-the-art methods and results of clonality studies of tissue regeneration and maintenance with a particular emphasis on the hematopoietic system. The meeting was the 6th in a series of similar conceptual workshops, termed StemCellMathLab,(2) all of which have had the general objective of using an interdisciplinary approach to discuss specific aspects of stem cell biology. The StemCellMathLab 2012, which was jointly organized by the Institute for Medical Informatics and Biometry, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology and the Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, brought together 32 scientists from 8 countries, with scientific backgrounds in medicine, cell biology, virology, physics, computer sciences, bioinformatics and mathematics. The workshop focused on the following questions: (1) How heterogeneous are stem cells and their progeny? and (2) What are the characteristic differences in the clonal dynamics between physiological and pathophysiological situations? In discussing these questions, particular emphasis was placed on (a) the methods for quantifying clones and their dynamics in experimental and clinical settings and (b) general concepts and models for their description. In this workshop summary we start with an introduction to the current state of clonality research and a proposal for clearly defined terminology. Major topics of discussion include clonal heterogeneity in unperturbed tissues, clonal dynamics due to physiological and pathophysiological pressures and conceptual and technical issues of clone quantification. We conclude that an interactive cross-disciplinary approach to research in this

  9. Urea Cycle Defects: Early-Onset Disease Associated with A208T Mutation in OTC Gene—Expanding the Clinical Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OMIM: 311250 is the most common disorder of urea cycle disorders, accounting for nearly 50% of all cases. We report a case of a two-month- old male patient, who attends our medical genetics consultation because of low citrulline levels and elevated glutamine to citrulline ratio detected by expanded newborn screening with tandem mass spectrometry. He is an asymptomatic male with a normal physical examination and appropriate neurodevelopmental milestones. The patient has a family history of one older brother who died at 18 months old from severe and sudden hyperammonemia and a maternal aunt who suddenly died at two years old. He had high plasma ammonium concentration and a confirmed OTC mutation (p.A208T. Usually, this mutation causes OTC deficiency of late onset in adult males. However, this report raises awareness about mutations previously described as a late-onset causing disease, which can cause severe hyperammonemia and high risk of dying at an early age.

  10. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine. PMID:25949219

  11. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine.

  12. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  13. Expanding Thurston maps

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    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  14. No Synergistic Effect of Cotransplantation of MSC and Ex Vivo TPO-Expanded CD34(+) Cord Blood Cells on Platelet Recovery and Bone Marrow Engraftment in NOD SCID Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Garde, Mark; Brand, Anneke; Slot, Manon C; de Graaf-Dijkstra, Alice; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; van Hensbergen, Yvette

    2015-06-15

    After cord blood (CB) transplantation, early platelet recovery in immune-deficient mice is obtained by expansion of CB CD34(+) cells with thrombopoietin (TPO) as single growth factor. Moreover, improvement of hematopoietic engraftment has been shown by cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We investigated whether a combination of both approaches would further enhance the outcome of CB transplantation in NOD SCID mice. NOD SCID mice were transplanted with either CB CD34(+) cells, CD34(+) cells with MSC, TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells or TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells with MSC. We analyzed human platelet recovery in the peripheral blood (PB) from day 4 after transplantation onward and human bone marrow (BM) engraftment at week 6. The different transplants were assessed in vitro for their migration capacity and expression of CXCR4. TPO expansion improved the early platelet recovery in the PB of the mice. Cotransplantation of MSC with CD34(+) cells improved BM engraftment and platelet levels in the PB 6 weeks after transplantation. Combining TPO expansion and MSC cotransplantation, however, neither resulted in a more efficient early platelet recovery, nor in a better BM engraftment, nor even very low or absent BM engraftment occurred. In vitro, MSC boosted the migration of CD34(+) cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increase in engraftment. Our results show that cotransplantation of MSC with TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells at most combines, but does not increase the separate advantages of these different strategies. A combination of both strategies even adds a risk of non engraftment.

  15. No Synergistic Effect of Cotransplantation of MSC and Ex Vivo TPO-Expanded CD34+ Cord Blood Cells on Platelet Recovery and Bone Marrow Engraftment in NOD SCID Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Garde, Mark; Brand, Anneke; Slot, Manon C.; de Graaf-Dijkstra, Alice; van Hensbergen, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    After cord blood (CB) transplantation, early platelet recovery in immune-deficient mice is obtained by expansion of CB CD34+ cells with thrombopoietin (TPO) as single growth factor. Moreover, improvement of hematopoietic engraftment has been shown by cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We investigated whether a combination of both approaches would further enhance the outcome of CB transplantation in NOD SCID mice. NOD SCID mice were transplanted with either CB CD34+ cells, CD34+ cells with MSC, TPO-expanded CD34+ cells or TPO-expanded CD34+ cells with MSC. We analyzed human platelet recovery in the peripheral blood (PB) from day 4 after transplantation onward and human bone marrow (BM) engraftment at week 6. The different transplants were assessed in vitro for their migration capacity and expression of CXCR4. TPO expansion improved the early platelet recovery in the PB of the mice. Cotransplantation of MSC with CD34+ cells improved BM engraftment and platelet levels in the PB 6 weeks after transplantation. Combining TPO expansion and MSC cotransplantation, however, neither resulted in a more efficient early platelet recovery, nor in a better BM engraftment, nor even very low or absent BM engraftment occurred. In vitro, MSC boosted the migration of CD34+ cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increase in engraftment. Our results show that cotransplantation of MSC with TPO-expanded CD34+ cells at most combines, but does not increase the separate advantages of these different strategies. A combination of both strategies even adds a risk of non engraftment. PMID:25668618

  16. Clinical significance of metallothioneins in cell therapy and nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sushil Sharma,1 Afsha Rais,1 Ranbir Sandhu,1 Wynand Nel,1 Manuchair Ebadi21Saint James School of Medicine, Bonaire, The Netherlands; 2Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Therapeutics, Center of Excellence in Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USAAbstract: Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs are low molecular weight (6–7 kDa cysteine-rich proteins that are specifically induced by metal nanoparticles (NPs. MT induction in cell therapy may provide better protection by serving as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic agents, and by augmenting zinc-mediated transcriptional regulation of genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Liposome-encapsulated MT-1 promoter has been used extensively to induce growth hormone or other genes in culture and gene-manipulated animals. MTs are induced as a defensive mechanism in chronic inflammatory conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and infections, hence can serve as early and sensitive biomarkers of environmental safety and effectiveness of newly developed NPs for clinical applications. Microarray analysis has indicated that MTs are significantly induced in drug resistant cancers and during radiation treatment. Nutritional stress and environmental toxins (eg, kainic acid and domoic acid induce MTs and aggregation of multilamellar electron-dense membrane stacks (Charnoly body due to mitochondrial degeneration. MTs enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex-1, a rate-limiting enzyme complex involved in the oxidative phosphorylation. Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (eg, selegiline inhibit α-synuclein nitration, implicated in Lewy body formation, and inhibit 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium and 3-morpholinosydnonimine-induced apoptosis in cultured human dopaminergic neurons and mesencephalic fetal stem cells. MTs

  17. High purity of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells obtained from neural stem cells: suitable for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caiying; Luan, Zuo; Yang, Yinxiang; Wang, Zhaoyan; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yabin; Du, Qingan

    2015-01-30

    Recent studies have suggested that the transplantation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) may be a promising potential therapeutic strategy for a broad range of diseases affecting myelin, such as multiple sclerosis, periventricular leukomalacia, and spinal cord injury. Clinical interest arose from the potential of human stem cells to be directed to OPCs for the clinical application of treating these diseases since large quantities of high quality OPCs are needed. However, to date, there have been precious few studies about OPC induction from human neural stem cells (NSCs). Here we successfully directed human fetal NSCs into highly pure OPCs using a cocktail of basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and neurotrophic factor-3. These cells had typical morphology of OPCs, and 80-90% of them expressed specific OPC markers such as A2B5, O4, Sox10 and PDGF-αR. When exposed to differentiation medium, 90% of the cells differentiated into oligodendrocytes. The OPCs could be amplified in our culture medium and passaged at least 10 times. Compared to a recent published method, this protocol had much higher stability and repeatability, and OPCs could be obtained from NSCs from passage 5 to 38. It also obtained more highly pure OPCs (80-90%) via simpler and more convenient manipulation. This study provided an easy and efficient method to obtain large quantities of high-quality human OPCs to meet clinical demand. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long bone mesenchymal stem cells (Lb-MSCs): clinically reliable cells for osteo-diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosi, Shirin; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Kalalinia, Fatemeh; Pievandi, Mohammad Taghi; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Behravan, Javad

    2017-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been designated as the most reliable cells in clinics to treat osteo-diseases because of their versatile nature. MSCs, isolated from long bone (Lb-MSCs) are rarely reported and named as RIA-MSCs because of the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) device. The potential of these cells in the treatment of non-union bone fractures made them the ideal candidates to be studied for clinical practices. In this work, effect of cryopreservation on the proliferation and differentiation capabilities of long bone MSCs (Lb-MSCs) has been studied. For this purpose, Lb-MSCs were isolated via RIA device and characterized using flow cytometry and differentiation assays. Cells were cryopreserved for 3, 6 and 12 months and thereafter were characterized using differentiation assays and genetic markers specific for osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic potential quantitatively by qRT-PCR. Lb-MSCs were found expressing MSC characteristic markers defining their identity. The population doubling time (PDT) was about 2.5 ± 0.5 days and colonies appeared after 7-10 days. Differentiation potential and gene expression of 3, 6 and 12 months cryopreserved Lb-MSCs were unaltered. The results show that cryopreservation did not have an effect on the differentiation potential of human Lb-MSCs. Therefore, our work offers Lb-MSCs as clinically cells for treating osteo-diseases.

  19. Stem cell therapies for myocardial infarction in clinical trials: bioengineering and biomaterial aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Akon; Ku, Nien-Ju; Tseng, Yeh-Chia; Pan, Chih-Hsien; Li, Hsing-Fen; Kumar, S Suresh; Ling, Qing-Dong; Chang, Yung; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Benelli, Giovanni; Murugan, Kadarkarai

    2017-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death and disability in advanced countries. Stem cell transplantation has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for acute and chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. The current status of stem cell therapies for patients with myocardial infarction is discussed from a bioengineering and biomaterial perspective in this review. We describe (a) the current status of clinical trials of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) compared with clinical trials of human adult or fetal stem cells, (b) the gap between fundamental research and application of human stem cells, (c) the use of biomaterials in clinical and pre-clinical studies of stem cells, and finally (d) trends in bioengineering to promote stem cell therapies for patients with myocardial infarction. We explain why the number of clinical trials using hPSCs is so limited compared with clinical trials using human adult and fetal stem cells such as bone marrow-derived stem cells.

