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Sample records for cell expanding clinical

  1. PROFAM expands Mexican family planning clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Mexico's private, nonprofit social marketing company, known as PROFAM, intends to expand its family planning clinics to marginal urban areas. The clinics are part of PROFAM's push to diversify social marketing outlets for contraceptive products and other birth control methods. PROFAM expects to establish 3 new clinics, possibly including a pregnancy test laboratory, a small 1-doctor clinic, and a large clinic housing an operating room. 1 clinic will be located outside the Mexico City area, the program's traditional boundaries. The company currently runs 2 small clinics and a pregnancy testing laboratory in Ciudad Netzahualcoyti, a community of 3.5 million on Mexico City's outskirts. PROFAM recently obtaine d government approval to sell condoms in food stores, which should increase distribtuion and sales. Currently, the company sells over 1 million high quality, lubricated condoms each month, accounting for over half of the Mexican market. Distribution covers 85% of the country's drugstore. Program setbacks occurred in 1981, when the Mexican government cancelled PROFAM's sales permits for all contraceptive products except condoms. Cancelled products included an oral contraceptive and 3 vaginal spermicides. These 4 products had provided nearly 100,000 couple years of protection in 1979 and an estimated 120,000 CYP 1980. During 1979 and 1980, condoms provided about 27,000 and 60,000 CYP, respectively. PROFAM had relied heavily on the pill and spermicides because its early studies showed condoms had a negative image in Mexico, due largely to the product's association with extramarital affairs. To counter this, PROFAM launched a widespread, free product sampling program in 1979, along with a continuing educational and advertising drive. Subsequent consumer surveys revealed a marked increase in product acceptance, with PROFAM's condom becoming the most widely known brand available in Mexico. PMID:12267250

  2. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome II, expanding the clinical spectrum

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    Rabah M. Shawky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4.5 year old Egyptian male child, fourth in the order of birth of healthy remote consanguineous parents. He has typical facial as well as skeletal features of Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS II. The facial features included bilateral downward slanting palpebral fissures, bulbous nose, long filtrum, retromicrognathia, sparse hair in the scalp and thick eyebrows. The skeletal features included retarded bone age, cone shaped epiphyses of the phalanges and multiple exostoses. The patient has also growth retardation, moderate mental retardation and hyperlaxity of the right knee joint. However our patient has some features not reported in TRPS II patients. These included bilateral partial ptosis, long eye lashes, preauricular skin tag, short 2nd right finger, short metacarpals of both thumbs. So we have to expand the clinical spectrum. Karyotype demonstrated 46,XY,del 8(q23.3-q24.1.

  3. Transportation conditions for prompt use of ex vivo expanded and freshly harvested clinical-grade bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Elena; Murgia, Alba; Caselli, Anna; Grisendi, Giulia; Piccinno, Maria Serena; Rasini, Valeria; Giordano, Rosaria; Montemurro, Tiziana; Bourin, Philippe; Sensebé, Luc; Rojewski, Markus T; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Layrolle, Pierre; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Panaitescu, Carmen Bunu; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Catani, Fabio; Paolucci, Paolo; Burns, Jorge S; Dominici, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    Successful preliminary studies have encouraged a more translational phase for stem cell research. Nevertheless, advances in the culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hBM-MSC) and osteoconductive qualities of combined biomaterials can be undermined if necessary cell transportation procedures prove unviable. We aimed at evaluating the effect of transportation conditions on cell function, including the ability to form bone in vivo, using procedures suited to clinical application. hBM-MSC expanded in current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) facilities (cGMP-hBM-MSC) to numbers suitable for therapy were transported overnight within syringes and subsequently tested for viability. Scaled-down experiments mimicking shipment for 18 h at 4°C tested the influence of three different clinical-grade transportation buffers (0.9% saline alone or with 4% human serum albumin [HSA] from two independent sources) compared with cell maintenance medium. Cell viability after shipment was >80% in all cases, enabling evaluation of (1) adhesion to plastic flasks and hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate osteoconductive biomaterial (HA/β-TCP 3D scaffold); (2) proliferation rate; (3) ex vivo osteogenic differentiation in contexts of 2D monolayers on plastic and 3D HA/β-TCP scaffolds; and (4) in vivo ectopic bone formation after subcutaneous implantation of cells with HA/β-TCP scaffold into NOD/SCID mice. Von Kossa staining was used to assess ex vivo osteogenic differentiation in 3D cultures, providing a quantifiable test of 3D biomineralization ex vivo as a rapid, cost-effective potency assay. Near-equivalent capacities for cell survival, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were found for all transportation buffers. Moreover, cGMP-hBM-MSC transported from a production facility under clinical-grade conditions of 4% HSA in 0.9% saline to a destination 18 h away showed prompt adhesion to HA/β-TCP 3D scaffold and subsequent in vivo bone formation

  4. First-in-man clinical results with good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant polypeptide-expanded adenovirus-specific T cells after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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    Geyeregger, René; Freimüller, Christine; Stemberger, Julia; Artwohl, Michaela; Witt, Volker; Lion, Thomas; Fischer, Gottfried; Lawitschka, Anita; Ritter, Julia; Hummel, Michael; Holter, Wolfgang; Fritsch, Gerhard; Matthes-Martin, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy against viral infections is a promising treatment option for patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the generation of virus-specific T cells is either cost-intensive or time-consuming. We developed the first GMP-compliant protocol to generate donor-derived adenovirus (HAdV), cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cell lines (TCLs) within 12 days by the use of overlapping polypeptides derived from different viruses in combination with IL-15. Two patients after undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with HAdV viremia displaying rising viral loads despite treatment with cidofovir received 1×10 donor-derived short-term expanded HAdV-specific TCLs per kg body weight. In both patients, HAdV-specific T cells could be detected by IFN-γ-ELISpot 30 and 22 days postinfusion, and resulted in complete clearance or >1.5 log reduction of viral load within 15 and 18 days, respectively. This protocol facilitates rapid and cost-effective generation of virus-specific TCLs, which appear to provide an effective treatment option.

  5. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. Objective The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. Methods This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Results Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one

  6. RIN2 syndrome: Expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Simonetta; Syx, Delfien; Ivanovski, Ivan; Pollazzon, Marzia; Santodirocco, Daniela; De Marco, Loredana; Beltrami, Marina; Callewaert, Bert; Garavelli, Livia; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    Biallelic defects in the RIN2 gene, encoding the Ras and Rab interactor 2 protein, are associated with a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder, with only nine patients from four independent families reported to date. The condition was initially termed MACS syndrome (macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis), based on the clinical features of the first identified family; however, with the expansion of the clinical phenotype in additional families, it was subsequently coined RIN2 syndrome. Hallmark features of this condition include dysmorphic facial features with striking, progressive facial coarsening, sparse hair, normal to enlarged occipitofrontal circumference, soft redundant and/or hyperextensible skin, and scoliosis. Patients with RIN2 syndrome present phenotypic overlap with other conditions, including EDS (especially the dermatosparaxis and kyphoscoliosis subtypes). Here, we describe a 10th patient, the first patient of Caucasian origin and the oldest reported patient so far, who harbors the previously identified homozygous RIN2 mutation c.1878dupC (p. (Ile627Hisfs*7)). Besides the hallmark features, this patient also presents problems not previously associated with RIN2 syndrome, including cervical vertebral fusion, mild hearing loss, and colonic fibrosis. We provide an overview of the clinical findings in all reported patients with RIN2 mutations and summarize some of the possible pathogenic mechanisms that may underlie this condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27277385

  7. Transplantation of autologous ex vivo expanded human conjunctival epithelial cells for treatment of pterygia: A prospective open-label single arm multicentric clinical trial

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    Viraf Sam Vasania

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We have, for the 1 st time, standardized a protocol for preparing autologous hCjEC grafts that can be safely transported to multiple centers across the country for transplantation. The clinical outcome was satisfactory for treating pterygia.

  8. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  9. Expanding the mutation and clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hanan H; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Eid, Maha M; Tosson, Angie M S; Shousha, Wafaa Gh; Abdel Azeem, Amira A; Farag, Mona K; Mehrez, Mennat I; Gaber, Khaled R

    2016-07-01

    Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia syndrome are rare autosomal recessive genetic disorders representing the extremes of the spectrum of severity of the same condition, caused by mutations in ESCO2 gene. We report three new patients with Roberts syndrome from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families. All patients presented with growth retardation, mesomelic shortening of the limbs more in the upper than in the lower limbs and microcephaly. Patients were subjected to clinical, cytogenetic and radiologic examinations. Cytogenetic analysis showed the characteristic premature separation of centromeres and puffing of heterochromatic regions. Further, sequencing of the ESCO2 gene identified a novel mutation c.244_245dupCT (p.T83Pfs*20) in one family besides two previously reported mutations c.760_761insA (p.T254Nfs*27) and c.764_765delTT (p.F255Cfs*25). All mutations were in homozygous state, in exon 3. The severity of the mesomelic shortening of the limbs and craniofacial anomalies showed variability among patients. Interestingly, patient 1 had abnormal skin hypopigmentation. Serial fetal ultrasound examinations and measurements of long bones diagnosed two affected fetuses in two of the studied families. A literature review and case comparison was performed. In conclusion, we report a novel ESCO2 mutation and expand the clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

  10. DNA damage in Human Limbal Epithelial Cells expanded ex vivo.

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    Yolanda Lorenzo Corrales

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Limbal stem cell deficiency, secondary to insults and diseases, may be treated by transplantation of ex vivo engineered epithelial grafts. We here present preliminary data on levels of cellular DNA damage in grafts produced in two different types of culture medium. Cultures were initiated using corneo-limbal donor tissue after removal of the central area for transplant purposes. Explants (approx. 2x2 mm were positioned epithelial side down on tissue culture treated polyester membranes and expanded for four weeks in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium F12 Nutrient Mixture (Ham [DMEM/F12 (1:1] with either (1 H. medium; 10% human serum or (2 COM; 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, insulin-transferrin-sodiumselenzine (ITS , cholera toxin-A, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and hydrocortisone. Cells were dissociated using Trypsin-EDTA (0.05% for 30 min., the enzyme activity was inhibited by medium and serum. The cell suspension was transferred to tubes on ice and processed using the Comet Assay. Duplicate samples from each culture were analyzed in each assay by visual scoring. Using a fluorescence microscope, 100 comets (50 from each gel were classified into five categories, 0-4, representing increasing relative tail intensities. Summing the scores (0-4 of 100 comets therefore gives an overall score of between 0 and 400 arbitrary units. Preliminary data show some levels of DNA damage in cells dissociated from the grafts regardless of the type of culture medium used. Anyway more experiments with other donors have to be done to have some conclusions. Recent studies have shown that medium with human serum equally support production of grafts containing differentiated as well as undifferentiated cells suitable for clinical transplantation. Preliminary data from our experiments indicate that levels of molecular damage to the DNA do not increase in cells cultured in H. medium despite its lacks of complexity.

  11. Non-expanded adipose stromal vascular fraction cell therapy for multiple sclerosis

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    Rodriguez Jorge

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The stromal vascular fraction (SVF of adipose tissue is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, T regulatory cells, endothelial precursor cells, preadipocytes, as well as anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Safety of autologous adipose tissue implantation is supported by extensive use of this procedure in cosmetic surgery, as well as by ongoing studies using in vitro expanded adipose derived MSC. Equine and canine studies demonstrating anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of non-expanded SVF cells have yielded promising results. Although non-expanded SVF cells have been used successfully in accelerating healing of Crohn's fistulas, to our knowledge clinical use of these cells for systemic immune modulation has not been reported. In this communication we discuss the rationale for use of autologous SVF in treatment of multiple sclerosis and describe our experiences with three patients. Based on this rationale and initial experiences, we propose controlled trials of autologous SVF in various inflammatory conditions.

  12. Redefining Signaling Pathways with an Expanding Single-Cell Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Suzanne; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2016-06-01

    Genetically identical cells respond heterogeneously to uniform environmental stimuli. Consequently, investigating the signaling networks that control these cell responses using 'average' bulk cell measurements can obscure underlying mechanisms and misses information emerging from cell-to-cell variability. Here we review recent technological advances including live-cell fluorescence imaging-based approaches and microfluidic devices that enable measurements of signaling networks, dynamics, and responses in single cells. We discuss how these single-cell tools have uncovered novel mechanistic insights for canonical signaling pathways that control cell proliferation (ERK), DNA-damage responses (p53), and innate immune and stress responses (NF-κB). Future improvements in throughput and multiplexing, analytical pipelines, and in vivo applicability will all significantly expand the biological information gained from single-cell measurements of signaling pathways. PMID:26968612

  13. Redefining Signaling Pathways with an Expanding Single-Cell Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Suzanne; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2016-06-01

    Genetically identical cells respond heterogeneously to uniform environmental stimuli. Consequently, investigating the signaling networks that control these cell responses using 'average' bulk cell measurements can obscure underlying mechanisms and misses information emerging from cell-to-cell variability. Here we review recent technological advances including live-cell fluorescence imaging-based approaches and microfluidic devices that enable measurements of signaling networks, dynamics, and responses in single cells. We discuss how these single-cell tools have uncovered novel mechanistic insights for canonical signaling pathways that control cell proliferation (ERK), DNA-damage responses (p53), and innate immune and stress responses (NF-κB). Future improvements in throughput and multiplexing, analytical pipelines, and in vivo applicability will all significantly expand the biological information gained from single-cell measurements of signaling pathways.

  14. The Expanding Clinical Spectrum of Genetic Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shbarou, Rolla; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric epileptic encephalopathies represent a clinically challenging and often devastating group of disorders that affect children at different stages of infancy and childhood. With the advances in genetic testing and neuroimaging, the etiologies of these epileptic syndromes are now better defined. The various encephalopathies that are reviewed in this article include the following: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or Ohtahara syndrome, early myoclonic encephalopathy, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome), Landau-Kleffner syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Their clinical features, prognosis as well as underlying genetic etiologies are presented and updated. PMID:27544470

  15. Beyond NK cells: the expanding universe of Innate Lymphoid Cells.

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    Marina eCella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time NK cells were thought to be the only immune innate lymphoid population capable of responding to invading pathogens under the influence of changing environmental cues. In the last few years, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that a number of different Innate Lymphoid Cells found at mucosal sites rapidly respond to locally produced cytokines in order to establish or maintain homeostasis. ILC populations closely mirror the phenotype of adaptive Thelper subsets in their ability to secrete soluble factors. Early in the immune response, ILCs are responsible for setting the stage to mount an adaptive T cell response appropriate to the incoming insult. Here we review the diversity of ILC subsets and discuss similarities and differences between ILCs and NK cells in function and key transcriptional factors required for their development.

  16. Beyond NK Cells: The Expanding Universe of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cella, Marina; Miller, Hannah; Song, Christina

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, natural killer (NK) cells were thought to be the only innate immune lymphoid population capable of responding to invading pathogens under the influence of changing environmental cues. In the last few years, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that a number of different innate lymphoid cell (ILC) populations found at mucosal sites rapidly respond to locally produced cytokines in order to establish or maintain homeostasis. These ILC populations closely mirror the phenoty...

  17. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  18. Expanding the List of Dysregulated Immunosuppressive Cells in Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, David C; McCormick, Thomas S

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been studied in regard to their increased numbers of circulating cells in cancer patients. Recent research efforts have also increased awareness of MDSC in non-malignant inflammatory diseases, including asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, and arthritis. Psoriasis can now be added to the growing list of inflammatory disorders with an MDSC component. Cao et al. report increased numbers of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSC) in psoriasis patients and examine the implication of dysregulated Mo-MDSC function. Cao et al. describe psoriatic Mo-MDSC that produce increased IL-23, IL-1b, and CCL4 cytokines compared to Mo-MDSC from healthy controls. These results complement previous research demonstrating psoriatic Mo-MDSC are unable to suppress autologous and heterologous CD8 T-cell proliferations, display decreased expression levels of PD-1 as well as PD-L1, and fail to produce effective immuno-competent regulatory T cells (Tregs). Cao et al. also identify the unique expression of the surface protein DC-HIL on psoriatic Mo-MDSC. The expanded population of DC-HIL(+) Mo-MDSC in psoriasis patients, however, display inferior suppressive capabilities compared to DC-HIL(+) Mo-MDSC found in melanoma patients, suggesting contextual signaling as a potential contributing factor to Mo-MDSC function. PMID:27542294

  19. Clinical application of stem cells: An update 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Van, Phuc Pham

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has the long history of more than 50 years from the first bone marrow transplantation in 1957. From the 2000s, clinical applications of stem cells significantly increased with more diseases and more patients treated with stem cells. Both autologous stem cells and allogenic stem cells as well as adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and both in vitro non-expanded stem cells and in vitro expanded stem cells were clinically applied. For adult stem...

  20. Improving washing strategies of human mesenchymal stem cells using negative mode expanded bed chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Bárbara; Silva, Ricardo J S; Aguiar, Tiago; Serra, Margarida; Daicic, John; Maloisel, Jean-Luc; Clachan, John; Åkerblom, Anna; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-15

    The use of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in clinical applications has been increasing over the last decade. However, to be applied in a clinical setting hMSC need to comply with specific requirements in terms of identity, potency and purity. This study reports the improvement of established tangential flow filtration (TFF)-based washing strategies, further increasing hMSC purity, using negative mode expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with a new multimodal prototype matrix based on core-shell bead technology. The matrix was characterized and a stable, expanded bed could be obtained using standard equipment adapted from what is used for conventional packed bed chromatography processes. The effect of different expansion rates on cell recovery yield and protein removal capacity was assessed. The best trade-off between cell recovery (89%) and protein clearance (67%) was achieved using an intermediate expansion bed rate (1.4). Furthermore, we also showed that EBA chromatography can be efficiently integrated on the already established process for the downstream processing (DSP) of hMSC, where it improved the washing efficiency more than 10-fold, recovering approximately 70% of cells after global processing. This strategy showed not to impact cell viability (>95%), neither hMSC's characteristics in terms of morphology, immunophenotype, proliferation, adhesion capacity and multipotent differentiation potential. PMID:26739915

  1. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: Expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalogue

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    Suereta eFortuin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX and Titanium dioxide (TiO2 chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only forty five of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis.

  2. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

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    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for

  3. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

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    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1.

  4. Substrates for clinical applicability of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjar Enam; Sha Jin

    2015-01-01

    The capability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs)to differentiate into a variety of cells in the human bodyholds great promise for regenerative medicine. Manysubstrates exist on which hPSCs can be self-renewed,maintained and expanded to further the goal of clinicalapplication of stem cells. In this review, we highlightnumerous extracellular matrix proteins, peptide andpolymer based substrates, scaffolds and hydrogelsthat have been pioneered. We discuss their benefitsand shortcomings and offer future directions as well asemphasize commercially available synthetic peptidesas a type of substrate that can bring the benefits ofregenerative medicine to clinical settings.

  5. Preliminary clinical outcomes of percutaneous kyphoplasty with Sky-bone expander

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhao-min; KUANG Guan-ming; DONG Zhi-yong; K.M.C. Cheung; William W. Lu; LI Fo-bao

    2007-01-01

    Background Percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) using balloon expander has been proved to be effective in the treatment of painful vertebral compression fractures. Recently, Sky-bone expander, an alternative bone expander for PKP has been developed. The purpose of this study was to show our preliminary clinical outcomes of PKP with Sky-bone expander.Methods PKP with Sky-bone expander was performed in 25 patients (30 vertebrae). The operation time, bleeding volume, cement volume injected were recorded. The pain and functional activities of the patients before and after the operation were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The cement distribution in the vertebrae, vertebral height restoration, and kyphosis correction after the procedure were evaluated by radiography. The pre- and post-operative absolute values of the vertebral height and kyphotic angle were compared by paired-sample t test. All the patients were followed up by telephone or clinic consulting after being discharged from our hospital.Results The procedure was performed successfully in all the patients. Bipedicular injection was used in 2 of the patients, and unipedicular injection was made in the others. The operation time ranged from 25 to 120 minutes (45 minutes per vertebra on average). The average bleeding volume was about 20 ml. Polymethylmethacrylate1.5 - 5.0 ml (mean, (3.15±0.78) ml) was injected through each pedicle into all the patients except one, who received calcium sulphate 3.5 ml instead. The patients were followed up for 12-15 months (13.5 months on average). The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index, anterior, midline, and posterior vertebral height, and kyphotic angle of the patients were improved significantly at the end of the follow-up compared with those before the operation.(2.5±1.3, 35.1%, (20.94±6.15) mm, (20.26±4.59) mm, (26.72±3.49) mm, and 8.2 degrees vs. 8.5±1.9, 61.2%, (19.11±6.72) mm, (15.88±5.73) mm, (25.78±3.67) mm, and 17.3 degrees

  6. Covered Self-Expanding Transhepatic Biliary Stents:Clinical Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report our preliminary results with a new type of self-expanding covered stent for treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. Methods: Wallstents, fully covered with high elasticity polyurethane, with an unconstrained diameter of 10 mm and a total length of 69 mm, were placed transhepatically under fluoroscopic guidance in five patients. The length of the biliary obstruction varied between 30-50 mm. At 1 and 3 months (82-98 days) clinical assessment, serum bilirubin measurement, and ultrasound examination of the biliary tree were performed. Results: Initial uncomplicated deployment of the stents and internal drainage was possible in all patients. Distal stent migration resulted in early biliary reobstruction in one patient. At 3-month follow-up, partial reobstruction, most probably due to sludge formation, was found in another patient. Conclusion: Our initial results indicate that the covered, self-expanding Wallstent endoprosthesis can be reliably and safely deployed transhepatically for malignant biliary obstruction

  7. The expanding spectrum of clinically-distinctive, immunotherapy-responsive autoimmune encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarosh R Irani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune encephalopathies are a group of conditions that are associated with autoantibodies against surface neuronal proteins, which are likely to mediate the disease. They are established as a frequent cause of encephalitis. Characteristic clinical features in individual patients often allow the specificity of the underlying antibody to be confidently predicted. Antibodies against the VGKC-complex, mainly LGI1(leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1, CASPR2 (contactin-associated protein 2, and contactin-2, and NMDA (N-methyl, D-aspartate -receptor are the most frequently established serological associations. In the minority of cases, an underlying tumour can be responsible. Early administration of immunotherapies, and tumour removal, where it is relevant, offer the greatest chance of improvement. Prolonged courses of immunotherapies may be required, and clinical improvements often correlate well with the antibody levels. In the present article, we have summarised recent developments in the clinical and laboratory findings within this rapidly expanding field.

  8. PD-1 Blockade Expands Intratumoral Memory T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse;

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed by multi......Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed...

  9. Characterization of ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with malignant melanoma for clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald;

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials of adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to patients with advanced malignant melanoma have shown remarkable results with objective clinical responses in 50% of the treated patients. In order to initiate a clinical trial in melanoma, we have establis...... patients tested. TIL cultures contained specificity towards tumor cells as well as peptides derived from tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) during expansion procedures....

  10. Isolation and Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renuka P; Hanley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with both regenerative and immunomodulatory capacities. These unique properties make them appealing as a biologic, with multiple phase 1-3 clinical trials currently testing their safety and efficacy. Although expanding MSCs does not require extensive manipulation, expanding MSCs for use in clinical trials does require the knowledge and safety that are delineated in current good manufacturing practices (GMPs). Here we briefly detail the characteristics of MSCs and considerations for expanding them for clinical use. We then include a step-by-step protocol for expanding MSCs for early phase clinical trials, with important notes to consider during the expansion of these MSCs. PMID:27236680

  11. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  12. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3 peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16% being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%, suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in

  13. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  14. Research on a Scroll Expander Used for Recovering Work in a Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Shen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The energy of the exhausted high-pressure air from a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell can still be recovered. The performance of the scroll expander used for recovering this energy is studied in this paper. A numerical simulation of the expander is presented, and then the simulated results are compared with that of the experiment results gleaned from the prototype of the expander. The matching of the flows and pressure characteristics between the compressor-expander (C-E is also discussed. Finally, this paper points out that leakage has a significant effect on the volumetric efficiency, the quantity of recovered work, and other performance indicators of the scroll expander. The matching of the C-E is a key factor in the practical application of this system.

  15. Endoscopic expand transnasal approach to the suprasellar region :anatomical study and clinical considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiao-jie; CHEN Kai-lai; WANG Qin; JI Wei-yang; LI Bing; SUN Ji-yong; LI Jiang-an

    2009-01-01

    Backgroud The expanded endonasal approach (EEA) is used sparingly by surgeons for resection of lesions in the ventrocranial base. Herein, we examined the anatomy of the ventrocranial base by endoscopy and comment on the use of EEA in clinical practice.Methods Twenty artery-injected adult cadaveric heads were studied under surgical conditions using the endoscopic EEA. The extent of the surgical exposure, the endoscopic anatomic view and the maneuverability of surgical instruments about the suprasellar region were studied by the endoscopic EEA.Results The EEA by endoscope can reach the suprasellar region. In this approach, the optocarotid recess, supra and infra-optic chiasm interspace, the ophthalmic artery and others were important anatomical landmarks for identification of the suprasellar region.Conclusions The endoscopic EEA can be used to remove many types of lesions in the ventrocranial base. The microanatorny observed using the endoscope provides important anatomical information on the suprasellar region for neurosurgeons.

  16. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placementfor benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of theliterature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emo E van Halsema; Jeanin E van Hooft

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stentplacement for benign esophageal strictures and benignesophageal leaks in the literature.METHODS: The PubMed, Embase and Cochranedatabases were searched for relevant articles publishedbetween January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospectivestudies were identified that analyzed the outcomesof stent placement for refractory benign esophagealstrictures. The outcomes of stent placement forbenign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulaewere extracted from 20 retrospective studies thatwere published after the inclusion period of a recentsystematic review. Data were pooled and analyzedusing descriptive statistics.RESULTS: Fully covered self-expandable metal stents(FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n =77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70)were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benignesophageal strictures. The overall clinical success ratewas 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% forFC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS.Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. Theoverall complication rate was 31.0%, including major(17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of643 patients were treated with self-expandable stentsmainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenicperforations (19.6%), Boerhaave's syndrome (7.8%)and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially coveredSEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successfulclosure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% ofpatients and according to etiology in 81.4% forpostsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7%for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4%of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%)complications.CONCLUSION: The outcomes of stent placementfor refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor.However, randomized trials are needed to put thisinto perspective. The evidence on successful

  17. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  18. Local transplantation of ex vivo expanded bone marrow-derived CD34-positive cells accelerates fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Alev, Cantas; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Masuda, Haruchika; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Kuroda, Tomoya; Horii, Miki; Yokoyama, Ayumi; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) cells, an endothelial/hematopoietic progenitor-enriched cell population, has shown therapeutic efficiency in the treatment of ischemic diseases enhancing neovascularization. However, the number of CD34(+) cells obtained from bone marrow is not sufficient for routine clinical application. To overcome this issue, we developed a more efficient and clinically applicable CD34(+) cell expansion method. Seven-day ex vivo expansion culture of BM CD34(+) cells with a cocktail of five growth factors containing VEGF, SCF, IL-6, Flt-3 ligand, and TPO resulted in reproducible more than 20-fold increase in cell number. The favorable effect of the local transplantation of culture expanded (cEx)-BM CD34(+) cells on rat unhealing fractures was equivalent or higher than that of nonexpanded (fresh) BM CD34(+) cells exhibiting sufficient therapeutic outcome with frequent vasculogenic/osteogenic differentiation of transplanted cEx-BM CD34(+) cells and fresh BM CD34(+) cells as well as intrinsic enhancement of angiogenesis/osteogenesis at the treated fracture sites. Specifically, cEx-BM CD34(+) cell treatment demonstrated the best blood flow recovery at fracture sites compared with the nonexpanded BM CD34(+) cells. In vitro, cEx-BM CD34(+) cells showed higher colony/tube-forming capacity than nonexpanded BM CD34(+) cells. Both cells demonstrated differentiation potential into osteoblasts. Since fresh BM CD34(+) cells can be easily collected from fracture sites at the time of primary operation and stored for future use, autologous cEx-BM CD34(+) cell transplantation would be not only a simple but also a promising therapeutic strategy for unhealing fractures in the field of orthopedic trauma surgery.

  19. Exergoeconomic analysis of vehicular PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell systems with and without expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we perform an exergoeconomic analysis to a PEM (proton exchange membrane) vehicular fuel cell system used in the latest generation of environmentally friendly cars. Two alternative configurations of a fuel cell system are considered (with and without an expander), and two alternative design concepts for each configuration: BoL (Begin of Life) and EoL (End of Life). The system including an expander generates additional power from the exhaust gases leaving the fuel cell stack, which might increase the system efficiency. However the total investment costs for this case are higher than for the other system configuration without an expander, due to the investment costs associated with the expander and its accessories. The fuel cell stack area in the EoL-sized systems is larger than in the BoL-sized systems. A larger stack area on one hand raises the investment costs, but on the other hand decreases the fuel consumption due to a higher cell efficiency. In this paper, exergoeconomic analyses have been implemented to consider a trade-off between positive and negative effects of using an expander in the system and to select the proper design concept. The results from the exergoeconomic analysis show that (a) an EoL-sized system with an expander is the most cost effective system, (b) the compression and humidification of air are very expensive processes, (c) the stack is by far the most important component from the economic viewpoint, and (d) the thermodynamic efficiency of almost all components must be improved to increase the cost effectiveness of the overall system. - Highlights: • Two vehicular PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell system configurations are studied in this paper. • Exergoeconomics has been performed to compare these two system configurations. • The compression and humidification of air are very expensive processes. • The stack is by far the most important component from the economic viewpoint. • The thermodynamic efficiencies

  20. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: ► Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. ► Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. ► Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. ► Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells undergo complete removal by one year.

  1. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacIsaac, Zoe Marie, E-mail: zmm4a@virgina.edu [University of Virginia (United States); Shang, Hulan, E-mail: shanghulan@gmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Agrawal, Hitesh, E-mail: hiteshdos@hotmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Yang, Ning, E-mail: ny6u@virgina.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Parker, Anna, E-mail: amp4v@virginia.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Katz, Adam J., E-mail: ajk2f@virginia.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States)

    2012-02-15

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non

  2. Combination nickel foam expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Robert; Prevish, Thomas; Bronson, Angela; George, Raymond A.

    2007-01-02

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 25) of fuel cells (17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31), each having an outer interconnection (20) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh member (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions and bottom portions, where the top crown portion (40) have a top bonded open cell nickel foam (51) which contacts outer interconnections (20) of the fuel cells, said mesh and nickel foam electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no more metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  3. Non-expanded adipose stromal vascular fraction cell therapy for multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Jorge; Alfaro Miguel; Lara Fabian; Solano Fabio; Wang Hao; Min Wei-Ping; Ichim Thomas E; Riordan Neil H; Harman Robert J; Patel Amit N; Murphy Michael P; Lee Roland R; Minev Boris

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), T regulatory cells, endothelial precursor cells, preadipocytes, as well as anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Safety of autologous adipose tissue implantation is supported by extensive use of this procedure in cosmetic surgery, as well as by ongoing studies using in vitro expanded adipose derived MSC. Equine and canine studies demonstrating anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects...

  4. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  5. Impaired heat shock response in cells expressing full-length polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha M Chafekar

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms by which polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt causes neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD remain unclear. The malfunction of cellular proteostasis has been suggested as central in HD pathogenesis and also as a target of therapeutic interventions for the treatment of HD. We present results that offer a previously unexplored perspective regarding impaired proteostasis in HD. We find that, under non-stress conditions, the proteostatic capacity of cells expressing full length polyQ-expanded Htt is adequate. Yet, under stress conditions, the presence of polyQ-expanded Htt impairs the heat shock response, a key component of cellular proteostasis. This impaired heat shock response results in a reduced capacity to withstand the damage caused by cellular stress. We demonstrate that in cells expressing polyQ-expanded Htt the levels of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 are reduced, and, as a consequence, these cells have an impaired a heat shock response. Also, we found reduced HSF1 and HSP70 levels in the striata of HD knock-in mice when compared to wild-type mice. Our results suggests that full length, non-aggregated polyQ-expanded Htt blocks the effective induction of the heat shock response under stress conditions and may thus trigger the accumulation of cellular damage during the course of HD pathogenesis.

  6. Clinical results of carotid artery stenting with a nitinol self-expanding stent (SMART stent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert; Mathias, Klaus D.; Jaeger, Horst J.; Bockisch, Georg; Demirel, Eren; Gissler, Martin H.; Hauth, Elke [Department of Radiology, Staedtische Kliniken Dortmund, Beurhausstrasse 40, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University Witten/Herdecke (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Our objective was to assess the technical feasibility and the clinical results of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenting using a nitinol self-expanding stent (SMART stent). In 13 patients 13 high-grade stenoses of the internal carotid artery were treated via an implantation of a SMART stent. In all cases a predilation of the stenosis and a postdilation within the stent were performed. Follow-up examinations were carried out in all patients after a period of 6 months. In each case the implantation of the stent was performed without technical complications. In 12 of 13 cases the stent was placed in the patients' internal carotid artery, in 1 case from the internal to the common carotid artery (CCA). The average degree of stenosis of 78% (70-95%) was reduced to an average of 2.8% (0-21%). The 6-month follow-up angiography showed an average degree of restenosis of 11.8% (0-29%) in 8 of 13 patients. Duplex sonography in the remaining 5 patients demonstrated patent stents. One patient showed brief neurological symptoms during the intervention. No further complications occurred during follow-up time. Treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis with the SMART stent seems technically feasible, safe, and promises long-term patency. (orig.)

  7. Expanding concept of clinical conditions and symptoms in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirohisa; Riku, Yuichi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yoshida, Mari; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-07-28

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is an adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. MSA patients show various phenotypes during the course of their illness including parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic failure, and pyramidal signs. MSA is classified into the parkinsonian (MSA-P) or cerebellar (MSA-C) variant depending on the clinical motor phenotype at presentation. MSA-P and MSA-C are predominant in Western countries and Japan, respectively. The mean age at onset is 55 to 60 years. Prognosis ranges from 6 to 10 years, but some cases survive for more than 15 years. Early and severe autonomic failure is a poor prognostic factor. MSA patients sometimes present with isolated autonomic failure or motor symptoms/signs, and the median duration from onset to the concomitant appearance of motor and autonomic symptoms was approximately 2 years in our previous study. As the presence of the combination of motor and autonomic symptoms is essential for the current diagnostic criteria, early diagnosis is difficult when patients present with isolated autonomic failure or motor symptoms/signs. We experienced MSA patients who died before presentation of the motor symptoms/signs diagnostic for MSA (i.e., premotor MSA). Detection of the nature of autonomic failure consistent with MSA and identification of the dysfunctional anatomical sites may increase the probability of a diagnosis of premotor MSA. Dementia is another problem in MSA. Although dementia had been thought to be rare in MSA, frontal lobe dysfunction is observed frequently during the early course of the illness. Magnetic resonance imaging can show progressive cerebral atrophy in longstanding cases. More recently, MSA patients presenting with frontotemporal dementia preceding the presence of motor and autonomic manifestations diagnostic of MSA have been reported. Novel diagnostic criteria based on an expanding concept of the clinical conditions and symptoms of MSA will be needed for the development of disease

  8. In vitro induced dopaminergic differentiation of expanded rat mesencephalic neural stem cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Min; WANG Dongmei; JIAO Wenchang; LI Haiming; ZHAO Lianxu; BAI Chixian; WANG Yaping; PEI Xuetao

    2003-01-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) is the progenitor of the neural system with the character of self-renew and having the potential to differentiate into all the phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS). NSC may serve as a source of cell transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases to replace degenerative neurons. In this study, NSCs derived from E12.5 rat mesencephalon were maintained and expanded using a serum-free defined medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). While proliferating, the cells were immunoreactive for nestin and remained multipotent to generate neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. After 15 times passage the total number of the cell expanded about 2.4×104 fold. Compared with untreated cultures, ascorbic acid (AA) treatment led to more dopaminergic (DAergic) differentitiation as indicated by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). With the concentration increasing, more TH+ neurons were obtained. 100 μmol/L AA could lead to a increase more than 20-fold, and a concentration of 10 μmol/L could lead to nearly 5-fold increase in TH+ cells. However, the ratio of TH+ cells was not improved any longer with the AA increasing above the concentration of 100 μmol/L. The results demonstrate that expanded NSCs can be induced to differentiate into dopamine neurons in vitro, which can provide enough cell population for the cell transplantation, as a main intervention for the neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  9. Tumor associated antigen specific T-cell populations identified in ex vivo expanded TIL cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Kvistborg, Pia; Køllgaard, Tania;

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from malignant melanoma (MM) and head & neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) share a similar oligoclonal composition of T effector memory cells, with HLA class I restricted lysis of tumor cell lines. In this study we show that ex vivo expanded...... TILs from MM and HNSCC demonstrate a heterogeneous composition in frequency and magnitude of tumor associated antigen specific populations by Elispot IFN¿ quantitation. TILs from MM and HNSCC shared reactivity towards NY ESO-1, cyclin B1 and Bcl-x derived peptides. Additionally we show that dominating...... the heterogeneous tumors upon adoptive transfer; increasing the probability of tumor control by minimizing immune evasion by tumor cell escape variants....

  10. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. PMID:25680810

  11. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  12. Development of preform moulding technique using expanded graphite for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, S.I.; Oh, K.S.; Yun, J.C.; Han, K.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea); Jung, S.H.; Yang, Y.C. [Fuel Cell Vehicle Team, Advanced Technology Center, Research and Development Division for Hyundai Motor Company and Kia Motors Corporation, 104, Mabuk-dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin, 446-912 (Korea)

    2007-09-27

    A preform moulding technique using expanded graphite is developed to manufacture composite bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The preform is composed of expanded graphite, graphite flake and phenol resin. Preforms utilizing the tangled structure of expanded graphite are easily fabricated at a low pressure of 0.07-0.28 MPa. A pre-curing temperature (100 C) slightly above the melting point of phenol powders (90 C) induces moderate curing, but also prevents excessive curing. After the preform is placed in a steel mould, compression moulding is carried out at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (150 C). The fabrication conditions are optimized by checking the electrical conductivity, flexural strength and microstructure of the composite. The optimized electrical conductivity and flexural strength, 250 S cm{sup -1} and 50 MPa, respectively, met the requirements for PEMFC bipolar plates. (author)

  13. Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, Paul

    2004-12-31

    In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

  14. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  15. TGFβ Pathway Inhibition Redifferentiates Human Pancreatic Islet β Cells Expanded In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginat Toren-Haritan

    Full Text Available In-vitro expansion of insulin-producing cells from adult human pancreatic islets could provide an abundant cell source for diabetes therapy. However, proliferation of β-cell-derived (BCD cells is associated with loss of phenotype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Nevertheless, BCD cells maintain open chromatin structure at β-cell genes, suggesting that they could be readily redifferentiated. The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ pathway has been implicated in EMT in a range of cell types. Here we show that human islet cell expansion in vitro involves upregulation of the TGFβ pathway. Blocking TGFβ pathway activation using short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFBR1, ALK5 transcripts inhibits BCD cell proliferation and dedifferentiation. Treatment of expanded BCD cells with ALK5 shRNA results in their redifferentiation, as judged by expression of β-cell genes and decreased cell proliferation. These effects, which are reproducible in cells from multiple human donors, are mediated, at least in part, by AKT-FOXO1 signaling. ALK5 inhibition synergizes with a soluble factor cocktail to promote BCD cell redifferentiation. The combined treatment may offer a therapeutically applicable way for generating an abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells following ex-vivo expansion.

  16. Proteomic Profiling of Ex Vivo Expanded CD34-Positive Haematopoetic Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Falkenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo expansion of haematopoetic cells by application of specific cytokines is one approach to overcome boundaries in cord blood transplantation due to limited numbers of haematopoetic stem cells. While many protocols describe an effective increase of total cell numbers and the amount of CD34-positive cells, it still remains unclear if and how the procedure actually affects the cells’ properties. In the presented publications, CD34-positive cells were isolated from cord blood and expanded for up to 7 days in media supplemented with stem cell factor (SCF, thrombopoietin (THPO, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3lg. At days 3 and 7, expanded cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative proteomics. 2970 proteins were identified, whereof proteomic analysis showed 440 proteins significantly changed in abundance during ex vivo expansion. Despite the fact that haematopoetic cells still expressed CD34 on the surface after 3 days, major changes in regard to the protein profile were observed, while further expansion showed less effect on the proteome level. Enrichment analysis of biological processes clearly showed a proteomic change toward a protein biosynthesis phenotype already within the first three days of expression.

  17. GMP-compliant, large-scale expanded allogeneic natural killer cells have potent cytolytic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae Lim

    Full Text Available Ex vivo-expanded, allogeneic natural killer (NK cells can be used for the treatment of various types of cancer. In allogeneic NK cell therapy, NK cells from healthy donors must be expanded in order to obtain a sufficient number of highly purified, activated NK cells. In the present study, we established a simplified and efficient method for the large-scale expansion and activation of NK cells from healthy donors under good manufacturing practice (GMP conditions. After a single step of magnetic depletion of CD3(+ T cells, the depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were stimulated and expanded with irradiated autologous PBMCs in the presence of OKT3 and IL-2 for 14 days, resulting in a highly pure population of CD3(-CD16(+CD56(+ NK cells which is desired for allogeneic purpose. Compared with freshly isolated NK cells, these expanded NK cells showed robust cytokine production and potent cytolytic activity against various cancer cell lines. Of note, expanded NK cells selectively killed cancer cells without demonstrating cytotoxicity against allogeneic non-tumor cells in coculture assays. The anti-tumor activity of expanded human NK cells was examined in SCID mice injected with human lymphoma cells. In this model, expanded NK cells efficiently controlled lymphoma progression. In conclusion, allogeneic NK cells were efficiently expanded in a GMP-compliant facility and demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  19. Cybersecurity in the Clinical Setting: Nurses' Role in the Expanding "Internet of Things".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Luanne; McKee, Shawn A

    2016-08-01

    Nurses face growing complexity in their work. The expanding "Internet of Things" with "smart" technologies can reduce the burden. However, equipment and devices that connect to patients, the network, or to the Internet can be exploited by hackers. Nurses should be able to identify, understand, and protect against cybersecurity risks to safeguard patients. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):347-349.

  20. Characterization of ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with malignant melanoma for clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald;

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials of adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to patients with advanced malignant melanoma have shown remarkable results with objective clinical responses in 50% of the treated patients. In order to initiate a clinical trial in melanoma, we have establis......Clinical trials of adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to patients with advanced malignant melanoma have shown remarkable results with objective clinical responses in 50% of the treated patients. In order to initiate a clinical trial in melanoma, we have...

  1. Mass cytometry analysis shows that a novel memory phenotype B cell is expanded in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Leo; Blum, Lisa; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Liedtke, Michaela; Robinson, William H.; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    It would be very beneficial if the status of cancers could be determined from a blood specimen. However, peripheral blood leukocytes are very heterogeneous between individuals and thus high resolution technologies are likely required. We used cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and next generation sequencing to ask whether a plasma cell cancer (multiple myeloma) and related pre-cancerous states had any consistent effect on the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotypes of patients. Analysis of peripheral blood samples from 13 cancer patients, 9 pre-cancer patients, and 9 healthy individuals revealed significant differences in the frequencies of the T, B, and natural killer cell compartments. Most strikingly, we identified a novel B-cell population that normally accounts for 4.0±0.7% (mean±SD) of total B cells and is up to 13-fold expanded in multiple myeloma patients with active disease. This population expressed markers previously associated with both memory (CD27+) and naïve (CD24loCD38+) phenotypes. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene sequencing showed polyclonality, indicating that these cells are not precursors to the myeloma, and somatic mutations, a characteristic of memory cells. SYK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation responses, and the fact that most of these cells expressed isotypes other than IgM or IgD, confirmed the memory character of this population, defining it as a novel type of memory B cells. PMID:25711758

  2. Replication-competent chimeric lenti-oncovirus with expanded host cell tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiprich, S; Gundlach, B R; Fleckenstein, B; Uberla, K

    1997-04-01

    Baboon bone marrow was grafted into human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients in the course of recent trials for AIDS treatment. Since the baboon genome harbors multiple copies of an endogenous oncovirus, chimeric lenti-oncoviruses could emerge in the xenotransplant recipient. To analyze the potential replication competence of hybrid viruses between different genera of retroviruses, we replaced most of the env gene of simian immunodeficiency virus with the env gene of an amphotropic murine leukemia virus. The hybrid virus could be propagated in human T-cell lines, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rhesus macaques, and in CD4- B-cell lines. Because of the expanded cell tropism, the hybrid virus might have a selective advantage in comparison to parental viruses. Therefore, emerging chimeric viruses may be considered a serious risk of xenotransplantation. A note of caution is also suggested for the use of pseudotyped lentiviral vectors for human gene therapy.

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  4. Cybersecurity in the Clinical Setting: Nurses' Role in the Expanding "Internet of Things".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Luanne; McKee, Shawn A

    2016-08-01

    Nurses face growing complexity in their work. The expanding "Internet of Things" with "smart" technologies can reduce the burden. However, equipment and devices that connect to patients, the network, or to the Internet can be exploited by hackers. Nurses should be able to identify, understand, and protect against cybersecurity risks to safeguard patients. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):347-349. PMID:27467307

  5. Galectin-9 activates and expands human T-helper 1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes J M Gooden

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9 is known for induction of apoptosis in IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T-cells and amelioration of autoimmunity in murine models. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced IFN-γ positive T-cells in a sarcoma mouse model and in food allergy, suggesting that Gal-9 can have diametric effects on T-cell immunity. Here, we aimed to delineate the immunomodulatory effect of Gal-9 on human resting and ex vivo activated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of resting lymphocytes with low concentrations of Gal-9 (5-30 nM induced apoptosis in ∼60% of T-cells after 1 day, but activated the surviving T-cells. These viable T-cells started to expand after 4 days with up to 6 cell divisions by day 7 and an associated shift from naïve towards central memory and IFN-γ producing phenotype. In the presence of T-cell activation signals (anti-CD3/IL-2 Gal-9 did not induce T-cell expansion, but shifted the CD4/CD8 balance towards a CD4-dominated T-cell response. Thus, Gal-9 activates resting T-cells in the absence of typical T-cell activating signals and promotes their transition to a TH1/C1 phenotype. In the presence of T-cell activating signals T-cell immunity is directed towards a CD4-driven response by Gal-9. Thus, Gal-9 may specifically enhance reactive immunological memory.

  6. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.;

    2008-01-01

    used for MSC cultivation in animal studies simulating clinical stem cell therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from BM aspirates by density gradient centrifugation and cultivated in a GMP-accepted medium (EMEA medium) or in one of four other media. RESULTS: FACS...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008......OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  7. Ex Vivo Expanded Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells With Bone Marrow Transplantation Improved Osteogenesis in Infants With Severe Hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketani, Takeshi; Oyama, Chigusa; Mihara, Aya; Tanabe, Yuka; Abe, Mariko; Hirade, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Bo, Ryosuke; Kanai, Rie; Tadenuma, Taku; Michibata, Yuko; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Hattori, Miho; Katsube, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Hiroe; Sasao, Mari; Oda, Yasuaki; Hattori, Koji; Yuba, Shunsuke; Ohgushi, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe hypophosphatasia (HPP) develop osteogenic impairment with extremely low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, resulting in a fatal course during infancy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into various mesenchymal lineages, including bone and cartilage. The efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for congenital skeletal and storage disorders is limited, and therefore we focused on MSCs for the treatment of HPP. To determine the effect of MSCs on osteogenesis, we performed multiple infusions of ex vivo expanded allogeneic MSCs for two patients with severe HPP who had undergone bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from asymptomatic relatives harboring the heterozygous mutation. There were improvements in not only bone mineralization but also muscle mass, respiratory function, and mental development, resulting in the patients being alive at the age of 3. After the infusion of MSCs, chimerism analysis of the mesenchymal cell fraction isolated from bone marrow in the patients demonstrated that donor-derived DNA sequences existed. Adverse events of BMT were tolerated, whereas those of MSC infusion did not occur. However, restoration of ALP activity was limited, and normal bony architecture could not be achieved. Our data suggest that multiple MSC infusions, following BMT, were effective and brought about clinical benefits for patients with lethal HPP. Allogeneic MSC-based therapy would be useful for patients with other congenital bone diseases and tissue disorders if the curative strategy to restore clinically normal features, including bony architecture, can be established.

  8. Expand and Regularize Federal Funding for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Smith, Jason; Scott, Christopher Thomas; McCormick, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has sparked incredible scientific and public excitement, as well as significant controversy. hESCs are pluripotent, which means, in theory, that they can be differentiated into any type of cell found in the human body. Thus, they evoke great enthusiasm about potential clinical applications. They are…

  9. Expanding the clinical and molecular characteristics of PIGT-CDG, a disorder of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christina; Golas, Gretchen A; Davids, Mariska; Huizing, Marjan; Kane, Megan S; Krasnewich, Donna M; Malicdan, May Christine V; Adams, David R; Markello, Thomas C; Zein, Wadih M; Gropman, Andrea L; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A; Maric, Irina; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Baker, Eva H; Ferreira, Carlos R; Danylchuk, Noelle R; Kahler, Stephen; Garnica, Adolfo D; Bradley Schaefer, G; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; Wolfe, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    PIGT-CDG, an autosomal recessive syndromic intellectual disability disorder of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, was recently described in two independent kindreds [Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome 3 (OMIM, #615398)]. PIGT encodes phosphatidylinositol-glycan biosynthesis class T, a subunit of the heteropentameric transamidase complex that facilitates the transfer of GPI to proteins. GPI facilitates attachment (anchoring) of proteins to cell membranes. We describe, at ages 7 and 6 years, two children of non-consanguineous parents; they had hypotonia, severe global developmental delay, and intractable seizures along with endocrine, ophthalmologic, skeletal, hearing, and cardiac anomalies. Exome sequencing revealed that both siblings had compound heterozygous variants in PIGT (NM_015937.5), i.e., c.918dupC, a novel duplication leading to a frameshift, and c.1342C > T encoding a previously described missense variant. Flow cytometry studies showed decreased surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins on granulocytes, consistent with findings in previous cases. These siblings further delineate the clinical spectrum of PIGT-CDG, reemphasize the neuro-ophthalmologic presentation, clarify the endocrine features, and add hypermobility, low CSF albumin quotient, and hearing loss to the phenotypic spectrum. Our results emphasize that GPI anchor-related congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) should be considered in subjects with early onset severe seizure disorders and dysmorphic facial features, even in the presence of a normal carbohydrate-deficient transferrin pattern and N-glycan profiling. Currently available screening for CDGs will not reliably detect this family of disorders, and our case reaffirms that the use of flow cytometry and genetic testing is essential for diagnosis in this group of disorders.

  10. IL-35, an anti-inflammatory cytokine which expands CD4+CD25+ Treg Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Maria Luisa; Anogeianaki, A; Felaco, P; Toniato, E; De Lutiis, M A; Shaik, B; Fulcheri, M; Vecchiet, J; Tetè, S; Salini, V; Theoharides, T C; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Frydas, I; Conti, P; Cuccurullo, C; Ciampoli, C; Cerulli, G; Kempuraj, D

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL 12) p35/p40 is a heterodimeric cytokine which plays a critical role in inflammation, immunity and tissue proliferation, and also plays a relevant function in T helper (Th) cell polarization and Th1 T-cell differentiation. IL-12 family members, IL-12p70, IL-23, IL-27 and IL-35, play an important role in influencing helper T-cell differentiation. EBV-induced gene 3 can be associated with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, also called IL-35. It has been shown that IL-35 has biological activity and able to expand CD4+CD25+ Treg cells, suppress the proliferation of CD4+CD25- effector cells and inhibit Th17 cell polarization. IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by regulatory T (Treg) cells CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. IL-35 is a crucial mediator which provokes CD4+CD25+ T cell proliferation and IL-10 generation, another well-known anti-inflammatory cytokine, along with TGFbeta cytokine. These studies suggest that IL-35, together with other successfully discovered cytokine inhibitors, represents a new potential therapeutic cytokine for chronic inflammation, autoimmunity and other immunological disorders.

  11. Empirical Correlates and Expanded Interpretation of the MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (Cynicism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Paul B.; Kelso, Kristy M.; McCord, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The recent release of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has received much attention from the clinical psychology community. Particular concerns have focused on Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (RC3; Cynicism). This article briefly reviews the major criticisms and responses regarding the restructuring of…

  12. The clinical importance of expanded subarachnoid spaces detected by CT in early infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It depends on the clinical course and on follow-jup CT findings whether expansions of the subarachnoid space should be considered as pathological changes or as normal. There is no direct correlation between the degree of severity of the clinical symptoms on the one hand and the CT changes on the other. The clinical course and the follow-up CT images are found to be uncorrelated, too. CT findings alone are insufficient in predicting children's development. Especially in the case of unspecific changes, e.g. slight expansions of the subarachnoid space, cranial CT can only provide further proof of a suspected clinical diagnosis. The ventricular indices frequently used for CT interpretation can rarely be used as decision aids or as factors providing new information. (orig./MG)

  13. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Psoriasis Are an Expanded Population Exhibiting Diverse T-Cell-Suppressor Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lauren Y; Chung, Jin-Sung; Teshima, Takahiro; Feigenbaum, Lawrence; Cruz, Ponciano D; Jacobe, Heidi T; Chong, Benjamin F; Ariizumi, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an inflammatory skin disease caused by hyperactivated T cells regulated by positive and negative mechanisms; although the former have been much studied, the latter have not. We studied the regulatory mechanism mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and showed that MDSCs expanded in melanoma patients express dendritic cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent integrin ligand, a critical mediator of T-cell suppressor function. We examined expansion of DC-HIL(+) MDSCs in psoriasis and characterized their functional properties. Frequency of DC-HIL(+) monocytic MDSCs (CD14(+)HLA-DR(no/low)) in blood and skin was markedly increased in psoriatic patients versus healthy control subjects, but there was no statistically significant relationship with disease severity (based on Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score). Blood DC-HIL(+) MDSC levels in untreated patients were significantly higher than in treated patients. Compared with melanoma-derived MDSCs, psoriatic MDSCs exhibited significantly reduced suppressor function and were less dependent on DC-HIL, but they were capable of inhibiting proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-17 responses of autologous T cells. Psoriatic MDSCs were functionally diverse among patients in their ability to suppress allogeneic T cells and in the use of either IL-17/arginase I or IFN-γ/inducible nitric oxide synthase axis as suppressor mechanisms. Thus, DC-HIL(+) MDSCs are expanded in psoriasis patients, and their mechanistic heterogeneity and relative functional deficiency may contribute to the development of psoriasis. PMID:27236103

  14. Expanding xylose metabolism in yeast for plant cell wall conversion to biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Vivian Yaci; Lin, Yuping; Chomvong, Kulika; Estrela, Raíssa; Park, Annsea; Liang, Julie M; Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Feehan, Joanna; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Glass, N Louise; Cate, Jamie H D

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable biofuel production from renewable biomass will require the efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the plant cell wall. Using the cellulolytic fungus Neurospora crassa as a model, we identified a xylodextrin transport and consumption pathway required for its growth on hemicellulose. Reconstitution of this xylodextrin utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that fungal xylose reductases act as xylodextrin reductases, producing xylosyl-xylitol oligomers as metabolic intermediates. These xylosyl-xylitol intermediates are generated by diverse fungi and bacteria, indicating that xylodextrin reduction is widespread in nature. Xylodextrins and xylosyl-xylitol oligomers are then hydrolyzed by two hydrolases to generate intracellular xylose and xylitol. Xylodextrin consumption using a xylodextrin transporter, xylodextrin reductases and tandem intracellular hydrolases in cofermentations with sucrose and glucose greatly expands the capacity of yeast to use plant cell wall-derived sugars and has the potential to increase the efficiency of both first-generation and next-generation biofuel production. PMID:25647728

  15. Inducing dopaminergic differentiation of expanded rat mesencephalic neural stem cells by ascorbic acid in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Min; WANG Dongmei; HOU Lingling; LI Haimin; XIE Chao; JIAO Wencang; BAI Cixian; WANG Yaping; PEI Xuetao

    2004-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) induced differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is reported.NSCs derived from rat mesencephalon were maintained and expanded in a defined medium containing mitogens of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF).Compared with the control, ascorbic acid treatment led to more DAergic neuronal differentiation as indicated by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT), which are specific markers of dopamine neurons.AA induction also enhanced expression of Nurr1 and Shh.PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway, could block AA-induced Nurr1, TH and DAT mRNA expression.The results might suggest a new strategy to provide enough dopaminergic cells for the therapy of Parkinson's disease (PD), and Nurr1 and ERK signaling pathway might participate in the AA-induced DAergic differentiation.

  16. C9orf72-related disorders: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions primarily involving dementia, motor neuron disease and movement disorders. They are mostly related to different pathophysiological processes, notably in family forms in which the clinical and genetic heterogeneity are lush. In the last decade, much knowledge has been acumulated about the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases, making it essential in cases of motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia the repeat expansions of C9orf72 gene. This review analyzes the main clinical, radiological and genetic aspects of the phenotypes related to the hexanucleotide repeat expansions (GGGGCC of C9orf72 gene. Future studies will aim to further characterize the neuropsychological, imaging and pathological aspects of the extra-motor features of motor neuron disease, and will help to provide a new classification system that is both clinically and biologically relevant.

  17. The expanding role of metformin in cancer: an update on antitumor mechanisms and clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Kelekar, Gauri; Shen, James; Shen, John; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Mita, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Metformin has been used for nearly a century to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiologic studies first identified the association between metformin and reduced risk of several cancers. The anticancer mechanisms of metformin involve both indirect or insulin-dependent pathways and direct or insulin-independent pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated metformin's broad anticancer activity across a spectrum of malignancies. Prospective clinical trials involving metformin in the chemoprevention and treatment of cancer now number in the hundreds. We provide an update on the anticancer mechanisms of metformin and review the results thus far available from prospective clinical trials investigating metformin's efficacy in cancer.

  18. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallstrom, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  19. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  20. Educational paper: The expanding clinical and immunological spectrum of severe combined immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Burg (Mirjam); A.R. Gennery (Andy R.)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSevere combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency characterized by absence of functional T lymphocytes. It is a paediatric emergency, which is life-threatening when recognized too late. The clinical presentation varies from the classical

  1. The evaluation of a successful collaborative education model to expand student clinical placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony; Cross, Merylin; Shahwan-Akl, Lina; Jacob, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, universities have been encouraged to increase the number of students enrolled in nursing courses as a way to bolster the domestic supply of graduates and address workforce shortages. This places pressure on clinical agencies to accommodate greater numbers of students for clinical experience who, in Australia, may often come from different educational institutions. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a collaborative model of clinical education that would increase the capacity of a health care agency to accommodate student placements and improve workplace readiness. The project was undertaken in a medium sized regional hospital in rural Australia where most nurses worked part time. Through an iterative process, a new supported preceptorship model was developed by academics from three institutions and staff from the hospital. Focus group discussions and interviews were conducted with key stakeholders and clinical placement data analysed for the years 2004 (baseline) to 2007. The model was associated with a 58% increase in the number of students and a 45% increase in the number of student placement weeks over the four year period. Students reported positively on their experience and key stakeholders believed that the new model would better prepare students for the realities of nursing work. PMID:19243994

  2. Expanding clinical roles for nurses to realign the global health workforce with population needs: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Claudia B; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    Many countries, including Israel, face health workforce challenges to meet the needs of their citizens, as chronic conditions increase. Provider shortages and geographical maldistribution are common. Increasing the contribution of nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nursing roles through task-shifting and expansion of scope-of-practice can improve access to care and result in greater workforce efficiency. Israel and many other countries are introducing reforms to expand nurses' scope-of-practice. Recent international research offers three policy lessons for how countries just beginning to implement reforms could bypass policy barriers to implementation. First, there is substantial evidence on the equivalence in quality of care, patient safety and high consumer acceptance which should move policy debates from if to how to effectively implement new roles in practice. Second, regulatory and finance policies as well as accessible advanced education are essential to facilitate realignment of roles. Third, country experience suggests that advanced practice roles for nurses improve the attractiveness of nursing as a career thus contributing to solving nursing shortages rather than exacerbating them. Designing enabling policy environments and removing barriers will gain in relevance in the future as the demand for high-quality, patient-centered care is increasing. PMID:27280014

  3. Expanding horizons in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma: Ibrutinib a novel BTK-targeting inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Dhingra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by involvement of the lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and bone marrow with short remission duration to standard therapies and a median overall survival of 4–5 years. Small molecule inhibitors targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, PI3K/PKB/mTOR, JAK/STAT have significantly improved clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Recently Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK, a crucial terminal kinase enzyme in the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling pathway, has emerged as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in human malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Ibrutinib, a novel first-in-human BTK-inhibitor, has demonstrated clinical effectiveness and tolerability in clinical trials, recently been approved by FDA in the treatment of MCL. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 249-254

  4. Final results from the large sunitinib global expanded-access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, M E; Szczylik, C; Porta, C; Bracarda, S; Bjarnason, G A; Oudard, S; Lee, S-H; Haanen, J; Castellano, D; Vrdoljak, E; Schöffski, P; Mainwaring, P; Hawkins, R E; Crinò, L; Kim, T M; Carteni, G; Eberhardt, W E E; Zhang, K; Fly, K; Matczak, E; Lechuga, M J; Hariharan, S; Bukowski, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report final results with extended follow-up from a global, expanded-access trial that pre-regulatory approval provided sunitinib to metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients, ineligible for registration-directed trials. Methods: Patients ⩾18 years received oral sunitinib 50 mg per day on a 4-weeks-on–2-weeks-off schedule. Safety was assessed regularly. Tumour measurements were scheduled per local practice. Results: A total of 4543 patients received sunitinib. Median treatment duration and follow-up were 7.5 and 13.6 months. Objective response rate was 16% (95% confidence interval (CI): 15–17). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 9.4 months (95% CI: 8.8–10.0) and 18.7 months (95% CI: 17.5–19.5). Median PFS in subgroups of interest: aged ⩾65 years (33%), 10.1 months; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ⩾2 (14%), 3.5 months; non-clear cell histology (12%), 6.0 months; and brain metastases (7%), 5.3 months. OS was strongly associated with the International Metastatic Renal-Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium prognostic model (n=4065). The most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (10%), fatigue (9%), and asthenia, neutropenia, and hand–foot syndrome (each 7%). Conclusion: Final analysis of the sunitinib expanded-access trial provided a good opportunity to evaluate the long-term side effects of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used worldwide in mRCC. Efficacy and safety findings were consistent with previous results. PMID:26086878

  5. Expanding the clinical spectrum associated with defects in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann Reinhard

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterozygous copy-number and missense variants in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 have repeatedly been associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders such as developmental language and autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy and schizophrenia. Recently, homozygous or compound heterozygous defects in either gene were reported as causative for severe intellectual disability. Methods 99 patients with severe intellectual disability and resemblance to Pitt-Hopkins syndrome and/or suspected recessive inheritance were screened for mutations in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1. Molecular karyotyping was performed in 45 patients. In 8 further patients with variable intellectual disability and heterozygous deletions in either CNTNAP2 or NRXN1, the remaining allele was sequenced. Results By molecular karyotyping and mutational screening of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 in a group of severely intellectually disabled patients we identified a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1 in one patient and heterozygous splice-site, frameshift and stop mutations in CNTNAP2 in four patients, respectively. Neither in these patients nor in eight further patients with heterozygous deletions within NRXN1 or CNTNAP2 we could identify a defect on the second allele. One deletion in NRXN1 and one deletion in CNTNAP2 occurred de novo, in another family the deletion was also identified in the mother who had learning difficulties, and in all other tested families one parent was shown to be healthy carrier of the respective deletion or mutation. Conclusions We report on patients with heterozygous defects in CNTNAP2 or NRXN1 associated with severe intellectual disability, which has only been reported for recessive defects before. These results expand the spectrum of phenotypic severity in patients with heterozygous defects in either gene. The large variability between severely affected patients and mildly affected or asymptomatic carrier parents might suggest the presence of a second hit, not

  6. Penium margaritaceum as a model organism for cell wall analysis of expanding plant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydahl, Maja Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard;

    2015-01-01

    have focused primarily upon late divergent multicellular land plants and specialized cell types (e.g., pollen tubes, root hairs). Here, we describe a unicellular green alga, Penium margaritaceum (Penium), which can serve as a valuable model organism for understanding cell expansion and the underlying...

  7. Mechanistic aspects of radioprotection by todralazine hydrochloride, a hematopoietic stem cell expanding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we have reported todralazine hydrochloride, an antihypertensive drug, as a radioprotector and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expanding agent. The present study aims at unraveling mechanistic aspects of its radioprotective and HSC expanding potential. Zebrafish Tg (cmyb:GFP) embryos treated with 5 μM todralazine from 24-36 hours post fertilization (hpf), increased the number of HSCs (∼ 2 folds) at aorta gonad mesonephros (AGM) region. Similarly, the expression of HSC marker genes, runx1 (3.3 folds) and cMyb (1.4 folds) were also found to be increased. Further, todralazine also accelerated hematopoietic lineage production, erythropoiesis, as evaluated in chemical induced anemic model in zebrafish. Genome wide expression changes in todralazine treated embryos (from 24-36 hpf) using microarray, revealed up and down regulation of 645 and 429 genes respectively. Pathway analysis using DAVID database strongly suggested up regulation of wnt pathway (p<0.019253), which is known to involve in HSC expansion, in todralazine pre-treated embryos. NOS1, known to have its role in HSC expansion through wnt pathway, has been significantly upregulated (1.54 folds; q PCR) by todralazine treatment (from 24-36 hpf). Todralazine treatment (∼30 minutes; 20 Gy) led to a significant upregulation of antioxidant genes (SOD, catalase), DNA damage response genes (p53, p21, GADD45) and nucleotide excision repair genes (XPC, XPA, XPF, XPD) when compared to irradiated control. Immunohistochemical analysis of DNA damage marker (γH2AX) (30 minutes post irradiation), further supported radiation induced DNA damage and protection by todralazine pre-treatment. Corroborating these results, pre-irradiation treatment of todralazine reduced radiation induced apoptosis (caspase 3 assay). Overall, the results suggest that, todralazine protects zebrafish from radiation induced damages by upregulating antioxidant defense system, DNA damage recognition, DNA repair machinery and by reducing cell

  8. Stem cell treatment for patients with autoimmune disease by systemic infusion of culture-expanded autologous adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra Jeong Chan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prolonged life expectancy, life style and environmental changes have caused a changing disease pattern in developed countries towards an increase of degenerative and autoimmune diseases. Stem cells have become a promising tool for their treatment by promoting tissue repair and protection from immune-attack associated damage. Patient-derived autologous stem cells present a safe option for this treatment since these will not induce immune rejection and thus multiple treatments are possible without any risk for allogenic sensitization, which may arise from allogenic stem cell transplantations. Here we report the outcome of treatments with culture expanded human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs of 10 patients with autoimmune associated tissue damage and exhausted therapeutic options, including autoimmune hearing loss, multiple sclerosis, polymyotitis, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment, we developed a standardized culture-expansion protocol for hAdMSCs from minimal amounts of fat tissue, providing sufficient number of cells for repetitive injections. High expansion efficiencies were routinely achieved from autoimmune patients and from elderly donors without measurable loss in safety profile, genetic stability, vitality and differentiation potency, migration and homing characteristics. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from the compassionate use treatments in terms of therapeutic efficacy are only preliminary, the data provide convincing evidence for safety and therapeutic properties of systemically administered AdMSC in human patients with no other treatment options. The authors believe that ex-vivo-expanded autologous AdMSCs provide a promising alternative for treating autoimmune diseases. Further clinical studies are needed that take into account the results obtained from case studies as those presented here.

  9. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  10. Expanding the scope and relevance of health interventions: Moving beyond clinical trials and behavior change models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khary K. Rigg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An overemphasis on clinical trials and behavior change models has narrowed the knowledge base that can be used to design interventions. The overarching point is that the process of overanalyzing variables is impeding the process of gaining insight into the everyday experiences that shape how people define health and seek treatment. This claim is especially important to health decision-making and behavior change because subtle interpretations often influence the decisions that people make. This manuscript provides a critique of traditional approaches to developing health interventions, and theoretically justifies what and why changes are warranted. The limited scope of these models is also discussed, and an argument is made to adopt a strategy that includes the perceptions of people as necessary for understanding health and health-related decision-making. Three practical strategies are suggested to be used with the more standard approaches to assessing the effectiveness and relevance of health interventions.

  11. Challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation at rural clinics in Capricorn District, Limpopo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebogo M. Mothiba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunisation is the cornerstone of primary healthcare. Apart from the provision of safe water, immunisation remains the most cost-effective public health intervention currently available. Immunisation prevents infectious conditions that are debilitating, fatal and have the potential to cause huge public health burdens, both financially and socially, in South Africa.Aim: To determine the challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI at rural clinics in Capricorn District, Limpopo Province, South Africa.Setting: The study was conducted in selected primary healthcare clinics of Capricorn District, Limpopo Province.Methods: A qualitative explorative descriptive contextual research design was used to gather data related to the challenges faced by professional nurses when implementing EPI at rural clinics in Capricorn District.Results: The findings revealed that professional nurses had knowledge of the programme, but that they experienced several challenges during implementation of EPI that included staff shortages and problems related to maintenance of the vaccines’ potency.Conclusions: The Department of Health as well as the nursing administration should monitor policies and guidelines, and especially maintenance of a cold chain for vaccines, to ensure that they are practised throughout Limpopo Province. The problem of staff shortages also needs to be addressed so that the EPI can achieve its targeted objectives.Keywords: Professional nurse, knowledge, EPI-SA, immunisation

  12. Expanding the Clinical Application of Fractional Radiofrequency Treatment: Findings on Rhytides, Hyperpigmentation, Rosacea, and Acne Redness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongcharu, Wichai; Gold, Michael

    2015-11-01

    While radiofrequency has been used medically for decades to treat a wide variety of conditions, its use therapeutically to target conditions affecting the skin is relatively new. With the development of fractional radiofrequency, which allows for the heat energy to be delivered in a more targeted manner through the use of needles as electrodes, this technique is now the preferred medical treatment option for many skin conditions given the reduction in recovery time and fewer number of reported side effects. The current study examined the clinical effectiveness of SmartScan(TM) Nano-Fractional RFTM treatment. Participants included 12 healthy female volunteers who reported varying degrees of rhytides, hyperpigmentation, or acne redness. Participants each received one treatment of SmartScan Nano-Fractional RF. The areas receiving treatment were photographed in a standardized way, using high-resolution macrophotography, at baseline (prior to receiving the treatment) and one month after treatment. Baseline and post-treatment photographs were then visually compared for treatment effects and analyzed through software-assisted quantification of variation in pigmentation and skin texture. The results indicated that this SmartScan technique for Nano-Fractional RF is effective in improving skin texture, and pigmentation. PMID:26580880

  13. The Breadth of Expandable Memory CD8+ T Cells Inversely Correlates with Residual Viral Loads in HIV Elite Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Stampouloglou, Eleni; Cesa, Kevin; Mavrothalassitis, Orestes; Alvino, Donna Marie; Li, Jonathan Z.; Wilton, Shannon; Karel, Daniel; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Chen, Huabiao; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that elite controllers with minimal effector T cell responses harbor a low-frequency, readily expandable, highly functional, and broadly directed memory population. Here, we interrogated the in vivo relevance of this cell population by investigating whether the breadth of expandable memory responses is associated with the magnitude of residual viremia in individuals achieving durable suppression of HIV infection. HIV-specific memory CD8+ T cells were expanded by using autologous epitopic and variant peptides. Viral load was measured by an ultrasensitive single-copy PCR assay. Following expansion, controllers showed a greater increase in the overall breadth of Gag responses than did untreated progressors (P = 0.01) as well as treated progressors (P = 0.0003). Nef- and Env-specific memory cells expanded poorly for all groups, and their expanded breadths were indistinguishable among groups (P = 0.9 for Nef as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test; P = 0.6 for Env as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test). More importantly, we show that the breadth of expandable, previously undetectable Gag-specific responses was inversely correlated with residual viral load (r = −0.6; P = 0.009). Together, these data reveal a direct link between the abundance of Gag-specific expandable memory responses and prolonged maintenance of low-level viremia. Our studies highlight a CD8+ T cell feature that would be desirable in a vaccine-induced T cell response. IMPORTANCE Many studies have shown that the rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy appears to be heavily dependent upon special HIV-specific killer T lymphocytes that are able to inhibit viral replication. The identification of key features of these immune cells has the potential to inform rational HIV vaccine design. This study shows that a special subset of killer lymphocytes, known as central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes, is at least

  14. Clinical application of mesenchymal stem cells for aseptic bone necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Aoyama

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, we had started clinical trial using mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs for the treatment of aseptic bone necrosis as a first clinical trial permitted by Japanese Health, Labour and Welfare Ministry.Aseptic bone necrosis of the femoral head commonly occurs in patients with two to four decades, causing severe musculoskeletal disability. Although its diagnosis is easy with X-ray and MRI, there has been no gold standard invented for treatment of this disease. MSCs represent a stem cell population in adult tissues that can be isolated and expanded in culture, and differentiate into cells with different nature. Combination with β-tri-calcium phosphate and vascularized bone graft, we succeeded to treat bone necrosis of the femoral head.Regenerative medicine using stem cells is hopeful and shed a light on intractable disease. To become widespread, Basic, Translational, Application, and Developmental study is needed.? From an experience of cell therapy using MSCs, we started to research induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS for clinical application.

  15. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W. Scott; Woods, Erik J

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations t...

  16. Dendritic cells decreased the concomitant expanded Tregs and Tregs related IL-35 in cytokine-induced killer cells and increased their cytotoxicity against leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Tao, Qianshan; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Tianping; Tao, Lili; Zhai, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are potent immunosuppressive cells and essential for inducing immune tolerance. Recent studies have reported that Tregs and Tregs related cytokines can inhibit the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, but dendritic cells co-cultured CIK (DC-CIK) cells can be used for induction of a specific immune response by blocking of Tregs and TGF-β, IL-10. As a novel identified cytokine, IL-35 is specially produced by Tregs and plays an essential role in immune regulation. However, it remains unknown whether IL-35 roles in tumor immunotherapy mediated by CIK and DC-CIK cells. In this study, we cultured CIK and DC-CIK cells from the same healthy adult samples, and investigated their phenotype, proliferation, cytotoxic activity against leukemia cell lines K562 and NB4 by FCM and CCK-8, measured IL-35, TGF-β and IL-10 protein by ELISA, detected Foxp3, IL-35 and IL-35 receptor mRNA by Real-time PCR, respectively. We found Tregs and IL-35 concomitantly expanded by a time-dependent way during the generation of CIK cells, but DC significantly down-regulated the expression of them and simultaneously up-regulated the proliferation ability as well as cytotoxic activity of CIK cells against leukemia cell lines. Therefore, our data suggested that DC decreased concomitant expanded Tregs and Tregs related IL-35 in CIK cells and might contribute to improve their cytotoxicity against leukemia cells in vitro.

  17. Artificial antigen-presenting cells transduced with telomerase efficiently expand epitope-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Jakob; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Ma, Chia; Sadelain, Michel

    2005-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is overexpressed in most human tumors, making it a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. hTERT-derived CTL epitopes have been identified previously, including p865 (RLVDDFLLV) and p540 (ILAKFLHWL), which are restricted by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I A*0201 allele. However, it remains a major challenge to efficiently and consistently expand hTERT-specific CTLs from donor peripheral blood T lymphocytes. To bypass the need for generating conventional antigen-presenting cells (APC) on an autologous basis, we investigated the potential ability of fibroblast-derived artificial APCs (AAPC) to activate and expand HLA-A*0201-restricted CTLs. We show here that AAPCs stably expressing HLA-A*0201, human beta(2)-microglobulin, B7.1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and LFA-3, together with either p540 and p865 minigenes or the full-length hTERT, effectively stimulate tumoricidal, hTERT-specific CTLs. hTERT-expressing AAPCs stimulated both p540 and p865 CTLs as shown by peptide-specific cytolysis and tetramer staining, indicating that hTERT is processed by the AAPCs and that the two peptides are presented as codominant epitopes. The level of cytotoxic activity against a panel of tumors comprising hematologic and epithelial malignancies varied, correlating overall with the level of HLA-A2 and hTERT expression by the target cell. Starting from 100 mL blood, approximately 100 million hTERT-specific CTLs could be generated over the course of five sequential stimulations, representing an expansion of approximately 1 x 10(5). Our data show that AAPCs process hTERT antigen and efficiently stimulate hTERT-specific CTLs from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and suggest that sufficient expansion could be achieved to be clinically useful for adoptive cell therapy.

  18. Clinical Strategies to Enhance T cell Reconstitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Perales, Miguel A; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Strategies to enhance T cell recovery are of increasing clinical importance to overcome long lasting T cell deficiencies, which occur in association with infections, autoimmunity and chemo/radiotherapy as well as aging of the immune system. In this review we discuss those strategies that are close to or in the clinic. Interleukin-7, sex steroid modulation, keratinocyte growth factor, growth hormone and cellular therapies using ex vivo generated T cell precursors are currently being tested in recipients of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and patients with malignancies or HIV/AIDS. PMID:17964803

  19. The aminobisphosphonate pamidronate controls influenza pathogenesis by expanding a γδ T cell population in humanized mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Wenwei; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Yinping; Sia, Sin Fun; Liu, Ming; Qin, Gang; Ng, Iris H. Y.; Xiang, Zheng; Lam, Kwok-Tai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2011-01-01

    There are few antiviral drugs for treating influenza, and the emergence of antiviral resistance has further limited the available therapeutic options. Furthermore, antivirals are not invariably effective in severe influenza, such as that caused by H5N1 viruses. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop alternative therapeutic strategies. Here, we show that human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells expanded by the aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM) kill influenza virus–infected cells and inhibit viral replicatio...