  20. Human placental eXpanded (PLX) mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells confer neuroprotection to nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells exposed to ischemia by secretion of IL-6 and VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiani, Adi; Zahavi, Efrat; Netzer, Nir; Ofir, Racheli; Pinzur, Lena; Raveh, Shani; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Yavin, Ephraim; Lazarovici, Philip

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are potent candidates in stroke therapy due to their ability to secrete protective anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of human placental mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells (PLX) using an established ischemic model of nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated pheochromocytoma PC12 cells exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reperfusion. Under optimal conditions, 2 × 10⁵ PLX cells, added in a trans-well system, conferred 30-60% neuroprotection to PC12 cells subjected to ischemic insult. PC12 cell death, measured by LDH release, was reduced by PLX cells or by conditioned medium derived from PLX cells exposed to ischemia, suggesting the active release of factorial components. Since neuroprotection is a prominent function of the cytokine IL-6 and the angiogenic factor VEGF165, we measured their secretion using selective ELISA of the cells under ischemic or normoxic conditions. IL-6 and VEGF165 secretion by co-culture of PC12 and PLX cells was significantly higher under ischemic compared to normoxic conditions. Exogenous supplementation of 10 ng/ml each of IL-6 and VEGF165 to insulted PC12 cells conferred neuroprotection, reminiscent of the neuroprotective effect of PLX cells or their conditioned medium. Growth factors as well as co-culture conditioned medium effects were reduced by 70% and 20% upon pretreatment with 240 ng/ml Semaxanib (anti VEGF165) and/or 400 ng/ml neutralizing anti IL-6 antibody, respectively. Therefore, PLX-induced neuroprotection in ischemic PC12 cells may be partially explained by IL-6 and VEGF165 secretion. These findings may also account for the therapeutic effects seen in clinical trials after treatment with these cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Update on contemporary management of clinically localized renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, J J; Thiel, D D; Castle, E P

    2012-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to increase in incidence with the largest increase manifesting in small, organ-confined tumors. This review outlines the epidemiology and current data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC. In this manuscript, the current data outlining the benefit of nephron sparing to the overall survival of the patient is described. The data pertaining to minimally invasive nephron sparing is also explained in detail. From laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy to watchful waiting and percutaneous ablation, the urologist is continually assaulted with new data for the management of clinically-localized RCC. The data can be confusing, and much of it is conflicting. The addition of new scoring systems or nomograms may aid in predicting which therapy would be most beneficial in certain patient groups. New scoring systems may also predict the difficulty of surgical resection and predict surgical complications. The limitations of the data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC are also outlined.

  2. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  3. Immunoselection and clinical use of T regulatory cells in HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Mauro; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Del Papa, Beatrice; Perruccio, Katia; Ruggeri, Loredana; Sportoletti, Paolo; Rosati, Emanuela; Marconi, Pierfrancesco; Falini, Brunangelo; Reisner, Yair; Velardi, Andrea; Aversa, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F

    2011-09-01

    Haploidentical transplantation, with extensive T cell depletion to prevent GvHD, is associated with a high incidence of infection-related deaths. The key challenge is to improve immune recovery with allogeneic donor T cells without triggering GvHD. As T regulatory cells (Tregs) controlled GvHD in pre-clinical studies, the present study evaluated the impact of an infusion of donor CD4/CD25 + Tregs, followed by an inoculum of donor mature T cells (Tcons) and positively immunoselected CD34 + cells in the setting of haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in this study (22 AML; 5 ALL; 1 NHL). All received immunoselected Tregs (CliniMACS, Miltenyi Biotec) followed by positively immunoselected CD34 + cells together with Tcons 4 days later. No GvHD prophylaxis was administered. 26/28 patients engrafted. No acute GvHD developed in 24/26 patients; 2 developed ≥ grade II acute GvHD. No patient has developed chronic GvHD. CD4 and CD8 counts rapidly increased after transplant. Episodes of CMV reactivation were significantly fewer than in controls. In the setting of haploidentical transplantation infusion of Tregs makes administration of a high dose of T cells feasible. This strategy provides a long-term protection from GvHD and robust immune reconstitution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of Cell Therapies Used in Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piuzzi, Nicolas S; Chahla, Jorge; Jiandong, Hao; Chughtai, Morad; LaPrade, Robert F; Mont, Michael A; Muschler, George F; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2017-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is associated with regional loss of cells within bone, often resulting in pain and mechanical collapse. Our purpose was to analyze the cell-therapies used in clinical trials for the treatment of ONFH with regard to (1) cell-sources, (2) collection techniques, (3) cell-processing, (4) qualitative and quantitative characterizations, and (5) delivery methods. A systematic review of the current literature on the use of cell therapies for the treatment of ONFH was performed. Studies with a level-of-evidence III or higher were evaluated. A total of 1483 articles were screened. Eleven studies met the criteria to be included in this review. Ten studies used bone-marrow, and 1 study used blood as the cell-source. Nine studies used freshly isolated tissue-derived nucleated cells from bone-marrow, mixed bone marrow-derived nucleated cells, 1 study used mixed blood-derived nucleated cells, and 1 study used culture-expanded cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. Cell dose varied from 2-million to 3-billion cells. Qualitative cell characterization of injected cells using surface markers was done by 5 studies using CD34. Two studies assayed the cell-population using a colony-forming-unit assay. There is a lack of standardization with respect to the quantitative and qualitative characterization of methods for cell-harvest, cell-processing, and cell-transplantation/delivery. Cell-therapy holds promise as a means of restoring local cell populations that are made deficient because of injury or disease. However, the orthopedic community and patients will benefit greatly by a greater investment in blinded, randomized, controlled trials and clinical effectiveness trials that embrace rigorous standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Skin Stem Cells: At the Frontier Between the Laboratory and Clinical Practice. Part 1: Epidermal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastushenko, I; Prieto-Torres, L; Gilaberte, Y; Blanpain, C

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into the different cell lineages of their tissue of origin. The discovery of stem cells in adult tissues, together with the description of specific markers for their isolation, has opened up new lines of investigation, expanding the horizons of biomedical research and raising new hope in the treatment of many diseases. In this article, we review in detail the main characteristics of the stem cells that produce the specialized cells of the skin (epidermal, mesenchymal, and melanocyte stem cells) and their potential implications and applications in diseases affecting the skin. Part I deals with the principal characteristics and potential applications of epidermal stem cells in dermatology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in patients with hypernasal speech due to velopharyngeal insufficiency: Expanded phenotype and clinical comparison to nondeletion

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    Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Witzel, M.A.; Teshima, I.E. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 has been reported as a frequent ethiology of both velocardiofacial (VCF) and DiGeorge syndromes. We have studied the prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in a group of patients ascertained through a Speech and Language clinic presenting with (1) velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and (2) difficultly in school. Growth parameters were measured, and facies were scored for features of VCF. Microdeletions were detected at locus D22S75 by FISH with probe N25 (Oncor), and at 22q11.2 with high resolution banding analysis (HRB). One child with typical VCF facies was considered to have a deletion at 22q11 with HRB, but is not deleted with N25, indicating that N25 may not detect all deletion patients. An additional 8/30 children tested to date were deleted with the N25 probe. Heart defects were present in only 2/8 deletion patients: VSD/ASD and PS/AS. One N25 deletion patient was atypica; he has a tall, lanky habitus (height = 90%), and facies not characteristic of CVF. As expected, there is a trend to lower head size, smaller ear size, and more typical facies in deletion patients; however, four of the nondeletion patients also had a clinical diagnosis of VCF. Medially displaced carotid arteries were present in both groups, which is therefore not a diagnostic feature of microdeletion 22q11. Our findings indicate that the microdeletion 22q11 is frequent (26% in this series) in a population with VPI, even when not selected for typical facies. We believe this series supports the view that microdeletion 22q11 has a broader clinical phenotype than previously recognized.

  7. Clinical Relevance of Gene Copy Number Variation in Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Blanchard, France; Sesboue, Richard; Flaman, Jean-Michel; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Pfister, Christian; Di Fiore, Frédéric

    2018-02-23

    Gene copy number variations (CNVs) have been reported to be frequent in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with potential prognostic value for some. However, their clinical utility, especially to guide treatment of metastatic disease remains to be established. Our objectives were to assess CNVs on a panel of selected genes and determine their clinical relevance in patients who underwent treatment of metastatic RCC. The genetic assessment was performed on frozen tissue samples of clear cell metastatic RCC using quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction of short fluorescent fragment method to detect CNVs on a panel of 14 genes of interest. The comparison of the electropherogram obtained from both tumor and normal renal adjacent tissue allowed for CNV identification. The clinical, biologic, and survival characteristics were assessed for their associations with the most frequent CNVs. Fifty patients with clear cell metastatic RCC were included. The CNV rate was 21.4%. The loss of CDKN2A and PLG was associated with a higher tumor stage (P relevance, especially those located on CDKN2A, PLG, and ALDOB, in a homogeneous cohort of patients with clear cell metastatic RCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  9. Gonorrhea Treatment Failures With Oral and Injectable Expanded Spectrum Cephalosporin Monotherapy vs Dual Therapy at 4 Canadian Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ameeta E; Gratrix, Jennifer; Martin, Irene; Friedman, Dara S; Hoang, Linda; Lester, Richard; Metz, Gila; Ogilvie, Gina; Read, Ron; Wong, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has developed to all antibiotics used to treat gonorrhea (GC), and trends in GC antimicrobial resistance have prompted changes in treatment guidelines. We examined treatment failures in sexually transmitted infection clinics. Four Canadian sexually transmitted infection clinics reviewed treatment regimens, minimum inhibitory concentrations for cephalosporins and azithromycin, anatomical infection sites, and treatment outcomes for GC infections between January 2010 and September 2013, in individuals who returned for test of cure within 30 days of treatment. Treatment failure was defined as the absence of reported sexual contact during the posttreatment period and (i) positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae on culture of specimens taken at least 72 hours after treatment or (ii) positive nucleic acid amplification test specimens taken at least 2 to 3 weeks after treatment, and matching sequence type pretreatment and posttreatment. χ Test and Fisher exact test were used to assess association of categorical variables. Of 389 specimens reviewed, GC treatment failures occurred in 13 specimens treated with cefixime 400-mg single dose (17.8% treatment failure rate regardless of anatomical site) and in 1 oropharyngeal specimen treated with cefixime 800-mg single dose. No treatment failures occurred using either ceftriaxone monotherapy or cefixime/ceftriaxone combined with azithromycin or doxycycline. In contrast to oral cefixime monotherapy, no treatment failures were identified with injectable ceftriaxone monotherapy or combination GC treatment. Our data support the use of combination treatment of GC with an extended spectrum cephalosporin (including oral cefixime) with azithromycin or doxycycline as well as ceftriaxone monotherapy.

  10. Characterization of single cell derived cultures of periosteal progenitor cells to ensure the cell quality for clinical application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stich

    Full Text Available For clinical applications of cells and tissue engineering products it is of importance to characterize the quality of the used cells in detail. Progenitor cells from the periosteum are already routinely applied in the clinics for the regeneration of the maxillary bone. Periosteal cells have, in addition to their potential to differentiate into bone, the ability to develop into cartilage and fat. However, the question arises whether all cells isolated from periosteal biopsies are able to differentiate into all three tissue types, or whether there are subpopulations. For an efficient and approved application in bone or cartilage regeneration the clarification of this question is of interest. Therefore, 83 different clonal cultures of freshly isolated human periosteal cells derived from mastoid periosteum biopsies of 4 donors were generated and growth rates calculated. Differentiation capacities of 51 clonal cultures towards the osteogenic, the chondrogenic, and the adipogenic lineage were investigated. Histological and immunochemical stainings showed that 100% of the clonal cultures differentiated towards the osteogenic lineage, while 94.1% demonstrated chondrogenesis, and 52.9% could be stimulated to adipogenesis. For osteogenesis real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR of BGLAP and RUNX2 and for adipogenesis of FABP4 and PPARG confirmed the results. Overall, 49% of the cells exhibited a tripotent potential, 45.1% showed a bipotent potential (without adipogenic differentiation, 3.9% bipotent (without chondrogenic differentiation, and 2% possessed a unipotent osteogenic potential. In FACS analyses, no differences in the marker profile of undifferentiated clonal cultures with bi- and tripotent differentiation capacity were found. Genome-wide microarray analysis revealed 52 differentially expressed genes for clonal subpopulations with or without chondrogenic differentiation capacity, among them DCN, NEDD9, TGFBR3, and TSLP. For clinical

  11. Radiological Results and Clinical Patient Outcome After Implantation of a Hydraulic Expandable Vertebral Body Replacement following Traumatic Vertebral Fractures in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine: A 3-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinest, Michael; Schmahl, Dorothee; Grützner, Paul A; Matschke, Stefan

    2017-04-15

    A prospective monocentric study. The aim of the current study was the analysis of patient outcome and radiological results 3 years after implantation of a hydraulic expandable vertebral body replacement (VBR) system. Around 70% to 90% of all traumatic spinal fractures are located in the thoracic and lumbar spine. Dorso-ventral stabilization is a frequently used procedure in traumatic vertebral body fracture treatment. VBR systems can be used to bridge bony defects. In the current study, a new VBR expanded by water pressure with adjustable endplates is used. All patients who suffered a singular traumatic fracture to a thoracic or lumbar vertebral body (Th 5-L 5) in the period from November 2009 to December 2010 and (i) underwent dorsal instrumentation and (ii) afterwards received the implantation of a hydraulic VBR were included in this study. The clinical outcome (visual analogue scale [VAS] spine score, questionnaire) and radiological findings (sagittal angle, implant subsidence, and implant position) 3 years after implantation were analyzed. The follow-up was successful for n = 47 patients (follow-up rate: 89%). Most of the patients (n = 40) were "generally/very satisfied" with their outcome. The mean rating of the VAS spine score was 65.2 ± 23.1 (range: 20.5-100.0). The analysis of the radiological data showed an average subsidence of the implants of 1.1 ± 1.2 mm (range 0.0-5.0 mm). After the initial operation, the local sagittal angle remained stable in the follow-up 3 years later both for the thoracic spine and lumbar spine. Furthermore, no change in the implant's position was observed. The implantation of a hydraulically expandable VBR allows a permanent stable fixation after traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. 2.

  12. Clinical use of plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedar J Fowler

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cedar J Fowler1, Richard T Maziarz21Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases – NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Adult Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Plerixafor is a CXC4:CXCL12 antagonist that has an expanding role in the stem cell mobilization phase of the hematopoietic stem cell transplant procedure. The drug is currently licensed by the FDA to be used in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood for collection and subsequent autologous transplantations in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Plerixafor is particularly useful in patients who have been heavily pretreated or as effective therapy for frontline salvage of poor peripheral blood stem cells mobilizers. In conjunction with G-CSF, plerixafor can be successful in decreasing the number of apheresis days and therefore the associated additional risks and cost of more apheresis procedures. Patients taking plerixafor, when compared to the side effect profile of G-CSF alone, do not report significantly more side effects.Keywords: plerixafor, AMD3100, autologous stem cell mobilization, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma, CXCR4, CXCL12

  13. Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Central Nervous System Disorders – Recent Progress and Perspective for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the transplanted BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with CNS disorders. In this review, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy as the scientifically proven entity in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose. The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. The BMSC can be expanded in vitro using the animal serum-free medium. Pharmacological modulation may accelerate the in vitro proliferation of the BMSC. Using in vivo optical imaging technique, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future.

  14. Analysis of miR-146a and miR-142-3p as Potential Markers of Freshly Isolated or In Vitro-Expanded Human Treg cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrøm, K; Pedersen, A E; Gad, M

    2017-01-01

    Tregs and identified miR-146a and 142-3p as possible candidates. We analysed freshly isolated naïve and activated tTregs and non-Treg subsets after or prior to in vitro expansion. We observed a tTreg-specific profile of these miRNAs together with FOXP3 and Helios in freshly isolated tTregs, but observed a decline...... in the same markers in activated tTregs as opposed to naïve tTregs. In vitro-expanded Tregs could be identified based on FOXP3 expression, but with loss of a discriminate profile for miRNA candidates and a decline in FOXP3 when activated tTregs were expanded. Our data demonstrate miR-146a and 142-3p...... as potential miRNA markers for discrimination between non-Treg cells and tTregs, but these miRNAs are not stable markers for in vitro-expanded Treg cells. In addition, the loss of FOXP3 in expansion of activated tTregs has implication for in vitro use of this cell subset in immunopharmacological assays...

  15. Removal process of prion and parvovirus from human platelet lysates used as clinical-grade supplement for ex vivo cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Chun; Bailey, Andy; Samminger, Bernhard; Tanimoto, Junji; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Pooled human platelet lysate (HPL) is becoming the new gold standard as supplement for ex vivo cell culture for clinical protocols. However, the risk of pathogen contamination of HPL increases with the platelet pool size. We hypothesized that hollow fiber anion exchange membrane chromatography using QyuSpeed D (QSD) could remove resistant and untested bloodborne pathogens, such as parvoviruses and prions, from HPL-supplemented growth media without substantially affecting their capacity to support ex vivo cell expansion. Frozen or thawed platelet concentrates were serum-converted and centrifuged for obtaining HPL that was added to various growth media (ca. 100 mL), filtered through a 0.6-mL QSD membrane and characterized for proteins, growth factors and chemical composition. Capacity to expand Chinese hamster ovary, periodontal ligament, gingival fibroblast cells and Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stromal cells was studied. Removal of porcine parvovirus (PPV) and of the 263K prion strain of hamster-adapted scrapie was studied by spiking experiments following international guidelines. QSD had minimal impact on HPL-supplemented medium composition in proteins, growth factors and chemical content, nor capacity to expand and differentiate cells. In addition, QSD could remove ≥5.58 log10 [TCID50/mL] and ≥3.72 log10 of PPV and the 263K prion, respectively. QSD hollow fiber chromatography can be used to improve the virus and prion safety of HPL-supplemented media to safely expand cells for clinical protocols. These data bring new perspectives for increasingly safer use of pooled HPL in cell therapy and regenerative medicine applications. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endometrial regenerative cells for treatment of heart failure: a new stem cell enters the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockeria, Leo; Bogin, Vladimir; Bockeria, Olga; Le, Tatyana; Alekyan, Bagrat; Woods, Erik J; Brown, Amalia A; Ichim, Thomas E; Patel, Amit N

    2013-03-05

    Heart failure is one of the key causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The recent findings that regeneration is possible in the heart have made stem cell therapeutics the Holy Grail of modern cardiovascular medicine. The success of cardiac regenerative therapies hinges on the combination of an effective allogeneic "off the shelf" cell product with a practical delivery system. In 2007 Medistem discovered the Endometrial Regenerative Cell (ERC), a new mesenchymal-like stem cell. Medistem and subsequently independent groups have demonstrated that ERC are superior to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the most widely used stem cell source in development. ERC possess robust expansion capability (one donor can generate 20,000 patients doses), key growth factor production and high levels of angiogenic activity. ERC have been published in the peer reviewed literature to be significantly more effect at treating animal models of heart failure (Hida et al. Stem Cells 2008).Current methods of delivering stem cells into the heart suffer several limitations in addition to poor delivery efficiency. Surgical methods are highly invasive, and the classical catheter based techniques are limited by need for sophisticated cardiac mapping systems and risk of myocardial perforation. Medistem together with Dr. Amit Patel Director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine at University of Utah have developed a novel minimally invasive delivery method that has been demonstrated safe and effective for delivery of stem cells (Tuma et al. J Transl Med 2012). Medistem is evaluating the combination of ERC, together with our retrograde delivery procedure in a 60 heart failure patient, double blind, placebo controlled phase II trial. To date 17 patients have been dosed and preliminary analysis by the Data Safety Monitoring Board has allowed for trial continuation.The combined use of a novel "off the shelf" cell together with a minimally invasive 30 minute delivery method provides a

  17. Examining the feasibility of clinical grade CD271+ enrichment of mesenchymal stromal cells for bone regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Cuthbert

    Full Text Available Current clinical trials utilize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs expanded in culture, however these interventions carry considerable costs and concerns pertaining to culture-induced losses of potency. This study assessed the feasibility of new clinical-grade technology to obtain uncultured MSC isolates from three human intra-osseous tissue sources based on immunomagnetic selection for CD271-positive cells.MSCs were isolated from bone marrow (BM aspirates or surgical waste materials; enzymatically digested femoral heads (FHs and reamer irrigator aspirator (RIA waste fluids. Flow cytometry for the CD45-/lowCD73+CD271+ phenotype was used to evaluate uncultured MSCs before and after selection, and to measure MSC enrichment in parallel to colony forming-unit fibroblast assay. Trilineage differentiation assays and quantitative polymerase chain-reaction for key transcripts involved in bone regeneration was used to assess the functional utility of isolated cells for bone repair.Uncultured CD45-/lowCD271+ MSCs uniformly expressed CD73, CD90 and CD105 but showed variable expression of MSCA-1 and SUSD2 (BM>RIA>FH. MSCs were enriched over 150-fold from BM aspirates and RIA fluids, whereas the highest MSC purities were obtained from FH digests. Enriched fractions expressed increased levels of BMP-2, COL1A2, VEGFC, SPARC and CXCL12 transcripts (BM>RIA>FH, with the highest up-regulation detected for CXCL12 in BM (>1300-fold. Following culture expansion, CD271-selected MSCS were tri-potential and phenotypically identical to plastic adherence-selected MSCs.A CD271-based GMP-compliant immunomagnetic selection resulted in a substantial increase in MSC purity and elevated expression of transcripts involved in bone formation, vascularisation and chemo-attraction. Although this technology, particularly from RIA fluids, can be immediately applied by orthopaedic surgeons as autologous therapy, further improvements in MSC purities and pre-clinical testing of product

  18. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  19. Circulating tumor cells: clinically relevant molecular access based on a novel CTC flow cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer-Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error and a precision (CV<25% down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens

  20. The expanded clinical profile and the efficacy of colchicine therapy in Egyptian children suffering from familial mediterranean fever: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaat Hala Salah El-Din

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by self-limiting recurrent attacks of fever and serosal inflammation, leading to abdominal, thoracic or articular pain. Objective To detect variable clinical presentations and genotypic distribution of different groups of FMF patients and the efficacy of colchicine therapy in treatment of these groups of FMF after one year. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 70 patients already diagnosed with FMF and following-up at the Rheumatology Clinic, Children's Hospital - Cairo University. Diagnosis of FMF was determined according to Tel Hashomer criteria for FMF. All patients were subjected to a questionnaire including detailed history with emphasis on clinical manifestations and colchicine dose to control attacks. Mutational analysis was performed for all study subjects covering 12 mutations in the MEFV gene: E148Q, P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C, M680I (G/A, I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S and R761H. Response to colchicine treatment was evaluated as complete, incomplete and unresponsive. Results Out of the 70 patients- 40 males and 30 females- fever was the most common presenting feature, followed by abdominal pain, and arthritis; documented in 95.7%, 94.3%, and 77.1% of cases respectively. Mutational analysis detected gene mutation on both alleles in 20 patients (homozygotes, on only 1 allele in 40 patients (heterozygotes, and on none of the alleles (uncharacterized cases. Mild to moderate disease severity score (according to Tel Hashomer key to severity score was detected in a significant proportion of heterozygotes and the uncharacterized group than the homozygotes. All patients received colchicine therapy; 22.9% of them showed complete response, 74.3% showed incomplete response and 2.9% showed no response to therapy. The colchicine dose needed to control attacks was significantly lower in heterozygotes than the homozygotes(P=0