  20. The enhancement of neural stem cell survival and growth by coculturing with expanded Sertoli cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingyang; Deng, Lei; Shi, Xiaolin; Dai, Sheng; Zhang, Hu; Wang, Yonghong; Bi, Jingxiu; Guo, Meijin

    2012-01-01

    Sertoli cells (SCs) have been described as the "nurse cells" of testis to provide essential growth factors and to create a proper environment for the development of other cells (e.g., germinal and neural stem cell). However, the physiological functions of the SCs obtained from different culture conditions are different in a coculturing system, and thus the optimal SC culturing condition should be investigated in vitro. In this paper, primary Sertoli cells were isolated from a 12-day-old mouse and expanded in two different culture conditions: a two dimensional (2D) plastic tissue disc and a three dimensional (3D) microcarrier culture system. They were then cocultured with neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from 14-day-old mouse embryos. The metabolic activities of SCs(2D) (SCs in 2D) and SCs(3D) (SCs in 3D) and the amount of proteins secreted from two culturing systems were compared. The results show that the metabolic activity and the amount of secreted proteins from SCs(3D) were higher than both from SCs(2D). Three coculturing groups: NSCs+SC(2D), NSCs+SC(3D), and NSCs +SC-conditioned medium (SCCM, control group) were also compared regarding cell morphology and the numbers of neurons, neural outgrowths and neurospheres. The quantity of neurons, neural outgrowths and neurospheres were the highest in the NSCs+SC(3D) group. SCs cultured in the 3D system had a strong trophic effect on NSCs and enhanced their survival and growth. Besides, the mRNA of trophic and nutritive factors such as Glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and Interleukin-1 α (IL-1 α) secreted by the SCs from both 2D and 3D culture system were analyzed by real time-PCR and gel assay. The mRNA transcription of GDNF and IL-1α is more apparent in the 3D culture system than that from the 2D one. The coculturing system of NSCs+SC(3D) is a promising candidate for future neural stem cell transplantation.

  1. Clinical application of self-expanding metallic stent in the management of acute left-sided colorectal malignant obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Ben Fan; Ying-Sheng Cheng; Ni-Wei Chen; Hui-Min Xu; Zhe Yang; Yue Wang; Yu-Yao Huang; Qi Zheng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To summarize our experience with the application of self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) in the management of acute left-sided colorectal malignant obstruction.METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing placement of SEMS between April 2000 and January 2004 was performed.RESULTS: Insertion of SEMS was attempted in 26patients under fluoroscopic guidance with occasional endoscopic assistance. The sites of lesions were located in splenic flexure of two patients, left colon of seven patients, sigmoid colon of eight patients and rectum of nine patients. The intended uses of SEMS were for palliation in 7 patients and as a bridge to elective surgery in 19 patients. In the latter group, placement of SEMS allowed for preoperative systemic and bowel preparation and the following one-stage anastomosis. Successful stent placement was achieved in 22 (85%) of the 26patients. The clinical bowel obstruction resolved 24 hours after successful stent placement in 21 (95%) patients.Three SEMS-related minor complications occurred, two stents migrated and one caused anal pain.CONCLUSION: SEMS represents an effective and safe tool in the management of acute malignant colorectal obstruction. As a bridge to surgery, SEMS can provide time for systematic support and bowel preparation and obviate the need for fecal diversion or on-table lavage.As a palliative measure, SEMS can eliminate the need for emergent colostomy.

  2. Nanoparticles and clinically applicable cell tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Bernsen (Monique); J. Guenoun (Jamal); S.T. van Tiel (Sandra); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn vivo cell tracking has emerged as a much sought after tool for design and monitoring of cell-based treatment strategies. Various techniques are available for pre-clinical animal studies, from which much has been learned and still can be learned. However, there is also a need for clini

  3. Cryopreserved Ex Vivo-Expanded Allogeneic Myeloid Progenitor Cell Product Protects Neutropenic Mice From a Lethal Fungal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domen, Jos; Christensen, Julie L; Gille, Daphne; Smith-Berdan, Stephanie; Fong, Timothy; Brown, Janice M Y; Sedello, Anna K

    2016-01-01

    Severe neutropenia induced by chemotherapy or conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation often results in morbidity and mortality due to infection by opportunistic pathogens. A system has been developed to generate ex vivo-expanded mouse myeloid progenitor cells (mMPCs) that produce functional neutrophils in vivo upon transplantation in a pathogen challenge model. It has previously been demonstrated that transplantation of large numbers of freshly isolated myeloid progenitors from a single donor provides survival benefit in radiation-induced neutropenic mice. In the present work, an ex vivo-expanded and cryopreserved mMPC product generated from an allogeneic donor pool retains protective activity in vivo in a lethal fungal infection model. Infusion of the allogeneic pooled mMPC product is effective in preventing death from invasive Aspergillus fumigatus in neutropenic animals, and protection is dose dependent. Cell progeny from the mMPC product is detected in the bone marrow, spleen, blood, and liver by flow cytometry 1 week postinfusion but is no longer evident in most animals 4 weeks posttransplant. In this model, the ex vivo-generated pooled allogeneic mMPC product (i) expands and differentiates in vivo; (ii) is functional and prevents death from invasive fungal infection; and (iii) does not permanently engraft or cause allosensitization. These data suggest that an analogous ex vivo-expanded human myeloid progenitor cell product may be an effective off-the-shelf bridging therapy for the infectious complications that develop during hematopoietic recovery following hematopoietic cell transplantation or intensive chemotherapy. PMID:25812169

  4. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  5. Therapeutic neovascularization by autologous transplantation with expanded endothelial progenitor cells from peripheral blood into ischemic hind limbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-ling FAN; Ping-jin GAO; Zai-qian CHE; Jian-jun LIU; Jian WEI; Ding-liang ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the hypothesis that transplantation with expanded autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) could enhance neovascularization.Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MNC) isolated from New Zealand White rabbits were cultured in vitro. At d 7, the adherent cells were collected for autologous transplantation. Rabbits with severe unilateral hind limb ischemia were randomly assigned to receive phosphate-buffered saline or expanded EPC in phosphate-buffered saline, administered by intramuscular injection in 6 sites of the ischemic thigh at postoperative d 7. Neovascularization was monitored by using the calf blood pressure ratio to indicate tissue perfusion, digital subtraction angiography to identify collateral vessel development and histological analysis of capillary density in the ischemic limb at d 35 after surgery. Results: Autologous EPC transplantation produced significant amelioration in ischemic hind limbs,as indicated by a greater calf blood pressure ratio (0.52±0.04 vs 0.42±0.05, P<0.01),angiographic score (1.44±0.06 vs 0.98±0.08, P<0.01) and capillary density in muscle (195.2±5.4/mm2 vs 169.4±6.4/mm2, P<0.05), than controls. Conclusion: Transplantation of autologous expanded EPC can promote neovascularization in ischemic hindlimbs.

  6. Anti-leukemia activity of in vitro-expanded human gamma delta T cells in a xenogeneic Ph+ leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle M Siegers

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells (GDTc lyse a variety of hematological and solid tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and are thus promising candidates for cellular immunotherapy. We have developed a protocol to expand human GDTc in vitro, yielding highly cytotoxic Vgamma9/Vdelta2 CD27/CD45RA double negative effector memory cells. These cells express CD16, CD45RO, CD56, CD95 and NKG2D. Flow cytometric, clonogenic, and chromium release assays confirmed their specific cytotoxicity against Ph(+ cell lines in vitro. We have generated a fluorescent and bioluminescent Ph(+ cell line, EM-2eGFPluc, and established a novel xenogeneic leukemia model. Intravenous injection of EM-2eGFPluc into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG mice resulted in significant dose-dependent bone marrow engraftment; lower levels engrafted in blood, lung, liver and spleen. In vitro-expanded human GDTc injected intraperitoneally were found at higher levels in blood and organs compared to those injected intravenously; GDTc survived at least 33 days post-injection. In therapy experiments, we documented decreased bone marrow leukemia burden in mice treated with GDTc. Live GDTc were found in spleen and bone marrow at endpoint, suggesting the potential usefulness of this therapy.

  7. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensebé, L; Krampera, M; Schrezenmeier, H; Bourin, P; Giordano, R

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells/Multipotent Marrow Stromal Cells (MSC) are multipotent adult stem cells present in all tissues, as part of the perivascular population. As multipotent cells, MSCs can differentiate into different tissues originating from mesoderm ranging from bone and cartilage, to cardiac muscle. Conflicting data show that MSCs could be pluripotent and able to differentiate into tissues and cells of non-mesodermic origin as neurons or epithelial cells. Moreover, MSCs exhibit non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive properties. This wide range of properties leads to increasing uses of MSC for immunomodulation or tissue repair. Based on their immunosuppressive properties MSC are used particularly in the treatment of graft versus host disease, For tissue repair, MSCs can work by different ways from cell replacement to paracrine effects through the release of cytokines and to regulation of immune/inflammatory responses. In regenerative medicine, trials are in progress or planed for healing/repair of different tissue or organs as bone, cartilage, vessels, myocardium, or epithelia. Although it has been demonstrated that ex-vivo expansion processes using fetal bovine serum, recombinant growth factors (e.g. FGF2) or platelet lysate are feasible, definitive standards to produce clinical-grade MSC are still lacking. MSCs have to be produced according GMP and regulation constraints. For answering to the numerous challenges in this fast developing field of biology and medicine, integrative networks linking together research teams, cell therapy laboratories and clinical teams are needed.

  9. Clear Cell Carcinoma Presented as a Large Polypoid Mass Expanding the Vaginal Fornix: Report of Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Primary clear cell carcinoma of the vagina or uterine cervix is a very rare tumor. We report radiologic findings of two cases of clear cell carcinoma, arising in the vagina and uterine cervix in a 16-year-old and a 26-year-old female. These were presented as a large polypoid mass with a stalk and expanding the vaginal fornix. One case with ultrasonography showed relatively homogeneous echoic solid mass; the other case with a CT showed heterogeneously and strongly enhancing mass. All of the two cases showed non-specific signal intensity with heterogeneous and strong enhancement on MRI.

  10. Islet and stem cell encapsulation for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster, Clarence E; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  11. The expanding family of innate lymphoid cells: regulators and effectors of immunity and tissue remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Spits; J.P. Di Santo

    2011-01-01

    Research has identified what can be considered a family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) that includes not only natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells but also cells that produce interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-13, IL-17 and/or IL-22. These ILC subsets are developmentally related,

  12. A clinical evaluation of endoscopically placed self-expanding metallic stents in patients with acute large bowel obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, H C; Vilmann, P; Jakobsen, H L;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) have since 1991 established themselves as an option in the treatment of large bowel obstruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of SEMS in management of acute colorectal obstructions at a Danish Surgical Gastroenterology...

  13. Opti mal Protocols to Expand Neural Stem Cells in Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionNeurodegenerative disorders exert on an enormous cost, both financially and emotionally, on afflicted individuals and their families for a long time. Fortunately, a neural stem cell (NSC) was identified in the adult central nervous system (CNS) and induced to proliferate untransformed in vitro~([1,2]). Neural stem cells are extremely primitive cells capable of self-maintenance and have the ability to generate large numbers of cells, including all of the phenotypes present in the adult CNS. The...

  14. Immunoprofiling reveals unique cell-specific patterns of wall epitopes in the expanding Arabidopsis stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hardy C; Cheung, Jingling; Ellis, Brian E

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis inflorescence stem undergoes rapid directional growth, requiring massive axial cell-wall extension in all its tissues, but, at maturity, these tissues are composed of cell types that exhibit markedly different cell-wall structures. It is not clear whether the cell-wall compositions of these cell types diverge rapidly following axial growth cessation, or whether compositional divergence occurs at earlier stages in differentiation, despite the common requirement for cell-wall extensibility. To examine this question, seven cell types were assayed for the abundance and distribution of 18 major cell-wall glycan classes at three developmental stages along the developing inflorescence stem, using a high-throughput immunolabelling strategy. These stages represent a phase of juvenile growth, a phase displaying the maximum rate of stem extension, and a phase in which extension growth is ceasing. The immunolabelling patterns detected demonstrate that the cell-wall composition of most stem tissues undergoes pronounced changes both during and after rapid extension growth. Hierarchical clustering of the immunolabelling signals identified cell-specific binding patterns for some antibodies, including a sub-group of arabinogalactan side chain-directed antibodies whose epitope targets are specifically associated with the inter-fascicular fibre region during the rapid cell expansion phase. The data reveal dynamic, cell type-specific changes in cell-wall chemistry across diverse cell types during cell-wall expansion and maturation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem, and highlight the paradox between this structural diversity and the uniform anisotropic cell expansion taking place across all tissues during stem growth.

  15. A survey of cellulose microfibril patterns in dividing, expanding, and differentiating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Miki; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2014-05-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are critical for plant cell specialization and function. Recent advances in live cell imaging of fluorescently tagged cellulose synthases to track cellulose synthesis have greatly advanced our understanding of cellulose biosynthesis. Nevertheless, cellulose deposition patterns remain poorly described in many cell types, including those in the process of division or differentiation. In this study, we used field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis of cryo-planed tissues to determine the arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in various faces of cells undergoing cytokinesis or specialized development, including cell types in which cellulose cannot be imaged by conventional approaches. In dividing cells, we detected microfibrillar meshworks in the cell plates, consistent with the concentration at the cell plate of cellulose synthase complexes, as detected by fluorescently tagged CesA6. We also observed a loss of parallel cellulose microfibril orientation in walls of the mother cell during cytokinesis, which corresponded with the loss of fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase complexes from these surfaces. In recently formed guard cells, microfibrils were randomly organized and only formed a highly ordered circumferential pattern after pore formation. In pit fields, cellulose microfibrils were arranged in circular patterns around plasmodesmata. Microfibrils were random in most cotyledon cells except the epidermis and were parallel to the growth axis in trichomes. Deposition of cellulose microfibrils was spatially delineated in metaxylem and protoxylem cells of the inflorescence stem, supporting recent studies on microtubule exclusion mechanisms.

  16. AR42J-B-13 cell: An expandable progenitor to generate an unlimited supply of functional hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocytes are the preparation of choice for Toxicological research in vitro. However, despite the fact that hepatocytes proliferate in vivo during liver regeneration, they are resistant to proliferation in vitro, do not tolerate sub-culture and tend to enter a de-differentiation program that results in a loss of hepatic function. These limitations have resulted in the search for expandable rodent and human cells capable of being directed to differentiate into functional hepatocytes. Research with stem cells suggests that it may be possible to provide the research community with hepatocytes in vitro although to date, significant challenges remain, notably generating a sufficiently pure population of hepatocytes with a quantitative functionality comparable with hepatocytes. This paper reviews work with the AR42J-B-13 (B-13) cell line. The B-13 cell was cloned from the rodent AR42J pancreatic cell line, express genes associated with pancreatic acinar cells and readily proliferates in simple culture media. When exposed to glucocorticoid, 75-85% of the cells trans-differentiate into hepatocyte-like (B-13/H) cells functioning at a level quantitatively similar to freshly isolated rat hepatocytes (with the remaining cells retaining the B-13 phenotype). Trans-differentiation of pancreatic acinar cells also appears to occur in vivo in rats treated with glucocorticoid; in mice with elevated circulating glucocorticoid and in humans treated for long periods with glucocorticoid. The B-13 response to glucocorticoid therefore appears to be related to a real pathophysiological response of a pancreatic cell to glucocorticoid. An understanding of how this process occurs and if it can be generated or engineered in human cells would result in a cell line with the ability to generate an unlimited supply of functional human hepatocytes in a cost effective manner.

  17. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n = 363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients. PMID:24970380

  18. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith;

    2013-01-01

    inexpensive synthesis, constant availability, a good safety profile, biodegradability and the long clinical use as plasma expanders. Three polymers have been tested for cytotoxicity and cytokine activation in cell cultures and conjugated with a near-infrared fluorescent dye: hydroxyethyl starches (HES 200 k...

  19. A Requisite Role for Induced Regulatory T cells in Tolerance Based on Expanding Antigen Receptor Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Jason B; Jia, Shuang; Nickerson, Derek; Schmitt, Erica G.; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yassai, Maryam; Li, Shun-Hwa; Relland, Lance M.; Wise, Petra M; Chen, Andrew; Zheng, Yu-Qian; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gorski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although both natural and induced regulatory T (nTreg and iTreg) cells can enforce tolerance, the mechanisms underlying their synergistic actions have not been established. We examined the functions of nTreg and iTreg cells by adoptive transfer immunotherapy of newborn Foxp3-deficient mice. As monotherapy, only nTreg cells prevented disease lethality, but did not suppress chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Provision of Foxp3-sufficient conventional T cells with nTreg cells reconstituted t...

  20. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP, have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA.

  1. An Evaluation of the Stemness, Paracrine, and Tumorigenic Characteristics of Highly Expanded, Minimally Passaged Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Atat, Oula; Antonios, Diane; Hilal, George; Hokayem, Nabil; Abou-Ghoch, Joelle; Hashim, Hussein; Serhal, Rim; Hebbo, Clara; Moussa, Mayssam; Alaaeddine, Nada

    2016-01-01

    The use of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) in regenerative medicine is rising due to their plasticity, capacity of differentiation and paracrine and trophic effects. Despite the large number of cells obtained from adipose tissue, it is usually not enough for therapeutic purposes for many diseases or cosmetic procedures. Thus, there is the need for culturing and expanding cells in-vitro for several weeks remain. Our aim is to investigate if long- term proliferation with minimal passaging will affect the stemness, paracrine secretions and carcinogenesis markers of ADSC. The immunophenotypic properties and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity of the initial stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and serially passaged ADSC were observed by flow cytometry. In parallel, the telomerase activity and the relative expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were assessed by q-PCR. We also assessed the cytokine secretion profile of passaged ADSC by an ELISA. The expanded ADSC retain their morphological and phenotypical characteristics. These cells maintained in culture for up to 12 weeks until P4, possessed stable telomerase and ALDH activity, without having a TP53 mutation. Furthermore, the relative expression levels of TP53, RB, and MDM2 were not affected while the relative expression of c-Myc decreased significantly. Finally, the levels of the secretions of PGE2, STC1, and TIMP2 were not affected but the levels of IL-6, VEGF, and TIMP 1 significantly decreased at P2. Our results suggest that the expansion of passaged ADSC does not affect the differentiation capacity of stem cells and does not confer a cancerous state or capacity in vitro to the cells. PMID:27632538

  2. Peri-alloHCT IL-33 administration expands recipient T-regulatory cells that protect mice against acute GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Benjamin M; Reichenbach, Dawn K; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mathews, Lisa; Koehn, Brent H; Dwyer, Gaelen K; Lott, Jeremy M; Uhl, Franziska M; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Feser, Colby J; Smith, Michelle J; Liu, Quan; Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R; Turnquist, Hēth R

    2016-07-21

    During allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), nonhematopoietic cell interleukin-33 (IL-33) is augmented and released by recipient conditioning to promote type 1 alloimmunity and lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Yet, IL-33 is highly pleiotropic and exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties in the absence of coincident proinflammatory stimuli. We tested whether peri-alloHCT IL-33 delivery can protect against development of GVHD by augmenting IL-33-associated regulatory mechanisms. IL-33 administration augmented the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing the IL-33 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity-2 (ST2), which persist following total body irradiation. ST2 expression is not exclusive to Tregs and IL-33 expands innate immune cells with regulatory or reparative properties. However, selective depletion of recipient Foxp3(+) cells concurrent with peri-alloHCT IL-33 administration accelerated acute GVHD lethality. IL-33-expanded Tregs protected recipients from GVHD by controlling macrophage activation and preventing accumulation of effector T cells in GVHD-target tissue. IL-33 stimulation of ST2 on Tregs activates p38 MAPK, which drives expansion of the ST2(+) Treg subset. Associated mechanistic studies revealed that proliferating Tregs exhibit IL-33-independent upregulation of ST2 and the adoptive transfer of st2(+) but not st2(-) Tregs mediated GVHD protection. In total, these data demonstrate the protective capacity of peri-alloHCT administration of IL-33 and IL-33-responsive Tregs in mouse models of acute GVHD. These findings provide strong support that the immunoregulatory relationship between IL-33 and Tregs can be harnessed therapeutically to prevent GVHD after alloHCT for treatment of malignancy or as a means for tolerance induction in solid organ transplantation. PMID:27222477

  3. Overview of cell-free protein synthesis: historic landmarks, commercial systems, and expanding applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shaorong

    2014-10-01

    During the early days of molecular biology, cell-free protein synthesis played an essential role in deciphering the genetic code and contributed to our understanding of translation of protein from messenger RNA. Owing to several decades of major and incremental improvements, modern cell-free systems have achieved higher protein synthesis yields at lower production costs. Commercial cell-free systems are now available from a variety of material sources, ranging from "traditional" E. coli, rabbit reticulocyte lysate, and wheat germ extracts, to recent insect and human cell extracts, to defined systems reconstituted from purified recombinant components. Although each cell-free system has certain advantages and disadvantages, the diversity of the cell-free systems allows in vitro synthesis of a wide range of proteins for a variety of downstream applications. In the post-genomic era, cell-free protein synthesis has rapidly become the preferred approach for high-throughput functional and structural studies of proteins and a versatile tool for in vitro protein evolution and synthetic biology. This unit provides a brief history of cell-free protein synthesis and describes key advances in modern cell-free systems, practical differences between widely used commercial cell-free systems, and applications of this important technology.

  4. Antigen Specificity of Clonally Expanded and Receptor Edited Cerebrospinal Fluid B cells from Patients with Relapsing Remitting MS

    OpenAIRE

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; O’Connor, Kevin C.; Cameron, Elizabeth; Jowdry, Andrea; Ward, E. Sally; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael K.; Monson, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    We re-engineered the immunoglobulin rearrangements from clonally expanded CSF B cells of three Multiple Sclerosis patients as Fab fragments, and used three methods to test for their Ag-specificity. Nine out of ten Fab fragments were reactive to Myelin Basic Protein (MBP). The one Fab that did not react to MBP was a product of receptor editing. Two of the nine MBP-reactive Fabs were also reactive to GFAP and CNPase, indicating that these clones were polyreactive. Targeting the mechanisms that ...

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells: from experiment to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto William R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is currently much interest in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and their ability to differentiate into other cell types, and to partake in the anatomy and physiology of remote organs. It is now clear these cells may be purified from several organs in the body besides bone marrow. MSCs take part in wound healing by contributing to myofibroblast and possibly fibroblast populations, and may be involved in epithelial tissue regeneration in certain organs, although this remains more controversial. In this review, we examine the ability of MSCs to modulate liver, kidney, heart and intestinal repair, and we update their opposing qualities of being less immunogenic and therefore tolerated in a transplant situation, yet being able to contribute to xenograft models of human tumour formation in other contexts. However, such observations have not been replicated in the clinic. Recent studies showing the clinical safety of MSC in several pathologies are discussed. The possible opposing powers of MSC need careful understanding and control if their clinical potential is to be realised with long-term safety for patients.

  6. Clinical Outcomes of the Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of Early Gastric Cancer Are Comparable between Absolute and New Expanded Criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Keun Young; Jeon, Seong Woo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Chang Keun; Chung, Yun Jin; Kwon, Joong Goo; Jung, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, Si Hyung; Park, Jeong Bae; Yang, Chang Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) techniques have led to the development of expanded criteria for endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes for ESD using indication criteria. Methods A total of 1,105 patients underwent ESD for EGC at six medical centers. The patients were classified into the following two groups based on the lesion size, presence of ulceration and pathological re...

  7. Expanding roles for CD4 T cells and their subpopulations in tumor immunity and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dobrzanski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of CD4 T cells in orchestrating the immune system and their role in inducing effective T cell-mediated therapies for the treatment of patients with select established malignancies are undisputable. Through a complex and balanced array of direct and indirect mechanisms of cellular activation and regulation, this functionally diverse family of lymphocytes can potentially promote tumor eradication, long-term tumor immunity and aid in establishing and/or rebalancing immune cell homeostasis through interaction with other immune cell populations within the highly dynamic tumor environment. However, recent studies have uncovered additional functions and roles for CD4 T cells, some of which are independent of other lymphocytes, that can not only influence and contribute to tumor immunity but paradoxically promote tumor growth and progression. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the various CD4 T cell lineages and their signature cytokines in disease progression and/or regression. We discuss their direct and indirect mechanistic interplay among themselves and with other responding cells of the antitumor response, their potential roles and abilities for "plasticity" and memory cell generation within the hostile tumor environment and their potentials in cancer treatment and adoptive immunotherapies.

  8. Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A universe that expands with time. Although the possibility had been raised earlier through theoretical work carried out by Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), Aleksandr Friedmann (1888-1925), and the Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), that our universe is expanding was first demonstrated observationally in 1929 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), through his measurements of the redshifts in the spectra of ...

  9. No increase in brain cancer rates during period of expanding cell phone use

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a new examination of United States cancer incidence data, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) reported that incidence trends have remained roughly constant for glioma, the main type of brain cancer hypothesized to be related to cell ph

  10. Mass cytometry analysis shows that a novel memory phenotype B cell is expanded in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Hansmann, Leo; Blum, Lisa; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Liedtke, Michaela; Robinson, William H; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    It would be very beneficial if the status of cancers could be determined from a blood specimen. However, peripheral blood leukocytes are very heterogeneous between individuals and thus high resolution technologies are likely required. We used cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and next generation sequencing to ask whether a plasma cell cancer (multiple myeloma) and related pre-cancerous states had any consistent effect on the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotypes of patients. Analysis...

  11. Characterization of Senescence of Culture-expanded Human Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legzdina, Diana; Romanauska, Anete; Nikulshin, Sergey; Kozlovska, Tatjana; Berzins, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) are promising candidates in regenerative medicine. The need for in vitro propagation to obtain therapeutic quantities of the cells imposes a risk of impaired functionality due to cellular senescence. The aim of the study was to analyze in vitro senescence of previously cryopreserved human ADSCs subjected to serial passages in cell culture. Methods and Results ADSC cultures from 8 donors were cultivated until proliferation arrest was reached. A gradual decline of ADSC fitness was observed by altered cell morphology, loss of proliferative, clonogenic and differentiation abilities and increased β-galactosidase expression all of which occurred in a donor-specific manner. Relative telomere length (RTL) analysis revealed that only three tested cultures encountered replicative senescence. The presence of two ADSC subsets with significantly different RTL and cell size was discovered. The heterogeneity of ADSC cultures was supported by the intermittent nature of aging seen in tested samples. Conclusions We conclude that the onset of in vitro senescence of ADSCs is a strongly donor-specific process which is complicated by the intricate dynamics of cell subsets present in ADSC population. This complexity needs to be carefully considered when elaborating protocols for personalized cellular therapy. PMID:27426094

  12. Bioculture System: Expanding ISS Space Bioscience Capabilities for Fundamental Stem Cell Research and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Fitzpatrick, Garret; Ellingson, Lance; Mitchell, Sarah; Yang, Anthony; Kosnik, Cristine; Rayl, Nicole; Cannon, Tom; Austin, Edward; Sato, Kevin

    With the recent call by the 2011 Decadal Report and the 2010 Space Biosciences Roadmap for the International Space Station (ISS) to be used as a National Laboratory for scientific research, there is now a need for new laboratory instruments on ISS to enable such research to occur. The Bioculture System supports the extended culturing of multiple cell types and microbiological specimens. It consists of a docking station that carries ten independent incubation units or ‘Cassettes’. Each Cassette contains a cooling chamber (5(°) C) for temperature sensitive solutions and samples, or long duration fluids and sample storage, as well as an incubation chamber (ambient up to 42(°) C). Each Cassette houses an independent fluidics system comprised of a biochamber, medical-grade fluid tubing, medium warming module, oxygenation module, fluid pump, and sixteen solenoid valves for automated biochamber injections of sampling. The Bioculture System provides the user with the ability to select the incubation temperature, fluid flow rate and automated biochamber sampling or injection events for each separate Cassette. Furthermore, the ISS crew can access the biochamber, media bag, and accessory bags on-orbit using the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The Bioculture System also permits initiation of cultures, subculturing, injection of compounds, and removal of samples for on-orbit processing using ISS facilities. The Bioculture System therefore provides a unique opportunity for the study of stem cells and other cell types in space. The first validation flight of the Bioculture System will be conducted on SpaceX5, consisting of 8 Cassettes and lasting for 30-37 days. During this flight we plan to culture two different mammalian cell types in bioreactors: a mouse osteocytic-like cell line, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS)-derived cardiomyocytes. Specifically, the osteocytic line will enable the study of a type of cell that has been flown on the Bioculture System

  13. Expanded polyfunctional T cell response to mycobacterial antigens in TB disease and contraction post-treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cells producing multiple factors have been shown to be required for protection from disease progression in HIV but we have recently shown this not to be the case in TB. Subjects with active disease had a greater proportion of polyfunctional cells responding to ESAT-6/CFP-10 stimulation than their infected but non-diseased household contacts (HHC. We therefore wanted to assess this profile in subjects who had successfully completed standard TB chemotherapy. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study using PBMC from TB cases (pre- and post-treatment and HHC. Samples were stimulated overnight with TB antigens (ESAT-6/CFP-10 and PPD and their CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were assessed for production of CD107a, IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and the complexity of the responses was determined using SPICE and PESTLE software. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We found that an increase in complexity (i.e., production of more than 1 factor simultaneously of the T cell profile was associated with TB disease and that this was significantly reduced following TB treatment. This implies that T cells are able to respond adequately to TB antigens with active disease (at least initially but the ability of this response to protect the host from disease progression is hampered, presumably due to immune evasion strategies by the bacteria. These findings have implications for the development of new diagnostics and vaccine strategies.

  14. Pharmacogenomics: from cell to clinic (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siest, Gérard; Medeiros, Rui; Melichar, Bohuslav; Stathopoulou, Maria; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Cacabelos, Ramon; Abt, Peter Meier; Monteiro, Carolino; Gurwitz, David; Queiroz, Jao; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Ndiaye, Ndieye Coumba; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    The second international European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) conference was organized in Lisbon, Portugal, and attracted 250 participants from 37 different countries. The participants could listen to 50 oral presentations, participate in five lunch symposia and were able to view 83 posters and an exhibition. The first part of this Conference Scene will focus on the pharmacogenomics and biomarkers used in medical oncology, and in particular solid tumors. In addition, this article covers the two keynote conference introductory lectures by Ann K Daly and Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg. The second part of this article will discuss the clinical implementation of pharmacogenomic tests; the role of transports and pharmacogenomics; how stem cells and other new tools are helping the development of pharmacogenomics and drug discovery; and an update on the clinical translation of pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine. Part two of this Conference Scene will be featured in the next issue of Pharmacogenomics.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  16. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a common disorder affecting the quality of life for millions of women worldwide. Effective surgical procedures involving synthetic permanent meshes exist, but significant short- and long-term complications occur. Cell-based therapy using autologous stem cells or...... provided proof of concept for the idea. An initial enthusiasm caused by positive results from early clinical trials has been dampened by the recognition of scientific irregularities. At the same time, the safety issue for cell-based therapy has been highlighted by the appearance of new and comprehensive...... progenitor cells presents an alternative approach, which aims at repairing the anatomical components of the urethral continence mechanism. In vitro expanded progenitor cells isolated from muscle biopsies have been most intensely investigated, and both preclinical trials and a few clinical trials have...

  17. In vivo tumorigenesis was observed after injection of in vitro expanded neural crest stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC and neural crest stem cells (NCSC. Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application.

  18. In vivo tumorigenesis was observed after injection of in vitro expanded neural crest stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Poulet, Christophe; Neirinckx, Virginie; Hennuy, Benoit; Swingland, James T; Laudet, Emerence; Sommer, Lukas; Shakova, Olga; Bours, Vincent; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q) compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application. PMID:23071568

  19. The Plasmodium falciparum-specific human memory B cell compartment expands gradually with repeated malaria infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta E Weiss

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf malaria is only acquired after years of repeated infections and wanes rapidly without ongoing parasite exposure. Antibodies are central to malaria immunity, yet little is known about the B-cell biology that underlies the inefficient acquisition of Pf-specific humoral immunity. This year-long prospective study in Mali of 185 individuals aged 2 to 25 years shows that Pf-specific memory B-cells and antibodies are acquired gradually in a stepwise fashion over years of repeated Pf exposure. Both Pf-specific memory B cells and antibody titers increased after acute malaria and then, after six months of decreased Pf exposure, contracted to a point slightly higher than pre-infection levels. This inefficient, stepwise expansion of both the Pf-specific memory B-cell and long-lived antibody compartments depends on Pf exposure rather than age, based on the comparator response to tetanus vaccination that was efficient and stable. These observations lend new insights into the cellular basis of the delayed acquisition of malaria immunity.

  20. In vitro expanded human invariant natural killer T-cells promote functional activity of natural killer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, M.; Molling, J.W.; Mensdorff-Pouilly, S von; Verheijen, R.H.; Blomberg, B.M.E. von; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Scheper, R.J.; Bontkes, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play a pivotal role in cancer immunity through trans-activation of effector cells via swift cytokine secretion. In mice, iNKT cell activation by alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GC) induces potent NK cell-mediated anti-tumour effects. Here we investigated wheth

  1. Prdm14 initiates lymphoblastic leukemia after expanding a population of cells resembling common lymphoid progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    E J Dettman; Simko, Stephen J.; Ayanga, Bernard; Carofino, Brandi; Margolin, Judith; Morse, Herbert C.; Justice, Monica J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneous genetic mechanisms of tumor initiation in lymphoid leukemias (LL) will lead to improvements in prognostic classification and treatment regimens. In previous studies of mouse leukemias, we showed that retroviral insertion at the Evi32 locus leads to increased expression of Prdm14, a pluripotency gene implicated in the self-renewal capacity of embryonic stem cells and the early stages of breast cancer. Here we show that PRDM14 is also overexpressed in ~25% of hum...

  2. Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Bhatia, Shivank S; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-10-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a vascular complication frequently seen because of increase in the number of renal transplantations. Early diagnosis and management is essential to optimize a proper graft function. Currently, the endovascular treatment of TRAS using angioplasty and/or stenting is considered the treatment of choice with the advantage that it does not preclude subsequent surgical correction. Treatment of TRAS with the use of stents, particularly in tortuous transplant renal anatomy presents a unique challenge to an interventional radiologist. In this study, we present three cases from our practice highlighting the use of a balloon-expandable Multi-Link RX Ultra coronary stent system (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA) for treating high grade focal stenosis along very tortuous renal arterial segments. Cobalt-Chromium alloy stent scaffold provides excellent radial force, whereas the flexible stent design conforms to the vessel course allowing for optimal stent alignment. PMID:26629289

  3. Efficient derivation and inducible differentiation of expandable skeletal myogenic cells from human ES and patient-specific iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioletti, Sara M; Gerli, Mattia F M; Ragazzi, Martina; Dastidar, Sumitava; Benedetti, Sara; Loperfido, Mariana; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio

    2015-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant human tissue; therefore, an unlimited availability of myogenic cells has applications in regenerative medicine and drug development. Here we detail a protocol to derive myogenic cells from human embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and we also provide evidence for its extension to human iPS cells cultured without feeder cells. The procedure, which does not require the generation of embryoid bodies or prospective cell isolation, entails four stages with different culture densities, media and surface coating. Pluripotent stem cells are disaggregated to single cells and then differentiated into expandable cells resembling human mesoangioblasts. Subsequently, transient Myod1 induction efficiently drives myogenic differentiation into multinucleated myotubes. Cells derived from patients with muscular dystrophy and differentiated using this protocol have been genetically corrected, and they were proven to have therapeutic potential in dystrophic mice. Thus, this platform has been demonstrated to be amenable to gene and cell therapy, and it could be extended to muscle tissue engineering and disease modeling. PMID:26042384

  4. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  5. Reversal of hyperglycemia in mice by using human expandable insulin-producing cells differentiated from fetal liver progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalzman, Michal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Giri, Ranjit K.; Berkovich, Irina; Sappal, Baljit S.; Karnieli, Ohad; Zern, Mark A.; Fleischer, Norman; Efrat, Shimon

    2003-06-01

    Beta-cell replacement is considered to be the most promising approach for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Its application on a large scale is hindered by a shortage of cells for transplantation. Activation of insulin expression, storage, and regulated secretion in stem/progenitor cells offers novel ways to overcome this shortage. We explored whether fetal human progenitor liver cells (FH) could be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells after expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene, which is a key regulator of pancreatic development and insulin expression in beta cells. FH cells possess a considerable replication capacity, and this was further extended by introduction of the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase. Immortalized FH cells expressing Pdx1 activated multiple beta-cell genes, produced and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released insulin in a regulated manner in response to glucose. When transplanted into hyperglycemic immunodeficient mice, the cells restored and maintained euglycemia for prolonged periods. Quantitation of human C-peptide in the mouse serum confirmed that the glycemia was normalized by the transplanted human cells. This approach offers the potential of a novel source of cells for transplantation into patients with type 1 diabetes.

  6. CD8αα expression marks terminally differentiated human CD8+ T cells expanded in chronic viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Jane Walker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell co-receptor CD8αβ enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen, however studies indicate CD8αα has the converse effect and acts as a co-repressor. Using a combination of Thymic Leukaemia antigen (TL tetramer, which directly binds CD8αα, anti-CD161 and anti-Vα7.2 antibodies we have been able for the first time to clearly define CD8αα expression on human CD8 T cells subsets. In healthy controls CD8αα is most highly expressed by CD161 bright (CD161++ mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT cells, with CD8αα expression highly restricted to the TCR Vα7.2+ cells of this subset. We also identified CD8αα-expressing populations within the CD161 mid (CD161+ and negative (CD161- non-MAIT CD8 T cell subsets and show TL-tetramer binding to correlate with expression of CD8β at low levels in the context of maintained CD8α expression (CD8α+CD8βlow. In addition, we found CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations to be significantly expanded in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 and hepatitis B (mean of 47% and 40% of CD161- T cells respectively infected individuals. Such CD8αα expressing T cells are an effector-memory population (CD45RA-, CCR7-, CD62L- that express markers of activation and maturation (HLA-DR+, CD28-, CD27-, CD57+ and are functionally distinct, expressing greater levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ on stimulation and perforin at rest than their CD8α+CD8βhigh counterparts. Antigen-specific T cells in HLA-B*4201+HIV-1 infected patients are found within both the CD161-CD8α+CD8βhigh and CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations. Overall we have clearly defined CD8αα expressing human T cell subsets using the TL-tetramer, and have demonstrated CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations, highly expanded in disease settings, to co-express CD8αβ and CD8αα. Co-expression of CD8αα on CD8αβ T cells may impact on their overall function in-vivo and contribute to the distinctive phenotype of highly differentiated populations in HBV and HIV-1 infection.