  1. Expanding mediation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Peter P.C.C.

    2012-01-01

    In his article In Between Us, Yoni van den Eede expands existing theories of mediation into the realm of the social and the political, focusing on the notions of opacity and transparency. His approach is rich and promising, but two pitfalls should be avoided. First, his concept of ‘in-between’ runs

  2. Urate levels predict survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Analysis of the expanded Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS clinical trials database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Nicholson, Katharine; Chan, James; Shui, Amy; Schoenfeld, David; Sherman, Alexander; Berry, James; Cudkowicz, Merit; Atassi, Nazem

    2018-03-01

    Urate has been identified as a predictor of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) survival in some but not all studies. Here we leverage the recent expansion of the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database to study the association between urate levels and ALS survival. Pooled data of 1,736 ALS participants from the PRO-ACT database were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate associations between urate levels at trial entry and survival. After adjustment for potential confounders (i.e., creatinine and body mass index), there was an 11% reduction in risk of reaching a survival endpoint during the study with each 1-mg/dL increase in uric acid levels (adjusted hazard ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.82-0.97, P ALS and confirms the utility of the PRO-ACT database as a powerful resource for ALS epidemiological research. Muscle Nerve 57: 430-434, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical outcomes of secondary gastroduodenal self-expandable metallic stent placement by stent-in-stent technique for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takashi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Takahara, Naminatsu; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Suguru; Mohri, Dai; Yagioka, Hiroshi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Togawa, Osamu; Matsubara, Saburo; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Sasahira, Naoki; Hirano, Kenji; Toda, Nobuo; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of secondary gastroduodenal stent placement after first stent dysfunction for malignant gastric outlet obstruction. We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of secondary stent-in-stent gastroduodenal stent placement. Among 260 patients who had been treated with first gastroduodenal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction, 29 patients (11.2%) were treated with secondary gastroduodenal stent placement because of first stent dysfunction. Pancreatic cancer was the major primary cancer (55.2%). A WallFlex duodenal stent was the most frequently inserted stent both as a first stent (75.9%) and as a secondary stent (62.1%). There were 22 patients (75.9%) that received gastroduodenal stents at the bending site (supraduodenal angle or infraduodenal angle). Technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 86.2%, respectively. Median eating period was 3.0 months, and median survival time was 3.5 months. As for related complications, gastrointestinal perforation, insufficient stent expansion, tumor ingrowth, tumor overgrowth, and cholangitis were experienced in 13.8% (four cases), 6.9% (two cases), 6.9% (two cases), 3.4% (one case), and 3.4% (one case), respectively. Secondary gastroduodenal stent placement might be effective for managing first stent dysfunction in malignant gastric outlet obstruction. However, gastrointestinal perforation was the major complication. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  4. Revisions to the 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards: expanding the scope to include inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Polovich, Martha; Gilmore, Terry R; Schulmeister, Lisa; Esper, Peg; Lefebvre, Kristine B; Neuss, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    In November 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) jointly published a set of 31 voluntary chemotherapy safety standards for adult patients with cancer, as the end result of a highly structured, multistakeholder process. The standards were explicitly created to address patient safety in the administration of parenteral and oral chemotherapeutic agents in outpatient oncology settings. In January 2011, a workgroup consisting of ASCO and ONS members was convened to review feedback received since publication of the standards, to address interim changes in practice, and to modify the standards as needed. The most significant change to the standards is to extend their scope to the inpatient setting. This change reflects the conviction that the same standards for chemotherapy administration safety should apply in all settings. The proposed set of standards has been approved by the Board of Directors for both ASCO and ONS and has been posted for public comment. Comments were used as the basis for final editing of the revised standards. The workgroup recognizes that the safety of oral chemotherapy usage, nononcology medication reconciliation, and home chemotherapy administration are not adequately addressed in the original or revised standards. A separate process, cosponsored by ASCO and ONS, will address the development of safety standards for these areas.

  5. Expanding the clinical spectrum of hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy and pulmonary fibrosis due to FAM111B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Sandra; Küry, Sébastien; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Magot, Armelle; Agbim, Uchenna; Besnard, Thomas; Bodak, Nathalie; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Bréhéret, Flora; Brunelle, Perrine; Caillon, Florence; Chabrol, Brigitte; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; David, Albert; Eymard, Bruno; Faivre, Laurence; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Fleurence, Emmanuelle; Ganapathi, Mythily; Gherardi, Romain; Goldenberg, Alice; Hamel, Antoine; Igual, Jeanine; Irvine, Alan D; Israël-Biet, Dominique; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Laboisse, Christian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Mahé, Jean-Yves; Mallet, Stéphanie; MacGowan, Stuart; McAleer, Maeve A; McLean, Irwin; Méni, Cécile; Munnich, Arnold; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Nagy, Peter L; Odel, Jeffrey; O'Regan, Grainne M; Péréon, Yann; Perrier, Julie; Piard, Juliette; Puzenat, Eve; Sampson, Jacinda B; Smith, Frances; Soufir, Nadem; Tanji, Kurenai; Thauvin, Christel; Ulane, Christina; Watson, Rosemarie M; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P; Mayosi, Bongani M; Barbarot, Sébastien; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-10-15

    Hereditary Fibrosing Poikiloderma (HFP) with tendon contractures, myopathy and pulmonary fibrosis (POIKTMP [MIM 615704]) is a very recently described entity of syndromic inherited poikiloderma. Previously by using whole exome sequencing in five families, we identified the causative gene, FAM111B (NM_198947.3), the function of which is still unknown. Our objective in this study was to better define the specific features of POIKTMP through a larger series of patients. Clinical and molecular data of two families and eight independent sporadic cases, including six new cases, were collected. Key features consist of: (i) early-onset poikiloderma, hypotrichosis and hypohidrosis; (ii) multiple contractures, in particular triceps surae muscle contractures; (iii) diffuse progressive muscular weakness; (iv) pulmonary fibrosis in adulthood and (v) other features including exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, liver impairment and growth retardation. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging was informative and showed muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration. Histological examination of skeletal muscle revealed extensive fibroadipose tissue infiltration. Microscopy of the skin showed a scleroderma-like aspect with fibrosis and alterations of the elastic network. FAM111B gene analysis identified five different missense variants (two recurrent mutations were found respectively in three and four independent families). All the mutations were predicted to localize in the trypsin-like cysteine/serine peptidase domain of the protein. We suggest gain-of-function or dominant-negative mutations resulting in FAM111B enzymatic activity changes. HFP with tendon contractures, myopathy and pulmonary fibrosis, is a multisystemic disorder due to autosomal dominant FAM111B mutations. Future functional studies will help in understanding the specific pathological process of this fibrosing disorder.

  6. Expanding the clinical phenotype associated with ELOVL4 mutation: study of a large French-Canadian family with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia and erythrokeratodermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Turcotte-Gauthier, Maude; Noreau, Anne; Martin, Caroline; Meloche, Caroline; Gravel, Micheline; Drouin, Christian Allen; Rouleau, Guy A; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a complex group of neurodegenerative disorders with significant genetic heterogeneity. Despite the identification of 20 SCA genes, the cause of the disorder in a significant proportion of families with SCA remains unexplained. In 1972, a French-Canadian family segregating a combination of SCA and erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV) in an autosomal dominant fashion was described. To map and identify the causative gene in this large family with SCA and EKV using a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. A total of 32 individuals from the family have undergone complete neurologic and dermatologic examinations. Mutations in ELOVL4 have been reported in families with macular degeneration. Recently, homozygous mutations were found in patients with ichthyosis, spastic paraplegia, and severe neurodevelopmental defects. In the present study, we report on a heterozygote mutation in ELOVL4 in affected individuals from the family with SCA and EKV. The mutation segregates with a milder phenotype consisting of early-onset patches of erythema and hyperkeratosis, as well as SCA manifesting in the fourth or fifth decade of life. We describe the mapping and the identification of a c.504G>C transversion in ELOVL4 resulting in the p.L168F substitution. We also provide clinical characterization of the phenotypes in 19 mutation carriers. We report, to our knowledge, the first mutation in ELOVL4 that is associated with SCA and EKV. This gene encodes a member of the elongase family, which is responsible for the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (at least 26 carbons). These fatty acids participate in a wide variety of physiological functions, including skin barrier formation and peroxisome β-oxidation. Overall, these results provide additional insight into the pathogenesis of these complex neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Expression of the activation antigen CD69 predicts functionality of in vitro expanded peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Ersbøll, A K

    1998-01-01

    Gene therapy for AIDS necessitates harvest and expansion of PBMC from HIV-infected patients. We expanded PBMC from healthy blood donors and HIV-infected patients for up to 14 days using four expansion protocols: 3 days of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, continuous PHA stimulation, 3 days...... examined for apoptosis. Only a minor fraction was primed for apoptosis, and this fraction could be significantly reduced by addition of IL-2 to the culture medium (P

  8. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in neurological disorders: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xingyu; Wu, Xiaoying; Shi, Wei

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the intrathecally administrated unbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) by lumbar puncture and assessed the technical difficulties and effects in various neurological conditions. One hundred patients underwent subarachnoid placement of UC-MSCs between December 2006 and May 2010 in the Affiliated Hospital of Medicine. Technical difficulties in patients in the form of localization of subarachnoid space, number of attempts, and post-procedural complications were evaluated. Functional evaluation was done using Hauser Ambulation Index (HAI) by the stem cell transplant team on a regular basis. All patients were followed-up for more than 1 yr after the treatment. Clinical symptoms, related biochemical index and photographic examinations were observed regularly. We encountered technical difficulties in 31 patients (31%) in the form of general anesthesia supplementation and difficulty localizing the lumbar space. Side effects (headache, low-grade fever, low back pain and lower limb pain) were observed in 22 (22%) patients, which were treated with symptomatic therapy within 48 h. One year after the treatment, functional indices improved in 47 patients (47%): 12 patients with spinal cord injury, 11 patients with cerebral palsy, 9 patients with post-traumatic brain syndrome, 9 patients with post-brain infarction syndrome, 3 patients with spinocerebellar ataxias, and 3 patients with motor neuron disease. In conclusion, intrathecal administration of UC-MSCs is a safe and effective way to treat neurological disorders. Our encouraging results of intrathecal administration of UC-MSCs indicate the potential of restoration of lost tissue and improvement of function in patients with profound neurological defects and inefficient conventional cure. These data support expanded double-blind, placebo-controlled studies for this treatment modality.

  9. Clinical outcome of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisumoto, Koji; Okami, Kenji; Sakai, Akihiro; Atsumi, Taku; Maki, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Iida, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate therapeutic strategies for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma based on an examination of clinical outcomes in our department. The patients were 99 cases with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated in our hospital from March 2000 to March 2009. Five-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) were examined by the Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Subsite, stage, treatment (surgery group or radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group) and prognosis were reviewed retrospectively. Five-year OS and 5-year CSS were 50% and 59%. Compared with the Stage I and II groups, the prognosis of Stage III and IV groups was significantly worse. As for the treatment, 5-year CSS of the surgery group was 76%, while that of the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group was 52%. Regarding the subsite, 5-year CSS of the lateral wall type Stage I and II groups was 90% (surgery group: 100%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 83%), and that of the Stage III and IV groups was 63% (surgery group: 87%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 55%). Five-year CSS of the superior wall type Stage I and II groups was 85% (surgery group: 100%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 66%), and that of the Stage III and IV groups was 50% (surgery group: 75%, 5-year CSS was not obtained in the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group). The good outcome of the surgery group suggests that the indications for the operation were appropriate, and expansion of transoral resection should be considered in the near future. The outcomes of the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group require improvement. (author)

  10. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  11. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  12. Chronic inflammation-elicited liver progenitor cell conversion to liver cancer stem cell with clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Cheng; Xiang, Dai-Min; Qu, Le; Sun, Wen; Lu, Xin-Yuan; Zhou, Teng-Fei; Chen, Shu-Zhen; Ning, Bei-Fang; Cheng, Zhuo; Xia, Ming-Yang; Shen, Wei-Feng; Yang, Wen; Wen, Wen; Lee, Terence Kin Wah; Cong, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hong-Yang; Ding, Jin

    2017-12-01

    The substantial heterogeneity and hierarchical organization in liver cancer support the theory of liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs). However, the relationship between chronic hepatic inflammation and LCSC generation remains obscure. Here, we observed a close correlation between aggravated inflammation and liver progenitor cell (LPC) propagation in the cirrhotic liver of rats exposed to diethylnitrosamine. LPCs isolated from the rat cirrhotic liver initiated subcutaneous liver cancers in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, suggesting the malignant transformation of LPCs toward LCSCs. Interestingly, depletion of Kupffer cells in vivo attenuated the LCSC properties of transformed LPCs and suppressed cytokeratin 19/Oval cell 6-positive tumor occurrence. Conversely, LPCs cocultured with macrophages exhibited enhanced LCSC properties. We further demonstrated that macrophage-secreted tumor necrosis factor-α triggered chromosomal instability in LPCs through the deregulation of ubiquitin D and checkpoint kinase 2 and enhanced the self-renewal of LPCs through the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1/Src/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway, which synergistically contributed to the conversion of LPCs to LCSCs. Clinical investigation revealed that cytokeratin 19/Oval cell 6-positive liver cancer patients displayed a worse prognosis and exhibited superior response to sorafenib treatment. Our results not only clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammation-mediated LCSC generation but also provide a molecular classification for the individualized treatment of liver cancer. (Hepatology 2017;66:1934-1951). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  14. Stem cell tourism--a web-based analysis of clinical services available to international travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Ruairi; O'Brien, Timothy; Flaherty, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are advertised through online resources which describe a range of treatments with diverse clinical indications. Stem cell tourists may not be aware of the information they should seek when consulting these clinics, or of the potential risks involved. The aim of this study was to characterise the therapies offered by online stem cell clinics. A web based search utilising five search terms was employed. The first twenty pages of each search result were screened against 340 variables. 224 out of 1091 websites advertised stem cell clinics. 68 eligible sites covering 21 countries were evaluated. The top five clinical indications for stem cell therapy were multiple sclerosis, anti-ageing, Parkinson's disease, stroke and spinal cord injury. Adult, autologous stem cells were the most commonly utilised stem cell, and these were frequently sourced from bone marrow and adipose tissue and administered intravenously. Thirty-four per cent of sites mentioned the number of patients treated while one quarter of clinics provided outcome data. Twenty-nine per cent of clinics had an internationally recognised accreditation. Fifteen per cent of clinics stated that their therapies posed no risk. Eighty-eight per cent of clinics claimed treatment effectiveness, with 16% describing their curative potential. Over 40% of sites did not specify the number or duration of treatments. Fifty-three per cent of clinics requested access to patients' medical records, and 12% recommended patients discuss the proposed therapy with their doctor. No clinic recommended that travellers consult a travel medicine specialist or receive vaccinations prior to their intended travel. One quarter of sites discussed contraindications to treatment, with 41% of sites detailing follow up patient care. There is potential for stem cell tourists to receive misleading or deficient information from online stem cell clinics. Both the stem cell tourist and travel medicine practitioner should be educated

  15. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Culture of Iris Pigment Epithelial Cells on Expanded-Polytetrafluroethylene (ePTFE Substrates for the Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transplantation of an intact differentiated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell layer may provide a means to treat Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD. However, harvesting RPE cells can be a technically complicated procedure. Our current work aimed to prepare intact differentiated iris pigment epithelial (IPE cell layers, which are easy to obtain and have the same embryonic origin and similar properties as RPE cells, on ePTFE substrates for transplantation purposes to rescue deteriorated photoreceptors in AMD. Methods: IPE cells isolated from rat eyes were seeded on different substrates, including fibronectin n-heptylamine (HA ePTFE substrates, HA ePTFE substrates, ePTFE substrates and fibronectin tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS as control. Cell number and morphology were assessed at each time interval. The formation of tight junction was examined by immunostaining of junction proteins. Results: An obvious increasing trend of cell number was observed in IPE cells on fibronectin n-heptylamine (HA ePTFE substrate, exhibiting heavy pigmentation and epithelial morphology. At Day 28, tight junction formation was indicated by cell-cell junctional proteins along cell borders. Conclusion: Harvested IPE cells cultured on fibronectin HA-ePTFE substrates can differentiate and form a cell monolayer that may be suitable for transplantation.

  17. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  18. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, Su Yeon; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    To evaluate the early clinical experience associated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The RF ablation treatment was performed on 17 tumors from 16 patients (mean age, 60.5 years; range, 43 73 years) with RCC. The treatment indications were localized, solid renal mass, comorbidities, high operation risk, and refusal to perform surgery. All tumors were treated by a percutaneous CT (n = 10), followed by an US-guided (n = 2), laparoscopy-assisted US (n = 2), and an open (n = 2) RF ablation. Furthermore, patients underwent a follow- up CT at one day, one week, one month, three and six months, and then every six months from the onset of treatment. We evaluated the technical success, technical effectiveness, ablation zone, benign periablation enhancement, irregular peripheral enhancement, and complications. All 17 exophytic tumors (mean size, 2.2 cm; range, 1.1 5.0 cm) were completely ablated. Technical success and effectiveness was achieved in all cases and the mean follow-up period was 23.8 months (range, 17 33 months). A local recurrence was not detected in any of the cases; however, five patients developed complications as a result of treatment, including hematuria (n = 2), mild thermal injury of the psoas muscle (n = 1), mild hydronephrosis (n = 1), and fistula formation (n = 1). The RF ablation is an alternative treatment for exophytic RCCs and represents a promising treatment for some patients with small RCCs.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Early Clinical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, Su Yeon; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the early clinical experience associated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The RF ablation treatment was performed on 17 tumors from 16 patients (mean age, 60.5 years; range, 43 73 years) with RCC. The treatment indications were localized, solid renal mass, comorbidities, high operation risk, and refusal to perform surgery. All tumors were treated by a percutaneous CT (n = 10), followed by an US-guided (n = 2), laparoscopy-assisted US (n = 2), and an open (n = 2) RF ablation. Furthermore, patients underwent a follow- up CT at one day, one week, one month, three and six months, and then every six months from the onset of treatment. We evaluated the technical success, technical effectiveness, ablation zone, benign periablation enhancement, irregular peripheral enhancement, and complications. All 17 exophytic tumors (mean size, 2.2 cm; range, 1.1 5.0 cm) were completely ablated. Technical success and effectiveness was achieved in all cases and the mean follow-up period was 23.8 months (range, 17 33 months). A local recurrence was not detected in any of the cases; however, five patients developed complications as a result of treatment, including hematuria (n = 2), mild thermal injury of the psoas muscle (n = 1), mild hydronephrosis (n = 1), and fistula formation (n = 1). The RF ablation is an alternative treatment for exophytic RCCs and represents a promising treatment for some patients with small RCCs

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are clonogenic, non-hematpoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages, for example, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages, for example, neuronal...

  2. An expandable embryonic stem cell-derived Purkinje neuron progenitor population that exhibits in vivo maturation in the adult mouse cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, Gustavo A; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Bedar, Meiwand; Shpak, Guy; Broersen, Robin; Munshi, Shashini T; Dupont, Catherine; Gribnau, Joost; de Vrij, Femke M S; Kushner, Steven A; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-01-01

    The directed differentiation of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into cell-type specific neurons has inspired the development of therapeutic discovery for neurodegenerative diseases. Many forms of ataxia result from degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, but thus far it has not

  3. An expandable embryonic stem cell-derived Purkinje neuron progenitor population that exhibits in vivo maturation in the adult mouse cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Higuera (Gustavo A.); Iaffaldano, G. (Grazia); Bedar, M. (Meiwand); G. Shpak (Guy); R. Broersen (Robin); S.T. Munshi (Shashini T.); Dupont, C. (Catherine); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); F.M.S. Vrij (Femke); S.A. Kushner (Steven); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe directed differentiation of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into cell-type specific neurons has inspired the development of therapeutic discovery for neurodegenerative diseases. Many forms of ataxia result from degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, but thus far it

  4. Umbilical cord blood stem cells: clinical trials in non-hematological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dusko; Miere, Cristian; Lazic, Emilija

    2012-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has become the second most common source of stem cells for cell therapy. The recent boom in stem cell research and public fascination with promises of stem cell-based therapies, fueled by the media, have led researchers to explore the potential of UCB stem cells in therapy for non-hematological disorders. ClinicalTrials.gov database searched with key words 'cord blood stem cells' on December 28, 2011. As a rich source of the most primitive hematopoietic stem cells, UCB has a strong regenerative potential in stem cell-based-therapy for hematological disorders. Potential of UCB stem cells in therapy for non-hematological disorders. Increasing number of clinical trials with UCB stem cell-based therapy for a variety of diseases. A need for standardization of criteria for selection of UCB units for stem cell-based therapy, outcome measures and long-term follow-up.

  5. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome II, expanding the clinical spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-06-17

    Jun 17, 2014 ... an autosomal dominant fashion, most cases of TRPS II are sporadic [1]. TRPS III, is a form of brachydactyly due to short metacarpals and severe .... and broad on both sides (black asterisk), the fifth metacarpal bone has similar yet less pronounced appearance (white asterisk). Langer–Giedion syndrome. 91 ...

  6. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  7. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  8. Leishmania-specific T cells expressing interferon-¿(IFN-¿) and IL-10 upon activation are expanded in individuals cured of visceral leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Kemp, M; Kharazmi, A

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients who have recovered from visceral leishmaniasis often respond to Leishmania antigens in vitro by production of both IL-4, IFN-gamma and IL-10. In order to establish the cellular sources of these cytokines, we activated cells from individuals...... with a history of visceral leishmaniasis with Leishmania antigen for 6 days in culture, and identified cytokine production at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. The cytokines were only found in CD3+ cells and among these mainly within the CD4+ subset. The percentage of cytokine-producing cells was compared...... in Leishmania-activated PBMC cultures from the previous patients and from individuals living in a village where leishmaniasis does not occur. The percentage of IL-10- and IFN-gamma-containing cells was significantly higher in the previous patients than in the controls, indicating that Leishmania-specific T...