  7. Expanded lung T-bet+RORγT+ CD4+ T-cells in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ylva; Lepzien, Rico; Kullberg, Susanna; Eklund, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Grunewald, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Disease phenotypes of pulmonary sarcoidosis are distinguished by clinical rather than immunological criteria. We aimed to characterise patterns of CD4(+) T-cell lineage plasticity underlying the differences in clinical presentation and disease course between the acute form, Löfgren's syndrome, and the heterogeneous, potentially progressive "non-Löfgren" form.33 pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and nine controls underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. CD4(+) T-cell transcription factor, chemokine receptor and T-cell receptor expression, proliferation and cytokine production were assessed in the lavage fluid and peripheral blood using flow cytometry and multicolour FluoroSpot.CD4(+) T-cells simultaneously expressing the T-helper cell (Th)1 and Th17 transcriptional regulators T-bet and RORγT (T-bet(+)RORγT(+)) were identified in the lavage, but not blood, of all subjects, and to a significantly higher degree in Löfgren's patients. T-bet(+)RORγT(+) cells proliferated actively, produced interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin (IL)-17A, co-expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, and correlated with nonchronic disease. T-cell receptor-restricted Vα2.3(+)Vβ22(+) T-cells strongly co-expressed T-bet/RORγT and CXCR3/CCR6. Cytokine production was more heterogeneous in Löfgren's patients, with significantly higher IL-17A, IL-10, IL-22 and IL-2, but lower IFNγ.Here we demonstrate the presence of lung T-bet(+)RORγT(+)CXCR3(+)CCR6(+) CD4(+) T-cells and Th17-associated cytokines especially in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable prognosis, suggesting a Th1/Th17-permissive environment in the lung with implications for disease resolution. PMID:27230441

  8. Expanding the Aperture of Psychological Assessment: Introduction to the Special Section on Innovative Clinical Assessment Technologies and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary psychological assessment is dominated by tried-and-true methods like clinical interviewing, self-report questionnaires, intellectual assessment, and behavioral observation. These approaches have served as the mainstays of psychological assessment for decades. To be sure, these methods have survived over the years because clinicians…

  9. miR-34a expands myeloid-derived suppressor cells via apoptosis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Anfei, E-mail: huang_anfei@163.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Haitao, E-mail: zhanghtjp@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215021, Jiangsu Province (China); Chen, Si, E-mail: chensisdyxb@126.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Xia, Fei, E-mail: xiafei87@gmail.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Yang, Yi, E-mail: 602744364@qq.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Dong, Fulu, E-mail: adiok0903@126.com [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Sun, Di, E-mail: dongfl@suda.edu.cn [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Xiong, Sidong, E-mail: sdxiong@suda.edu.cn [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Jinping, E-mail: j_pzhang@suda.edu.cn [Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-08-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population and show significant expansion under pathological conditions. microRNA plays important roles in many biological processes, whether microRNAs have a function in the expansion of MDSCs is still not very clear. In this study, miR-34a overexpression can induce the expansion of MDSCs in bone marrow chimera and transgenic mice model. The experimental results suggest that miR-34a inhibited the apoptosis of MDSCs but did not affect the proliferation of MDSCs. The distinct mRNA microarray profiles of MDSCs of wild type and miR-34a over-expressing MDSCs combined with the target prediction of miR-34a suggest that miR-34a may target genes such as p2rx7, Tia1, and plekhf1 to inhibit the apoptosis of MDSCs. Taken together, miR-34a contributes to the expansion of MDSCs by inhibiting the apoptosis of MDSCs. - Highlights: • Over-expression of miR-34a increases the number of MDSCs. • miR-34a inhibits the apoptosis of MDSCs, but does not affects their proliferation. • miR-34a may inhibit the apoptosis of MDSCs via targeting the p2rx7, Tia1 and plekhf1.

  10. miR-34a expands myeloid-derived suppressor cells via apoptosis inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population and show significant expansion under pathological conditions. microRNA plays important roles in many biological processes, whether microRNAs have a function in the expansion of MDSCs is still not very clear. In this study, miR-34a overexpression can induce the expansion of MDSCs in bone marrow chimera and transgenic mice model. The experimental results suggest that miR-34a inhibited the apoptosis of MDSCs but did not affect the proliferation of MDSCs. The distinct mRNA microarray profiles of MDSCs of wild type and miR-34a over-expressing MDSCs combined with the target prediction of miR-34a suggest that miR-34a may target genes such as p2rx7, Tia1, and plekhf1 to inhibit the apoptosis of MDSCs. Taken together, miR-34a contributes to the expansion of MDSCs by inhibiting the apoptosis of MDSCs. - Highlights: • Over-expression of miR-34a increases the number of MDSCs. • miR-34a inhibits the apoptosis of MDSCs, but does not affects their proliferation. • miR-34a may inhibit the apoptosis of MDSCs via targeting the p2rx7, Tia1 and plekhf1

  11. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  12. Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  13. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: A surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Bárcena (Paloma); M. Jara-Acevedo (M.); M.D. Tabernero; A. López (Antonio); M.-L. Sánchez (M.); A.C. García-Montero (Andrés); N. Muñoz-García (Noemí); M.B. Vidriales (M.); A. Paiva (Artur); Q. Lecrevisse (Quentin); M. Lima (Margarida); A.W. Langerak (Ton); S. Böttcher (Stephan); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); A. Orfao (Alberto); J. Almeida (Julia)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for

  14. Expanding the role of primary care in the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity: a review of clinic- and community-based recommendations and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Michaela; Hargreaves, Margaret B; Briefel, Ronette R; Orfield, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Although pediatric providers have traditionally assessed and treated childhood obesity and associated health-related conditions in the clinic setting, there is a recognized need to expand the provider role. We reviewed the literature published from 2005 to 2012 to (1) provide examples of the spectrum of roles that primary care providers can play in the successful treatment and prevention of childhood obesity in both clinic and community settings and (2) synthesize the evidence of important characteristics, factors, or strategies in successful community-based models. The review identified 96 articles that provide evidence of how primary care providers can successfully prevent and treat childhood obesity by coordinating efforts within the primary care setting and through linkages to obesity prevention and treatment resources within the community. By aligning the most promising interventions with recommendations published over the past decade by the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and other health organizations, we present nine areas in which providers can promote the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity through efforts in clinical and community settings: weight status assessment and monitoring, healthy lifestyle promotion, treatment, clinician skill development, clinic infrastructure development, community program referrals, community health education, multisector community initiatives, and policy advocacy. PMID:23710345

  15. Expanding the Role of Primary Care in the Prevention and Treatment of Childhood Obesity: A Review of Clinic- and Community-Based Recommendations and Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Vine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although pediatric providers have traditionally assessed and treated childhood obesity and associated health-related conditions in the clinic setting, there is a recognized need to expand the provider role. We reviewed the literature published from 2005 to 2012 to (1 provide examples of the spectrum of roles that primary care providers can play in the successful treatment and prevention of childhood obesity in both clinic and community settings and (2 synthesize the evidence of important characteristics, factors, or strategies in successful community-based models. The review identified 96 articles that provide evidence of how primary care providers can successfully prevent and treat childhood obesity by coordinating efforts within the primary care setting and through linkages to obesity prevention and treatment resources within the community. By aligning the most promising interventions with recommendations published over the past decade by the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and other health organizations, we present nine areas in which providers can promote the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity through efforts in clinical and community settings: weight status assessment and monitoring, healthy lifestyle promotion, treatment, clinician skill development, clinic infrastructure development, community program referrals, community health education, multisector community initiatives, and policy advocacy.

  16. Expanding the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network to address the management of substance use disorders in general medical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai, Steven Sparenborg, Udi E Ghitza, David Liu Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Abstract: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010 and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (2008 expand substance use disorder (SUD care services in the USA into general medical settings. Care offered in these settings will engage substance-using patients in an integrated and patient-centered environment that addresses physical and mental health comorbidities and follows a chronic care model. This expansion of SUD services presents a great need for evidence-based practices useful in general medical settings, and reveals several research gaps to be addressed. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse can serve an important role in this endeavor. High-priority research gaps are highlighted in this commentary. A discussion follows on how the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network can transform to address changing patterns in SUD care to efficiently generate evidence to guide SUD treatment practice within the context of recent US health care legislation. Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, substance use disorders, practice-based research network, electronic health records

  17. Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells and Their Orthopedic Applications: Forging a Path towards Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana S. Shenaq

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs are nonhematopoietic multipotent cells capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. While they can be isolated from various tissues, MPCs isolated from the bone marrow are best characterized. These cells represent a subset of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs which, in addition to their differentiation potential, are critical in supporting proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. They are of clinical interest because they can be easily isolated from bone marrow aspirates and expanded in vitro with minimal donor site morbidity. The BMSCs are also capable of altering disease pathophysiology by secreting modulating factors in a paracrine manner. Thus, engineering such cells to maximize therapeutic potential has been the focus of cell/gene therapy to date. Here, we discuss the path towards the development of clinical trials utilizing BMSCs for orthopaedic applications. Specifically, we will review the use of BMSCs in repairing critical-sized defects, fracture nonunions, cartilage and tendon injuries, as well as in metabolic bone diseases and osteonecrosis. A review of www.ClinicalTrials.gov of the United States National Institute of Health was performed, and ongoing clinical trials will be discussed in addition to the sentinel preclinical studies that paved the way for human investigations.

  18. Novel Serial Positive Enrichment Technology Enables Clinical Multiparameter Cell Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Stemberger; Stefan Dreher; Claudia Tschulik; Christine Piossek; Jeannette Bet; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Matthias Schiemann; Michael Neuenhahn; Klaus Martin; Martin Schlapschy; Arne Skerra; Thomas Schmidt; Matthias Edinger; Riddell, Stanley R.; Lothar Germeroth

    2012-01-01

    A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell product...

  19. Widespread atypical vascular lesions of the skin after whole-body electron beam therapy: expanding the clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Werner

    2013-02-01

    Atypical vascular lesion of the skin is an uncommon usually benign condition, thus far reported almost exclusively from mammary skin after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast. Some clinical and histological overlap exists with early angiosarcoma, which can also occur on irradiated skin. The lesions are divided into vascular and lymphatic types, the first representing a higher risk for development of angiosarcoma and the latter being more common. This article reports a rare case of widespread, progressive, vascular-type atypical vascular lesion after repeated whole-body electron beam irradiation administered as treatment for mycosis fungoides.

  20. Property control of expanding thermal plasma deposited textured zinc oxide with focus on thin film solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenen, R. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Loeffler, J. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute, SID-Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Linden, J.L. [TNO TPD, Division Models and Processes, P.O. Box 595, 5600 AN Eindhoven (Netherlands); Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute, SID-Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Sanden, M.C.M. van de [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.c.m.v.d.sanden@tue.nl

    2005-12-01

    Property control of expanding thermal plasma deposited textured zinc oxide is demonstrated considering intrinsic, i.e. bulk, and extrinsic transparent conducting oxide quality relevant for application in thin film amorphous silicon pin solar cells. Particularly the interdependence of electrical conductivity, film composition and film morphology, i.e. structure, feature shape and roughness of the surface, is addressed. Control of film composition is mainly governed by plasma production and gas phase chemistry inherently inducing a significant contribution to film morphology, whereas control of film morphology solely is governed by near-substrate conditions. Especially the ratio of zinc to oxygen and the reactor chamber pressure appear to be determinative in obtaining zinc oxide exhibiting the appropriate intrinsic and extrinsic quality, i.e. a high electrical conductivity, a high transmittance, a textured rough surface morphology and a strong hydrogen plasma resistance. The solar cell performance of appropriate undoped and aluminium doped textured zinc oxide inherently obtained during deposition is comparable with respect to Asahi U-type fluorine-doped tin oxide.

  1. A clinical and pharmacokinetic study of the combination of etravirine plus raltegravir in HIV patients with expanded intolerance or resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bañón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The combination of etravirine (ETR plus raltegravir (RAL could be an option for HIV patients with resistance, intolerance or important interactions with other drugs. However, there are few data on the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of this dual therapy, taking into account the effect of HCV co-infection or the possible induction of ETR in the drug metabolism of RAL. Material and Methods: Cohort study of HIV patients initiating ETR plus RAL as dual therapy. Plasma trough levels of RAL were measured by LC/MS after at least one month on therapy. Results: A total of 25 patients have been included in this combination since 2009. Mean age was 46 years, 72% were male, and 20 patients (80% had HCV co-infection (seven patients with fibrosis 3–4. Median nadir CD4+ count was 109 (60–209, and 21 patients had an HIV RNA level below 50 copies/mL. Median time on previous therapy was 473 months (IQR, 395–570, and reasons for this dual therapy was toxicity/intolerance in 19, and interactions in nine (two chemotherapy, three DAAs, two methadone, two other. After a median follow up of 722 days (473–1088: 53.3 patients-year, there were no cases of blips or virological failure. Six patients (24% discontinued therapy after more than 1.5 year on therapy, in four cases due to lost follow up and in two due to simplification after finishing the reason for interaction. There were no cases of liver toxicity, and only two patients increased slightly transaminases values (grade 1 and 2. Total cholesterol and triglycerides levels decrease significantly after initiation (TC, from 182 to 165 at one year; p=0.01; TG from 185 to 143 mg/dL; p=0.01. CT/HDL ratio decreases from 4.35 to 4.28 after six months. Geometric mean plasma trough level of RAL was 166 ng/mL (IQR, 40–249 and only one patient (6% was below the in vitro IC50 of the wild type. Conclusions: The combination of ETR plus RAL as dual therapy is effective and safe in patients with expanded

  2. Insights from a Chimpanzee Adipose Stromal Cell Population: Opportunities for Adult Stem Cells to Expand Primate Functional Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pfefferle, Lisa W.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Comparisons between humans and chimpanzees are essential for understanding traits unique to each species. However, linking important phenotypic differences to underlying molecular changes is often challenging. The ability to generate, differentiate, and profile adult stem cells provides a powerful but underutilized opportunity to investigate the molecular basis for trait differences between species within specific cell types and in a controlled environment. Here, we characterize adipose strom...

  3. Safety and efficacy of sunitinib in patients from Latin America: subanalysis of an expanded access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrios CH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos H Barrios,1 Daniel Herchenhorn,2 Matías Chacón,3 Paula Cabrera-Galeana,4 Peter Sajben,5 Ke Zhang6 1Department of Medicine, PUCRS School of Medicine, Porto Alegre, 2Division of Clinical Oncology, Instituto Nacional do Câncer, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 3Clinical Oncology, Alexander Fleming Institute, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 4Department of Medical Oncology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México, Centro Oncológico Issemym Edomex, México; 5Pfizer Oncology, New York, NY, 6Pfizer Oncology, La Jolla, CA, USA Background: Sunitinib is an approved treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC. The safety profile and efficacy of sunitinib were confirmed in a global expanded access trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00130897. This report presents a subanalysis of the final trial data from patients in Latin America.Methods: Treatment-naïve or previously treated mRCC patients aged ≥18 years received oral sunitinib at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off schedule. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. Safety was assessed regularly, and tumor measurements were scheduled per local practice (using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.Results: In total, 348 patients from Latin America received sunitinib. Overall, 75% of patients had two or more sites of metastatic disease, 28% were aged ≥65 years, 14% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2, 9% had brain metastases, 9% had no prior nephrectomy, and 5% had non-clear cell RCC. Median treatment duration was 8 months, and median follow-up was 15.1 months. In total, 326 patients (94% discontinued treatment, primarily due to death (41% or lack of efficacy (22%. Most treatment-related adverse events were of mild to moderate severity (grade 1/2. Mucosal inflammation (reported in 54% of patients, diarrhea (53%, and asthenia (41% were the most common any-grade treatment

  4. The impact of expanding the numbers of clinical nurse specialists in cancer care: a United Kingdom case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A

    2000-12-01

    In the last few years there has been an increase in the number of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) working in cancer care throughout the UK. This paper examines the issues raised by the proliferation of site-specific cancer CNS posts, developed to give a 'nursing lead' for a particular tumour type. The issues common to all CNS posts are exacerbated when a number of specialists are involved in the cancer journey, causing potential fragmentation and confusion. Key issues need to be addressed if the role is to remain credible, and ensure clarity for patients and the multiprofessional team. These include role clarification, sensitive integration, interface with other cancer CNSs and the multiprofessional team, evaluation, cost, education and training, recruitment and succession planning and the 'career cul-de-sac'. Cancer nursing's response to these challenges will set the professional agenda for education, training and future models of service delivery. PMID:12849018

  5. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stents in palliation of malignant anastomotic strictures caused by recurrent gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Kyung Cho; Sang Woo Kim; Kwan Woo Nam; Jae Hyuck Chang; Jae Myung Park; Jeong-Jo Jeong; In Seok Lee; Myung-Gyu Choi; In-Sik Chung

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the technical feasibility and clinical outcomes of the endoscopic insertion of a selfexpandable metal stent (SEMS) for the palliation of a malignant anastomotic stricture caused by recurrent gastric cancer. METHODS: The medical records of patients, who had obstructive symptoms caused by a malignant anastomotic stricture after gastric surgery and underwent endoscopic insertion of a SEMS from January 2001 to December 2007 at Kangnam St Mary's Hospital, were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: Twenty patients (15 male, mean age 63 years) were included. The operations were a total gastrectomy with esophagojejunostomy ( n = 12), subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth-Ⅰ reconstruction ( n = 2) and subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth- Ⅱ reconstruction ( n = 8). The technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 70%, respectively. A small bowel or colon stricture was the reason for a lack of improvement in symptoms in 4 patients. Two of these patients showed improvement in symptoms after another stent was placed. Stent reobstruction caused by tumor ingrowth or overgrowth occurred in 3 patients (15%) within 1 mo after stenting. Stent migration occurred with a covered stent in 3 patients who underwent a subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth-Ⅱ reconstruction. Two cases of partial stent migration were easily treated with a second stent or stent repositioning. The median stent patency was 56 d (range, 5-439 d). The median survival was 83 d (range, 12-439 d). CONCLUSION: Endoscopic insertion of a SEMS provides safe and effective palliation of a recurrent anastomotic stricture caused by gastric cancer. A meticulous evaluation of the presence of other strictures before inserting the stent is essential for symptom improvement.

  6. Expanding the clinical phenotype of the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome and characterization of the reciprocal microduplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Christopher A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial deletions of 3q29 have been recently described as a microdeletion syndrome mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats resulting in an ~1.6 Mb common-sized deletion. Given the molecular mechanism causing the deletion, the reciprocal duplication is anticipated to occur with equal frequency, although only one family with this duplication has been reported. Results In this study we describe 14 individuals with microdeletions of 3q29, including one family with a mildly affected mother and two affected children, identified among 14,698 individuals with idiopathic mental retardation who were analyzed by array CGH. Eleven individuals had typical 1.6-Mb deletions. Three individuals had deletions that flank, span, or partially overlap the commonly deleted region. Although the clinical presentations of individuals with typical-sized deletions varied, several features were present in multiple individuals, including mental retardation and microcephaly. We also identified 19 individuals with duplications of 3q29, five of which appear to be the reciprocal duplication product of the 3q29 microdeletion and 14 of which flank, span, or partially overlap the common deletion region. The clinical features of individuals with microduplications of 3q29 also varied with few common features. De novo and inherited abnormalities were found in both the microdeletion and microduplication cohorts illustrating the need for parental samples to fully characterize these abnormalities. Conclusion Our report demonstrates that array CGH is especially suited to identify chromosome abnormalities with unclear or variable presentations.

  7. Expanding the clinical spectrum of the 16p11.2 chromosomal rearrangements: three patients with syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Christian P; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Nowell, Kerri P; Hunter, Jill V; Aleck, Kirk A; Cox, Sarah; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shinawi, Marwan

    2011-02-01

    16p11.2 rearrangements are associated with developmental delay, cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral problems (especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), seizures, obesity, dysmorphic features, and abnormal head size. In addition, congenital anomalies and abnormal brain findings were frequently observed in patients with these rearrangements. We identified and performed a detailed microarray, phenotypic, and radiological characterization of three new patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements: two deletion patients and one patient with the reciprocal duplication. All patients have a heterozygous loss (deletion) or gain (duplication) corresponding to chromosomal coordinates (chr16: 29 528 190-30 107 184) with a minimal size of 579 kb. The deletion patients had language delay and learning disabilities and one met criteria for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. The duplication patient received a diagnosis of autism and had academic deficits and behavioral problems. The patients with deletion had long cervicothoracic syringomyelia and the duplication patient had long thoracolumbar syringomyelia. The syringomyelia in one patient with deletion was associated with Chiari malformation. Our findings highlight the broad spectrum of clinical and neurological manifestations in patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements. Our observation suggests that genes (or a single gene) within the implicated interval have significant roles in the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. A more comprehensive and systematic research is warranted to study the frequency and spectrum of malformations in the central nervous system in these patients.

  8. Rapamycin combined with allogenic immature dendritic cells selectively expands CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-YingWang; QiZhang; YangYang; Wen-JieChen; WeiLiu; NanJiang; Gui-HuaChen

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendriticcells(DCs)caninitiatetheexpansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play an indispensable role in inducing transplantation tolerance. Some studies have investigated the effect of the immunosuppressant rapamycin (Rapa) on Tregs in vitro. However, the in vivo effect of Rapa combined with immature DCs (iDCs) on Tregs is unknown. This study was undertaken to determine whether allogenic iDCs combined with a short course of Rapa have the ability to selectivelyexpandtheCD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregsinarat model. METHODS: Brown Norway rats were injected intravenously with 2×106 Lewis iDCs followed by 1 mg/kg per day Rapa intraperitoneally for 7 consecutive days. On day 8, the levels of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in peripheral blood and spleen cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. IL-2, IL-4, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ levels in serum were assessed by ELISA. The experimental animals were divided into four groups: control, Rapa-treated, iDC-treated,andcombination-treated. RESULTS: CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs comprised 7%-8% of CD4+T cells in control rats. Rapa combined with iDCs enhanced this percentage in the peripheral blood and spleen. However, the levels of Tregs did not significantly change after treatment with Rapa or iDCs alone. The levels of CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ T cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3- T cells in CD4+ T cells did not significantly change in the combined group. The TGF-β1 level in serum from the combined group increased significantly compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: A significantly higher percentage of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs was found in rats treated with allogenic iDCs and a short course of Rapa, along with an increase in the TGF-β1 level in serum. This improved protocol may be a promising therapeutic strategy to increase Tregs, which are beneficial to the induction of peritransplant tolerance.

  9. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiao

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  10. An expanded model of HIV cell entry phenotype based on multi-parameter single-cell data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozek Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 into the host cell involves interactions between the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env and the cellular receptor CD4 as well as a coreceptor molecule (most importantly CCR5 or CXCR4. Viral preference for a specific coreceptor (tropism is in particular determined by the third variable loop (V3 of the Env glycoprotein gp120. The approval and use of a coreceptor antagonist for antiretroviral therapy make detailed understanding of tropism and its accurate prediction from patient derived virus isolates essential. The aim of the present study is the development of an extended description of the HIV entry phenotype reflecting its co-dependence on several key determinants as the basis for a more accurate prediction of HIV-1 entry phenotype from genotypic data. Results Here, we established a new protocol of quantitation and computational analysis of the dependence of HIV entry efficiency on receptor and coreceptor cell surface levels as well as viral V3 loop sequence and the presence of two prototypic coreceptor antagonists in varying concentrations. Based on data collected at the single-cell level, we constructed regression models of the HIV-1 entry phenotype integrating the measured determinants. We developed a multivariate phenotype descriptor, termed phenotype vector, which facilitates a more detailed characterization of HIV entry phenotypes than currently used binary tropism classifications. For some of the tested virus variants, the multivariant phenotype vector revealed substantial divergences from existing tropism predictions. We also developed methods for computational prediction of the entry phenotypes based on the V3 sequence and performed an extrapolating calculation of the effectiveness of this computational procedure. Conclusions Our study of the HIV cell entry phenotype and the novel multivariate representation developed here contributes to a more detailed

  11. Expanding horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Editor

    2009-01-01

    Dear Friends, The debate of whether Stem Cell Therapy is a hype or hope has been raging for quite some time and has been rekindled in the current year. Stem Cell Scientists have been particularly enthused by the bold standard taken by Barack Obama in passing an Executive Order that lifted the ban on federal funding of Research on Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) lines created after August 9, 2001. With the lifting of the ban more money is expected to be poured into ESC and Stem Cell Research in gene...

  12. Safety and efficacy of sunitinib in patients from Latin America: subanalysis of an expanded access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Carlos H; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Chacón, Matías; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula; Sajben, Peter; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is an approved treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The safety profile and efficacy of sunitinib were confirmed in a global expanded access trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00130897). This report presents a subanalysis of the final trial data from patients in Latin America. Methods Treatment-naïve or previously treated mRCC patients aged ≥18 years received oral sunitinib at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off schedule. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. Safety was assessed regularly, and tumor measurements were scheduled per local practice (using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). Results In total, 348 patients from Latin America received sunitinib. Overall, 75% of patients had two or more sites of metastatic disease, 28% were aged ≥65 years, 14% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2, 9% had brain metastases, 9% had no prior nephrectomy, and 5% had non-clear cell RCC. Median treatment duration was 8 months, and median follow-up was 15.1 months. In total, 326 patients (94%) discontinued treatment, primarily due to death (41%) or lack of efficacy (22%). Most treatment-related adverse events were of mild to moderate severity (grade 1/2). Mucosal inflammation (reported in 54% of patients), diarrhea (53%), and asthenia (41%) were the most common any-grade treatment-related adverse events. Asthenia (12%), neutropenia (10%), and fatigue and thrombocytopenia (both 9%) were the most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events. In total, 311 patients were included for tumor response, of whom eight (3%) had a complete response and 46 (15%) a partial response, yielding an objective response rate of 17%. Median duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 26.7, 12.1, and 16.9 months, respectively. Conclusion The efficacy and safety profile of sunitinib in patients with m

  13. Expanding horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Friends, The debate of whether Stem Cell Therapy is a hype or hope has been raging for quite some time and has been rekindled in the current year. Stem Cell Scientists have been particularly enthused by the bold standard taken by Barack Obama in passing an Executive Order that lifted the ban on federal funding of Research on Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC lines created after August 9, 2001. With the lifting of the ban more money is expected to be poured into ESC and Stem Cell Research in general and this augurs well for this emerging science. This is hope. Amariglio et al have reported the occurrence of a multifocal brain tumor in a boy with ataxia telengectasia four years after he was treated with intracerebella and intrathecal injection of human fetal neural stem cells. Molecular and Cytogenetic studies showed that the tumor was of non host origin raising the possibility of it being derived from transplanted neural stem cell. This is the first report of a donor-derived brain tumor in neural stem cell therapy and opens a Pandora’s Box of questions about the safety of such therapies. This signifies the hype surrounding the therapy. However controversies are a part of any emerging science. Our goals should be to march forward conducting our research under strict ethical principles and rigorous oversight, ironing out even minor flaws, always being on the lookout for adverse events and identifying ways and means of preventing their occurrence in future. JSRM has been in receipt of six articles, which speaks well for the interest people have for stem cell science in general and our journal in particular. The articles we have received for this edition of JSRM cover all aspects necessary for a science. Rosen et al have described the percentage variation of adipose stromal cells isolated from two different inbred mouse strains and Bhonde et al have reported the existence of multipotent stem cells in human fallopian tube. If cells can be identified

  14. Measuring and Predicting Prostate Cancer Related Quality of Life Changes using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Jonathan J.; Sanda, Martin G.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Wei, John T.; Litwin, Mark S.; Crociani, Catrina M.; Regan, Meredith M.; Chang, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To expand the clinical usefulness of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) by evaluating its responsiveness to health related quality of life (HRQOL) changes, defining the minimally important differences (MID) for an individual patient's change in each domain, and applying it to a sexual outcome prediction model. Methods In 1,201 subjects from a previously described multi-center, longitudinal cohort, we modeled each treatment group's EPIC-CP domain scores at pre-treatment, short-term, and long-term follow-up. We considered post-treatment domain score changes from pre-treatment ≥ 0.5 standard deviations (SD) clinically significant and with a p-value ≤ 0.01 as statistically significant. We determined domain MIDs using the 0.5 pooled SD of the 2, 6, 12, and 24 month post-treatment changes from pre-treatment. We recalibrated an EPIC-CP-based nomogram model predicting 2-year post-prostatectomy functional erections from that developed using EPIC-26. Results For every HRQOL domain, EPIC-CP was sensitive to similar post-treatment HRQOL changes over time as had been observed using EPIC-26. The EPIC-CP MIDs for changes in the urinary incontinence, urinary irritation/obstruction, bowel, sexual, and vitality/hormonal domains are 1.0, 1.3, 1.2, 1.6, and 1.0, respectively. The EPIC-CP-based sexual prediction model performs well (AUC=0.76) and shows robust agreement with its EPIC-26-based counterpart, with predicted probability differences between models of ≤10% for 95% of individuals and a mean difference of 0.0 (SD=0.05) across all individuals. Conclusions EPIC-CP is responsive to HRQOL changes during convalescence, and can be used to predict 2-year post-prostatectomy sexual outcomes. Its use can facilitate shared medical decision-making and patient-centered care. PMID:24076307

  15. De novo mutations in beta-catenin (CTNNB1) appear to be a frequent cause of intellectual disability: expanding the mutational and clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Alma; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Albrecht, Beate; Bacino, Carlos A; Bartholomew, Dennis W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van den Boogaard, Marie Jose H; Bramswig, Nuria; Büttner, Christian; Cremer, Kirsten; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Engels, Hartmut; van Gassen, Koen; Graf, Elisabeth; van Haelst, Mieke; He, Weimin; Hogue, Jacob S; Kempers, Marlies; Koolen, David; Monroe, Glen; de Munnik, Sonja; Pastore, Matthew; Reis, André; Reuter, Miriam S; Tegay, David H; Veltman, Joris; Visser, Gepke; van Hasselt, Peter; Smeets, Eric E J; Vissers, Lisenka; Wieland, Thomas; Wissink, Willemijn; Yntema, Helger; Zink, Alexander Michael; Strom, Tim M; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, de novo heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in beta-catenin (CTNNB1) were described for the first time in four individuals with intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, limited speech and (progressive) spasticity, and functional consequences of CTNNB1 deficiency were characterized in a mouse model. Beta-catenin is a key downstream component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Somatic gain-of-function mutations have already been found in various tumor types, whereas germline loss-of-function mutations in animal models have been shown to influence neuronal development and maturation. We report on 16 additional individuals from 15 families in whom we newly identified de novo loss-of-function CTNNB1 mutations (six nonsense, five frameshift, one missense, two splice mutation, and one whole gene deletion). All patients have ID, motor delay and speech impairment (both mostly severe) and abnormal muscle tone (truncal hypotonia and distal hypertonia/spasticity). The craniofacial phenotype comprised microcephaly (typically -2 to -4 SD) in 12 of 16 and some overlapping facial features in all individuals (broad nasal tip, small alae nasi, long and/or flat philtrum, thin upper lip vermillion). With this detailed phenotypic characterization of 16 additional individuals, we expand and further establish the clinical and mutational spectrum of inactivating CTNNB1 mutations and thereby clinically delineate this new CTNNB1 haploinsufficiency syndrome.

  16. Clinical outcomes of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients with brain metastasis treated with lapatinib and capecitabine: an open-label expanded access study in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ro Jungsil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate efficacy in patients with brain metastasis (BM on entry into the lapatinib expanded access program (LEAP. Methods LEAP is a worldwide, single-arm, open-label study. HER2-positive, locally-advanced or metastatic breast cancer patients with progression after an anthracycline, taxane, and trastuzumab were eligible. Patients received capecitabine 2000 mg/m2 daily in two divided doses, days 1–14, every 21 days and lapatinib 1250 mg once daily. Results Among 186 patients enrolled in 6 Korean centers, 58 had BM. Progression-free survival (PFS was 18.7 weeks in patients with BM and 19.4 weeks without BM (P = 0.88. In patients with BM, brain response was synchronized with systemic responses (P = 0.0001. Overall survival (OS was 48.9 weeks in patients with BM and 64.6 weeks without BM (P = 0.23. Multivariable analysis found hormone receptor positivity (P = 0.003 and clinical benefit rate (CBR of combined systemic and brain disease (P  Conclusion Lapatinib plus capecitabine is equally effective in patients with or without BM. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00338247

  17. Clinical Outcome after the Use of a New Craniocaudal Expandable Implant for Vertebral Compression Fracture Treatment: One Year Results from a Prospective Multicentric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Noriega

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this prospective multicentric observational study was to confirm the safety and clinical performance of a craniocaudal expandable implant used in combination with high viscosity PMMA bone cement for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Thirty-nine VCFs in 32 patients were treated using the SpineJack minimally invasive surgery protocol. Outcome was determined by using the Visual Analogue Scale for measuring pain, the Oswestry Disability Index for scoring functional capacity, and the self-reporting European Quality of Life scores for the quality of life. Safety was evaluated by reporting all adverse events. The occurrence of cement leakages was assessed by either radiographs or CT scan or both. Statistically significant improvements were found regarding pain, function, and quality of life. The global pain score reduction at 1 year was 80.9% compared to the preoperative situation and the result of the Oswestry Disability Index showed a decrease from 65.0% at baseline to 10.5% at 12 months postoperatively. The cement leakage rate was 30.8%. No device- or surgery-related complications were found. This observational study demonstrates promising and persistent results consisting of immediate and sustained pain relief and durable clinical improvement after the procedure and throughout the 1-year follow-up period.

  18. A new self-expanding nitinol stent (Enterprise) for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms: initial clinical and angiographic results in 31 aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Werner; Kuehne, Dietmar [Alfried Krupp Hospital, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Bendszus, Martin; Solymosi, Laszlo [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kis, Bernhard [University of Duisburg-Essen, Research Unit, Rheinische Kliniken Essen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Essen (Germany); Boulanger, Thierry [Centre Hospitalier of Luxembourg, Service of Neuroradiology, Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    2007-07-15

    We report the results of a prospective clinical study using a new self-expanding nitinol stent (Enterprise) designed for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We treated 31 saccular, wide-necked intracranial aneurysms in 30 patients. Ten aneurysms had recanalized after prior endovascular treatment without a stent, and 21 aneurysms had not been treated before. Stent deployment was successful in all procedures. Additional coil embolization was performed in all aneurysms. Initial complete angiographic occlusion was achieved in 6 aneurysms, a neck remnant was left in 18 aneurysms and there were 7 residual aneurysms. Angiographic follow-up examinations of 30 lesions after 6 months demonstrated 15 complete occlusions, 8 neck remnants and 7 residual aneurysms. One patient refused the 6-month angiographic follow-up. Spontaneous occlusion of the aneurysm had occurred in 14 patients, and 6 aneurysms showed recanalization. Four of these residual aneurysms were retreated. At the 6-month follow-up, 29 parent arteries were unaffected, whereas two parent vessels demonstrated minor asymptomatic narrowing at the stent site. Two patients experienced one or more possible or probable device-related serious adverse events during the 6-month follow-up period. There was no procedural morbidity or mortality at 6 months after the procedure. The reported results demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the Cordis Neurovascular Enterprise stent in the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Initial clinical and angiographic results are favorable. (orig.)

  19. A new self-expanding nitinol stent (Enterprise) for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms: initial clinical and angiographic results in 31 aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of a prospective clinical study using a new self-expanding nitinol stent (Enterprise) designed for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We treated 31 saccular, wide-necked intracranial aneurysms in 30 patients. Ten aneurysms had recanalized after prior endovascular treatment without a stent, and 21 aneurysms had not been treated before. Stent deployment was successful in all procedures. Additional coil embolization was performed in all aneurysms. Initial complete angiographic occlusion was achieved in 6 aneurysms, a neck remnant was left in 18 aneurysms and there were 7 residual aneurysms. Angiographic follow-up examinations of 30 lesions after 6 months demonstrated 15 complete occlusions, 8 neck remnants and 7 residual aneurysms. One patient refused the 6-month angiographic follow-up. Spontaneous occlusion of the aneurysm had occurred in 14 patients, and 6 aneurysms showed recanalization. Four of these residual aneurysms were retreated. At the 6-month follow-up, 29 parent arteries were unaffected, whereas two parent vessels demonstrated minor asymptomatic narrowing at the stent site. Two patients experienced one or more possible or probable device-related serious adverse events during the 6-month follow-up period. There was no procedural morbidity or mortality at 6 months after the procedure. The reported results demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the Cordis Neurovascular Enterprise stent in the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Initial clinical and angiographic results are favorable. (orig.)

  20. In vivo infiltration of mononuclear cells in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck correlates with the ability to expand tumour-infiltrating T cells in vitro and with the expression of MHC class I antigens on tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, J; Rasmussen, N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1994-01-01

    A series of 18 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, 6 primary and 12 recurrent, were investigated for tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells with monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Our results suggest that the number of T cells at the tumour edge in vivo correlates well with their abi......A series of 18 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, 6 primary and 12 recurrent, were investigated for tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells with monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Our results suggest that the number of T cells at the tumour edge in vivo correlates well...... with their ability to expand in vitro in the presence of high-dose interleukin-2 (2000 U/ml). High MHC class I antigen expression on tumour cells was found to be positively correlated with p53 overexpression, suggesting that p53-derived peptides, wild-type or mutated ones, presented by MHC class I antigens......, are potential targets for MHC-restricted cytotoxic T cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. However, lack of correlation between peritumoural T cell infiltration in vivo and T cell expansion in vitro, on the one hand, and p53 overexpression on tumour cells, on the other hand, suggests absence of p53...

  1. Translation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: From Clinical Trial in a Dish to Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Nazish; Liu, Chun; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-05-10

    The prospect of changing the plasticity of terminally differentiated cells toward pluripotency has completely altered the outlook for biomedical research. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a new source of therapeutic cells free from the ethical issues or immune barriers of human embryonic stem cells. iPSCs also confer considerable advantages over conventional methods of studying human diseases. Since its advent, iPSC technology has expanded with 3 major applications: disease modeling, regenerative therapy, and drug discovery. Here we discuss, in a comprehensive manner, the recent advances in iPSC technology in relation to basic, clinical, and population health.

  2. US stem cell clinics, patient safety, and the FDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2015-05-01

    Scholarship on patients accessing unproven stem cell interventions is dominated by research addressing 'stem cell tourism' to such countries as China, India, Mexico, and the Ukraine. However, clinics marketing 'adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatments' are proliferating across the USA. These businesses typically claim to operate in compliance with federal regulations, but careful review of their commercial practices suggests that such clinics are marketing unapproved and noncompliant biological drugs. PMID:25945404

  3. PIGMENTED BASAL CELL CARCINOMA: A RARE CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL VARIANT

    OpenAIRE

    Chandralekha; Vijaya Bhaskar; Bhagyalakshmi; Sudhakar; Sumanlatha

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumour of skin , commonly referred to as „rodent ulcer‟. It is common in the head and neck region. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits inc reased pigmentation. It is a rare variant that can clinically mimic malignant melanoma. It is more common in males than females. Herein , we are...

  4. Clinical utility of circulating tumor cell counting through CellSearch®: the dilemma of a concept suspended in Limbo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondi C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Raimondi,1 Angela Gradilone,1 Giuseppe Naso,2 Enrico Cortesi,2 Paola Gazzaniga1 1Dipartimento Medicina Molecolare, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Oncologiche e Anatomopatologiche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy Abstract: To date, 10 years after the first demonstration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer using the US Food and Drug Administration–cleared system CellSearch®, the potential utility of CTCs in early clinical development of drugs, their role as a surrogate marker of response to therapy, and their molecular analysis for patient stratification for targeted therapies are still major unsolved questions. Great expectations are pinned on the ongoing interventional trials aimed to demonstrate that CTCs might be of value for guiding treatment of patients and predicting cancer progression. To fill the gap between theory and practice with regard to the clinical utility of CTCs, a bridge is needed, taking into account innovative design for clinical trials, a revised definition of traditional CTCs, next-generation CTC technology, the potential clinical application of CTC analysis in non-validated settings of disease, and finally, expanding the number of patients enrolled in the studies. In this regard, the results of the first European pooled analysis definitely validated the independent prognostic value of CTC counting in metastatic breast cancer patients. Keywords: CTC, clinical trials, prognosis

  5. Safety of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs hold great promise as therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine and autoimmune diseases, based on their differentiation abilities and immunosuppressive properties. However, the therapeutic applications raise a series of questions about the safety of culture-expanded MSCs for human use. This paper summarized recent findings about safety issues of MSCs, in particular their genetic stability in long-term in vitro expansion, their cryopreservation, banking, and the role of serum in the preparation of MSCs.