  9. Red Blood Cell Mechanical Fragility Test for Clinical Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Luke A; Olia, Salim E; Kameneva, Marina V

    2017-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) susceptibility to mechanically induced hemolysis, or RBC mechanical fragility (MF), is an important parameter in the characterization of erythrocyte membrane health. The rocker bead test (RBT) and associated calculated mechanical fragility index (MFI) is a simple method for the assessment of RBC MF. Requiring a minimum of 15.5 mL of blood and necessitating adjustment of hematocrit (Ht) to a "standard" value (40%), the current RBT is not suitable for use in most studies involving human subjects. To address these limitations, we propose a 6.5 mL reduced volume RBT and corresponding modified MFI (MMFI) that does not require prior Ht adjustment. This new method was assessed for i) correlation to the existing text, ii) to quantify the effect of Ht on MFI, and iii) validation by reexamining the protective effect of plasma proteins on RBC MF. The reduced volume RBT strongly correlated (r = 0.941) with the established large volume RBT at matched Hts, and an equation was developed to calculate MMFI: a numerical estimation (R 2  = 0.923) of MFI if performed with the reduced volume RBT at "standard" (40%) Ht. An inversely proportional relationship was found between plasma protein concentration and RBC MF using the MMFI-reduced volume method, supporting previous literature findings. The new reduced volume RBT and modified MFI will allow for the measurement of RBC MF in clinical and preclinical studies involving humans or small animals. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Psychometric Assessment of the Chinese Version of the Abbreviated Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC-26) and the Clinical Practice Version (EPIC-CP) in Chinese Men With Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy W T; Tse, Michael A; Ng, Chris N L; Chung, Edward K M; Fielding, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) instrument was designed to assess a range of health-related quality-of-life issues specifically relevant to patients with prostate cancer. This study examined the validity and reliability of Chinese versions of the 26-item EPIC and of the 16-item EPIC for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) in Chinese patients with prostate cancer. A Chinese version of the 26-item EPIC and the 16-item EPIC-CP were self-completed by 252 Chinese patients with prostate cancer who were recruited from three community-based cancer service centers. Confirmatory factors analysis assessed the factor structures of the EPIC and the EPIC-CP. Internal consistency and construct and clinical validities of the factor structures were assessed. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the original factor structure of both EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP showed good fit to this sample. A correlated model was superior to a hierarchical model in both EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP supporting the utility of the domain scores over the total scores. Cronbach α ranged from 0.55 to 0.91 for EPIC-26 and 0.44 to 0.67 for EPIC-CP. Construct validity was supported by correlations between EPIC-26/EPIC-CP and psychological distress measures. Clinical validity was supported by differentiation between patients with and without prostatectomy. These Chinese versions of the five-factor EPIC-26 and the EPIC-CP are valid and practical measures for assessing a range of health-related quality-of-life issues related to the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, highlighting their utility in assessing health-related quality of life for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral T cell lymphoma: clinical utility of romidepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawey K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Zain, Kathryn SaweyNYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USAIntroduction: Direct therapeutic targets, such as aberrant tumor cell genes and tumor cell markers, have been the focus of cancer treatment for more than 50 years. The resulting damage to normal cells and emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells after exposure to conventional chemotherapy have led researchers to study indirect targets, like the tumor vasculature. A more recent indirect approach involves targeting the epigenetic modifiers, DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to be active cytotoxic agents in T cell lymphoma. The current treatments approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for relapsed cutaneous T cell lymphoma are vorinostat and romidepsin. The diversity and rarity of peripheral T cell lymphomas present a challenge for effective treatment. With their poor overall survival rate, new targeted therapies need to be developed.Keywords: peripheral T cell lymphoma, treatment, romidepsin

  12. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...

  13. Myeloid differentiation and maturation of SCF+IL-3+IL-11 expanded AC133+/CD34+ cells selected from high-risk breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, S; Vávrová, J; Vokurková, D; Bláha, M; Vanásek, J

    2000-01-01

    The AC133 antigen is selectively expressed on subset of CD 34+ cells isolated from leukapheresis products from high risk breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy plus G-CSF. MiniMACS AC133+ isolated cells contained a mean of 85% (80-90) AC133+ cells. Enriched AC133+ cells coexpressed 80% CD34+, 6.6% CD33+ and 2% CD15+. Separated AC133+ cells contained 600 GFU-GM/10(4) cells and 70 BFU-E/10(4) cells. Flow-cytometric analysis indicated that AC133+ cells were isolated from cells population with low granularity (SS), while CD33+ a CD15+ cells had a high granularity. After a seven-day ex vivo expansion in the presence of SCF + IL-3 + IL11, the expansion of cells increased 19.4 times. The mean percentage of blasts decreased from 100% at the start of culture to 81% on day 3 and 30% on day 7. Promyelocytes were slow to appear with 10% present on day 3, but thereafter increased to 33% on day 7. The appearance of myelocytes and metamyelocytes lagged 3 days behind promyelocytes and continued to increase during culture to become the predominant (30%) cell type on day 7. Very few neutrophils (2%) were observed in any of the cultures on day 7. Monocytes or macrophages were not detected on day 7. By day 7 megakaryocytes were present at low levels (10%). The mean value of CFU-GM in the culture after day 7 of ex vivo expansion in the presence of SCF+IL-3+IL-11 had increased 45-fold, BFU-E 5-fold. After 7 days of expansion with IL-3+SCF+IL-11 cells expressed a mean of 12% CD34+, 8% AC133+, 59% CD33+ and 30% CD15+. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether ex vivo culture of peripheral blood AC133+ cells could generate sufficient numbers of progenitors to potentially abrogate cytopenia after transplantation and passive purging of tumor cells.

  14. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy... Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), gene and cellular therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders...

  15. Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinical Variant, Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    K., Deepadarshan; M., Mallikarjun; N. Abdu, Noshin

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour of skin, comprising 80% of non-melanoma cancers. Intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits increased pigmentation. It is a very rare variant, although its frequency can reach upto 6% of total basal cell carcinomas in Hispanics. Herein, we are reporting 2 cases of pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  16. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) project is a NASA-industry partnership with Bigelow Aerospace (BA) that has developing the first human-rated expandable...

  17. Tissue expander infections in children: look beyond the expander pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A C; Davison, S P; Manders, E K

    1999-11-01

    Infection of the expander pocket is the most common complication encountered with soft-tissue expansion. It is usually due to direct inoculation with skin flora either at the time of expander insertion or from extrusion of the device. The authors report two cases of infection of tissue expanders in which the children had concomitant infected sites distant from the prosthesis. Etiological bacteria of common pediatric infections like otitis media and pharyngitis were cultured from the infected expander pocket, raising suspicion that translocation of the organism to the expander had occurred. Aggressive antibiotic treatment, removal of the prosthesis, and flap advancement is advocated.

  18. Mitotic events in cerebellar granule progenitor cells that expand cerebellar surface area are critical for normal cerebellar cortical lamination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-03-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereologic principles. We demonstrate that, during the proliferative phase of the external granular layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that, during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β events lie upstream of α events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify intermitotic times for β events on a per-cell basis in postnatal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereologic studies.

  19. T cell exhaustion in cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Cheng; Xu, Yong; Huang, Zheng-Ming; Lu, Xiao-Jie

    2017-12-23

    During chronic viral infection or cancer, the immune system usually induces a corresponding immune response against pathogens or cancer cells so as to prevent worsening disease. T cell exhaustion in which reduced and dysfunctional effector T cells lead to immune escape is one of the mechanisms that pathogens or cancer cells get rid of control from the immune system. In this review, we discuss some mechanisms associated with T cell exhaustion and enumerate current methods of reversing T cell exhaustion. We also summarize current targeted treatment strategies and put forward following aspects that required to research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Expanding hollow metal rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Harold B [Evans, GA; Imrich, Kenneth J [Grovetown, GA

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  1. Expandable pattern casting research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  2. Expanding or postponing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tanja Dall; Caswell, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    setting. Working with data from 97 team meetings in a social work setting, we identify two patterns of negotiation in talk; expanding and postponing. ‘Expanding’ covers a group of interactional actions involving turn-taking and closure, while ‘postponing’ includes a group of actions whereby assessments......In this paper, we examine patterns of negotiation in multi-party interaction in social work. We draw on Strauss’ theory of negotiated order and a conversation analytical approach, seeking to gain insight into the complex accomplishment of making a decision in an inter-professional and multiparty...... or topics are avoided or made irrelevant. Both are examples of the complex ways in which team members negotiate both the institutional order and the decision to be made in the specific case in situ....

  3. The clinical application of mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac stem cells as a therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeon; Shapiro, Linda; Flynn, Aidan

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) can be separated into two broad etiological categories, based on the presence or absence of ischemia as a causative factor. In both ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease, myocardial dysfunction or damage frequently results in the development of heart failure, characterized by dyspnea, fatigue and reduced survival. As one of the least regenerative organs in the human body, current standards of care are limited to mitigating loss and preventing recurrence of damage, rather than stimulating actual regeneration of functional heart tissue. Cell based therapies using progenitor cells from bone marrow and the heart itself have been evaluated in preclinical models, and have demonstrated some promise. Accordingly, several clinical trials using autologous stem and progenitor cells have been performed, showing that these cells can be used safely in humans, and suggesting that they may improve relevant clinical parameters in patients with heart disease. Two specific cell populations that are particularly promising are the bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and the heart muscle derived cardiac stem cell (CSC). This review will summarize preclinical studies evaluating these stem cell populations and will discuss the clinical application of these cells in contemporary clinical trials, and potential future investigations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Responsible Translation of Stem Cell Research: An Assessment of Clinical Trial Registration and Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Moses; Yuan, Yan; Atkins, Harold; Shi, Qian; Bubela, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Summary We assessed the extent to which the publication of clinical trial results of innovative cell-based interventions reflects International Society for Stem Cell Research best practice guidelines. We assessed: (1) characteristics and time to publication of completed trials; (2) quality of reported trials; and (3) results of published trials. We identified and analyzed publications from 1,052 novel stem cell clinical trials: 179 (45.4%) of 393 completed trials had published results; 48 tri...

  5. Guidelines for stem cell science and clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research has released its updated guidelines for stem cell research in order to provide "assurance that stem cell research is conducted with scientific and ethical integrity and that new therapies are evidence-based." The guidelines were updated by a Guidelines Update Task Force consisting of twenty-five scientists, ethicists and experts in health care policy from nine countries. The chairpersons of this task force are Jonathan Kimmelman, George Daley and Insoo Hyun. There is no representative from India; the only person of Indian origin on it, Mahendra Rao, represents The New York Stem Cell Foundation.

  6. The scope of clinical morbidity in sickle cell trait

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    Abstract Sickle cell trait (SCT), the heterozygous state of the sickle hemoglobin beta globin gene. (HbAS) is carried by as many as 100 million individuals including up to 25% of the population in some regions of the World. Sickle cell trait is the best-characterized genetic polymorphism known to protect against falciparum ...

  7. Towards clinical application of microvascular endothelial cell seeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, C.H.P. (Catharina Henrica Paulina)

    2002-01-01

    The central question in this thesis is whether microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) from subcutaneous fat tissue are suitable for the seeding of prosthetic vascular grafts and deendothelialized surfaces. The aim of the application of endothelial cells (EC) is the inhibition of thrombogenicity and

  8. Clinical translation of stem cells in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Olle; Barker, Roger A; Brüstle, Oliver; Isacson, Ole; Svendsen, Clive N

    2012-02-03

    Stem cells and their derivatives show tremendous potential for treating many disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss here the challenges and potential for the translation of stem-cell-based approaches into treatments for Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stem cells: Biology and clinical potential | Alenzi | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem cell technology has developed rapidly in recent years to the point that we can now envisage its future use in a variety of therapeutic areas. This review seeks to summarize the types and sources of stem cells that may be utilized in this way, their pattern of development, their plasticity in terms of differentiation and ...