  6. Stem Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disorders - Our Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishnan AG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autologous Bone Marrow stem Cell transplantation is a viable therapeutic option for patients with end stage heart failure due to cardiomyopathy of varied etiology as there are only limited treatment options other than cardiac transplantation. The rationale behind the application of stem cells in these patients include • Stem cells directly replace the affected cells by differentiation into the damaged cell type • Stem cells also exert Paracrine effects by secre tion of growth factors (VGEF,FGF-1to stimu late local cell growth•In addition to the above, stem cells release signaling factors which recruit stem cells from elsewhere by modulating the immune system.Materials and Methods: In this presentation we describe our study on a series of 13 patients who received isolated and expanded CD 34 cells from the bone marrow. Seven had ischemic dysfunction, three had dilated cardiomyopathy and three had primary pulmonary hypertension. Five patients received the stem cells via intracoronary injection, three directly into the myocardium and three intrapulmonary. Results: All patients showed functional improvement of the myocardium recorded by non-invasive investigations and improvement in the quality of life. Follow up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years. Conclusion: Our experience with bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with cardiomyopathy has been encouraging. More studies are planned in the future.

  7. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor presenting as a parotid gland mass: Expanding the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions in salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT are rare benign soft tissue tumors affecting mostly young adults. The most common affected sites include the knee, ankle, elbow, shoulder, and fingers. The temporomandibular joint is occasionally affected. Herein, we report a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian male who presented clinically with a parotid gland mass. The initial clinical and radiological work-up failed to reveal any involvement of the adjacent temporomandibular joint. Fine-needle aspiration revealed a cellular tumor composed of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells with fibrosis and hemosiderin deposition. This was subsequently found to be a TGCT arising from the temporomandibular joint. Giant cell-rich lesions are uncommon in salivary glands. Herein, we describe the cytomorphology and clinico-radiographic features of this tumor with emphasis on the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions presenting in salivary glands. Despite its rare occurrence, this entity should be considered when giant cells are prominent in specimens acquired from this location.

  8. Management of malignant biliary obstruction: Technical and clinical results using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent after 6-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-fluorinated ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction. Eighty consecutive patients with malignant common bile duct strictures were treated by placement of 83 covered metallic stents. The stent-graft consists of an inner ePTFE/FEP lining and an outer supporting structure of nitinol wire. Clinical evaluation, assessment of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels were analyzed before biliary drainage, before stent-graft placement and during the follow-up period at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Technical success was obtained in all cases. After a mean follow-up of 6.9±4.63 months, the 30-day mortality rate was 14.2%. Survival rates were 40% and 20.2% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Stent-graft patency rates were 95.5%, 92.6% and 85.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications occurred in five patients (6.4%); among these, acute cholecystitis was observed in three patients (3.8%). A stent-graft occlusion rate of 9% was observed. The percentage of patients undergoing lifetime palliation (91%) and the midterm patency rate suggest that placement of this ePTFE/FEP-covered stent-graft is safe and highly effective in achieving biliary drainage in patients with malignant strictures of the common bile duct. (orig.)

  9. Management of malignant biliary obstruction: Technical and clinical results using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent after 6-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Bezzi, Mario; Rossi, Plinio; Allegritti, Massimiliano; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-fluorinated ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction. Eighty consecutive patients with malignant common bile duct strictures were treated by placement of 83 covered metallic stents. The stent-graft consists of an inner ePTFE/FEP lining and an outer supporting structure of nitinol wire. Clinical evaluation, assessment of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels were analyzed before biliary drainage, before stent-graft placement and during the follow-up period at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Technical success was obtained in all cases. After a mean follow-up of 6.9{+-}4.63 months, the 30-day mortality rate was 14.2%. Survival rates were 40% and 20.2% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Stent-graft patency rates were 95.5%, 92.6% and 85.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications occurred in five patients (6.4%); among these, acute cholecystitis was observed in three patients (3.8%). A stent-graft occlusion rate of 9% was observed. The percentage of patients undergoing lifetime palliation (91%) and the midterm patency rate suggest that placement of this ePTFE/FEP-covered stent-graft is safe and highly effective in achieving biliary drainage in patients with malignant strictures of the common bile duct. (orig.)

  10. Novel serial positive enrichment technology enables clinical multiparameter cell sorting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stemberger

    Full Text Available A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4(high/CD25(high/CD45RA(high 'regulatory T cells' and CD8(high/CD62L(high/CD45RA(neg 'central memory T cells', have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research.

  11. Canine pluripotent stem cells: Are they ready for clinical applications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Harvey Betts

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The derivation of canine embryonic stem cells and generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells are significant achievements that have unlocked the potential for developing novel cell-based disease models, drug discovery platforms and transplantation therapies in the dog. A progression from concept to cure in this clinically relevant companion animal will not only help our canine patients but also help advance human regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, many issues remain to be resolved before pluripotent cells can be used clinically in a safe and reproducible manner.

  12. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William H. D. Hallett; William J. Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  13. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis.

  14. Clinical implications of immunologic phenotyping in cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderheid, E C; Tan, E; Sobel, E L; Schwab, E; Micaily, B; Jegasothy, B V

    1987-07-01

    The composition of cutaneous lesions from 158 patients with confirmed cutaneous T cell lymphoma, 91 patients with suspected cutaneous T cell lymphoma, and 145 patients with lymphoid disorders other than cutaneous T cell lymphoma was quantitated in situ with the use of commercially available murine monoclonal antibodies that identify the Pan T, T-helper/inducer (Th), T cytotoxic/suppressor (Ts), and Pan B lymphocyte subsets. On average, cutaneous infiltrates of confirmed cutaneous T cell lymphoma were found to contain significantly more Th and less Ts or Pan B cells compared to benign lymphoid disorders. Moreover, when analyzed in terms of the type of lesion examined by biopsy, the absolute amount of Th cells progressively expands with increasing magnitudes of infiltrate in the dermis while the amount of Ts and Pan B cells remains relatively constant among lesions. A useful diagnostic criterion (anti-Leu 1/4 greater than or equal to 70% and anti-Leu 3a/anti-Leu 2a ratio greater than or equal to 6) correctly discriminated between cutaneous T cell lymphoma and non-cutaneous T cell lymphoma in 87.5% of cases. A positive immunodiagnostic result also may be useful for the prediction of subsequent histopathologic confirmation of cutaneous T cell lymphoma in patients who have suspect lymphoid infiltrates, such as alopecia mucinosis or idiopathic generalized erythroderma, when first seen. With the use of multivariate analysis, stage and possibly the percentage of Th cells within the T cell component in cutaneous infiltrates were covariates with significant relationships to survival in patients with confirmed cutaneous T cell lymphoma. In addition, Ts cells in infiltrates did not correlate significantly with observed responses to topical treatment and subsequent course in pretumorous mycosis fungoides. These results indicate that Ts cells play little biologic role in modifying the natural history of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

  15. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...

  16. Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma:clinical analysis of 42 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma(AITL).Methods The clinical features and prognostic factors of 42 cases newly diagnosed as AITL at Peking University Cancer Hospital from January 2007 to August 2012 were retrospectively analyzed.Results Their median age was 59(34-76)

  17. Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Christof; Klose, Kristin; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    Regenerative medicine encompasses "tissue engineering" - the in vitro fabrication of tissues and/or organs using scaffold material and viable cells - and "cell therapy" - the transplantation or manipulation of cells in diseased tissue in vivo. In the cardiovascular system, tissue engineering strategies are being pursued for the development of viable replacement blood vessels, heart valves, patch material, cardiac pacemakers and contractile myocardium. Anecdotal clinical applications of such vessels, valves and patches have been described, but information on systematic studies of the performance of such implants is not available, yet. Cell therapy for cardiovascular regeneration, however, has been performed in large series of patients, and numerous clinical studies have produced sometimes conflicting results. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical experience with cell therapy for diseases of the cardiovascular system, and to analyse possible factors that may influence its outcome.

  18. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Song [Department of Lung Cancer Surgery, Lung Cancer Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, 300052 Tianjin (China); Stem Cell Laboratory-Division Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Department of Hematology and Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)-Myeloma Center, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); De Becker, Ann [Stem Cell Laboratory-Division Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); De Raeve, Hendrik [Department of Anatomopathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)-Myeloma Center, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.vanriet@uzbrussel.be [Stem Cell Laboratory-Division Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Department of Hematology and Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)-Myeloma Center, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  19. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. ► Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. ► Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(−)/Wnt(−) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  20. Stem cells in clinical practice: applications and warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Beniamino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cells are a relevant source of information about cellular differentiation, molecular processes and tissue homeostasis, but also one of the most putative biological tools to treat degenerative diseases. This review focuses on human stem cells clinical and experimental applications. Our aim is to take a correct view of the available stem cell subtypes and their rational use in the medical area, with a specific focus on their therapeutic benefits and side effects. We have reviewed the main clinical trials dividing them basing on their clinical applications, and taking into account the ethical issue associated with the stem cell therapy. Methods We have searched Pubmed/Medline for clinical trials, involving the use of human stem cells, using the key words "stem cells" combined with the key words "transplantation", "pathology", "guidelines", "properties" and "risks". All the relevant clinical trials have been included. The results have been divided into different categories, basing on the way stem cells have been employed in different pathological conditions.

  1. In vivo tumorigenesis was observed after injection of in vitro expanded neural crest stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien; Christophe Poulet; Virginie Neirinckx; Benoit Hennuy; Swingland, James T.; Emerence Laudet; Lukas Sommer; Olga Shakova; Vincent Bours; Bernard Rogister

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the ...

  2. Stem-Cell Work Yielding New Approach to Disease: Induced Pluripotent Stem-Cell Research Soars, Spurring Dreams of Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stem cells escalated in 2006 when scientists figured out how to reprogram some specialized adult cells to assume a stem-cell-like state. Called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), these cells opened the door to a range of potential applications, including generating cells and tissues to replace those that are faulty or missing in patients with cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or other maladies (Figure 1). Visions of new treatments and even cures for debilitating and fatal illnesses proliferated, and some of that work is well under way (see "A Wealth of Research"). Now, ten years later, those visions are looking more like real possibilities as research moves from the lab to the clinic and expands toward a greater understanding of the basic science behind stem cells and its applications. PMID:27414628

  3. Stem-Cell Work Yielding New Approach to Disease: Induced Pluripotent Stem-Cell Research Soars, Spurring Dreams of Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stem cells escalated in 2006 when scientists figured out how to reprogram some specialized adult cells to assume a stem-cell-like state. Called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), these cells opened the door to a range of potential applications, including generating cells and tissues to replace those that are faulty or missing in patients with cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or other maladies (Figure 1). Visions of new treatments and even cures for debilitating and fatal illnesses proliferated, and some of that work is well under way (see "A Wealth of Research"). Now, ten years later, those visions are looking more like real possibilities as research moves from the lab to the clinic and expands toward a greater understanding of the basic science behind stem cells and its applications.

  4. Novel Serial Positive Enrichment Technology Enables Clinical Multiparameter Cell Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschulik, Claudia; Piossek, Christine; Bet, Jeannette; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Schiemann, Matthias; Neuenhahn, Michael; Martin, Klaus; Schlapschy, Martin; Skerra, Arne; Schmidt, Thomas; Edinger, Matthias; Riddell, Stanley R.; Germeroth, Lothar; Busch, Dirk H.

    2012-01-01

    A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve – especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4high/CD25high/CD45RAhigh ‘regulatory T cells’ and CD8high/CD62Lhigh/CD45RAneg ‘central memory T cells’, have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research. PMID:22545138

  5. Expanded clinical evaluation of lovastatin (EXCEL) study results: III. Efficacy in modifying lipoproteins and implications for managing patients with moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, R H; Shear, C L; Chremos, A N; Franklin, F A; Nash, D T; Hurley, D P; Dujovne, C A; Pool, J L; Schnaper, H; Hesney, M

    1991-07-31

    In the multicenter, double-blind EXCEL (Expanded Clinical Evaluation of Lovastatin) study the efficacy of lovastatin in modifying plasma lipids and lipoproteins in 8,245 participants with moderate primary hypercholesterolemia was evaluated. Patients were randomly assigned to 48 weeks of treatment with diet and placebo or diet and lovastatin 20 or 40 mg once a day, or 20 or 40 mg twice a day. At all of these dosages, lovastatin produced substantial dose-dependent reductions in low-density-lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels, averaging 24% (20 mg/day) to 40% (80 mg/day). The magnitude of the effect of this lipoprotein was further reflected by the percentage of patients who achieved National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) goals. In the absence of coronary artery disease (CAD) or two other CAD risk factors, the LDL-cholesterol goal of 4.14 mmol/L (160 mg/dL) was attained by 22% of patients in the placebo group and between 81% (20 mg/day) and 96% (80 mg/day) of those treated with lovastatin. For those with CAD or at least two other CAD risk factors, the LDL-cholesterol goal of 3.36 mmol/L (130 mg/dL) was attained by 4% of placebo patients and between 38% (20 mg/day) and 83% (80 mg/day) of those treated with lovastatin. Lovastatin also increased high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (7-10%) and decreased triglycerides (10-19%) in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, when used as an adjunct to a prudent diet, lovastatin produces favorable changes in the entire lipoprotein profile and is a highly effective agent for managing patients with primary hypercholesterolemia. PMID:1867232

  6. Clinical study of modifying method of sturuing expanded scalp%扩张头皮改良缝合方法临床应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵京玉; 陈敏亮; 赖琳英

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of a modifying method of closing scalp on hair follicle and its clinical effects. Methods We have cut the scalp pararelled the hair growth direction.then pruned the expansion capsule and galea aponeurotica inner scalp margin 1mm,interrupted suturing directly, avoiding hair bulb continuous sutured in scalp. Results From 2010 to 2011,this method have been applied in 56 patients who with expanded flap in head. Follow-up result shows that this method can effectively protect the hair follicle,prevent hair loss and scar formation. Conclusion This new method of sturuing scalp can preventing localized alopecia and scar effectively.%目的:探讨头皮改良缝合方法对毛囊的保护作用及其临床效果.方法:平行于毛发方向切开头皮,将扩张后包膜层或帽状腱膜缘修剪至头皮缘内1mm,拉拢间断缝合,头皮层则避开毛球部间断缝合.结果:2010年~2011年,应用于56例头部扩张皮瓣缝合术患者,术后随访证实此缝合方法能有效的保护毛囊、减少脱发和瘢痕的产生.结论:改良头皮缝合方法可有效减少瘢痕性秃发.

  7. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  8. Human CD117 (cKit+ innate lymphoid cells have a discrete transcriptional profile at homeostasis and are expanded during filarial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Boyd

    Full Text Available Since innate lymphoid cells (ILCs have been found to play a role in the immune response to helminth parasites in rodents, we sought to determine their role in human helminth infection. By developing multicolor flow cytometry-based methods to identify and enumerate circulating ILCs and their subsets, we were able to identify a subset of cKit+ ILCs defined as Lineage (Lin-/CD45+/cKit+/CD127+ that were significantly expanded in the filarial-infected individuals (p=0.0473 as were those cKit+ ILCs that produced IL-13. Additionally, the frequency of these cKit+ ILCs correlated with the frequency of IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells; p=0.025. To investigate the function of cKit+ ILCs, sorted, highly purified human ILCs were subjected to transcriptional profiling by RNAseq and compared to appropriate control cells. These cKit+ ILCs expressed TLRs, a broad range of cytokines/cytokine receptors and MHC Class II molecules suggesting that these ILCs sense pathogens independent of other cell types. Functional analysis revealed expanded cKit+ ILC-specific transcription and ILC-specific microRNA precursors.

  9. Models to Study NK Cell Biology and Possible Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Anthony E; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Aguilar, Ethan G; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes that is due to the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge, indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells, and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models, and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Increased recombinant protein production owing to expanded opportunities for vector integration in high chromosome number Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Noriko; Takahashi, Mai; Ali Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kumamoto, Toshitaka; Frank, Jana; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal instability is a characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cultures of these cells gradually develop heterogeneity even if established from a single cell clone. We isolated cells containing different numbers of chromosomes from a CHO-DG44-based human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF)-producing cell line and found that high chromosome number cells showed higher hGM-CSF productivity. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between chromosome aneuploidy of CHO cells and high recombinant protein-producing cell lines. Distribution and stability of chromosomes were examined in CHO-DG44 cells, and two cell lines expressing different numbers of chromosomes were isolated from the original CHO-DG44 cell line to investigate the effect of aneuploid cells on recombinant protein production. Both cell lines were stably transfected with a vector that expresses immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3), and specific antibody production rates were compared. Cells containing more than 30 chromosomes had higher specific antibody production rates than those with normal chromosome number. Single cell analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (Egfp)-gene transfected cells revealed that increased GFP expression was relative to the number of gene integration sites rather than the difference in chromosome numbers or vector locations. Our results suggest that CHO cells with high numbers of chromosomes contain more sites for vector integration, a characteristic that could be advantageous in biopharmaceutical production.

  11. Increased recombinant protein production owing to expanded opportunities for vector integration in high chromosome number Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Noriko; Takahashi, Mai; Ali Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kumamoto, Toshitaka; Frank, Jana; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal instability is a characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cultures of these cells gradually develop heterogeneity even if established from a single cell clone. We isolated cells containing different numbers of chromosomes from a CHO-DG44-based human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF)-producing cell line and found that high chromosome number cells showed higher hGM-CSF productivity. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between chromosome aneuploidy of CHO cells and high recombinant protein-producing cell lines. Distribution and stability of chromosomes were examined in CHO-DG44 cells, and two cell lines expressing different numbers of chromosomes were isolated from the original CHO-DG44 cell line to investigate the effect of aneuploid cells on recombinant protein production. Both cell lines were stably transfected with a vector that expresses immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3), and specific antibody production rates were compared. Cells containing more than 30 chromosomes had higher specific antibody production rates than those with normal chromosome number. Single cell analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (Egfp)-gene transfected cells revealed that increased GFP expression was relative to the number of gene integration sites rather than the difference in chromosome numbers or vector locations. Our results suggest that CHO cells with high numbers of chromosomes contain more sites for vector integration, a characteristic that could be advantageous in biopharmaceutical production. PMID:26850366

  12. Histological, Immunohistological, and Clinical Features of Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Correlation to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin with high rates of metastasis and poor survival. Its incidence rate rises and is currently about 0.6/100000/year. Clinical differential diagnoses include basal cell carcinoma, cyst, amelanotic melanoma, lymphoma and atypical fibroxanthoma. In this review article clinical, histopathological and immunhistochemical features of Merkel cell carcinoma are reported. In addition, the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus is discussed.

  13. Advancing cell wall inhibitors towards clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioli, Sonia I; Cruz, João C S; Monciardini, Paolo; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Natural products represent a major source of approved drugs and still play an important role in supplying chemical diversity. Consistently, 2014 has seen new, natural product-derived antibiotics approved for human use by the US Food and Drug Administration. One of the recently approved second-generation glycopeptides is dalbavancin, a semi-synthetic derivative of the natural product A40,926. This compound inhibits bacterial growth by binding to lipid intermediate II (Lipid II), a key intermediate in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Like other recently approved antibiotics, dalbavancin has a complex history of preclinical and clinical development, with several companies contributing to different steps in different years. While our work on dalbavancin development stopped at the previous company, intriguingly our current pipeline includes two more Lipid II-binding natural products or derivatives thereof. In particular, we will focus on the properties of NAI-107 and related lantibiotics, which originated from recent screening and characterization efforts. PMID:26515981

  14. Enhancing endothelial progenitor cell for clinical use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) havebeen demonstrated to correlate negatively with vascularendothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors.However, translation of basic research into the clinicalpractice has been limited by the lack of unambiguousand consistent definitions of EPCs and reduced EPCcell number and function in subjects requiring them forclinical use. This article critically reviews the definitionof EPCs based on commonly used protocols, their valueas a biomarker of cardiovascular risk factor in subjectswith cardiovascular disease, and strategies to enhanceEPCs for treatment of ischemic diseases.

  15. Teratomas from pluripotent stem cells: A clinical hurdle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Bongso, Ariff

    2010-11-01

    Although basic research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the laboratory bench has progressed with enviable speed there has been little head way in terms of its clinical application. A look at the Internet however shows several stem cell clinics worldwide offering direct transplantation of undifferentiated hESCs to patients for the cure of a variety of diseases before bona fide evidence-based results can be demonstrated from large controlled studies. This raises concern because reliable protocols have to be first developed to resolve the three major hurdles delaying clinical trials such as inadequate cell numbers, immunorejection and tumorigenesis. Cell expansion methods using bioreactors, rotary culture and mitotic agents have now been developed to generate stem cell derivatives in large numbers. The problem of immunorejection can now be overcome with the development of indirect and direct reprogramming protocols to personalize tissues to patients (human induced pluripotent stem cells, hiPSCs; nuclear transfer stem cells, NTSCs; induced neuronal cells, iN). However, hESC, hiPSC, and NTSCs being pluripotent have the disadvantage of teratoma formation in vivo which has to be carefully addressed so as to provide safe stem cell based therapies to the patient. This review addresses the issue of tumorigenesis and discusses approaches by which this concern may be overcome and at the same time emphasizes the need to concurrently explore alternative stem cell sources that do not confer the disadvantages of pluripotency but are widely multipotent so as to yield safe desirable tissues for clinical application as soon as possible. PMID:20665544

  16. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pleumeekers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. This study evaluated the performance of culture-expanded human chondrocytes from ear (EC, nose (NC and articular joint (AC, as well as bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. All cells (≥ 3 donors per source were culture-expanded, encapsulated in alginate and cultured for 5 weeks. Subsequently, constructs were implanted subcutaneously for 8 additional weeks. Before and after implantation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen content were measured using biochemical assays. Mechanical properties were determined using stress-strain-indentation tests. Hypertrophic differentiation was evaluated with qRT-PCR and subsequent endochondral ossification with histology. ACs had higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other cell sources, as assessed by gene expression and GAG content (p < 0.001. However, after implantation, ACs did not further increase their matrix. In contrast, ECs and NCs continued producing matrix in vivo leading to higher GAG content (p < 0.001 and elastic modulus. For NC-constructs, matrix-deposition was associated with the elastic modulus (R2 = 0.477, p = 0.039. Although all cells – except ACs – expressed markers for hypertrophic differentiation in vitro, there was no bone formed in vivo. Our work shows that cartilage formation and functionality depends on the cell source used. ACs possess the highest chondrogenic capacity in vitro, while ECs and NCs are most potent in vivo, making them attractive cell sources for cartilage repair.

  17. Functional engraftment of colon epithelium expanded in vitro from a single adult Lgr5⁺ stem cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yui, Shiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Sato, Toshiro;

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem-cell therapy holds promise for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Here we describe methods for long-term expansion of colonic stem cells positive for leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5(+) cells) in culture. To test the transplantability of these ...

  18. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  19. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: a model for evaluating and delivering stem cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan; DeWitt, Natalie D; Feigal, Ellen G

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies.

  20. Indeterminate cell histiocytosis that presented clinically as benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimovic, Adele; Chernoff, Karen; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Schaffer, Julie V

    2014-12-16

    Indeterminate cell histiocytosis (ICH) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by immunophenotypic features of both Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-LCH. We describe a 12-month-old boy with a four-month history of asymptomatic, small, pink-tan papules on his face. Histopathologic evaluation showed a superficial, dermal infiltrate of histiocytes that was positive for S100, CD1a, CD68, and Factor XIIIa. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of the clinical presentation of benign cephalic histiocytosis with immunohistochemical findings of ICH. We review the classification of histiocytic disorders and the clinical and immunohistochemical features of both ICH and benign cephalic histiocytosis.

  1. Radiolabelled Autologous Cells: Methods and Standardization for Clinical Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication serves as a useful resource for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, radiopharmacists, pharmacologists and other researchers engaged with radiolabelling of autologous products for clinical application. It provides practical guidelines towards clinical work with radiolabelled autologous products and aims to streamline the variety of strategies that have evolved, for example, in the handling of radiolabelled red and white blood cells. The publication highlights the importance of the quality of radiolabelling services, provides advice on safety issues, and also addresses the use of other radiolabelled autologous products and their translation into the clinical environment

  2. Advances in umbilical cord blood stem cell expansion and clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineault, Nicolas; Abu-Khader, Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with important applications in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, the low numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in banked units remain a major limitation. Protocols developed for HSPC expansion ex vivo or to improve HSPC homing to the marrow represent solutions to overcome this shortcoming. In recent decades, wide arrays of functionally divergent approaches were developed for the amplification of HSPCs. These include optimization of cytokine cocktails, coculture systems, small molecules, and delivery systems for HSPC-expansion genes. Herein, we review past and current strategies, focusing on studies that characterize the contribution of expanded CB HSPC to short- and long-term engraftment in transplantation models or in clinical trials. Also discussed are homing effectors used to promote engraftment. In summary, these studies underscore that early-acting cytokines alone can expand HSPC with short-term engraftment activity, but that robust expansion of HSPCs with long-term engraftment necessitates the synergistic action of multiple HSC-expansion agonists. In support of this, early clinical trials based on cytokine-driven HSPC-expansion protocols delivered disappointing results, whereas recent trials based on the synergistic action of cytokines and HSPC-expansion agonists reported significant improvements in engraftment and therapeutic outcomes. Conversely, molecules that enhance homing of HSPC may represent a complementary approach to improve and perhaps accelerate engraftment. Optimization of the next generation of HSPC-expansion and priming strategies should support a paradigm shift in CB transplantation in which smaller, better matched units may preferentially be used.

  3. CD4+ natural regulatory T cells prevent experimental cerebral malaria via CTLA-4 when expanded in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraful Haque

    Full Text Available Studies in malaria patients indicate that higher frequencies of peripheral blood CD4(+ Foxp3(+ CD25(+ regulatory T (Treg cells correlate with increased blood parasitemia. This observation implies that Treg cells impair pathogen clearance and thus may be detrimental to the host during infection. In C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, depletion of Foxp3(+ cells did not improve parasite control or disease outcome. In contrast, elevating frequencies of natural Treg cells in vivo using IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes resulted in complete protection against severe disease. This protection was entirely dependent upon Foxp3(+ cells and resulted in lower parasite biomass, impaired antigen-specific CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses that would normally promote parasite tissue sequestration in this model, and reduced recruitment of conventional T cells to the brain. Furthermore, Foxp3(+ cell-mediated protection was dependent upon CTLA-4 but not IL-10. These data show that T cell-mediated parasite tissue sequestration can be reduced by regulatory T cells in a mouse model of malaria, thereby limiting malaria-induced immune pathology.

  4. NZ51, a ring-expanded nucleoside analog, inhibits motility and viability of breast cancer cells by targeting the RNA helicase DDX3

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Min; Vesuna, Farhad; Botlagunta, Mahendran; Bol, Guus Martinus; Irving, Ashley; Bergman, Yehudit; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.; Kato, Yoshinori; Winnard, Paul T.; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    DDX3X (DDX3), a human RNA helicase, is over expressed in multiple breast cancer cell lines and its expression levels are directly correlated to cellular aggressiveness. NZ51, a ring-expanded nucleoside analogue (REN) has been reported to inhibit the ATP dependent helicase activity of DDX3. Molecular modeling of NZ51 binding to DDX3 indicated that the 5:7-fused imidazodiazepine ring of NZ51 was incorporated into the ATP binding pocket of DDX3. In this study, we investigated the anticancer prop...

  5. Dendritic Cell Responses to Surface Properties of Clinical Titanium Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kou, Peng Meng; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D; Babensee, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in responding to foreign entities during an innate immune response and initiating effective adaptive immunity as well as maintaining immune tolerance. The sensitivity of DCs to foreign stimuli also makes them useful cells to assess the inflammatory response to biomaterials. Elucidating the material property-DC phenotype relationships using a well-defined biomaterial system is expected to provide criteria for immuno-modulatory biomaterial design. Clinic...

  6. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Immunotherapy Expands and Maintains the Function of High-Affinity Tumor-Infiltrating CD8 T Cells In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Amy E; Polesso, Fanny; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2016-09-15

    Cancer cells harbor high-affinity tumor-associated Ags capable of eliciting potent antitumor T cell responses, yet detecting these polyclonal T cells is challenging. Therefore, surrogate markers of T cell activation such as CD69, CD44, and programmed death-1 (PD-1) have been used. We report in this study that in mice, expression of activation markers including PD-1 is insufficient in the tumor microenvironment to identify tumor Ag-specific T cells. Using the Nur77GFP T cell affinity reporter mouse, we highlight that PD-1 expression can be induced independent of TCR ligation within the tumor. Given this, we characterized the utility of the Nur77GFP model system in elucidating mechanisms of action of immunotherapies independent of PD-1 expression. Coexpression of Nur77GFP and OX40 identifies a polyclonal population of high-affinity tumor-associated Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, which produce more IFN-γ in situ than OX40 negative and doubles in quantity with anti-OX40 and anti-CTLA4 mAb therapy but not with anti-PD-1 or programmed death ligand-1. Moreover, expansion of these high-affinity CD8 T cells prolongs survival of tumor-bearing animals. Upon chronic stimulation in tumors and after adoptive cell therapy, CD8 TCR signaling and Nur77GFP induction is impaired, and tumors progress. However, this can be reversed and overall survival significantly enhanced after adoptive cell therapy with agonist OX40 immunotherapy. Therefore, we propose that OX40 agonist immunotherapy can maintain functional TCR signaling of chronically stimulated tumor-resident CD8 T cells, thereby increasing the frequency of cytotoxic, high-affinity, tumor-associated Ag-specific cells. PMID:27503208

  9. Comparison of TGFbR2 down-regulation in expanded HSCs on MBA/DBM scaffolds coated by UCB stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Zahra Sadat; Moghadam, Mehdi Forouzandeh; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-05-01

    Bone marrow transplants (BMTs) are mainly limited by a low number of CD34(+) cells. The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway downregulation is a key factor that increases cell self-renewal. In nature, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in a microenvironment, surrounded by cells in a three-dimensional (3D) configuration. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between a 3D culture and the delivery ratio of downregulation. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and mineralized bone allograft (MBA) scaffolds were coated using unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) as the feeder layer. Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-CD34(+) cells were then ex vivo expanded in them and transfected by small interfering RNA (siRNA) against TGFbR2, a type 2 receptor in the TGF-β pathway. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR, flow cytometry, and clonogenic assay were performed. In a global comparison, we observed that the highest expansion ratio, lowest expression level, and the highest CD34 marker belonged to the simple 2D culture transfected group. This suggests that TGFbR2 downregulation in a 2D culture can be done more effectively. The siRNA delivery system and the transfection ratio in an ex vivo environment, which mimicks in vivo conditions, have low efficiency. Genetic modification of the cells needs free 3D spaces to enable better transfection.

  10. Valproic acid affects the engraftment of TPO-expanded cord blood cells in NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Barca, Alessandra; Agostini, Francesca; Altieri, Ilaria; Macioce, Giampiero; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Screnci, Maria; De Felice, Lidia; Giampaolo, Adele; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2012-02-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) can improve the long-term outcome of transplanted individuals and reduce the relapse rate. Valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, when combined with different cytokine cocktails, induces the expansion of CD34+ cell populations derived from cord blood (CB) and other sources. We evaluated the effect of VPA, in combination with thrombopoietin (TPO), on the viability and expansion of CB-HSPCs and on short- and long-term engraftability in the NOD/SCID mouse model. In vitro, VPA+TPO inhibited HSPC differentiation and preserved the CD34+ cell fraction; the self-renewal of the CD34+ TPO+VPA-treated cells was suggested by the increased replating efficiency. In vivo, short- and long-term engraftment was determined after 6 and 20 weeks. After 6 weeks, the median chimerism percentage was 13.0% in mice transplanted with TPO-treated cells and only 1.4% in those transplanted with TPO+VPA-treated cells. By contrast, after 20 weeks, the engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells was three times more effective than that induced by TPO alone, and over ten times more effective compared to the short-term engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells. The in vivo results are consistent with the higher secondary plating efficiency of the TPO+VPA-treated cells in vitro. PMID:22166516

  11. [Basal cell carcinoma. Molecular genetics and unusual clinical features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenberger, J

    2007-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Its incidence is steadily increasing. The development of basal cell carcinoma is linked to genetic factors, including the individual skin phototype, as well as the cumulative exposure to UVB. The vast majority of basal cell carcinomas are sporadic tumors, while familial cases associated with certain hereditary syndromes are less common. At the molecular level, basal cell carcinomas are characterized by aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog signaling, usually due to mutations either in the ptch or smoh genes. In addition, about half of the cases carry mutations in the tp53 tumor suppressor gene, which are often UVB-associated C-->T transition mutations. Clinically, basal cell carcinomas may show a high degree of phenotypical variability. In particular, tumors occurring in atypical locations, showing an unusual clinical appearance, or imitating other skin diseases may cause diagnostic problems. This review article summarizes the current state of the art concerning the etiology, predisposition and molecular genetics of basal cell carcinoma. In addition, examples of unusual clinical manifestations are illustrated. PMID:17440702

  12. Breast cancer stem cells: current advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Clouthier, Shawn G; Deol, Yadwinder; Liu, Suling; Nagrath, Sunitha; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, are driven by a population of cells that display stem cell properties. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells, not only drive tumor initiation and growth but also mediate tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. In this chapter, we summarize current advances in CSC research with a major focus on breast CSCs (BCSCs). We review the prevailing methods to isolate and characterize BCSCs and recent evidence documenting their cellular origins and phenotypic plasticity that enables them to transition between mesenchymal and epithelial-like states. We describe in vitro and clinical evidence that these cells mediate metastasis and treatment resistance in breast cancer, the development of novel strategies to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that contain CSCs and the use of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in preclinical breast cancer research. Lastly, we highlight several signaling pathways that regulate BCSC self-renewal and describe clinical implications of targeting these cells for breast cancer treatment. The development of strategies to effectively target BCSCs has the potential to significantly improve the outcomes for patients with breast cancer.

  13. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  14. Imaging retinal ganglion cells: enabling experimental technology for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey A; Chauhan, Balwantray C

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical ophthalmic imaging have enhanced patient care. However, the ability to differentiate retinal neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), would advance many areas within ophthalmology, including the screening and monitoring of glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. Imaging at the single cell level would take diagnostics to the next level. Experimental methods have provided techniques and insight into imaging RGCs, however no method has yet to be translated to clinical application. This review provides an overview of the importance of non-invasive imaging of RGCs and the clinically relevant capabilities. In addition, we report on experimental data from wild-type mice that received an in vivo intravitreal injection of a neuronal tracer that labelled RGCs, which in turn were monitored for up to 100 days post-injection with confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. We were able to demonstrate efficient and consistent RGC labelling with this delivery method and discuss the issue of cell specificity. This type of experimental work is important in progressing towards clinically applicable methods for monitoring loss of RGCs in glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. We discuss the challenges to translating these findings to clinical application and how this method of tracking RGCs in vivo could provide valuable structural and functional information to clinicians. PMID:25448921

  15. Systemic BCG immunization induces persistent lung mucosal multifunctional CD4 T(EM cells which expand following virulent mycobacterial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryan A Kaveh

    Full Text Available To more closely understand the mechanisms of how BCG vaccination confers immunity would help to rationally design improved tuberculosis vaccines that are urgently required. Given the established central role of CD4 T cells in BCG induced immunity, we sought to characterise the generation of memory CD4 T cell responses to BCG vaccination and M. bovis infection in a murine challenge model. We demonstrate that a single systemic BCG vaccination induces distinct systemic and mucosal populations of T effector memory (T(EM cells in vaccinated mice. These CD4+CD44(hiCD62L(loCD27⁻ T cells concomitantly produce IFN-γ and TNF-α, or IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α and have a higher cytokine median fluorescence intensity MFI or 'quality of response' than single cytokine producing cells. These cells are maintained for long periods (>16 months in BCG protected mice, maintaining a vaccine-specific functionality. Following virulent mycobacterial challenge, these cells underwent significant expansion in the lungs and are, therefore, strongly associated with protection against M. bovis challenge. Our data demonstrate that a persistent mucosal population of T(EM cells can be induced by parenteral immunization, a feature only previously associated with mucosal immunization routes; and that these multifunctional T(EM cells are strongly associated with protection. We propose that these cells mediate protective immunity, and that vaccines designed to increase the number of relevant antigen-specific T(EM in the lung may represent a new generation of TB vaccines.

  16. Somatic cell count distributions during lactation predict clinical mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M.J.; Green, L.E.; Schukken, Y.H.; Bradley, A.J.; Peeler, E.J.; Barkema, H.W.; Haas, de Y.; Collis, V.J.; Medley, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigated somatic cell count (SCC) records during lactation, with the purpose of identifying distribution characteristics (mean and measures of variation) that were most closely associated with clinical mastitis. Three separate data sets were used, one containing quarter SCC (n = 14

  17. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine;

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Several studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSC in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues...

  19. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    of them in transferring gene into different cells. Today, this method have had considerable progress in the treatment of many disease. In this review study, some aspect of stem cells like types and characteristic, origin, derivation techniques, storage conditions and differentiation to target tissues, current clinical usage and their therapeutic capabilities will be discussed.

  20. Clinical-grade mesenchymal stromal cells produced under various good manufacturing practice processes differ in their immunomodulatory properties: standardization of immune quality controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Cedric; Pacelli, Luciano; Bassi, Giulio; Dulong, Joelle; Bifari, Francesco; Bezier, Isabelle; Zanoncello, Jasmina; Ricciardi, Mario; Latour, Maelle; Bourin, Philippe; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Sensebé, Luc; Tarte, Karin; Krampera, Mauro

    2013-06-15

    Clinical-grade mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are usually expanded from bone marrow (BMMSCs) or adipose tissue (ADSCs) using processes mainly differing in the use of fetal calf serum (FCS) or human platelet lysate (PL). We aimed to compare immune modulatory properties of clinical-grade MSCs using a combination of fully standardized in vitro assays. BMMSCs expanded with FCS (BMMSC-FCS) or PL (BMMSC-PL), and ADSC-PL were analyzed in quantitative phenotypic and functional experiments, including their capacity to inhibit the proliferation of T, B, and NK cells. The molecular mechanisms supporting T-cell inhibition were investigated. These parameters were also evaluated after pre-stimulation of MSCs with inflammatory cytokines. BMMSC-FCS, BMMSC-PL, and ADSC-PL displayed significant differences in expression of immunosuppressive and adhesion molecules. Standardized functional assays revealed that resting MSCs inhibited proliferation of T and NK cells, but not B cells. ADSC-PL were the most potent in inhibiting T-cell growth, a property ascribed to interferon-γ-dependent indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. MSCs did not stimulate allogeneic T cell proliferation but were efficiently lysed by activated NK cells. The systematic use of quantitative and reproducible validation techniques highlights differences in immunological properties of MSCs produced using various clinical-grade processes. ADSC-PL emerge as a promising candidate for future clinical trials.

  1. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Deater, Matthew; Schubert, Kathryn; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Pelz, Carl; Sinclair, David A; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2(-/-) mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1-p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  2. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Shuo Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2−/− mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1–p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  3. Transmission of an expanding donor-derived del(20q) clone through allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without the development of a hematologic neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Vania; Porter, David; Luskin, Marlise R; Bagg, Adam; Morrissette, Jennifer J D

    2015-12-01

    Donor cell leukemia is a rare complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which may result from the development of a new malignancy in previously healthy donor cells after transplant into the recipient, or it may derive from the transmission of an occult leukemia from donor to recipient. We report a case of donor derived 20q11.2 deletion in a male patient who received an allogeneic HSCT from his HLA-identical sister for the treatment of his chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Bone marrow cells from the donor were found to contain the 20q deletion that expanded over time, but which was absent in her peripheral blood cells. Although cases of donor cell leukemia after HSCT have been reported, in this case there has been no evidence of an associated hematologic neoplasm in either the donor or recipient. Pre-transplant donor bone marrow evaluations are not practical or warranted, however the finding of new cytogenetic abnormalities after transplant mandates a thorough evaluation of the donor.

  4. Clinical significance of T cell metabolic reprogramming in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Christoph; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Seth, Pankaj; Weaver, Jessica D; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-12-01

    Conversion of normal cells to cancer is accompanied with changes in their metabolism. During this conversion, cell metabolism undergoes a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, also known as Warburg effect, which is a hallmark for cancer cell metabolism. In cancer cells, glycolysis functions in parallel with the TCA cycle and other metabolic pathways to enhance biosynthetic processes and thus support proliferation and growth. Similar metabolic features are observed in T cells during activation but, in contrast to cancer, metabolic transitions in T cells are part of a physiological process. Currently, there is intense interest in understanding the cause and effect relationship between metabolic reprogramming and T cell differentiation. After the recent success of cancer immunotherapy, the crosstalk between immune system and cancer has come to the forefront of clinical and basic research. One of the key goals is to delineate how metabolic alterations of cancer influence metabolism-regulated function and differentiation of tumor resident T cells and how such effects might be altered by immunotherapy. Here, we review the unique metabolic features of cancer, the implications of cancer metabolism on T cell metabolic reprogramming during antigen encounters, and the translational prospective of harnessing metabolism in cancer and T cells for cancer therapy. PMID:27510264

  5. Establishing a stem cell culture laboratory for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elíseo Joji Sekiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem/progenitor cells are found in different human tissues. An in vitro cell culture is needed for their isolation or for their expansion when they are not available in a sufficient quantity to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The level of complexity of these new technologies requires adequate facilities, qualified personnel with experience in cell culture techniques, assessment of quality and clear protocols for cell production. The rules for the implementation of cell therapy centers involve national and international standards of good manufacturing practices. However, such standards are not uniform, reflecting the diversity of technical and scientific development. Here standards from the United States, the European Union and Brazil are analyzed. Moreover, practical solutions encountered for the implementation of a cell therapy center appropriate for the preparation and supply of cultured cells for clinical studies are described. Development stages involved the planning and preparation of the project, the construction of the facility, standardization of laboratory procedures and development of systems to prevent cross contamination. Combining the theoretical knowledge of research centers involved in the study of cells with the practical experience of blood therapy services that manage structures for cell transplantation is presented as the best potential for synergy to meet the demands to implement cell therapy centers.

  6. Expanded Access Protocol (EAP) Using the CliniMACS® Device for Pediatric Haplocompatible Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Lymphomas; Bone Marrow Failure; Hemoglobinopathy; Immune Deficiency; Osteopetrosis; Cytopenias; Leukocyte Disorders; Anemia Due to Intrinsic Red Cell Abnormality

  7. Tumor-Derived Microvesicles Induce, Expand and Up-Regulate Biological Activities of Human Regulatory T Cells (Treg)

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Szajnik; Malgorzata Czystowska; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Magis Mandapathil; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor-derived microvesicles (TMV) or exosomes are present in body fluids of patients with cancer and might be involved in tumor progression. The frequency and suppressor functions of peripheral blood CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) Treg are higher in patients with cancer than normal controls. The hypothesis is tested that TMV contribute to induction/expansion/and activation of human Treg. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TMV isolated from supernatants of tumor cells but not normal cells i...

  8. End Sequence Analysis Toolkit (ESAT) expands the extractable information from single-cell RNA-seq data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Alan; Yang, Chaoxing; Zilionis, Rapolas; Sergushichev, Alexey; Blodgett, David M.; Redick, Sambra; Bortell, Rita; Luban, Jeremy; Harlan, David M.; Kadener, Sebastian; Greiner, Dale L.; Klein, Allon; Artyomov, Maxim N.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-seq protocols that focus on transcript termini are well suited for applications in which template quantity is limiting. Here we show that, when applied to end-sequencing data, analytical methods designed for global RNA-seq produce computational artifacts. To remedy this, we created the End Sequence Analysis Toolkit (ESAT). As a test, we first compared end-sequencing and bulk RNA-seq using RNA from dendritic cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). As predicted by the telescripting model for transcriptional bursts, ESAT detected an LPS-stimulated shift to shorter 3′-isoforms that was not evident by conventional computational methods. Then, droplet-based microfluidics was used to generate 1000 cDNA libraries, each from an individual pancreatic islet cell. ESAT identified nine distinct cell types, three distinct β-cell types, and a complex interplay between hormone secretion and vascularization. ESAT, then, offers a much-needed and generally applicable computational pipeline for either bulk or single-cell RNA end-sequencing. PMID:27470110

  9. Potential and clinical utility of stem cells in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korff Krause

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Korff Krause, Carsten Schneider, Kai Jaquet, Karl-Heinz KuckHanseatic Heart Center Hamburg, Department of Cardiology, Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: The recent identification of bone marrow-derived adult stem cells and other types of stem cells that could improve heart function after transplantation have raised high expectations. The basic mechanisms have been studied mostly in murine models. However, these experiments revealed controversial results on transdifferentiation vs transfusion of adult stem cells vs paracrine effects of these cells, which is still being debated. Moreover, the reproducibility of these results in precisely translated large animal models is still less well investigated. Despite these weaknesses results of several clinical trials including several hundreds of patients with ischemic heart disease have been published. However, there are no solid data showing that any of these approaches can regenerate human myocardium. Even the effectiveness of cell therapy in these approaches is doubtful. In future we need in this important field of regenerative medicine: i more experimental data in large animals that are closer to the anatomy and physiology of humans, including data on dose effects, comparison of different cell types and different delivery routes; ii a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the fate of transplanted cells; iii more intensive research on genuine regenerative medicine, applying genetic regulation and cell engineering.Keywords: stem cells, cardiovascular disease

  10. Brain injury expands the numbers of neural stem cells and progenitors in the SVZ by enhancing their responsiveness to EGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Lazzarino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There is an increase in the numbers of neural precursors in the SVZ (subventricular zone after moderate ischaemic injuries, but the extent of stem cell expansion and the resultant cell regeneration is modest. Therefore our studies have focused on understanding the signals that regulate these processes towards achieving a more robust amplification of the stem/progenitor cell pool. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of the EGFR [EGF (epidermal growth factor receptor] in the regenerative response of the neonatal SVZ to hypoxic/ischaemic injury. We show that injury recruits quiescent cells in the SVZ to proliferate, that they divide more rapidly and that there is increased EGFR expression on both putative stem cells and progenitors. With the amplification of the precursors in the SVZ after injury there is enhanced sensitivity to EGF, but not to FGF (fibroblast growth factor-2. EGF-dependent SVZ precursor expansion, as measured using the neurosphere assay, is lost when the EGFR is pharmacologically inhibited, and forced expression of a constitutively active EGFR is sufficient to recapitulate the exaggerated proliferation of the neural stem/progenitors that is induced by hypoxic/ischaemic brain injury. Cumulatively, our results reveal that increased EGFR signalling precedes that increase in the abundance of the putative neural stem cells and our studies implicate the EGFR as a key regulator of the expansion of SVZ precursors in response to brain injury. Thus modulating EGFR signalling represents a potential target for therapies to enhance brain repair from endogenous neural precursors following hypoxic/ischaemic and other brain injuries.

  11. Interleukin-2/Anti-Interleukin-2 Immune Complex Expands Regulatory T Cells and Reduces Angiotensin II-Induced Aortic Stiffening

    OpenAIRE

    Beenish Majeed; Supannikar Tawinwung; Lance S. Eberson; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.; Nicolas Larmonier; Larson, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive immune function is implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Inhibition of T-lymphocyte function has been shown to reduce hypertension, target-organ damage, and vascular stiffness. To study the role of immune inhibitory cells, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), on vascular stiffness, we stimulated the proliferation of Treg lymphocytes in vivo using a novel cytokine immune complex of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-IL-2 monoclonal antibody clone JES6-1 (mAbCD25). Thre...

  12. The clinical and mammographic features of plasma cell mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and mammographic features of plasma cell mastitis. Methods: Twenty-five patients (28 lesions) with histologically confirmed plasma cell mastitis, aged from 26 to 70 years (mean age 41 years), were examined with X-ray mammography. The clinical manifestations and imaging features were retrospectively reviewed. Results: No case was in lactation. The painful irregular masses, ranged from 1.3 to 8cm in size, were found in 22 patients, while 3 patients with acute episode. Recurrent episodes of breast masses were noted in 4 patients. Based on the mammographic appearances, the plasma cell mastitis were classified as the following four types: inflammation-like type (2/28), ductal ectasia type (3/28), focal infiltration type (10/28) and nodular type (13/28). The valuable radiographic signs: (1) An asymmetrically increased density along the lactiferous duct with a flame-like appearance, inhomogeneous low density tubular structures and scattered stick-shape calcifications. (2) Architectural distortion and oil cysts formation in adjacent area, (3) Subareolar ductal ectasia. Conclusions: The clinical and mammographic characteristics of plasma cell mastitis are critical to avoiding unnecessary surgery. Histopathological result is needed for the diagnosis in patients highly suspected of malignancy. (authors)

  13. Enrichment of autologous fat grafts with ex-vivo expanded adipose tissue-derived stem cells for graft survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun;

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting is increasingly used in reconstructive surgery. However, resorption rates ranging from 25% to 80% have been reported. Therefore, methods to increase graft viability are needed. Here, we report the results of a triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare the survival ...... of fat grafts enriched with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) versus non-enriched fat grafts....

  14. Clinical outcomes after autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Juan; JI Bing-xin; SU Li; DONG Hui-qing; SUN Xue-jing; LIU Cong-yan

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a continuously disabling disease and it is unresponsive to high dose steroid and immunomodulation with disease progression. The autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been introduced in the treatment of refractory forms of multiple sclerosis. In this study, the clinical outcomes followed by ASCT were evaluated for patients with progressive MS.Methods Twenty-two patients with secondary progressive MS were treated with ASCT. Peripheral blood stem cells were obtained by leukapheresis after mobilization with granulocyte colony stimulating factor. Etoposide,melphalan, carmustin and cytosine arabinoside were administered as conditioning regimen. Outcomes were evaluated by the expanded disability status scale and progression free survival. No maintenance treatment was administered during a median follow-up of 39 months (range, 6 to 59 months).Results No death occurred following the treatment. The overall confirmed progression free survival rate was77% up to 59 months after transplantation which was significantly higher compared with pre-transplantation (P=0.000). Thirteen patients (59%) had remarkable improvement in neurological manifestations, four (18%)stabilized their disability status and five (23%) showed clinical recurrence of active symptoms.Conclusions ASCT as a therapy is safe and available. It can improve or stabilize neurological manifestations in most patients with progressive MS following failure of conventional therapy.

  15. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Obstructing Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer under Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Comparison of the Clinical Results according to Stent Diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Pyeong Guk; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Min Hee; Park, Hae Won; Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of self-expandable metallic stent for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer under fluoroscopic guidance, and to compare results according to the stent diameter. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 31 self-expandable metallic stents were placed into 25 patients for palliative purposes. The rates of technical success, clinical success, complications associated with stent insertion, patient survival, and primary stent patency were evaluated. The results were also compared between two groups: 13 patients using stents with a diameter of 22 mm and 12 patients using stents with a diameter of 26 mm. The technical and clinical success rates were 93.5 and 90.3%, respectively. The complications included severe abdominal pain (6.5%), minor rectal bleeding (9.7%), stent migration (9.7%), and tumor ingrowth or overgrowth (9.7%). No statistical differences in technical were detected between the two groups for the clinical success rate and complication rates. The mean survival time was 5.5 +- 1.4 months. The primary stent patency rates were 91.3% at 5 months, 85.2% at 10 months, and 77.4% at 15 months. The mean period of stent patency was 12.4 +- 2.6 months. The mean period of primary stent patency was 16.4 +- 2.6 months in the 26 mm stent group, and significantly higher than 5.4 +- 1.4 months in the 22 mm stent group (p=0.031). A self-expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic guidance, for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer, was feasible and effective, and yielded good clinical results. The period of primary stent patency of the 26 mm stent group was longer than the 22 mm stent group, and the complication rate was not significantly different between the two stent groups

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells: from Nobel Prizes to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, S Tamir; Alexander, Graeme J M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in basic hepatology have been constrained for many years by the inability to culture primary hepatocytes in vitro, until just over five years ago when the scientific playing field was changed beyond recognition with the demonstration that human skin fibroblasts could be reprogrammed to resemble embryonic cells. The reprogrammed cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), were then shown to have the capacity to re-differentiate into almost any human cell type, including hepatocytes. The unlimited number and isogenic nature of the cells that can be generated from tiny fragments of tissue have massive implications for the study of human liver diseases in vitro. Of more immediate clinical importance were recent data demonstrating precision gene therapy on patient specific iPSCs, which opens up the real and exciting possibility of autologous hepatocyte transplantation as a substitute for allogeneic whole liver transplantation, which has been an effective approach to end-stage liver disease, but one that has now been outstripped by demand. In this review, we describe the historical development, current technology and potential clinical applications of induced pluripotency, concluding with a perspective on possible future directions in this dynamic field.

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cells: from Nobel Prizes to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, S Tamir; Alexander, Graeme J M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in basic hepatology have been constrained for many years by the inability to culture primary hepatocytes in vitro, until just over five years ago when the scientific playing field was changed beyond recognition with the demonstration that human skin fibroblasts could be reprogrammed to resemble embryonic cells. The reprogrammed cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), were then shown to have the capacity to re-differentiate into almost any human cell type, including hepatocytes. The unlimited number and isogenic nature of the cells that can be generated from tiny fragments of tissue have massive implications for the study of human liver diseases in vitro. Of more immediate clinical importance were recent data demonstrating precision gene therapy on patient specific iPSCs, which opens up the real and exciting possibility of autologous hepatocyte transplantation as a substitute for allogeneic whole liver transplantation, which has been an effective approach to end-stage liver disease, but one that has now been outstripped by demand. In this review, we describe the historical development, current technology and potential clinical applications of induced pluripotency, concluding with a perspective on possible future directions in this dynamic field. PMID:23131523

  18. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  19. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation.

  20. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation. PMID:26272183

  1. Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew T Czyż

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

  2. New technology for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.

    1995-04-01

    A high-speed, 11-parameter, 6-color fluorescence, laser flow cytometer/cell sorter with a number of special and unique features has been built for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cells for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. The software for real-time data acquisition and sort control, written as C++ programming language modules with a WindowsTM graphical user interface, runs on a 66-MHz 80486 computer joined by an extended bus to 23 sophisticated multi-layered boards of special data acquisition and sorting electronics. Special features include: high-speed (> 100,000 cells/sec) real-time data classification module (U.S. Patent 5,204,884 (1993)); real-time principal component cell sorting; multi-queue signal-processing system with multiple hardware and software event buffers to reduce instrument dead time, LUT charge-pulse definition, high-resolution `flexible' sorting for optimal yield/purity sort strategies (U.S. Patent 5,199,576); pre-focusing optical wavelength correction for a second laser beam; and two trains of three fluorescence detectors-- each adjustable for spatial separation to interrogate only one of two laser beams, syringe- driven or pressure-driven fluidics, and time-windowed parameters. The system has been built to be both expandable and versatile through the use of LUT's and a modular hardware and software design. The instrument is especially useful at detection and isolation of rare cell subpopulations for which our laboratory is well-known. Cell subpopulations at frequencies as small as 10-7 have been successfully studied with this system. Current applications in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics include detection and isolation of (1) fetal cells from material blood for prenatal diagnosis of birth defects, (2) hematopoietic stem and precursor cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation, (3) metastatic breast cancer cells for molecular characterization, and (4) HIV-infected maternal cells in newborn blood to study mother

  3. Regulations and guidelines governing stem cell based products: Clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells as medicines is a promising and upcoming area of research as they may be able to help the body to regenerate damaged or lost tissue in a host of diseases like Parkinson′s, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, liver disease, spinal cord damage, cancer and many more. Translating basic stem cell research into routine therapies is a complex multi-step process which entails the challenge related to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks while complying with the existing regulations and guidelines. While in the United States (US and European Union (EU regulations are in place, in India, we do not have a well-defined regulatory framework for "stem cell based products (SCBP". There are several areas that need to be addressed as it is quite different from that of pharmaceuticals. These range from establishing batch consistency, product stability to product safety and efficacy through pre-clinical, clinical studies and marketing authorization. This review summarizes the existing regulations/guidelines in US, EU, India, and the associated challenges in developing SCBP with emphasis on clinical aspects.

  4. Ethical Issues for Clinical Studies That use Human Embryonic Stem Cells: The 2014 Revisions to the Japanese Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in clinical studies has been expanding in recent years. The application of hESCs in clinical studies raises ethical issues from a different standpoint compared with the use of other types of stem cells. In Japan, the Guidelines on the Derivation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells, and Guidelines on the Distribution and Utilization of Human Embryonic Stem Cells had been revised for clinical studies in 2014. In the revised guidelines, the method for protection of personal information was changed to offer the choice between unlinkable anonymization and linkable anonymization, to enable the use of information on diseases suffered by donors and the assurance of traceability for safety. Procedures for re-consent are generally prohibited out of consideration for donors' feelings. However, obtaining re-consent is permitted when consent for re-consent has been received in advance and approval has been given by an ethical review board, in which case the donors may be contacted. Incidental findings obtained from hESCs are not disclosed individually to donors, while the research results should be actively published for the common good. These guidelines have enabled the derivation, distribution, and use of hESCs for clinical studies.

  5. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour: a rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliki Hymavathi Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the third most common neoplasm of the female genital tract. Based on the cell type of origin, primary ovarian malignancies are classified into surface epithelium, germ cell, and sex cord tumors. Sex cord tumors account for 1% to 2% of ovarian malignancies. They may contain granulosa cells, theca cells, sertoli cells, or fibroblasts of gonadal stromal origin. Granulosa Cell Tumours (GCTs account for approximately 2-5% of all ovarian tumors and can be divided into adult (95% and juvenile (5% types based on histologic findings. GCTs secrete estrogen thus resulting in menstrual irregularities in the affected individual. More serious estrogen effects can occur in various end organs such as uterus resulting in endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial adenocarcinomas and increased risk of breast cancers. Androgen production is also reported but rare and produces virilization in the affected women. Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumours (JGCTs are clinically and histopathologically distinct from the GCTs. They are rarely encountered but mostly in youngsters. Surgery is the primary modality of treatment with chemotherapy being reserved for advanced or recurrent disease states. We herewith report an interesting case of JGCT in a young teenage girl. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1150-1154

  6. Allogeneic cell transplant expands bone marrow distribution by colonizing previously abandoned areas: an FDG PET/CT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiz, Francesco; Marini, Cecilia; Campi, Cristina; Massone, Anna Maria; Podestà, Marina; Bottoni, Gianluca; Piva, Roberta; Bongioanni, Francesca; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Piana, Michele; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Frassoni, Francesco

    2015-06-25

    Mechanisms of hematopoietic reconstitution after bone marrow (BM) transplantation remain largely unknown. We applied a computational quantification software application to hybrid 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images to assess activity and distribution of the hematopoietic system throughout the whole skeleton of recently transplanted patients. Thirty-four patients underwent PET/CT 30 days after either adult stem cell transplantation (allogeneic cell transplantation [ACT]; n = 18) or cord blood transplantation (CBT; n = 16). Our software automatically recognized compact bone volume and trabecular bone volume (IBV) in CT slices. Within IBV, coregistered PET data were extracted to identify the active BM (ABM) from the inactive tissue. Patients were compared with 34 matched controls chosen among a published normalcy database. Whole body ABM increased in ACT and CBT when compared with controls (12.4 ± 3 and 12.8 ± 6.8 vs 8.1 ± 2.6 mL/kg of ideal body weight [IBW], P bones, ABM increased three- and sixfold in CBT and ACT, respectively, compared with controls (0.9 ± 0.9 and 1.7 ± 2.5 vs 0.3 ± 0.3 mL/kg IBW, P transplanted BM into previously abandoned BM sites.

  7. MicroRNA-125b expands hematopoietic stem cells and enriches for the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, A G Lisa; Sahoo, Debashis; Adorno, Maddalena; Wang, Yulei; Weissman, Irving L; Park, Christopher Y

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNAs profoundly impact hematopoietic cells by regulating progenitor cell-fate decisions, as well as mature immune effector function. However to date, microRNAs that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function have been less well characterized. Here we show that microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is highly expressed in HSCs and its expression decreases in committed progenitors. Overexpression of miR-125b in mouse HSC enhances their function, demonstrated through serial transplantation of highly purified HSC, and enriches for the previously described Slamf1(lo)CD34(-) lymphoid-balanced and the Slamf1(neg)CD34(-) lymphoid-biased cell subsets within the multipotent HSC (CD34-KLS) fraction. Mature peripheral blood cells derived from the miR-125b-overexpressing HSC are skewed toward the lymphoid lineage. Consistent with this observation, miR-125b overexpression significantly increases the number of early B-progenitor cells within the spleen and induces the expansion and enrichment of the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC subset via an antiapoptotic mechanism, reducing the mRNA expression levels of two proapoptotic targets, Bmf and KLF13. The antiapoptotic effect of miR-125b is more pronounced in the lymphoid-biased HSC subset because of their intrinsic higher baseline levels of apoptosis. These effects of miR-125b are associated with the development of lymphoproliferative disease, marked by expansion of CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data reveal that miR-125b regulates HSC survival and can promote lymphoid-fate decisions at the level of the HSC by preferentially expanding lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC.

  8. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50 and also in metastases (6 out of 10 and recurrences (2 out of 3, but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells.

  9. The expanding clinical phenotype of the tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation at np 3243 of mitochondrial DNA: Diabetic embryopathy associated with mitochondrial cytopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feigenbaum, A.; Chitayat, D.; Robinson, B.; MacGregor, D.; Myint, T. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-04-24

    We describe a family which demonstrates and expands the extreme clinical variability now known to be associated with the A{r_arrow}G transition at nucleotide position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA. The propositus presented at birth with clinical manifestations consistent with diabetic embryopathy including anal atresia, caudal dysgenesis, and multicystic dysplastic kidneys. His co-twin was normal at birth, but at 3 months of life, presented with intractable seizures later associated with developmental delay. The twins` mother developed diabetes mellitus type I at the age of 20 years and gastrointestinal problems at 22 years. Since age 19 years, the maternal aunt has had recurrent strokes, seizures, mental deterioration and deafness, later diagnosed as MELAS syndrome due to the tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation. A maternal uncle had diabetes mellitus type I, deafness, and normal intellect, and died at 35 years after recurrent strokes. This pedigree expands the known clinical phenotype associated with tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation and raises the possibility that, in some cases, diabetic embryopathy may be due to a mitochondrial cytopathy that affects both the mother`s pancreas (and results in diabetes mellitus and the metabolic dysfunction associated with it) and the embryonic/fetal and placental tissues which make the embryo more vulnerable to this insult. 33 refs., 1 tab.

  10. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Diani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis.

  11. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis. PMID:27595115

  12. B-cell depletion with rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Graves' ophthalmopathy the latest addition to an expanding family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; El Fassi, Daniel; Hasselbalch, Hans C;

    2007-01-01

    In this review, the authors summarise the clinical results obtained after therapy with rituximab in autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. On the basis of qualitative and quantitative analyses of B- and T-cell subsets, and autoantibody levels obtained in other...... diseases before and after rituximab therapy, the authors interpret the results of the only two clinical investigations of the efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of Graves' disease and Graves' opthalmopathy reported so far. No significant effect on autoantibody levels was observed. Nonetheless, 4 out...... of 10 Graves' disease patients remained in remission 400 days after rituximab treatment versus none in the control group, and remarkable improvements in the eye symptoms of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were observed. This supports a role for B cells in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy...

  13. B-cell depletion with rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Graves' ophthalmopathy the latest addition to an expanding family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; El Fassi, Daniel; Hasselbalch, Hans K;

    2007-01-01

    of 10 Graves' disease patients remained in remission 400 days after rituximab treatment versus none in the control group, and remarkable improvements in the eye symptoms of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were observed. This supports a role for B cells in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy......In this review, the authors summarise the clinical results obtained after therapy with rituximab in autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. On the basis of qualitative and quantitative analyses of B- and T-cell subsets, and autoantibody levels obtained in other...... diseases before and after rituximab therapy, the authors interpret the results of the only two clinical investigations of the efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of Graves' disease and Graves' opthalmopathy reported so far. No significant effect on autoantibody levels was observed. Nonetheless, 4 out...

  14. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  15. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  16. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  17. Unusual clinical presentation of anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, a well-recognized entity, presents a varied clinical picture and epidemiological characteristics associated with the expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK protein. When classic symptoms are present (weight loss, fever, and night sweats and combine with enlarged and easily accessible peripheral lymph nodes, diagnosis is not that difficult. But when the clinical presentation is nonspecific, a tough diagnostic task is required. HIV infection is highly associated with neoplastic disorders—mainly with those of hematological origin. However, ALCL is exceptionally associated with HIV infection, and the few reported cases are ALK– ALCL. The authors report two cases of ALK+ ALCL with the unusual clinical presentation: one is associated with the HIV infection and the other presents as a fever of unknown origin (FUO without peripheral lymphadenopathy. The latter was autopsied and was characterized by nodal and extra nodal involvement. The authors call attention to the plurality of clinical presentation of this group of lymphomas, and the early indication of bone marrow examination in cases of an FUO with elevated hepatic enzymes and lactic dehydrogenase.

  18. Expanding the genotype-phenotype correlation in subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions using high resolution clinical chromosomal microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Khalifa, Mohamed; Probst, Frank J; Stein, Jennifer; Harris, Leslie L; Kearney, Debra L; Vance, Gail H; Bull, Marilyn J; Grange, Dorothy K; Scharer, Gunter H; Kang, Sue-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Cheung, Sau W; Patel, Ankita

    2013-12-01

    Structural rearrangements of chromosome 19p are rare, and their resulting phenotypic consequences are not well defined. This is the first study to report a cohort of eight patients with subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions, identified using clinical chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). The deletion sizes ranged from 0.1 to 0.86 Mb. Detailed analysis of the patients' clinical features has enabled us to define a constellation of clinical abnormalities that include growth delay, multiple congenital anomalies, global developmental delay, learning difficulties, and dysmorphic facial features. There are eight genes in the 19p13.3 region that may potentially contribute to the clinical phenotype via haploinsufficiency. Moreover, in silico genomic analysis of 19p13.3 microdeletion breakpoints revealed numerous highly repetitive sequences, suggesting LINEs/SINEs-mediated events in generating these microdeletions. Thus, subtelomeric 19p13.3 appears important for normal embryonic and childhood development. The clinical description of patients with deletions in this genomic interval will assist clinicians to identify and treat individuals with similar deletions.

  19. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine. PMID:25949219

  20. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  1. Clinical relevance of stem cell therapies in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, characterized by the progressive loss of both upper and lower motor neurons, is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. This disease is often accompanied by a tremendous physical and emotional burden not only for the patients, but also for their families and friends as well. There is no clinically relevant treatment available for ALS. To date, only one Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drug, Riluzole, licensed 18 years ago, has been proven to marginally prolong patients′ survival without improving the quality of their lives. Because of the lack of an effective drug treatment and the promising outcomes from several preclinical studies, researchers have highlighted this disease as a suitable candidate for stem cell therapy. This review article highlights the finding of key preclinical studies that present a rationale for the use of different types of stem cells for the treatment of ALS, and the most recent updates on the stem cell-based ALS clinical trials around the world.

  2. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  3. Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary progress in understanding several key features of stem cells has been made in the last ten years, including definition of the niche, and identification of signals regulating mobilization and homing as well as partial understanding of the mechanisms controlling self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation. This progress produced invaluable tools for the development of rational cell therapy protocols that have yielded positive results in preclinical models of genetic and acquired diseases and, in several cases, have entered clinical experimentation with positive outcome. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic cells with multilineage potential to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. They can be isolated from bone marrow and other tissues and have the capacity to extensively proliferate in vitro. Moreover, MSCs have also been shown to produce anti-inflammatory molecules which can modulate humoral and cellular immune responses. Considering their regenerative potential and immunoregulatory effect, MSC therapy is a promising tool in the treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. It is obvious that much work remains to be done to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development, homeostasis, and tissue repair and thus to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials.

  4. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

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    Martínez-Cáceres E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our

  5. CD133-enriched Xeno-Free human embryonic-derived neural stem cells expand rapidly in culture and do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mice

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    Daniel L. Haus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Common methods for the generation of human embryonic-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs result in cells with potentially compromised safety profiles due to maintenance of cells in conditions containing non-human proteins (e.g. in bovine serum or on mouse fibroblast feeders. Additionally, sufficient expansion of resulting hNSCs for scaling out or up in a clinically relevant time frame has proven to be difficult. Here, we report a strategy that produces hNSCs in completely “Xeno-Free” culture conditions. Furthermore, we have enriched the hNSCs for the cell surface marker CD133 via magnetic sorting, which has led to an increase in the expansion rate and neuronal fate specification of the hNSCs in vitro. Critically, we have also confirmed neural lineage specificity upon sorted hNSC transplantation into the immunodeficient NOD-scid mouse brain. The future use or adaptation of these protocols has the potential to better facilitate the advancement of pre-clinical strategies from the bench to the bedside.

  6. Clinical Studies Applying Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells for the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Clara E. Jäkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC seems to be resistant to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy and the general treatment regimen of cytokine therapy produces only modest responses while inducing severe side effects. Nowadays standard of care is the treatment with VEGF-inhibiting agents or mTOR inhibition; nevertheless, immunotherapy can induce complete remissions and long-term survival in selected patients. Among different adoptive lymphocyte therapies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells have a particularly advantageous profile as these cells are easily available, have a high proliferative rate, and exhibit a high antitumor activity. Here, we reviewed clinical studies applying CIK cells, either alone or with standard therapies, for the treatment of RCC. The adverse events in all studies were mild, transient, and easily controllable. In vitro studies revealed an increased antitumor activity of peripheral lymphocytes of participants after CIK cell treatment and CIK cell therapy was able to induce complete clinical responses in RCC patients. The combination of CIK cell therapy and standard therapy was superior to standard therapy alone. These studies suggest that CIK cell immunotherapy is a safe and competent treatment strategy for RCC patients and further studies should investigate different treatment combinations and schedules for optimal application of CIK cells.

  7. New Developments in Mast Cell Biology: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Greer; Bradding, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in connective tissue and at mucosal surfaces in all classes of vertebrates. In health, they contribute to tissue homeostasis, host defense, and tissue repair via multiple receptors regulating the release of a vast stockpile of proinflammatory mediators, proteases, and cytokines. However, these potentially protective cells are a double-edged sword. When there is a repeated or long-term stimulus, MC activation leads to tissue damage and dysfunction. Accordingly, MCs are implicated in the pathophysiologic aspects of numerous diseases covering all organs. Understanding the biology of MCs, their heterogeneity, mechanisms of activation, and signaling cascades may lead to the development of novel therapies for many diseases for which current treatments are lacking or are of poor efficacy. This review will focus on updates and developments in MC biology and their clinical implications, with a particular focus on their role in respiratory diseases.

  8. Strategy Escalation: An emerging paradigm for safe clinical development of T cell gene therapies

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    Junghans Richard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy techniques are being applied to modify T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs for therapeutic ends. The versatility of this platform has spawned multiple options for their application with new permutations in strategies continually being invented, a testimony to the creative energies of many investigators. The field is rapidly expanding with immense potential for impact against diverse cancers. But this rapid expansion, like the Big Bang, comes with a somewhat chaotic evolution of its therapeutic universe that can also be dangerous, as seen by recently publicized deaths. Time-honored methods for new drug testing embodied in Dose Escalation that were suitable for traditional inert agents are now inadequate for these novel "living drugs". In the following, I propose an approach to escalating risk for patient exposures with these new immuno-gene therapy agents, termed Strategy Escalation, that accounts for the molecular and biological features of the modified cells and the methods of their administration. This proposal is offered not as a prescriptive but as a discussion framework that investigators may wish to consider in configuring their intended clinical applications.

  9. Perioperative medication management: expanding the role of the preadmission clinic pharmacist in a single centre, randomised controlled trial of collaborative prescribing

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, A.R.; Coombes, I D; Stokes, J.; D. McDougall; Whitfield, K; Maycock, E; Nissen, L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Current evidence to support non-medical prescribing is predominantly qualitative, with little evaluation of accuracy, safety and appropriateness. Our aim was to evaluate a new model of service for the Australia healthcare system, of inpatient medication prescribing by a pharmacist in an elective surgery preadmission clinic (PAC) against usual care, using an endorsed performance framework. Design Single centre, randomised controlled, two-arm trial. Setting Elective surgery PAC in a ...

  10. The expanded clinical profile and the efficacy of colchicine therapy in Egyptian children suffering from familial mediterranean fever: a descriptive study

    OpenAIRE

    Talaat Hala Salah El-Din; Mohamed Mohamed Farouk; El Rifai Nihal Mohamed; Gomaa Mohamed Ali

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by self-limiting recurrent attacks of fever and serosal inflammation, leading to abdominal, thoracic or articular pain. Objective To detect variable clinical presentations and genotypic distribution of different groups of FMF patients and the efficacy of colchicine therapy in treatment of these groups of FMF after one year. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 70 patients already...

  11. Seminal Fluid Regulates Accumulation of FOXP3(+) Regulatory T Cells in the Preimplantation Mouse Uterus Through Expanding the FOXP3(+) Cell Pool and CCL19-Mediated Recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerin, Leigh R.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Prins, Jelmer R.; Bromfield, John J.; Hayball, John D.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells facilitate maternal immune tolerance of the semiallogeneic conceptus in early pregnancy, but the origin and regulation of these cells at embryo implantation is unclear. During the preimplantation period, factors in the seminal fluid delivered at coitus cause expansion of a

  12. Immunomodulatory Effects of Hemagglutinin- (HA- Modified A20 B-Cell Lymphoma Expanded as a Brain Tumor on Adoptively Transferred HA-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin P. Shichkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the mouse A20 B-cell lymphoma engineered to express hemagglutinin (HA antigen (A20HA was used as a systemic tumor model. In this work, we used the A20HA cells as a brain tumor. HA-specific CD4+ T cells were transferred intravenously in a tail vein 5 days after A20HA intracranial inoculation and analyzed on days 2, 9, and 16 after the adoptive transfer by different methods. The transferred cells demonstrated state of activation as early as day 2 after the adoptive transfer and most the of viable HA-specific cells became anergic on day 16. Additionally, symptoms of systemic immunosuppression were observed in mice with massive brain tumors at a late stage of the brain tumor progression (days 20–24 after the A20HA inoculation. Despite that, a deal of HA-specific CD4+ T cells kept the functional activity even at the late stage of A20HA tumor growth. The activated HA-specific CD4+ T cells were found also in the brain of brain-tumor-bearing mice. These cells were still responding to reactivation with HA-peptide in vitro. Our data support an idea about sufficient role of both the tumor-specific and -nonspecific mechanisms inducing immunosuppression in cancer patients.

  13. The analysis of expanded cells from patients with lymphoproliferative disorders of granular lymphocytes may help to clarify the NK cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambello, R; Chisesi, T; De Rossi, G; Pandolfi, F; Trentin, L; Vespignani, M; Luciani, M; Cafaro, A; Agostini, C; Martelli, M

    1986-07-01

    Surface phenotype and functional in vitro activities were studied in 2 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders of granular lymphocytes. Cells from both patients presented the same, previously unreported, surface phenotype (i.e. T3+, T8+, T4-, HNK-1-, NK-15+, M1-), were unable to display either Natural Killer (NK) activity or suppressor function in a poke-weed-driven system, and showed a defective response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). On the basis of available schemes for NK cells ontogenesis, we will discuss the phenotype and functional activities of patients' cells suggesting that the cell population expressing the T3+, T8+, HNK-1-, NK-15+, M1- phenotype might represent a discrete stage along the NK-cell differentiation pathway. PMID:3746877

  14. A xenogeneic-free bioreactor system for the clinical-scale expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco; Campbell, Andrew; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Andrade, Pedro Z; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Wen, Yuan; Boucher, Shayne; Vemuri, Mohan C; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2014-06-01

    The large cell doses (>1 × 10(6)  cells/kg) used in clinical trials with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) will require an efficient production process. Moreover, monitoring and control of MSC ex-vivo expansion is critical to provide a safe and reliable cell product. Bioprocess engineering approaches, such as bioreactor technology, offer the adequate tools to develop and optimize a cost-effective culture system for the rapid expansion of human MSC for cellular therapy. Herein, a xenogeneic (xeno)-free microcarrier-based culture system was successfully established for bone marrow (BM) MSC and adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cell (ASC) cultivation using a 1L-scale controlled stirred-tank bioreactor, allowing the production of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(8) and (4.5 ± 0.2) × 10(7) cells for BM MSC and ASC, respectively, after 7 days. Additionally, the effect of different percent air saturation values (%Airsat ) and feeding regime on the proliferation and metabolism of BM MSC was evaluated. No significant differences in cell growth and metabolic patterns were observed under 20% and 9%Airsat . Also, the three different feeding regimes studied-(i) 25% daily medium renewal, (ii) 25% medium renewal every 2 days, and (iii) fed-batch addition of concentrated nutrients and growth factors every 2 days-yielded similar cell numbers, and only slight metabolic differences were observed. Moreover, the immunophenotype (positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105 and negative for CD31, CD80 and HLA-DR) and multilineage differentiative potential of expanded cells were not affected upon bioreactor culture. These results demonstrated the feasibility of expanding human MSC from different sources in a clinically relevant expansion configuration in a controlled microcarrier-based stirred culture system under xeno-free conditions. The further optimization of this bioreactor culture system will represent a crucial step towards an efficient GMP-compliant clinical-scale MSC

  15. Clinical significance of metallothioneins in cell therapy and nanomedicine

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    Sharma S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sushil Sharma,1 Afsha Rais,1 Ranbir Sandhu,1 Wynand Nel,1 Manuchair Ebadi21Saint James School of Medicine, Bonaire, The Netherlands; 2Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Therapeutics, Center of Excellence in Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USAAbstract: Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs are low molecular weight (6–7 kDa cysteine-rich proteins that are specifically induced by metal nanoparticles (NPs. MT induction in cell therapy may provide better protection by serving as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic agents, and by augmenting zinc-mediated transcriptional regulation of genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Liposome-encapsulated MT-1 promoter has been used extensively to induce growth hormone or other genes in culture and gene-manipulated animals. MTs are induced as a defensive mechanism in chronic inflammatory conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and infections, hence can serve as early and sensitive biomarkers of environmental safety and effectiveness of newly developed NPs for clinical applications. Microarray analysis has indicated that MTs are significantly induced in drug resistant cancers and during radiation treatment. Nutritional stress and environmental toxins (eg, kainic acid and domoic acid induce MTs and aggregation of multilamellar electron-dense membrane stacks (Charnoly body due to mitochondrial degeneration. MTs enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex-1, a rate-limiting enzyme complex involved in the oxidative phosphorylation. Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (eg, selegiline inhibit α-synuclein nitration, implicated in Lewy body formation, and inhibit 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium and 3-morpholinosydnonimine-induced apoptosis in cultured human dopaminergic neurons and mesencephalic fetal stem cells. MTs

  16. The synergistic immunoregulatory effects of culture-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells and CD4(+25(+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells on skin allograft rejection.