  10. Stem cells and the pancreas: from discovery to clinical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Dessì

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of stem cells within the adult pancreas is supported by the ability of this organ to regenerate its endocrine component in various conditions such as pregnancy and following partial pancreatectomy. Several studies have shown that progenitor or adult stem cells may reside within the pancreas and particularly in the pancreatic ducts, including acinar cells and islets of Langerhans. The discovery of human pluripotent stem cells in the pancreas, and the possibility of development of strategies for generating these, represented a turning point for the therapeutic interventions of type 1 diabetes.Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  11. Phagocytotic labelling of migratory blood cells and it clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhausen, E.; Schroth, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the labelling of monocytes and granulocytes with 99m-Tc-Sn-colloid in whole blood is described. The basis of the method is the phagocytosis of the Sn-colloid by the monocytes and granulocytes. There is the disadvantage that more than half of the activity is accumulated in the liver and spleen after the reinjection of labelled cells. Experiments in rats have revealed that about 90% of the administered cell bound activity were removed from the circulation and were taken up in the liver and spleen. By venipuncture of such a rat it was possible to remove circulating labelled cells of which, on reinjection into a second rat, about one half remiained in the circulation. This evidence indicated that phagocytotic tagging of white blood cells with 99m-Tc-Sn-colloid yielded viable, labelled cells. (Auth.)

  12. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an ever-expanding role in stem cell self-renewal, tumorigenesis and cancer chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Maryam K.; Shao, Connie; Wang, Jing; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xin; Collier, Zachary; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Fugui; Huang, Jiayi; Guo, Dan; Lu, Minpeng; Liu, Feng; Liu, Jianxiang; Ma, Chao; Shi, Lewis L.; Athiviraham, Aravind; He, Tong-Chuan; Lee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signaling transduces evolutionarily conserved pathways which play important roles in initiating and regulating a diverse range of cellular activities, including cell proliferation, calcium homeostasis, and cell polarity. The role of Wnt signaling in control of cell proliferation and stem cell self-renewal is primarily carried out through the canonical pathway, which is the best characterized among the multiple Wnt signaling branches. The past 10 years has seen a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of this pathway, as many new components of Wnt signaling have been identified and linked to signaling regulation, stem cell functions, and adult tissue homeostasis. Additionally, a substantial body of evidence links Wnt signaling to tumorigenesis of many cancer types and implicates it in the development of cancer drug resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which dysregulation of Wnt signaling precedes the development and progression of human cancer may hasten the development of pathway inhibitors to augment current therapy. This review summarizes and synthesizes our current knowledge of the canonical Wnt pathway in development and disease. We begin with an overview of the components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and delve into the role this pathway has been shown to play in stemness, tumorigenesis, and cancer drug resistance. Ultimately, we hope to present an organized collection of evidence implicating Wnt signaling in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance to facilitate the pursuit of Wnt pathway modulators that may improve outcomes of cancers in which Wnt signaling contributes to aggressive disease and/or treatment resistance. PMID:27077077

  13. Concise review: the periosteum: tapping into a reservoir of clinically useful progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hana; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2012-06-01

    Elucidation of the periosteum and its regenerative potential has become a hot topic in orthopedics. Yet few review articles address the unique features of periosteum-derived cells, particularly in light of translational therapies and engineering solutions inspired by the periosteum's remarkable regenerative capacity. This review strives to define periosteum-derived cells in light of cumulative research in the field; in addition, it addresses clinical translation of current insights, hurdles to advancement, and open questions in the field. First, we examine the periosteal niche and its inhabitant cells and the key characteristics of these cells in the context of mesenchymal stem cells and their relevance for clinical translation. We compare periosteum-derived cells with those derived from the marrow niche in in vivo studies, addressing commonalities as well as features unique to periosteum cells that make them potentially ideal candidates for clinical application. Thereafter, we review the differentiation and tissue-building properties of periosteum cells in vitro, evaluating their efficacy in comparison with marrow-derived cells. Finally, we address a new concept of banking periosteum and periosteum-derived cells as a novel alternative to currently available autogenic umbilical blood and perinatal tissue sources of stem cells for today's population of aging adults who were "born too early" to bank their own perinatal tissues. Elucidating similarities and differences inherent to multipotent cells from distinct tissue niches and their differentiation and tissue regeneration capacities will facilitate the use of such cells and their translation to regenerative medicine.

  14. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  15. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  16. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  17. Cell Therapy in Organ Transplantation: Our Experience on the Clinical Translation of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Safinia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ dysfunction. Despite improvements in short-term outcome, long-term outcome is suboptimal due to the increased morbidity and mortality associated with the toxicity of immunosuppressive regimens and chronic rejection (1–5. As such, the attention of the transplant community has focused on the development of novel therapeutic strategies to achieve allograft tolerance, a state whereby the immune system of the recipient can be re-educated to accept the allograft, averting the need for long-term immunosuppression. Indeed, reports of “operational” tolerance, whereby the recipient is off all immunosuppressive drugs and maintaining good graft function, is well documented in the literature for both liver and kidney transplantations (6–8. However, this phenomenon is rare and in the setting of liver transplantation has been shown to occur late after transplantation, with the majority of patients maintained on life-long immunosupression to prevent allograft rejection (9. As such, significant research has focused on immune regulation in the context of organ transplantation with regulatory T cells (Tregs identified as cells holding considerable promise in this endeavor. This review will provide a brief introduction to human Tregs, their phenotypic and functional characterization and focuses on our experience to date at the clinical translation of Treg immunotherapy in the setting of solid organ transplantation.

  18. Combination of chemotherapy and cancer stem cell targeting agents: Preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Atkinson, Katharine; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-28

    The cancer stem cell model claims that the initiation, maintenance, and growth of a tumor are driven by a small population of cancer cells termed cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells possess a variety of phenotypes associated with therapeutic resistance and often cause recurrence of the diseases. Several strategies have been investigated to target cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, such as blocking one or more self-renewal signaling pathways, reducing the expression of drug efflux and ATP-binding cassette efflux transporters, modulating epigenetic aberrations, and promoting cancer stem cell differentiation. A number of cell and animal studies strongly support the potential benefits of combining chemotherapeutic drugs with cancer stem cell targeting agents. Clinical trials are still underway to address the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of combination treatment. This mini-review provides an updated discussion of these preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Towards the clinical translation of stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espes, Daniel; Lau, Joey; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2017-10-01

    Insulin-producing cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have for long been a promising, but elusive treatment far from clinical translation into type 1 diabetes therapy. However, the field is now on the verge of moving such insulin-producing cells into clinical trials. Although stem cell therapies provide great opportunities, there are also potential risks such as teratoma formation associated with the treatment. Many considerations are needed on how to proceed with clinical translation, including whether to use hESCs or iPSCs, and whether encapsulation of tissue will be needed. This review aims to give an overview of the current knowledge of stem cell therapy outcomes in animal models of type 1 diabetes and a proposed road map towards the clinical setting with special focus on the potential risks and hurdles which needs to be considered. From a clinical point of view, transplantation of insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells must be performed without immune suppression in order to be an attractive treatment option. Although costly and highly labour intensive, patient-derived iPSCs would be the only solution, if not clinically successful encapsulation or tolerance induction protocols are introduced. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Expanding the host range of small insect RNA viruses: Providence virus (Carmotetraviridae) infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwaji, Meesbah; Short, James Roswell; Dorrington, Rosemary Ann

    2016-10-01

    Tetraviruses are small, positive (+ve)-sense ssRNA viruses that infect the midgut cells of lepidopteran larvae. Providence virus (PrV) is the only member of the family Carmotetraviridae (previously Tetraviridae). PrV particles exhibit the characteristic tetraviral T=4 icosahedral symmetry, but PrV is distinct from other tetraviruses with respect to genome organization and viral non-structural proteins. Currently, PrV is the only tetravirus known to infect and replicate in lepidopteran cell culture lines. In this report we demonstrate, using immunofluorescence microscopy, that PrV infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line (HeLa), producing infectious virus particles. We also provide evidence for PrV replication in vitro in insect, mammalian and plant cell-free systems. This study challenges the long-held view that tetraviruses have a narrow host range confined to one or a few lepidopteran species and highlights the need to consider the potential for apparently non-infectious viruses to be transferred to new hosts in the laboratory.

  1. Molecular Validation of Chondrogenic Differentiation and Hypoxia Responsiveness of Platelet-Lysate Expanded Adipose Tissue–Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galeano-Garces, Catalina; Camilleri, Emily T.; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Larson, Dirk R.; Qu, Wenchun; Smith, Jay; Dietz, Allan B.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Krych, Aaron J.; Larson, A. Noelle; Karperien, Marcel; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the optimal environmental conditions for chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs). In this investigation we specifically investigate the role of oxygen tension and 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Design: Both

  2. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Pleumeekers (Mieke); L. Nimeskern (Luc); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy); N. Kops (Nicole); R.M.L. Poublon (René); K.S. Stok (Kathryn); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix.

  3. Expanded cells in monoclonal TCR-{alpha}{beta}+/CD4+/NKa+/CD8-/+dim T-LGL lymphocytosis recognize hCMV antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rodríguez-Caballero (Arancha); A.C. García-Montero (Andrés); P. Bárcena (Paloma); J.M.M. Almeida (Julia); F. Ruiz-Cabello (Francisco); M.D. Tabernero; P. Garrido (Pilar); S. Muñoz-Criado (Santiago); Y. Sandberg (Yorick); A.W. Langerak (Anton); M. González (Marcos); A. Balanzategui (Ana); A. Orfao (Alberto)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies suggest the potential involvement of common antigenic stimuli on the ontogeny of monoclonal T-cell receptor (TCR)- αβ+/CD4+/NKa+/CD8-/+dimT-large granular lymphocyte (LGL) lymphocytosis. Because healthy persons show (oligo)clonal expansions of human cytomegalovirus

  4. B-cell depletion with rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Graves' ophthalmopathy the latest addition to an expanding family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; El Fassi, Daniel; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2007-01-01

    of 10 Graves' disease patients remained in remission 400 days after rituximab treatment versus none in the control group, and remarkable improvements in the eye symptoms of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were observed. This supports a role for B cells in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy...

  5. Metabolic activation capacity by primary hepatocytes expands the applicability of the embryonic stem cell test as alternative to experimental animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettwer, Michael; Reis-Fernandes, Marcos A; Iken, Marcus; Ott, Michael; Steinberg, Pablo; Nau, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) represents a validated alternative method for in vivo embryotoxicity testing. In the present study, primary hepatocytes were combined with the EST by a preincubation approach to improve its predictivity on bioactivation caused teratogenicity. As substances the well-known proteratogens cyclophosphamide (CPA) and valpromide (VPD) were used. The embryotoxic potential of CPA was detected by a strong decrease of the resulting ID(50)-concentration (50% inhibition of ES cell differentiation) after incubation with murine hepatocytes. Interspecies variation in metabolism was detected by testing VPD. After incubation of VPD with murine hepatocytes no inhibition of ES cell differentiation was observed, since hardly any teratogenic VPD metabolites were formed. In contrast, with human hepatocytes a significant conversion of VPD into the teratogen valproic acid (VPA) was observed. In summary we developed a co-culture approach for embryotoxicity testing, whereby the test compounds were incubated with hepatocytes and the supernatant was added to the ES cell culture to obtain a dose dependency of the preincubated test substances. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulatory issues in cell-based therapy for clinical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Tabera, Jaime; Vilarrodona, Anna; Trias, Esteve

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development in the fields of cellular and molecular biology, biotechnology, and bioengineering medicine has brought new, highly innovative treatments and medicinal products, some of which contain viable cells and tissues associated with scaffolds and devices. These new cell-based therapy approaches in regenerative medicine have great potential for use in the treatment of a number of diseases that at present cannot be managed effectively. Given the unique challenges associated with the development of human cell-based medicinal products, great care is required in the development of procedures, practices, and regulation. In cell therapy, appropriate methodologies in the areas of production, reproducibility, maintenance, and delivery are essential for accurate definition and reliable assurance of the suitability and quality of the final products. Recently, the official European Community agencies (EMA) and the relevant authority in the USA (FDA) have made significant efforts to establish regulatory guidance for use in the application of the cell-based therapies for human patients. The guidelines surrounding cell-based therapy take into account the current legislation, but focus less on the heterogeneity and requirements of individual human cell-based products, including specific combination products and applications. When considering guidelines and regulation, a risk assessment approach is an effective method of identifying priority areas for the development of human cell-based medicinal products. Additionally, effective design and thorough validation of the manufacturing process in line with existing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and quality control regimes and a program that ensures the traceability and biovigilance of the final products are also all essential elements to consider. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. CAR-T Cells: A Systematic Review and Mixed Methods Analysis of the Clinical Trial Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, David; Arshad, Zeeshaan; Smith, James; Stanic, Tijana; Holländer, Georg; Brindley, David

    2018-02-07

    CAR-T cells are a promising new therapy that offer significant advantages compared with conventional immunotherapies. This systematic review and clinical trial landscape identifies and critiques published CAR-T cell clinical trials and examines the critical factors required to enable CAR-T cells to become a standard therapy. A review of the literature was conducted to identify suitable studies from the MEDLINE and Ovid bibliographic databases. The literature and database searches identified 20 studies for inclusion. The average number of participants per clinical trial examined was 11 patients. All studies included in this systematic review investigated CAR-T cells and were prospective, uncontrolled clinical studies. Leukemia is the most common cancer subtype and accounts for 57.4% (n = 120) of disease indications. The majority of studies used an autologous cell source (85%, n = 17) rather than an allogeneic cell source. Translational challenges encompass technical considerations relating to CAR-T cell development, manufacturing practicability, clinical trial approaches, CAR-T cell quality and persistence, and patient management. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurotrauma and mesenchymal stem cells treatment: From experimental studies to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco; Goulart, Camila de Oliveira; Ramalho, Bruna Dos Santos; Oliveira, Júlia Teixeira; Almeida, Fernanda Martins

    2014-04-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy has attracted the attention of scientists and clinicians around the world. Basic and pre-clinical experimental studies have highlighted the positive effects of MSC treatment after spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. These effects are believed to be due to their ability to differentiate into other cell lineages, modulate inflammatory and immunomodulatory responses, reduce cell apoptosis, secrete several neurotrophic factors and respond to tissue injury, among others. There are many pre-clinical studies on MSC treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) and peripheral nerve injuries. However, the same is not true for clinical trials, particularly those concerned with nerve trauma, indicating the necessity of more well-constructed studies showing the benefits that cell therapy can provide for individuals suffering the consequences of nerve lesions. As for clinical trials for SCI treatment the results obtained so far are not as beneficial as those described in experimental studies. For these reasons basic and pre-clinical studies dealing with MSC therapy should emphasize the standardization of protocols that could be translated to the clinical set with consistent and positive outcomes. This review is based on pre-clinical studies and clinical trials available in the literature from 2010 until now. At the time of writing this article there were 43 and 36 pre-clinical and 19 and 1 clinical trials on injured spinal cord and peripheral nerves, respectively.

  9. Rational combinations of in vivo cancer antigen priming and adoptive T-cell therapy mobilize immune and clinical responses in terminal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Fu, Jian Qian; Wu, Xiao Xuan; Huang, Li Ping; Ruan, Run Sheng

    2018-03-06

    It is now recognized that solid tumors encroach on the host's immune microenvironment to favor its own proliferation. Strategies to enhance the specificity of the endogenous T-cell population against tumors have been met with limited clinical success. We aimed to devise a two-tier protocol coupling in vivo whole antigen priming with ex vivo cellular expansion to clinically evaluate survival in patients following re-infusion of primed, autologous T cells, thereby determining treatment efficacy. Treatment commenced with the acquisition of whole tumor antigens from tumor cell lines corresponding with patients' primary malignancy. Lysate mixture was inoculated intradermally, while peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were periodically extracted via phlebotomy and expanded in culture ex vivo for re-infusion. Post-treatment tumor-specific T-cell response and cytotoxicity was confirmed via Elispot and real-time cell analyzing (RTCA) assay. Serum cytokine levels and cytotoxicity scores were evaluated for associations with survival status and duration. There was a significant increase in cytotoxicity exhibited by T cells measured using both Elispot and RTCA following treatment. Correlation analysis determined significant association between higher post-treatment cytotoxicity scores and survival status (R = 0.52, p = 0.0028) as well as longer survival duration in months (R = 0.59, p = 0.005). Our treatment protocol successfully demonstrated significant correlation between tumor-associated antigen-specific immune response and objective prolongation of survival. Whole-cell cancer antigen priming and adoptive T-cell therapy is, therefore, a highly feasible clinical model which can be easily replicated to positively influence outcome in end-stage malignancy.

  10. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B-mediated disorders and identification of altered cell-cycle dynamics due to ARID1B haploinsufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Joe C H; White, Susan M; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Wilson, Gabrielle R; Gillies, Greta; Pope, Kate; Mountford, Hayley S; Torring, Pernille M; McKee, Shane; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Leventer, Richard J; Delatycki, Martin B; Amor, David J; Lockhart, Paul J

    2014-03-27

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex have recently been shown to contribute to multiple syndromes characterised by developmental delay and intellectual disability. ARID1B mutations have been identified as the predominant cause of Coffin-Siris syndrome and have also been shown to be a frequent cause of nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Here, we investigate the molecular basis of a patient with an overlapping but distinctive phenotype of intellectual disability, plantar fat pads and facial dysmorphism. High density microarray analysis of the patient demonstrated a heterozygous deletion at 6q25.3, which resulted in the loss of four genes including AT Rich Interactive Domain 1B (ARID1B). Subsequent quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed ARID1B haploinsufficiency in the patient. Analysis of both patient-derived and ARID1B knockdown fibroblasts after serum starvation demonstrated delayed cell cycle re-entry associated with reduced cell number in the S1 phase. Based on the patient's distinctive phenotype, we ascertained four additional patients and identified heterozygous de novo ARID1B frameshift or nonsense mutations in all of them. This study broadens the spectrum of ARID1B associated phenotypes by describing a distinctive phenotype including plantar fat pads but lacking the hypertrichosis or fifth nail hypoplasia associated with Coffin-Siris syndrome. We present the first direct evidence in patient-derived cells that alterations in cell cycle contribute to the underlying pathogenesis of syndromes associated with ARID1B haploinsufficiency.

  11. The Expanding Family of Bone Marrow Homing Factors for Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Stromal Derived Factor 1 Is Not the Only Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-chemokine stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1, which binds to the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, directs migration and homing of CXCR4+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs to bone marrow (BM and plays a crucial role in retention of these cells in stem cell niches. However, this unique role of SDF-1 has been recently challenged by several observations supporting SDF-1-CXCR4-independent BM homing. Specifically, it has been demonstrated that HSPCs respond robustly to some bioactive lipids, such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P, and migrate in response to gradients of certain extracellular nucleotides, including uridine triphosphate (UTP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, the responsiveness of HSPCs to an SDF-1 gradient is enhanced by some elements of innate immunity (e.g., C3 complement cascade cleavage fragments and antimicrobial cationic peptides, such as cathelicidin/LL-37 or β2-defensin as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Since all these factors are upregulated in BM after myeloblative conditioning for transplantation, a more complex picture of homing emerges that involves several factors supporting, and in some situations even replacing, the SDF-1-CXCR4 axis.

  12. Manufacturing and use of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for phase I clinical trials: Establishment and evaluation of a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been utilised in many clinical trials as an experimental treatment in numerous clinical settings. Bone marrow remains the traditional source tissue for MSCs but is relatively hard to access in large volumes. Alternatively, MSCs may be derived from other tissues including the placenta and adipose tissue. In an initial study no obvious differences in parameters such as cell surface phenotype, chemokine receptor display, mesodermal differentiation capacity or immunosuppressive ability, were detected when we compared human marrow derived- MSCs to human placenta-derived MSCs. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a protocol and related processes for preparation placenta-derived MSCs for early phase clinical trials. Methods. A full-term placenta was taken after delivery of the baby as a source of MSCs. Isolation, seeding, incubation, cryopreservation of human placentaderived MSCs and used production release criteria were in accordance with the complex regulatory requirements applicable to Code of Good Manufacturing Practice manufacturing of ex vivo expanded cells. Results. We established and evaluated instructions for MSCs preparation protocol and gave an overview of the three clinical areas application. In the first trial, MSCs were co-transplanted iv to patient receiving an allogeneic cord blood transplant as therapy for treatmentrefractory acute myeloid leukemia. In the second trial, MSCs were administered iv in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and without serious adverse effects. In the third trial, MSCs were injected directly into the site of tendon damage using ultrasound guidance in the treatment of chronic refractory tendinopathy. Conclusion. Clinical trials using both allogeneic and autologous cells demonstrated MSCs to be safe. A described protocol for human placenta-derived MSCs is appropriate for use in a clinical setting, relatively inexpensive and can be

  13. Clinical development of CAR T cells-challenges and opportunities in translating innovative treatment concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jessica; Schüßler-Lenz, Martina; Bondanza, Attilio; Buchholz, Christian J

    2017-09-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, together with checkpoint inhibition, has been celebrated as a breakthrough technology due to the substantial benefit observed in clinical trials with patients suffering from relapsed or refractory B-cell malignancies. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the clinical trials performed so far worldwide and analyze parameters such as targeted antigen and indication, CAR molecular design, CAR T cell manufacturing, anti-tumor activities, and related toxicities. More than 200 CAR T cell clinical trials have been initiated so far, most of which aim to treat lymphoma or leukemia patients using CD19-specific CARs. An increasing number of studies address solid tumors as well. Notably, not all clinical trials conducted so far have shown promising results. Indeed, in a few patients CAR T cell therapy resulted in severe adverse events with fatal outcome. Of note, less than 10% of the ongoing CAR T cell clinical trials are performed in Europe. Taking lead from our analysis, we discuss the problems and general hurdles preventing efficient clinical development of CAR T cells as well as opportunities, with a special focus on the European stage. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  14. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  15. Clinical applications of indium-111-acetylacetone-labelled blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, P.; Sinn, H.; Wellman, H.; Clorius, J.H.; Becker, W.

    1981-01-01

    A method permitting red-cell labelling with 111 In-acetylacetone was reported in 1974 for evaluating intestinal blood loss, the liver-spleen ratio and the red-cell volume. White blood cells can be tagged similarly. In white-cell labelling, simultaneous red-cell or platelet tagging is avoided. Several procedures (dextran separation and gradient centrifugations) have been combined, to develop a highly selective cell separation. In osteomyelitis it may not be as advantageous to use 67 Ga-citrate, as in