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    Jung Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are seen as an ideal source of cells to induce graft acceptance; however, some reports have shown that MSCs can be immunogenic rather than immunosuppressive. We speculate that the immunomodulatory effects of regulatory T cells (Tregs can aid the maintenance of immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy can have synergistic immunomodulatory effects on allograft rejection. After preconditioning with Fludarabine, followed by total body irradiation and anti-asialo-GM-1(ASGM-1, tail skin grafts from C57BL/6 (H-2k(b mice were grafted onto the lateral thoracic wall of BALB/c (H-2k(d mice. Group A mice (control group, n = 9 did not receive any further treatment after preconditioning, whereas groups B and C (n = 9 received cell therapy with MSCs or Tregs, respectively, on days -1, +6 and +13 relative to the skin transplantation. Group D (n = 10 received cell therapy with MSCs and Tregs on days -1, +6 and +13. Cell suspensions were obtained from the spleens of five randomly chosen mice from each group on day +7, and the immunomodulatory effects of the cell therapy were evaluated by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Our results show that allograft survival was significantly longer in group D compared to the control group (group A. Flow cytometric analysis and real-time PCR for splenocytes revealed that the Th2 subpopulation in group D increased significantly compared to the group B. Also, the expression of Foxp3 and STAT 5 increased significantly in group D compared to the conventional cell therapy groups (B and C. Taken together, these data suggest that a combined cell therapy approach with MSCs and Tregs has a synergistic effect on immunoregulatory function in vivo, and might provide a novel strategy for improving survival in allograft transplantation.

  17. Molecular confirmation of t(6;11)(p21;q12) renal cell carcinoma in archival paraffin-embedded material using a break-apart TFEB FISH assay expands its clinicopathologic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argani, Pedram; Yonescu, Raluca; Morsberger, Laura; Morris, Kerry; Netto, George J; Smith, Nathan; Gonzalez, Nilda; Illei, Peter B; Ladanyi, Marc; Griffin, Constance A

    2012-10-01

    A subset of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) is characterized by t(6;11)(p21;q12), which results in fusion of the untranslated Alpha (MALAT1) gene to the TFEB gene. Only 21 genetically confirmed cases of t(6;11) RCCs have been reported. This neoplasm typically demonstrates a distinctive biphasic morphology, comprising larger epithelioid cells and smaller cells clustered around basement membrane material; however, the full spectrum of its morphologic appearances is not known. The t(6;11) RCCs differ from most conventional RCCs in that they consistently express melanocytic immunohistochemical (IHC) markers such as HMB45 and Melan A and the cysteine protease cathepsin K but are often negative for epithelial markers such as cytokeratins. TFEB IHC has been proven to be useful to confirm the diagnosis of t(6;11) RCCs in archival material, because native TFEB is upregulated through promoter substitution by the gene fusion. However, IHC is highly fixation dependent and has been proven to be particularly difficult for TFEB. A validated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay for molecular confirmation of the t(6;11) RCC in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material has not been previously reported. We report herein the development of a break-apart TFEB FISH assay for the diagnosis of t(6;11)(p21;q12) RCCs. We validated the assay on 4 genetically confirmed cases and 76 relevant expected negative control cases and used the assay to report 8 new cases that expand the clinicopathologic spectrum of t(6;11) RCCs. An additional previously reported TFEB IHC-positive case was confirmed by TFEB FISH in 46-year-old archival material. In conclusion, TFEB FISH is a robust, clinically validated assay that can confirm the diagnosis of t(6;11) RCC in archival material and should allow a more comprehensive clinicopathologic delineation of this recently recognized neoplastic entity.

  18. Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Central Nervous System Disorders – Recent Progress and Perspective for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the transplanted BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with CNS disorders. In this review, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy as the scientifically proven entity in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose. The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. The BMSC can be expanded in vitro using the animal serum-free medium. Pharmacological modulation may accelerate the in vitro proliferation of the BMSC. Using in vivo optical imaging technique, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future.

  19. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  20. TLR-4 cooperates with Dectin-1 and mannose receptor to expand Th17 and Tc17 cells induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis stimulated dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Loures, Flávio V.; Araújo, Eliseu F.; Feriotti, Claudia; Silvia B. Bazan; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the mannose receptor (MR) are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with toll-like receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protectiv...

  1. TLR-4 Cooperates with Dectin-1 and Mannose Receptor to Expand Th17 and Tc17 Cells Induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Stimulated Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Lucia Garcia Calich; Flavio Vieira Loures; Eliseu F. Araujo; Claudia eFeriotti; Silvia B. Bazan

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the Mannose Receptor (MR) are C-type Lectin Receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protectiv...

  2. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  3. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical trials in pediatric populations, as well as challenges and considerations in the...

  4. Conference scene: pharmacogenomics: from cell to clinic (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siest, Gérard; Medeiros, Rui; Melichar, Bohuslav; Stathopoulou, Maria; Van Schaik, Ron Hn; Cacabelos, Ramon; Abt, Peter Meier; Monteiro, Carolino; Gurwitz, David; Queiroz, Jao; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Second International ESPT Meeting Lisbon, Portugal, 26-28 September 2013 The second European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) conference was organized in Lisbon, Portugal, and attracted 250 participants from 37 different countries. The participants could listen to 50 oral presentations, participate in five lunch symposia and were able to view 83 posters and an exhibition. Part 1 of this Conference Scene was presented in the previous issue of Pharmacogenomics. This second part will focus on: clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics tests; transporters and pharmacogenomics; stem cells and other new tools for pharmacogenomics and drug discovery; from system pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine; and, finally, we will discuss the Posters and Awards that were presented at the conference.

  5. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  6. The expanded clinical profile and the efficacy of colchicine therapy in Egyptian children suffering from familial mediterranean fever: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaat Hala Salah El-Din

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by self-limiting recurrent attacks of fever and serosal inflammation, leading to abdominal, thoracic or articular pain. Objective To detect variable clinical presentations and genotypic distribution of different groups of FMF patients and the efficacy of colchicine therapy in treatment of these groups of FMF after one year. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 70 patients already diagnosed with FMF and following-up at the Rheumatology Clinic, Children's Hospital - Cairo University. Diagnosis of FMF was determined according to Tel Hashomer criteria for FMF. All patients were subjected to a questionnaire including detailed history with emphasis on clinical manifestations and colchicine dose to control attacks. Mutational analysis was performed for all study subjects covering 12 mutations in the MEFV gene: E148Q, P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C, M680I (G/A, I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S and R761H. Response to colchicine treatment was evaluated as complete, incomplete and unresponsive. Results Out of the 70 patients- 40 males and 30 females- fever was the most common presenting feature, followed by abdominal pain, and arthritis; documented in 95.7%, 94.3%, and 77.1% of cases respectively. Mutational analysis detected gene mutation on both alleles in 20 patients (homozygotes, on only 1 allele in 40 patients (heterozygotes, and on none of the alleles (uncharacterized cases. Mild to moderate disease severity score (according to Tel Hashomer key to severity score was detected in a significant proportion of heterozygotes and the uncharacterized group than the homozygotes. All patients received colchicine therapy; 22.9% of them showed complete response, 74.3% showed incomplete response and 2.9% showed no response to therapy. The colchicine dose needed to control attacks was significantly lower in heterozygotes than the homozygotes(P=0

  7. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells:from basic research to clinical translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yelei Guo; Weidong Han

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of basic researches and clinical studies related to cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells has confirmed their safety and feasibility in treating malignant diseases. This review summarizes the available published literature related to the biological characteristics and clinical applications of CIK cells in recent years. A number of clinical trials with CIK cells have been implemented during the progressive phases of cancer, presenting potential widespread applications of CIK cells for the future. Furthermore, this review briefly compares clinical applications of CIK cells with those of other adoptive immunotherapeutic cells. However, at present, there are no uniform criteria or large-scale preparations of CIK cells. The overall clinical response is difficult to evaluate because of the use of autologous CIK cells. Based on these observations, several suggestions regarding uniform criteria and universal sources for CIK cell preparations and the use of CIK cells either combined with chemotherapy or alone as a primary strategy are briefly proposed in this review. Large-scale, controlled, grouped, and multi-center clinical trials on CIK cell-based immunotherapy should be conducted under strict supervision. These interventions might help to improve future clinical applications and increase the clinical curative effects of CIK cells for a broad range of malignancies in the future.

  8. A robust, good manufacturing practice-compliant, clinical-scale procedure to generate regulatory T cells from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis for adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuliman, Abdullah; Appel, Stanley H; Beers, David R; Basar, Rafet; Shaim, Hila; Kaur, Indresh; Zulovich, Jane; Yvon, Eric; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Kondo, Kayo; Liu, Enli; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a fundamental role in the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Defects in Treg function and/or frequencies have been reported in multiple disease models. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Compelling evidence supports a neuroprotective role for Tregs in this disease. Indeed, rapid progression in ALS patients is associated with decreased FoxP3 expression and Treg frequencies. Thus, we propose that strategies to restore Treg number and function may slow disease progression in ALS. In this study, we developed a robust, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant procedure to enrich and expand Tregs from ALS patients. Tregs isolated from these patients were phenotypically similar to those from healthy individuals but were impaired in their ability to suppress T-cell effector function. In vitro expansion of Tregs for 4 weeks in the presence of GMP-grade anti-CD3/CD28 beads, interleukin (IL)-2 and rapamcyin resulted in a 25- to 200-fold increase in their number and restored their immunoregulatory activity. Collectively, our data facilitate and support the implementation of clinical trials of adoptive therapy with ex vivo expanded and highly suppressive Tregs in patients with ALS.

  9. TLR-4 Cooperates with Dectin-1 and Mannose Receptor to Expand Th17 and Tc17 Cells Induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Stimulated Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Garcia Calich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant use of diverse Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the Mannose Receptor (MR are C-type Lectin Receptors (CLRs previously reported to cooperate with Toll Like Receptors (TLRs signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protective immunity against paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent fungal infection of Latin America, was previously shown to be influenced by these T cell subsets motivating us to study the contribution of TLRs, Dectin-1 and MR to the development of Th17/Tc17 immunity. First, curdlan a specific Dectin-1 agonist was used to characterize the influence of this receptor in the proliferative response and Th17/Tc17 differentiation of naïve lymphocytes induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis activated dendritic cells (DCs from C57BL/6 mice. Then, WT, Dectin-1-/-, TLR-2-/- and TLR-4-/- DCs treated or untreated with anti-Dectin-1 and anti-MR antibodies were used to investigate the contribution of these receptors in lymphocyte activation and differentiation. We verified that curdlan induces an enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and development of IL-17 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, treatment of WT, TLR-2-/- and TLR-4-/- DCs by anti-Dectin-1 antibodies or antigen presentation by Dectin-1-/- DCs led to decreased lymphoproliferation and impaired Th17 and Tc17 expansion. These responses were also inhibited by anti-MR treatment of DCs, but a synergistic action on Th17/Tc17 differentiation was mediated by TLR-4 and MR. Taken together, our results indicate that diverse TLRs and CLRs are involved in the induction of lymphocyte proliferation and Th17/Tc17 differentiation mediated by P. brasiliensis activated DCs, but a synergist action was restricted to Dectin-1, TLR

  10. TLR-4 cooperates with Dectin-1 and mannose receptor to expand Th17 and Tc17 cells induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis stimulated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loures, Flávio V; Araújo, Eliseu F; Feriotti, Claudia; Bazan, Silvia B; Calich, Vera L G

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the mannose receptor (MR) are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with toll-like receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, respectively. The protective immunity against paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent fungal infection of Latin America, was previously shown to be influenced by these T cell subsets motivating us to study the contribution of TLRs, Dectin-1, and MR to the development of Th17/Tc17 immunity. First, curdlan a specific Dectin-1 agonist was used to characterize the influence of this receptor in the proliferative response and Th17/Tc17 differentiation of naïve lymphocytes induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis activated dendritic cells (DCs) from C57BL/6 mice. Then, wild type (WT), Dectin-1(-/-), TLR-2(-/-), and TLR-4(-/-) DCs treated or untreated with anti-Dectin-1 and anti-MR antibodies were used to investigate the contribution of these receptors in lymphocyte activation and differentiation. We verified that curdlan induces an enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and development of IL-17 producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In addition, treatment of WT, TLR-2(-/-), and TLR-4(-/-) DCs by anti-Dectin-1 antibodies or antigen presentation by Dectin-1(-/-) DCs led to decreased lymphoproliferation and impaired Th17 and Tc17 expansion. These responses were also inhibited by anti-MR treatment of DCs, but a synergistic action on Th17/Tc17 differentiation was mediated by TLR-4 and MR. Taken together, our results indicate that diverse TLRs and CLRs are involved in the induction of lymphocyte proliferation and Th17/Tc17 differentiation mediated by P. brasiliensis activated DCs, but a synergist action was

  11. Clinical Grade of Gerneration of Dendritic Cells for Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Duozhuang; TAO Si; CAO Yang; ZHOU Jianfeng; MA Ding; HUANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immumotherapy, aphereses were performed with the continuous flow cell separator and materials were derived from 10 leukemia patients that had achieved complete remission. Peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in vitro with GM-CSF, IL-4 for 6 days, then TNF-α (the TNF-α group) or TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 (the cytokine mixture group) were added to promote maturation. Cell number was counted by hematology analyzer, and phenotype study (CD1a, CD14, CD83) was carried out by flow cytometry, and the function of DCs was examined by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The results showed that (0.70±0.13)×107/mL (the TNF-α group) and (0.79±0.04)×107/mL (the cytokine mixture group) DCs were generated respectively in peripheral blood obtained by leucapheresis. The phenotypes were as follows: CD1a+ (74.65±4.45)%, CD83+(39.50±4.16)%, CD14+(2.90±1.76)% in TNF-α group, and CD1a+ (81.86±5.87)%, CD83+ (81.65±6.36)%, CD14+ (2.46±1.68)% in the cytokine mixture group. It was concluded that leucapheresis may be a feasible way to provide large number of peripheral blood monocytes for DC generation, and combined administration of TNF-α, IL-1β,IL-6, and PGE2 may greatly promote maturity.

  12. Ex Vivo Restimulation of Human PBMC Expands a CD3+CD4−CD8− γδ + T Cell Population That Can Confound the Evaluation of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    B. J. Sedgmen; Papalia, L.; Wang, L; Dyson, A. R.; McCallum, H. A.; C. M. Simson; Pearse, M. J.; Maraskovsky, E.; Hung, D; P. P. Eomois; Hartel, G.; Barnden, M. J.; Rockman, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of vaccine-induced humoral and CD4+ and CD8+ cellular immune responses represents an important correlate of vaccine efficacy. Accurate and reliable assays evaluating such responses are therefore critical during the clinical development phase of vaccines. T cells play a pivotal role both in coordinating the adaptive and innate immune responses and as effectors. During the assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in subjects participating in a large-scale influenza vaccine tri...

  13. CELL THERAPY FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC REPAIR: ADVANCING CELL THERAPY FROM BENCH TO CLINICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benneker, L.M.; Andersson, G.; Iatridis, J.C.; Sakai, D.; Härtl, R.; Ito, K.; Grad, S.

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encourageing results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium “Where Science meets Clinics”, sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5–7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imageing methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neurogenesis. Discogenic pain, originating from “black discs” or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in outline order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects. PMID:24802611

  14. The clinical and biological significance of MICA in clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Yan, Lei; Jiao, Wei; Ren, Juchao; Xing, Naidong; Zhang, Yongzhen; Zang, Yuanwei; Wang, Jue; Xu, Zhonghua

    2016-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A (MICA), a ligand of Natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) receptor, is broadly upregulated in epithelial originated tumor cells. MICA plays a critical role in the immune surveillance against tumor cells and is associated with the prognosis of several malignancies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and biological significance of MICA in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The expression of MICA was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Both MICA mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in ccRCC tissues, compared with normal tissues. IHC staining revealed a homogenous pattern of MICA staining within each tumor, which combined both membrane staining and granular cytoplasmic staining. Furthermore, high MICA expression was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage and predicted poor prognosis in patients with ccRCC. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed using RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (TCGA) to elucidate the biological role of MICA in ccRCC and revealed that MICA was significantly associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene set, which was further confirmed by qRT-PCR. Our findings contribute to the studies on biomarkers of kidney cancers and the mechanism of renal cancer progression driven by EMT pathway.

  15. Development and characterization of a clinically compliant xeno-free culture medium in good manufacturing practice for human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Lucas G; Yang, Sufang; Zachar, Vladimir; Yang, Zheng; Lakshmipathy, Uma; Bradford, Jolene; Boucher, Shayne E; Vemuri, Mohan C

    2012-10-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapies are currently being tested in clinical trials for Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, graft-versus-host disease, type 1 diabetes, bone fractures, cartilage damage, and cardiac diseases. Despite remarkable progress in clinical trials, most applications still use traditional culture media containing fetal bovine serum or serum-free media that contain serum albumin, insulin, and transferrin. The ill-defined and variable nature of traditional culture media remains a challenge and has created a need for better defined xeno-free culture media to meet the regulatory and long-term safety requirements for cell-based therapies. We developed and tested a serum-free and xeno-free culture medium (SFM-XF) using human bone marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs by investigating primary cell isolation, multiple passage expansion, mesoderm differentiation, cellular phenotype, and gene expression analysis, which are critical for complying with translation to cell therapy. Human MSCs expanded in SFM-XF showed continual propagation, with an expected phenotype and differentiation potential to adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages similar to that of MSCs expanded in traditional serum-containing culture medium (SCM). To monitor global gene expression, the transcriptomes of bone marrow-derived MSCs expanded in SFM-XF and SCM were compared, revealing relatively similar expression profiles. In addition, the SFM-XF supported the isolation and propagation of human MSCs from primary human marrow aspirates, ensuring that these methods and reagents are compatible for translation to therapy. The SFM-XF culture system allows better expansion and multipotentiality of MSCs and serves as a preferred alternative to serum-containing media for the production of large scale, functionally competent MSCs for future clinical applications.

  16. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  17. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  18. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  19. Markers of stem cells in human ovarian granulosa cells: is there a clinical significance in ART?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varras Michail

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to determine the incidence of gene expression of Oct-4 and DAZL, which are typical markers for stem cells, in human granulosa cells during ovarian stimulation in women with normal FSH levels undergoing IVF or ICSI and to discover any clinical significance of such expression in ART. Methods Twenty one women underwent ovulation induction for IVF or ICSI and ET with standard GnRH analogue-recombinant FSH protocol. Infertility causes were male and tubal factor. Cumulus–mature oocyte complexes were denuded separately and granulosa cells were analyzed for each patient separately using quantitative reverse-transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis for Oct-4 and DAZL gene expression with G6PD gene as internal standard. Results G6PD and Oct-4 mRNA was detected in the granulosa cells in 47.6% (10/21. The median of Oct-4 mRNA/G6PD mRNA was 1.75 with intra-quarteral range from 0.10 to 98.21. The OCT-4 mRNA expression was statistically significantly correlated with the number of oocytes retrieved; when the Oct-4 mRNA expression was higher, then more than six oocytes were retrieved (p=0.037, Wilcoxon rank-sum. No detection of DAZL mRNA was found in granulosa cells. There was no additional statistically significant correlation between the levels of Oct-4 expression and FSH basal levels or estradiol peak levels or dosage of FSH for ovulation induction. No association was found between the presence or absence of Oct-4 mRNA expression in granulosa cells and ovarian response to gonadotropin stimulation. Also, no influence on pregnancy was observed between the presence or absence of Oct-4 mRNA expression in granulosa cells or to its expression levels accordingly. Conclusions Expression of OCT-4 mRNA, which is a typical stem cell marker and absence of expression of DAZL mRNA, which is a typical germ cell marker, suggest that a subpopulation of luteinized granulosa cells in healthy ovarian follicles (47

  20. Expanding mediation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, P.P.C.C.

    2012-01-01

    In his article In Between Us, Yoni van den Eede expands existing theories of mediation into the realm of the social and the political, focusing on the notions of opacity and transparency. His approach is rich and promising, but two pitfalls should be avoided. First, his concept of ‘in-between’ runs

  1. Expanding Student Assessment Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartscher, Beth; Carter, Andrea; Lawlor, Anna; McKelvey, Barbara

    This paper describes an approach for expanding assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of content. The targeted population consisted of elementary and junior high school students in two schools in a growing middle-class community in north central Illinois. The elementary school enrolled 467 students and the junior…

  2. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  3. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  4. Neoplastic lesions of endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract: ten evolving principles as a basis for clinical understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ben Lawrence,1,2 Malcolm Anderson,3 Simon Schimmack,1 Michael Findlay,2,3 Mark Kidd,1 Irvin Modlin11Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 3Department of Oncology, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: Timely and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms is a difficult clinical endeavor. The field is particularly dynamic, not only in terms of expanding therapeutic options, but in the classifications and biological principles that underpin good decision-making. Acknowledging the confusion created by past changes and the inevitability of future development, we combine our clinical experience with a review of the literature to frame the current understanding of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms in terms of a set of principles that have stabilized in the midst of this change. Firstly, we present five principles that guide classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms; specifically principles of prognostic classification, mechanisms of tumorigenesis, undiagnosed disease burden, clues regarding genetic etiology, and typical clinical presentation. Secondly, we offer five clinical principles upon which to build a therapeutic strategy. Specifically, these treatment principles include the separation of options by tumor cell differentiation, and the site of the primary lesion in well differentiated tumors. Chromogranin A is a moderately useful biomarker. Treatment should only be considered by clinicians in a multidisciplinary team, and in the face of multiple potential therapeutic options without a supporting evidence base, clinical trial enrolment remains imperative. Therefore, we provide a current synopsis of classification of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, and their etiology, clinical presentation, and

  5. Analysis of Vδ1 T cells in clinical grade melanoma-infiltrating lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald;

    2012-01-01

    . In this study, we have detected low frequencies of Vδ1 T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) products for adoptive cell transfer generated from melanoma metastases. An increased frequency of Vδ1 T cells was found among the cell products from patients with an advanced disease stage. Vδ1 T cells...... displayed in vitro antitumor activities and sufficient proliferative potential to generate over 1 × 10(9) cells using current protocols for T cell transfer. Infusion of Vδ1 T cells together with high numbers of αβ TILs in a clinical trial was safe and well tolerated. These data suggest that Vδ1 T cells...

  6. Culturing and expansion of "clinical grade" precursors cells from the fetal human central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelati, Maurizio; Profico, Daniela; Projetti-Pensi, Massimo; Muzi, Gianmarco; Sgaravizzi, Giada; Vescovi, Angelo Luigi

    2013-01-01

    NSCs have been demonstrated to be very useful in grafts into the mammalian central nervous system to investigate the exploitation of NSC for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. To push cell therapy in CNS on stage of clinical application, it is necessary to establish a continuous and standardized, clinical grade (i.e., produced following the good manufacturing practice guidelines) human neural stem cell lines. In this chapter, we illustrate some of the protocols routinely used into our GMP cell bank for the production of "clinical grade" human neural stem cell lines.

  7. 扩大根尖狭窄区治疗根尖周炎临床观察%Clinical observation of expanding the apical constriction treatment of the periapical periodontitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文燕

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨扩大根尖狭窄区治疗根尖周炎的临床疗效。方法:2010年1月-2013年10月收治根尖周炎患者80例,随机分成对照组和观察组,各40例,对照组采用传统根管治疗术进行治疗,观察组采用扩大根管狭窄区治疗术进行治疗。结果:观察组超充1例,术后持续牙龈肿胀1例,慢性牙龈炎1例。对照组欠充4例,超充6例,残余5例,术后持续牙龈肿胀7例,慢性牙龈炎8例。两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。经过6~27个月的随访,观察组复发2例,复发率5.0%,对照组复发11例,复发率27.5%,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:扩大根尖狭窄区治疗根尖周炎复发率低,临床疗效佳,值得推广。%Objective:To investigate the clinical effect of expanding the apical constriction treatment of the periapical periodontitis.Methods:80 patients with periapical periodontitis were selected from January 2010 to October 2013.They were divided into the observation group and the control group with 40 cases in each.The control group were given the traditional root canal therapy,while the observation group were treated with expanding the apical constriction therapy.Results:In the observation group,1 cases was over filling,1 cases continued gingival swelling after operation,and 1 cases was chronic gingivitis.In the control group,4 cases were under filling,6 cases were over filling,5 cases were residual,7 cases continued gingival swelling after operation, and 8 cases were chronic gingivitis.The difference between two groups was statistically significant(P<0.05).After 6~27 months of follow-up,2 cases were recurred in the observation group,and the recurrence rate was 5%.11 cases were recurred in the control group,and the recurrence rate was 27.5%.The difference between two groups was statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion:The treatment of expanding the apical constriction on periapical periodontitis

  8. Glomerulonephritis associated with marginal zone B-cell lymphoma: clinical, pathological characteristics of renal injury and treatment (clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzhumabaeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glomerulonephritis associated with marginal zone B-cell lymphoma at the onset of disease is rarely diagnosed. In this article we reported two patient of the extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with kidney damage. The first patient with the extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma involved the stomach, lymph nodes, bone marrow and associated with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis and renal failure. The second patient with the splenic form of marginal zone B-cell lymphoma associated with fibrillary glomerulonephritis and hepatitis C and involve the lymph nodes, liver, bone marrow, and synthesis monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgMκ, cryoglobulin type II. Glomerulonephritis of the both cases were established on the renal biopsies by the morphological investigation, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy.Both patients received therapy with bendamustine and rituximab, which has resulted in complete remission for lymphatic tumors and improve of kidney function. Overall and event-free survival in the first case corresponds to 21 and 16 months, the second 29 and 20, respectively.These cases illustrates that the kidney may be initially involved by extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, and the need for expanded investigation of the possible dissemination. Combination of bendamustine and rituximab were effective and safety treatment in these cases.

  9. Clinical relevance of KIRs in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitived target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation, and unlike cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, they do not require peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell cytotoxic activity is controlled by considerable number of cell surface Killer cell Immunoglobulin like Receptors (KIRs, which can exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. The inhibitory KIRs are mostly specific for HLA class I ligands and I HLA class like molecules, while the specificity of activating receptors is regarded to lectine-like superfamily. The role of NK cells in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT: NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT. By selecting donors mismatched for relevant HLA ligands in the context of recipients KIR genotype, multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing of recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion Investigation of KIRs heterogenity play an important role in the field of HSCT, because it is useful for the early diagnosis of post transplant complications and can serve as a predictive risk factor for GvHD development.

  10. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  11. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  12. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  13. Influence of freezing and thawing cycles on mechanical properties of closed-cell expanded perlite cemented soil%冻融循环对闭孔珍珠岩水泥土力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯宇慧; 申向东

    2013-01-01

    Due to poor frost resistance of cement-soil,in permafrost and seasonal frozen soil area,the application and promotion of the soil cement is subject to a certain limit,how to improve the strength and durability of cemented soil in repeated freeze-thaw conditions to ensure the service life of the engineering is the key for further promotion and application of soil cement material in cold regions.By adding closed-cell expanded perlite in cemented soil,it came to the strength that cemented soil in different closed-cell expanded perlite under freezing and thawing cycles,analyzed the effect of freezing and thawing cycles on closed-cell expanded perlite and the changes before and after freezing and thawing cycles closed-cell expanded perlite cemented soil.The cemented soil adding closed-cell expanded perlite are preliminary analyzed.%由于水泥土抗冻性能较差,在多年冻土和季节性冻土地区,水泥土的应用和推广受到了一定的限制,如何提高反复冻融条件下水泥土的强度和耐久性,保证工程的使用寿命,是水泥土材料在寒冷地区进一步推广应用的关键.通过在水泥土中加入闭孔珍珠岩,得出水泥土在不同闭孔珍珠岩掺量下冻融循环后的强度值,分析了冻融循环次数对闭孔珍珠岩水泥土性能的影响及冻融循环前后闭孔珍珠岩水泥土强度变化,对掺入闭孔珍珠岩的水泥土做了初步的机理分析.

  14. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Matsumoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities.

  15. Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinical Variant, Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    K., Deepadarshan; M., Mallikarjun; N. Abdu, Noshin

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour of skin, comprising 80% of non-melanoma cancers. Intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits increased pigmentation. It is a very rare variant, although its frequency can reach upto 6% of total basal cell carcinomas in Hispanics. Herein, we are reporting 2 cases of pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  16. Peripheral T cell lymphoma: clinical utility of romidepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawey K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Zain, Kathryn SaweyNYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USAIntroduction: Direct therapeutic targets, such as aberrant tumor cell genes and tumor cell markers, have been the focus of cancer treatment for more than 50 years. The resulting damage to normal cells and emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells after exposure to conventional chemotherapy have led researchers to study indirect targets, like the tumor vasculature. A more recent indirect approach involves targeting the epigenetic modifiers, DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to be active cytotoxic agents in T cell lymphoma. The current treatments approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for relapsed cutaneous T cell lymphoma are vorinostat and romidepsin. The diversity and rarity of peripheral T cell lymphomas present a challenge for effective treatment. With their poor overall survival rate, new targeted therapies need to be developed.Keywords: peripheral T cell lymphoma, treatment, romidepsin

  17. Glioma stem cell lines expanded in adherent culture have tumor-specific phenotypes and are suitable for chemical and genetic screens

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Steven M; YOSHIKAWA, KOICHI; Clarke, Ian D.; Danovi, Davide; Stricker, Stefan; Russell, Roslin; Bayani, Jane; Head, Renee; Lee, Marco; Bernstein, Mark; Squire, Jeremy A.; Smith, Austin; Dirks, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Human brain tumors appear to have a hierarchical cellular organization suggestive of a stem cell foundation. In vitro expansion of the putative cancer stem cells as stable cell lines would provide a powerful model system to study their biology. Here, we demonstrate routine and efficient derivation of adherent cell lines from malignant glioma that display stem cell properties and initiate high-grade gliomas following xenotransplantation. Significantly, glioma neural stem (GNS) cell lines from ...

  18. Stem cell therapy after myocardial infarction: ready for clinical application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Markus G; Franz, Wolfgang M

    2006-10-01

    The discovery of stem cells capable of generating angiogenic or contractile cells and structures might offer new treatment options for patients suffering from heart disease. In particular, embryonic stem cells are considered to have great potential for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Studies suggest that delivery or mobilization of stem and progenitor cells might improve tissue perfusion and contractile performance of the damaged heart; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Fusion or trans-differentiation into cardiomyocytes or vascular cells are considered rare events of cellular engraftment, and adult stem cells are now considered as 'regenerator cells', acting via paracrine effects of cytokines, or by activation of resident stent cells, thereby supporting the myocardial healing mechanisms after injury. Administration of autologous hematopoietic stem cells or mobilization of endogenous stem cells has been shown to be safe after myocardial infarction or cardiomyopathies, whereas skeletal myoblasts are considered to be hazardous due to the occurrence of life-threatening arrhythmias. This review focuses on the use of adult human stem cells for treating myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy, and discusses recent preliminary efficacy data, which suggest that 'regenerator cells' might have the potential to improve myocardial perfusion and contractile performance in patients suffering from myocardial infarction, severe ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure. PMID:17078382

  19. Human mesenchymal stem cells: from basic biology to clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, B M; Kassem, M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are bein...

  20. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid;

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Adipose and Other Tissues: Basic Biological Properties and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Orbay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells that were initially isolated from bone marrow. However, subsequent research has shown that other adult tissues also contain MSCs. MSCs originate from mesenchyme, which is embryonic tissue derived from the mesoderm. These cells actively proliferate, giving rise to new cells in some tissues, but remain quiescent in others. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types including adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Isolation and induction of these cells could provide a new therapeutic tool for replacing damaged or lost adult tissues. However, the biological properties and use of stem cells in a clinical setting must be well established before significant clinical benefits are obtained. This paper summarizes data on the biological properties of MSCs and discusses current and potential clinical applications.

  2. Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma morphologically mimicking clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma in an adult patient: report of a case expanding the morphologic spectrum of Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Asmita; Tickoo, Satish K; Kumar, Sunil; Arora, Vinod Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a relatively rare tumor mainly affecting children and adolescents. It shows significant morphological overlap with the 2 most common adult renal tumors, which are the clear cell (conventional) RCC and papillary RCC. We describe case of a young adult female who presented with right flank pain and abdominal mass. Radiological investigations showed features suggestive of renal cell carcinoma in the right kidney. Histopathological findings while suggestive of Xp11 carcinoma, showed significant overlap with the recently described entity clear cell papillary RCC. TFE3 immunohistochemistry confirmed the tumor to be Xp11 translocation RCC. The patient had an aggressive course with lymph node metastasis. In this report, we discuss differential diagnosis and the diagnostic challenges of Xp11 translocation RCC in adults.

  3. CLINICAL VALUE OF DETECTING T LYMPHOCYTE SUBSET AND NK CELL ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长安; 管增伟; 孙武; 邵玉霞; 李卓; 贾廷珍

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study on the expression and clinical significance of T lymphocyte subset and NK cell activity (NKA) in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods Fifty-seven cancer patients and 33 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. T lymphocyte subset was measured by SAP technique and NKA by LDH release assay based on K562 cells, which served as target cells.

  4. Combination of Circulating Tumor Cells with Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Enhances Clinical Prediction of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Xu Wang; Hua He; Ziling Liu; Ji-Fan Hu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and surveillance of lung cancer. However, CTC detection is not only costly, but its sensitivity is also low, thus limiting its usage and the collection of robust data regarding the significance of CTCs in lung cancer. We aimed to seek clinical variables that enhance the prediction of CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical samples and pathological data were c...

  5. Islet cell xenotransplantation: a serious look toward the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Kannan P; Martin, Benjamin M; Turgeon, Nicole A; Kirk, Allan D

    2014-01-01

    Type I diabetes remains a significant clinical problem in need of a reliable, generally applicable solution. Both whole organ pancreas and islet allotransplantation have been shown to grant patients insulin independence, but organ availability has restricted these procedures to an exceptionally small subset of the diabetic population. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has been pursued as a potential means of overcoming the limits of allotransplantation, and several preclinical studies have achieved near-physiologic function and year-long survival in clinically relevant pig-to-primate model systems. These proof-of-concept studies have suggested that xenogeneic islets may be poised for use in clinical trials. In this review, we examine recent progress in islet xenotransplantation, with a critical eye toward the gaps between the current state of the art and the state required for appropriate clinical investigation.

  6. Ex vivo restimulation of human PBMC expands a CD3+CD4-CD8- γδ+ T cell population that can confound the evaluation of CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgmen, B J; Papalia, L; Wang, L; Dyson, A R; McCallum, H A; Simson, C M; Pearse, M J; Maraskovsky, E; Hung, D; Eomois, P P; Hartel, G; Barnden, M J; Rockman, S P

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of vaccine-induced humoral and CD4(+) and CD8(+) cellular immune responses represents an important correlate of vaccine efficacy. Accurate and reliable assays evaluating such responses are therefore critical during the clinical development phase of vaccines. T cells play a pivotal role both in coordinating the adaptive and innate immune responses and as effectors. During the assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in subjects participating in a large-scale influenza vaccine trial, we identified the expansion of an IFN-γ-producing CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) γδ (+) T cell population in the peripheral blood of 90/610 (15%) healthy subjects. The appearance of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) γδ (+) T cells in the blood of subjects was transient and found to be independent of the study cohort, vaccine group, subject gender and ethnicity, and ex vivo restimulation conditions. Although the function of this population and relevance to vaccination are unclear, their inclusion in the total vaccine-specific T-cell response has the potential to confound data interpretation. It is thus recommended that when evaluating the induction of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) immune responses following vaccination, the CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) γδ (+) T cells are either excluded or separately enumerated from the overall frequency determination. PMID:24066003

  7. Ex Vivo Restimulation of Human PBMC Expands a CD3+CD4−CD8−γδ+ T Cell Population That Can Confound the Evaluation of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgmen, B. J.; Papalia, L.; Wang, L.; Dyson, A. R.; McCallum, H. A.; Simson, C. M.; Pearse, M. J.; Maraskovsky, E.; Hung, D.; Eomois, P. P.; Hartel, G.; Barnden, M. J.; Rockman, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of vaccine-induced humoral and CD4+ and CD8+ cellular immune responses represents an important correlate of vaccine efficacy. Accurate and reliable assays evaluating such responses are therefore critical during the clinical development phase of vaccines. T cells play a pivotal role both in coordinating the adaptive and innate immune responses and as effectors. During the assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in subjects participating in a large-scale influenza vaccine trial, we identified the expansion of an IFN-γ-producing CD3+CD4−CD8−γδ+ T cell population in the peripheral blood of 90/610 (15%) healthy subjects. The appearance of CD3+CD4−CD8−γδ+ T cells in the blood of subjects was transient and found to be independent of the study cohort, vaccine group, subject gender and ethnicity, and ex vivo restimulation conditions. Although the function of this population and relevance to vaccination are unclear, their inclusion in the total vaccine-specific T-cell response has the potential to confound data interpretation. It is thus recommended that when evaluating the induction of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses following vaccination, the CD3+CD4−CD8−γδ+ T cells are either excluded or separately enumerated from the overall frequency determination. PMID:24066003

  8. Ex Vivo Restimulation of Human PBMC Expands a CD3+CD4-CD8-γδ+ T Cell Population That Can Confound the Evaluation of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Sedgmen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of vaccine-induced humoral and CD4+ and CD8+ cellular immune responses represents an important correlate of vaccine efficacy. Accurate and reliable assays evaluating such responses are therefore critical during the clinical development phase of vaccines. T cells play a pivotal role both in coordinating the adaptive and innate immune responses and as effectors. During the assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI in subjects participating in a large-scale influenza vaccine trial, we identified the expansion of an IFN-γ-producing CD3+CD4-CD8-γδ+ T cell population in the peripheral blood of 90/610 (15% healthy subjects. The appearance of CD3+CD4-CD8-γδ+ T cells in the blood of subjects was transient and found to be independent of the study cohort, vaccine group, subject gender and ethnicity, and ex vivo restimulation conditions. Although the function of this population and relevance to vaccination are unclear, their inclusion in the total vaccine-specific T-cell response has the potential to confound data interpretation. It is thus recommended that when evaluating the induction of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses following vaccination, the CD3+CD4-CD8-γδ+ T cells are either excluded or separately enumerated from the overall frequency determination.

  9. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  10. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  11. Manufacturing and use of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for phase I clinical trials: Establishment and evaluation of a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been utilised in many clinical trials as an experimental treatment in numerous clinical settings. Bone marrow remains the traditional source tissue for MSCs but is relatively hard to access in large volumes. Alternatively, MSCs may be derived from other tissues including the placenta and adipose tissue. In an initial study no obvious differences in parameters such as cell surface phenotype, chemokine receptor display, mesodermal differentiation capacity or immunosuppressive ability, were detected when we compared human marrow derived- MSCs to human placenta-derived MSCs. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a protocol and related processes for preparation placenta-derived MSCs for early phase clinical trials. Methods. A full-term placenta was taken after delivery of the baby as a source of MSCs. Isolation, seeding, incubation, cryopreservation of human placentaderived MSCs and used production release criteria were in accordance with the complex regulatory requirements applicable to Code of Good Manufacturing Practice manufacturing of ex vivo expanded cells. Results. We established and evaluated instructions for MSCs preparation protocol and gave an overview of the three clinical areas application. In the first trial, MSCs were co-transplanted iv to patient receiving an allogeneic cord blood transplant as therapy for treatmentrefractory acute myeloid leukemia. In the second trial, MSCs were administered iv in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and without serious adverse effects. In the third trial, MSCs were injected directly into the site of tendon damage using ultrasound guidance in the treatment of chronic refractory tendinopathy. Conclusion. Clinical trials using both allogeneic and autologous cells demonstrated MSCs to be safe. A described protocol for human placenta-derived MSCs is appropriate for use in a clinical setting, relatively inexpensive and can be

  12. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  13. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  14. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013

  15. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  16. Clinical translation of stem cells in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Olle; Barker, Roger A; Brüstle, Oliver; Isacson, Ole; Svendsen, Clive N

    2012-02-01

    Stem cells and their derivatives show tremendous potential for treating many disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss here the challenges and potential for the translation of stem-cell-based approaches into treatments for Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  17. Breast cancer stem cell markers – the rocky road to clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dontu, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Lately, understanding the role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation and progression became a major focus in stem cell biology and in cancer research. Considerable efforts, such as the recent studies by Honeth and colleagues, published in the June issue of Breast Cancer Research, are directed towards developing clinical applications of the cancer stem cell concepts. This work shows that the previously described CD44+CD24- stem cell phenotype is associated with basal-type breast cancers in ...

  18. Derivation of xeno-free and GMP-grade human embryonic stem cells--platforms for future clinical applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly E Tannenbaum

    Full Text Available Clinically compliant human embryonic stem cells (hESCs should be developed in adherence to ethical standards, without risk of contamination by adventitious agents. Here we developed for the first time animal-component free and good manufacturing practice (GMP-compliant hESCs. After vendor and raw material qualification, we derived xeno-free, GMP-grade feeders from umbilical cord tissue, and utilized them within a novel, xeno-free hESC culture system. We derived and characterized three hESC lines in adherence to regulations for embryo procurement, and good tissue, manufacturing and laboratory practices. To minimize freezing and thawing, we continuously expanded the lines from initial outgrowths and samples were cryopreserved as early stocks and banks. Batch release criteria included DNA-fingerprinting and HLA-typing for identity, characterization of pluripotency-associated marker expression, proliferation, karyotyping and differentiation in-vitro and in-vivo. These hESCs may be valuable for regenerative therapy. The ethical, scientific and regulatory methodology presented here may serve for development of additional clinical-grade hESCs.

  19. Engineering a clinically-useful matrix for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-01-01

    The design criteria for matrices for encapsulation of cells for cell therapy include chemical, biological, engineering, marketing, regulatory, and financial constraints. What is required is a biocompatible material for culture of cells in three-dimensions (3-D) that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility to alter composition and compliance, and a composition that would permit a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo use. The challenge is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild a given tissue. Our approach is to deconstruct the ECM to a few modular components that can be reassembled into biomimetic materials that meet these criteria. These semi-synthetic ECMs (sECMs) employ thiol-modified derivatives of hyaluronic acid (HA) that can form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels. These sECMs are "living" biopolymers, meaning that they can be crosslinked in the presence of cells or tissues to enable cell therapy and tissue engineering. Moreover, the sECMs allow inclusion of the appropriate biological cues needed to simulate the complexity of the ECM of a given tissue. Taken together, the sECM technology offers a manufacturable, highly reproducible, flexible, FDA-approvable, and affordable vehicle for cell expansion and differentiation in 3-D. PMID:19279714

  20. Therapeutic dendritic cell vaccination of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma - A clinical, phase 1/2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, A.; Trepiakas, R.; Wenandy, L.;

    2008-01-01

    with a DC- based vaccine in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Twenty-seven patients with progressive cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma were vaccinated with DCs loaded with either a cocktail of survivin and telomerase peptides or tumor lysate depending on their HLA-A2 haplotype......Therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccination against cancer is a strategy aimed at activating the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells. In this nonrandomized phase 1/2 trial, we investigated the safety, feasibility, induction of T-cell response, and clinical response after treatment...

  1. Therapeutic dendritic cell vaccination of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a clinical phase 1/2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Annika; Trepiakas, Redas; Wenandy, Lynn;

    2008-01-01

    with a DC-based vaccine in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Twenty-seven patients with progressive cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma were vaccinated with DCs loaded with either a cocktail of survivin and telomerase peptides or tumor lysate depending on their HLA-A2 haplotype......Therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccination against cancer is a strategy aimed at activating the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells. In this nonrandomized phase 1/2 trial, we investigated the safety, feasibility, induction of T-cell response, and clinical response after treatment...

  2. Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: janus resurrected--two faces of B cell and plasma cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Rothstein, D M

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a complex role in the immune response. In addition to giving rise to plasma cells (PCs) and promoting T cell responses via antigen presentation, they perform immunoregulatory functions. This knowledge has created concerns regarding nonspecific B cell depletional therapy because of the potential to paradoxically augment immune responses. Recent studies now indicate that PCs have immune functions beyond immunoglobulin synthesis. Evidence for a new role for PCs as potent regulatory cells (via IL-10 and IL-35 production) is discussed including the implications for PC-targeted therapies currently being developed for clinical transplantation.

  3. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  4. Closed system generation of dendritic cells from a single blood volume for clinical application in immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, M; van Zanten, J; Hospers, GAP; Setroikromo, A; de Jong, MA; de Leij, LFMH; Mulder, NH

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) used for clinical trials should be processed oil a large scale conforming to current good manufacturing practice (cGM P) guidelines. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of immature DC in a closed-systern. Aphereses were performed with th

  5. Hypermutation in mantle cell lymphoma does not indicate a clinical or biological subentity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraders, Margit; Oeschger, Sabine; Kluin, Philip M.; Hebeda, Konnie; Schuuring, Ed; Groenen, Patricia J. T. A.; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; van Krieken, Johan H. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a prime example of a well-defined entity based on morphology, phenotype, genetics and also clinical features. Although most patients have an adverse clinical course, some have a better survival than others. The most consistently reported adverse prognostic parameter is a high

  6. Detection and clinical relevance of early disseminated breast cancer cells depend on their cytokeratin expression pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effenberger, Katharina E.; Borgen, Elin; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Bartkowiak, Kai; Grosser, Andrea; Synnestvedt, Marit; Kaaresen, Rolf; Brandt, Burkhard; Nesland, Jahn M.; Pantel, Klaus; Naume, Bjorn

    2011-01-01

    The factors determining the clinical relevance of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in breast cancer patients are largely unknown. Here we compared the specificity and clinical performance of two antibodies frequently used for DTC detection. Reactivities of antibodies A45-B/B3 (A45) and AE1/AE3 (AE) fo

  7. Paroxysmal hemicrania as the clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Beams

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Head pain is the most common complaint in patients with giant cell arteritis but the headache has no distinct diagnostic features. There have been no published reports of giant cell arteritis presenting as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. We describe a patient who developed a new onset headache in her fifties, which fit the diagnostic criteria for paroxysmal hemicrania and was completely responsive to corticosteroids. Removal of the steroid therapy brought a reemergence of her headaches. Giant cell arteritis should be considered in the evaluation of secondary causes of paroxysmal hemicrania; in addition giant cell arteritis needs to be ruled out in patients who are over the age of 50 years with a new onset trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

  8. The scope of clinical morbidity in sickle cell trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell trait (SCT, the heterozygous state of the sickle hemoglobin beta globin gene (HbAS is carried by as many as 100 million individuals including up to 25% of the population in some regions of the World. Sickle cell trait is the best-characterized genetic polymorphism known to protect against falciparum malaria. Although SCT was initially considered as a benign condition, data are accumulating of serious morbidities in SCT individuals including increased incidence of hematuria, renal papillary necrosis, renal failure and malignancy, thromboembolic disorders, splenic infarction as a high altitude complication, and exercise-related rhabdomyolysis and sudden death. Despite these associations, the average life span of individuals with sickle cell trait is similar to that of the general population. Nonetheless, given the large number of people with sickle cell trait, it is important that physicians be aware of these associations. The aim of this article is to review publications reporting and discussing morbidities in SCT individuals.

  9. Standardizing Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Translation to Clinical Use: Selection of GMP-Compliant Medium and a Simplified Isolation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J Robert; Pfeifer, Kyle; Petry, Florian; Powell, Natalie; Delzeit, Jennifer; Weiss, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) are a focus for clinical translation but standardized methods for isolation and expansion are lacking. Previously we published isolation and expansion methods for UC-MSCs which presented challenges when considering good manufacturing practices (GMP) for clinical translation. Here, a new and more standardized method for isolation and expansion of UC-MSCs is described. The new method eliminates dissection of blood vessels and uses a closed-vessel dissociation following enzymatic digestion which reduces contamination risk and manipulation time. The new method produced >10 times more cells per cm of UC than our previous method. When biographical variables were compared, more UC-MSCs per gram were isolated after vaginal birth compared to Caesarian-section births, an unexpected result. UC-MSCs were expanded in medium enriched with 2%, 5%, or 10% pooled human platelet lysate (HPL) eliminating the xenogeneic serum components. When the HPL concentrations were compared, media supplemented with 10% HPL had the highest growth rate, smallest cells, and the most viable cells at passage. UC-MSCs grown in 10% HPL had surface marker expression typical of MSCs, high colony forming efficiency, and could undergo trilineage differentiation. The new protocol standardizes manufacturing of UC-MSCs and enables clinical translation. PMID:26966439

  10. Langerhans cell histiocytosis : A clinical and immunological study

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstrand, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), previously known as histiocytosis X, eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schüller-Christian or Letterer-Siwe disease, is a rare disease with a reported incidence in childhood of 5.4 cases per million children per year. The disease can present at any age but young children are most often affected. It is characterized by an accumulation of abnormal and clonal Langerhans cells in various organs such as the skin, bone, lymph nodes, lungs, liver, spl...

  11. Process Engineering of Stem Cells for Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Maria Margarida de Carvalho Negrão

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have garnered a lot of attention owing to their inherent self-renewal ability and pluripotency. These characteristics have opened opportunities for potential stem cell-based regenerative medicines, for development of drug discovery platforms and as unique in vitro models for the study of early human development.(...) Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

  12. Expandable pattern casting research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  13. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  14. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  15. Latest status of the clinical and industrial applications of cell sheet engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Mime; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering, which allows tissue engineering to be realized without the use of biodegradable scaffolds as an original approach, using a temperature-responsive intelligent surface, has been applied in regenerative medicine for various tissues, and a number of clinical studies have been already performed for life-threatening diseases. By using the results and findings obtained from the initial clinical studies, additional investigative clinical studies in several tissues with cell sheet engineering are currently in preparation stage. For treating many patients effectively by cell sheet engineering, an automated system integrating cell culture, cell-sheet fabrication, and layering is essential, and the system should include an advanced three-dimensional suspension cell culture system and an in vitro bioreactor system to scale up the production of cultured cells and fabricate thicker vascularized tissues. In this paper, cell sheet engineering, its clinical application, and further the authors' challenge to develop innovative cell culture systems under newly legislated regulatory platform in Japan are summarized and discussed.

  16. Managing the potential and pitfalls during clinical translation of emerging stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Heather; Munsie, Megan; O'Connor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    We are moving into a new era of stem cell research where many possibilities for treatment of degenerative, chronic and/or fatal diseases and injuries are becoming primed for clinical trial. These reports have led millions of people worldwide to hope that regenerative medicine is about to revolutionise biomedicine: either through transplantation of cells grown in the laboratory, or by finding ways to stimulate a patient's intrinsic stem cells to repair diseased and damaged organs. While major contributions of stem cells to drug discovery, safety and efficacy testing, as well as modelling 'diseases in a dish' are also expected, it is the in vivo use of stem cells that has captured the general public's attention. However, public misconceptions of stem cell potential and applications can leave patients vulnerable to the influences of profit driven entities selling unproven treatments without solid scientific basis or appropriate clinical testing or follow up. This review provides a brief history of stem cell clinical translation together with an overview of the properties, potential, and current clinical application of various stem cell types. In doing so it presents a clearer picture of the inherent risks and opportunities associated with stem cell research translation, and thus offers a framework to help realise invested expectations more quickly, safely and effectively. PMID:24949190

  17. Leishmania-specific T cells expressing interferon-¿(IFN-¿) and IL-10 upon activation are expanded in individuals cured of visceral leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Kemp, M; Kharazmi, A;

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients who have recovered from visceral leishmaniasis often respond to Leishmania antigens in vitro by production of both IL-4, IFN-gamma and IL-10. In order to establish the cellular sources of these cytokines, we activated cells from individuals...... with a history of visceral leishmaniasis with Leishmania antigen for 6 days in culture, and identified cytokine production at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. The cytokines were only found in CD3+ cells and among these mainly within the CD4+ subset. The percentage of cytokine-producing cells was compared...... in Leishmania-activated PBMC cultures from the previous patients and from individuals living in a village where leishmaniasis does not occur. The percentage of IL-10- and IFN-gamma-containing cells was significantly higher in the previous patients than in the controls, indicating that Leishmania-specific T...

  18. T Cell Receptor Excision Circle (TREC) Monitoring after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation; a Predictive Marker for Complications and Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Ahmed; Sundin, Mikael; Stikvoort, Arwen; Abumaree, Muhamed; Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well-established treatment modality for a variety of malignant diseases as well as for inborn errors of the metabolism or immune system. Regardless of disease origin, good clinical effects are dependent on proper immune reconstitution. T cells are responsible for both the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect against malignant cells and protection against infections. The immune recovery of T cells relies initially on peripheral expansion of mature cells from the graft and later on the differentiation and maturation from donor-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The formation of new T cells occurs in the thymus and as a byproduct, T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) are released upon rearrangement of the T cell receptor. Detection of TRECs by PCR is a reliable method for estimating the amount of newly formed T cells in the circulation and, indirectly, for estimating thymic function. Here, we discuss the role of TREC analysis in the prediction of clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Due to the pivotal role of T cell reconstitution we propose that TREC analysis should be included as a key indicator in the post-HSCT follow-up. PMID:27727179

  19. Optimal Seeding Densities for In Vitro Chondrogenesis of Two- and Three-Dimensional-Isolated and -Expanded Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells Within a Porous Collagen Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornes, Troy D; Jomha, Nadr M; Mulet-Sierra, Aillette; Adesida, Adetola B

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are a promising cell source for treating articular cartilage defects. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of cell seeding density within a collagen I scaffold on in vitro BMSC chondrogenesis following isolation and expansion in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environments. It was hypothesized that both expansion protocols would produce BMSCs capable of hyaline-like chondrogenesis with an optimal seeding density of 10 × 10(6) cells/cm(3). Ovine BMSCs were isolated in a 2D environment by plastic adherence, expanded to passage two in flasks containing an expansion medium, and seeded within collagen I scaffolds at densities of 50, 10, 5, 1, and 0.5 × 10(6) BMSCs/cm(3). For 3D isolation and expansion, aspirates containing known quantities of mononucleated cells (bone marrow-derived mononucleated cells [BMNCs]) were seeded on scaffolds at 50, 10, 5, 1, and 0.5 × 10(6) BMNCs/cm(3) and cultured in the expansion medium for an equivalent duration to 2D expansion. Constructs were differentiated in vitro in the chondrogenic medium for 21 days and assessed with reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, safranin O staining, histological scoring using the Bern Score, collagen immunofluorescence, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification. Two-dimensional-expanded BMSCs seeded at all densities were capable of proteoglycan production and displayed increased expressions of aggrecan and collagen II messenger RNA (mRNA) relative to predifferentiation controls. Collagen II deposition was apparent in scaffolds seeded at 0.5-10 × 10(6) BMSCs/cm(3). Chondrogenesis of 2D-expanded BMSCs was most pronounced in scaffolds seeded at 5-10 × 10(6) BMSCs/cm(3) based on aggrecan and collagen II mRNA, safranin O staining, Bern Score, total GAG, and GAG/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). For 3D-expanded BMSC-seeded scaffolds, increased aggrecan and collagen II m

  20. NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy: from basic biology to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yin, Jie; Li, Ting; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Leavenworth, JianMei; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which recognize and kill target cells independent of antigen specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching, play pivotal roles in immune defence against tumors. However, tumor cells often acquire the ability to escape NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Thus, understanding mechanisms underlying regulation of NK cell phenotype and function within the tumor environment is instrumental for designing new approaches to improve the current cell-based immunotherapy. In this review, we elaborate the main biological features and molecular mechanisms of NK cells that pertain to regulation of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor activity. We further overview current clinical approaches regarding NK cell-based cancer therapy, including cytokine infusion, adoptive transfer of autologous or allogeneic NK cells, applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing NK cells and adoptive transfer of memory-like NK cells. With these promising clinical outcomes and fuller understanding the basic questions raised in this review, we foresee that NK cell-based approaches may hold great potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B-mediated disorders and identification of altered cell-cycle dynamics due to ARID1B haploinsufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sim, J. C. H.; White, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, E.;

    2014-01-01

    patient-derived and ARID1B knockdown fibroblasts after serum starvation demonstrated delayed cell cycle re-entry associated with reduced cell number in the S-1 phase. Based on the patient's distinctive phenotype, we ascertained four additional patients and identified heterozygous de novo ARID1B frameshift...

  2. The clinical value of squamous cell carcinoma antigen in cancer of the uterine cervix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, HWA; Duk, JM; van der Zee, AGJ; Pras, E; Willemse, PHB; Hollema, H; Mourits, MJE; de Vries, EGE; Aalders, JG; Boonstra, J.

    1998-01-01

    A review is given of the clinical use and interpretation of serum tumor marker levels during the treatment of patients with cancer of the uterine cervix, Pretreatment serum squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen provides a new prognostic factor in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine ce

  3. Saudi Oncology Society clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouki Bazarbashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of renal cell carcinoma is presented. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system, 7th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  4. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic and...

  5. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic...

  6. Translational Research on Esophageal Cancer: From Cell Line to Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Boonstra (Jurjen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide esophageal cancer is a signifi cant and an increasing health problem. In 2005, there were 497,700 new cases, and the prevalence is expected to increase by approximately 140% by 2025. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most of the cases of esophageal cancer w

  7. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  8. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  9. Short-term in-vitro expansion improves monitoring and allows affordable generation of virus-specific T-cells against several viruses for a broad clinical application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Geyeregger

    Full Text Available Adenoviral infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in pediatric patients. Adoptive transfer of donor-derived human adenovirus (HAdV-specific T-cells represents a promising treatment option. However, the difficulty in identifying and selecting rare HAdV-specific T-cells, and the short time span between patients at high risk for invasive infection and viremia are major limitations. We therefore developed an IL-15-driven 6 to 12 day short-term protocol for in vitro detection of HAdV-specific T cells, as revealed by known MHC class I multimers and a newly identified adenoviral CD8 T-cell epitope derived from the E1A protein for the frequent HLA-type A*02∶01 and IFN-γ. Using this novel and improved diagnostic approach we observed a correlation between adenoviral load and reconstitution of CD8(+ and CD4(+ HAdV-specific T-cells including central memory cells in HSCT-patients. Adaption of the 12-day protocol to good manufacturing practice conditions resulted in a 2.6-log (mean expansion of HAdV-specific T-cells displaying high cytolytic activity (4-fold compared to controls and low or absent alloreactivity. Similar protocols successfully identified and rapidly expanded CMV-, EBV-, and BKV-specific T-cells. Our approach provides a powerful clinical-grade convertible tool for rapid and cost-effective detection and enrichment of multiple virus-specific T-cells that may facilitate broad clinical application.

  10. Optimizing patient derived mesenchymal stem cells as virus carriers for a Phase I clinical trial in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mader Emily K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can serve as carriers to deliver oncolytic measles virus (MV to ovarian tumors. In preparation for a clinical trial to use MSC as MV carriers, we obtained cells from ovarian cancer patients and evaluated feasibility and safety of this approach. Methods MSC from adipose tissues of healthy donors (hMSC and nine ovarian cancer patients (ovMSC were characterized for susceptibility to virus infection and tumor homing abilities. Results Adipose tissue (range 0.16-3.96 grams from newly diagnosed and recurrent ovarian cancer patients yielded about 7.41×106 cells at passage 1 (range 4–9 days. Phenotype and doubling times of MSC were similar between ovarian patients and healthy controls. The time to harvest of 3.0×108 cells (clinical dose could be achieved by day 14 (range, 9–17 days. Two of nine samples tested had an abnormal karyotype represented by trisomy 20. Despite receiving up to 1.6×109 MSC/kg, no tumors were seen in SCID beige mice and MSC did not promote the growth of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells in mice. The ovMSC migrated towards primary ovarian cancer samples in chemotaxis assays and to ovarian tumors in athymic mice. Using non-invasive SPECT-CT imaging, we saw rapid co-localization, within 5–8 minutes of intraperitoneal administration of MV infected MSC to the ovarian tumors. Importantly, MSC can be pre-infected with MV, stored in liquid nitrogen and thawed on the day of infusion into mice without loss of activity. MV infected MSC, but not virus alone, significantly prolonged the survival of measles immune ovarian cancer bearing animals. Conclusions These studies confirmed the feasibility of using patient derived MSC as carriers for oncolytic MV therapy. We propose an approach where MSC from ovarian cancer patients will be expanded, frozen and validated to ensure compliance with the release criteria. On the treatment day, the cells will be thawed, washed, mixed with virus, briefly

  11. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  12. Effects of Saponins against Clinical E. coli Strains and Eukaryotic Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Arabski; Aneta Węgierek-Ciuk; Grzegorz Czerwonka; Anna Lankoff; Wiesław Kaca

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of sap...

  13. T cell transcriptional factors in allergic rhinitis and its association with clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Ji-Hun; Chung, Young-Jun; Kim, Ji Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Th2 cells are crucially important in allergic disease and the possible involvement of Treg and Th17 cells has not been clearly identified. Objective To identify the mRNA expression of T cell transcription factors in nasal mucosa in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and to reveal their correlations with clinical features. Methods Eighteen patients with AR and 12 controls with turbinate hypertrophy were included. mRNA expression of the following transcriptional factors in nasal mu...

  14. Managing the potential and pitfalls during clinical translation of emerging stem cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Main, Heather; Munsie, Megan; O’Connor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    We are moving into a new era of stem cell research where many possibilities for treatment of degenerative, chronic and/or fatal diseases and injuries are becoming primed for clinical trial. These reports have led millions of people worldwide to hope that regenerative medicine is about to revolutionise biomedicine: either through transplantation of cells grown in the laboratory, or by finding ways to stimulate a patient’s intrinsic stem cells to repair diseased and damaged organs. While major ...

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Promote Angiogenesis: Potencial Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Merino-González, Consuelo; Zuñiga, Felipe A.; Escudero, Carlos; Ormazabal, Valeska; Reyes, Camila; Nova-Lamperti, Estefanía; Salomón, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells that are able to differentiate into multiple specialized cell types including osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSCs exert different functions in the body and have recently been predicted to have a major clinical/therapeutic potential. However, the mechanisms of self-renewal and tissue regeneration are not completely understood. It has been shown that the biological effect depends mainly on its paracrine action. Furthermor...

  16. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang H; Mao G; Chen L; Liu A

    2015-01-01

    Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, sequelae of st...

  17. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hongyun

    2015-01-01

    Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, se...

  18. Adoptive cell transfer: a clinical path to effective cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P; Yang, James C.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes has emerged as the most effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma and can mediate objective cancer regression in approximately 50% of patients. The use of donor lymphocytes for ACT is an effective treatment for immunosuppressed patients who develop post-transplant lymphomas. The ability to genetically engineer human lymphocytes and use them to mediate cancer regression in patients, which has recently ...

  19. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  20. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F;

    2014-01-01

    in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related......There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility...

  1. Short and long-term conservation of blood and bone marrow cells for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of methods to conserve bone marrow, blood and blood components is necessary to ensure adequate supplies of these at times of radiation accidents or during radiation therapy with accompanying destruction of the haemopoietic tissues and essential blood elements. In addition, with adequate supplies of stored blood, treatment of astronauts affected by radiation, particularly when interplanetary flights become feasible, will be possible and therapy for patients with blood dyscrasias can be greatly expanded. The creation and expansion of blood banks for long-term storage of haemotherapeutic products is necessarily dependent on improved methods of conservation of blood and bone marrow cells

  2. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  3. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  4. Clinical variants, stages, and management of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomir A Dourmishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common paraneoplastic disease among human neoplasms. The tumor affects mainly photoexposed areas, most often in the head and seldom appears on genitalia and perigenital region. BCC progresses slowly and metastases are found in less than 0.5% of the cases; however, a considerable local destruction and mutilation could be observed when treatment is neglected or inadequate. Different variants as nodular, cystic, micronodular, superficial, pigment BCC are described in literature and the differential diagnosis in some cases could be difficult. The staging of BCC is made according to Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM classification and is essential for performing the adequate treatment. Numerous therapeutic methods established for treatment of BCC, having their advantages or disadvantages, do not absolutely dissolve the risk of relapses. The early diagnostics based on the good knowledge and timely organized and adequate treatment is a precondition for better prognosis. Despite the slow progress and numerous therapeutic methods, the basal cell carcinoma should not be underestimated.

  5. Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Wound Healing: A Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalp Uzun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review clinical studies on the use of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of chronic wounds. A search on PubMed was performed on April 30th, 2014 to identify the relevant clinical studies. We reviewed 13 articles that reported the use adipose derived stem cells in the treatment of different types of wounds. Adipose derived stem cells have the potential to be used in the treatment of chronic wounds. However, standard methods for isolation, storage and application of these cells are needed. New materials to transfer these stem cells to injured tissues should be investigated. [Dis Mol Med 2014; 2(4.000: 57-64

  6. Recombinant IL-33 prolongs leflunomide-mediated graft survival by reducing IFN-γ and expanding CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in concordant heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chen; Lu, Fang-Na; Jin, Ning; Yang, Bo; Gao, Chang; Zhao, Bin; Fu, Jia-Zhao; Hong, Shi-Fu; Liang, Han-Ting; Chen, Li-Hong; Chen, Zhi-Shui; Chen, Jie; Qi, Zhong-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a novel IL-1 family member, and its administration has been associated with promotion of T helper type-2 (Th2) cell activity and cytokines, particularly IL-4 and IL-5 in vivo. Recently, IL-33 was shown to increase CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and to suppress levels of the Th1-type cytokine IFN-γ in allogeneic heart transplantation in mice. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-33 and leflunomide (Lef) could prolong graft survival in the concordant mouse-to-rat heart transplantation model. In this model, xenografts undergo acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR) typically on day 3 or cell-mediated rejection approximately on day 7 if AHXR is inhibited by Lef treatment. Recipients were treated with Lef (n=6), IL-33 (n=6), IL-33 combined with Lef (n=6), or left untreated (n=6) for survival studies. Heart grafts were monitored until they stopped beating. Mouse heterotopic grafts were performed, and recipients were sacrificed on days 2 and 7 for histological and flow cytometric analyses. The combination of IL-33 and Lef significantly prolonged the grafts from 17.3±2.3 to 2.8±0.4 days, compared to untreated controls. IL-33 administration with Lef, while facilitating Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4 on day 2 but not day 7), also decreased IFN-γ on day 2 and day 7, compared with Lef treatment only. Furthermore, IL-33 with Lef administration caused an expansion of suppressive CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in rats. The IL-33 and Lef combination therapy resulted in significantly prolonged graft survival, associated with markedly decreased Th1 cells and increased IL-10 levels. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the percentage of CD-45(+) B cells on days 2 and 7, compared with monotherapy. These findings reveal a new immunoregulatory property of IL-33. Specifically, it facilitates regulatory cells, particularly functional CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs that underlie IL-33-mediated cardiac xenograft survival. Moreover, it can decrease Th

  7. IL-15 Superagonist Expands mCD8+ T, NK and NKT Cells after Burn Injury but Fails to Improve Outcome during Burn Wound Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem K Patil

    Full Text Available Severely burned patients are highly susceptible to opportunistic infections and sepsis, owing to the loss of the protective skin barrier and immunological dysfunction. Interleukin-15 (IL-15 belongs to the IL-2 family of common gamma chain cytokines and stimulates the proliferation and activation of T (specifically memory CD8, NK and NKT cells. It has been shown to preserve T cell function and improve survival during cecal ligation and puncture (CLP-induced sepsis in mice. However, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-15 or IL-15 superagonist (SA during infection after burn injury has not been evaluated. Moreover, very few, if any, studies have examined, in detail, the effect of burn injury and infection on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we examined the effect of burn and sepsis on adaptive immune cell populations and the effect of IL-15 SA treatment on the host response to infection.Mice were subjected to a 35% total body surface area burn, followed by wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In some experiments, IL-15 SA was administered after burn injury, but before infection. Leukocytes in spleen, liver and peritoneal cavity were characterized using flow cytometry. Bacterial clearance, organ injury and survival were also assessed.Burn wound infection led to a significant decline in total white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and induced organ injury and sepsis. Burn injury caused decline in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen, which was worsened by infection. IL-15 treatment inhibited this decline and significantly increased cell numbers and activation, as determined by CD69 expression, of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells in the spleen and liver after burn injury. However, IL-15 SA treatment failed to prevent burn wound sepsis-induced loss of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells and failed to improve bacterial clearance and survival.Cutaneous burn injury and infection cause significant adaptive immune dysfunction. IL-15 SA does not augment host

  8. Analysis of antigen specific T cells in diabetes - Lessons from pre-clinical studies and early clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Selck, Claudia; Chee, Jonathan; Jhala, Guarang; Kay, Thomas W H

    2016-07-01

    Antigen-specific immune tolerance promises to provide safe and effective therapies to prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D). Antigen-specific therapy requires two components: well-defined, clinically relevant autoantigens; and safe approaches to inducing tolerance in T cells specific for these antigens. Proinsulin is a critical autoantigen in both NOD mice, based on knockout mouse studies and induction of immune tolerance to proinsulin preventing disease whereas most antigens cannot, and also in human T1D based on proinsulin-specific T cells being found in the islets of affected individuals and the early appearance of insulin autoantibodies. Effective antigen-specific therapies that prevent T1D in humans have not yet been developed although doubt remains about the best molecular form of the antigen, the dose and the route of administration. Preclinical studies suggest that antigen specific therapy is most useful when administered before onset of autoimmunity but this time-window has not been tested in humans until the recent "pre-point" study. There may be a 'window of opportunity' during the neonatal period when 'vaccine' like administration of proinsulin for a short period may be sufficient to prevent diabetes. After the onset of autoimmunity, naive antigen-specific T cells have differentiated into antigen-experienced memory cells and the immune responses have spread to multiple antigens. Induction of tolerance at this stage becomes more difficult although recent studies have suggested generation of antigen-specific TR1 cells can inhibit memory T cells. Preclinical studies are required to identify additional 'help' that is required to induce tolerance to memory T cells and develop protocols for effective therapy in individuals with established autoimmunity. PMID:27083395

  9. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  10. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  11. Metabolic activation capacity by primary hepatocytes expands the applicability of the embryonic stem cell test as alternative to experimental animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettwer, Michael; Reis-Fernandes, Marcos A; Iken, Marcus; Ott, Michael; Steinberg, Pablo; Nau, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) represents a validated alternative method for in vivo embryotoxicity testing. In the present study, primary hepatocytes were combined with the EST by a preincubation approach to improve its predictivity on bioactivation caused teratogenicity. As substances the well-known proteratogens cyclophosphamide (CPA) and valpromide (VPD) were used. The embryotoxic potential of CPA was detected by a strong decrease of the resulting ID(50)-concentration (50% inhibition of ES cell differentiation) after incubation with murine hepatocytes. Interspecies variation in metabolism was detected by testing VPD. After incubation of VPD with murine hepatocytes no inhibition of ES cell differentiation was observed, since hardly any teratogenic VPD metabolites were formed. In contrast, with human hepatocytes a significant conversion of VPD into the teratogen valproic acid (VPA) was observed. In summary we developed a co-culture approach for embryotoxicity testing, whereby the test compounds were incubated with hepatocytes and the supernatant was added to the ES cell culture to obtain a dose dependency of the preincubated test substances. PMID:20132877

  12. Biological properties of neural crest-derived multipotent stem cells from the bulge region of whisker follicle expanded in new culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyliev R. G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The work is aimed at obtaining the culture of neural crest-derived multipotent stem cells (NC-MSCs in new culture conditions and to investigate their biological properties. Methods. NC-MSCs were grown from the explants of the bulge region of whisker follicle of adult mice. The cell cultures were examined by the following methods: sphere-forming assay, directed multilineage differentiation, CFU assay, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, RT-PCR. Results. The obtained NC-MSCs expressed the typical neural crest markers (nestin, Sox10 and Sox2 and were differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts and Schwann cells. Under our original growing conditions, the culture of NC-MSCs at the third passage had the following parameters: 66.8 % nestin+, 3.1 % ALDH brigth and 33.3 % clonogenic cells. The NC-MSCs growth rate depended on plating density. EGF and bFGF demonstrated a dose-dependent mitogenic action on NC-MSCs. Conclusions. The proposed approach permits the NC-MSC expansion with the maintenance of their main functional properties. Further optimization of the culture conditions will be based on the use of growth factors and low plating density.

  13. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ouyang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases.

  14. Clinical Application of Circulating Tumour Cells in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis León-Mateos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide. To improve future drug development and patient management, surrogate biomarkers associated with relevant outcomes are required. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs are tumour cells that can enter the circulatory system, and are principally responsible for the development of metastasis at distant sites. In recent years, interest in detecting CTCs as a surrogate biomarker has ghiiukjrown. Clinical studies have revealed that high levels of CTCs in the blood correlate with disease progression in patients with prostate cancer; however, their predictive value for monitoring therapeutic response is less clear. Despite the important progress in CTC clinical development, there are critical requirements for the implementation of their analysis as a routine oncology tool. The goal of the present review is to provide an update on the advances in the clinical validation of CTCs as a surrogate biomarker and to discuss the principal obstacles and main challenges to their inclusion in clinical practice.

  15. Clinical Application of Circulating Tumour Cells in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Mateos, Luis; Vieito, María; Anido, Urbano; López López, Rafael; Muinelo Romay, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide. To improve future drug development and patient management, surrogate biomarkers associated with relevant outcomes are required. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are tumour cells that can enter the circulatory system, and are principally responsible for the development of metastasis at distant sites. In recent years, interest in detecting CTCs as a surrogate biomarker has ghiiukjrown. Clinical studies have revealed that high levels of CTCs in the blood correlate with disease progression in patients with prostate cancer; however, their predictive value for monitoring therapeutic response is less clear. Despite the important progress in CTC clinical development, there are critical requirements for the implementation of their analysis as a routine oncology tool. The goal of the present review is to provide an update on the advances in the clinical validation of CTCs as a surrogate biomarker and to discuss the principal obstacles and main challenges to their inclusion in clinical practice. PMID:27657044

  16. Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified with an indolent clinical course: a distinct peripheral T-cell lymphoma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, A J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTL), unspecified, are rare lymphomas, with a poor prognosis. They grow and disseminate rapidly, leading to widespread disease. We report a case of PTL, unspecified occurring on the nose. Despite its aggressive histology, this tumour behaved indolently. It is remarkably similar, clinically and histologically, to four recently described cases that occurred on the ear.

  17. RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH PROGRAM STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM : INCORPORATING STEM CELL HYPOTHESES INTO CLINICAL TRIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodward, Wendy A.; Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2009-01-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease si

  18. Lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Guo, Lifei; Orgill, Dennis P; Padera, Robert F; Schmid, Thomas M; Spector, Myron

    2012-10-01

    Capsular contraction is the most common complication of breast reconstruction surgery. While presence of the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) is considered among the causes of capsular contraction, the exact etiology and pathophysiology is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible role of lubricin in capsular formation and contraction by determining the presence and distribution of the lubricating protein lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules. Related aims were to evaluate select histopathologic features of the capsules, and the percentage of cells expressing α-SMA, which reflects the myofibroblast phenotype. Capsules from tissue expanders were obtained from eight patients. Lubricin, at the tissue-implant interface, in the extracellular matrix, and in cells, and α-SMA-containing cells were evaluated immunohistochemically. The notable finding was that lubricin was identified in all tissue expander capsules: as a discrete layer at the tissue-implant interface, extracellular, and intracellular. There was a greater amount of lubricin in the extracellular matrix in the intimal-subintimal zone when compared with the tissue away from the implant. Varying degrees of synovial metaplasia were seen at the tissue-implant interface. α-SMA-containing cells were also seen in all but one patient. The findings might help us better understand factors involved in capsule formation.

  19. Cystitis: From Urothelial Cell Biology to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilho Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystitis is a urinary bladder disease with many causes and symptoms. The severity of cystitis ranges from mild lower abdominal discomfort to life-threatening haemorrhagic cystitis. The course of disease is often chronic or recurrent. Although cystitis represents huge economical and medical burden throughout the world and in many cases treatments are ineffective, the mechanisms of its origin and development as well as measures for effective treatment are still poorly understood. However, many studies have demonstrated that urothelial dysfunction plays a crucial role. In the present review we first discuss fundamental issues of urothelial cell biology, which is the core for comprehension of cystitis. Then we focus on many forms of cystitis, its current treatments, and advances in its research. Additionally we review haemorrhagic cystitis with one of the leading causative agents being chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide and summarise its management strategies. At the end we describe an excellent and widely used animal model of cyclophosphamide induced cystitis, which gives researches the opportunity to get a better insight into the mechanisms involved and possibility to develop new therapy approaches.

  20. Extracellular microvesicle microRNAs in children with sickle cell anaemia with divergent clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Connes, Phillippe; Romana, Marc; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Zhang, Chunling; Andrade, Jorge; Gozal, David

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is the most frequent genetic haemoglobinopathy, which exhibits a highly variable clinical course characterized by hyper-coagulable and pro-inflammatory states, as well as endothelial dysfunction. Extracellular microvesicles are released into biological fluids and play a role in modifying the functional phenotype of target cells. We hypothesized that potential differences in plasma-derived extracellular microvesicles (EV) function and cargo from SCA patients may underlie divergent clinical trajectories. Plasma EV from SCA patients with mild, intermediate and severe clinical disease course were isolated, and primary endothelial cell cultures were exposed. Endothelial cell activation, monocyte adhesion, barrier disruption and exosome cargo (microRNA microarrays) were assessed. EV disrupted the endothelial barrier and induced expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in a SCA severity-dependent manner compared to healthy children. Microarray approaches identified a restricted signature of exosomal microRNAs that readily distinguished severe from mild SCA, as well as from healthy children. The microRNA candidates were further validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assays, and revealed putative gene targets. Circulating exosomal microRNAs may play important roles in predicting the clinical course of SCA, and in delineation of individually tailored, mechanistically-based clinical treatment approaches of SCA patients in the near future. PMID:27161653

  1. Clinical Grade Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Larijani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, our aim was to produce a generation of GMP-grade adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical applications. According to our results, we fulfill to establish consistent and also reproducible current good manufacturing practice (cGMP compliant adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells from five female donors. The isolated cells were cultured in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and characterized by standard methods. Moreover, karyotyping was performed to evaluate chromosomal stability. Mean of donors’ age was 47.6 ± 8.29 year, mean of cell viability was 95.6 ± 1.51%, and cell count was between 9×106 and 14×106 per microliter with the mean of 12.2×106 ± 2863564.21 per microliter. The main aim of this project was demonstrating the feasibility of cGMP-compliant and clinical grade adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells preparation and banking for clinical cell transplantation trials.

  2. Clinical Perspectives on Targeting of Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana George Najjar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer (NK cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC, and their levels have been shown to correlate with prognosis and overall survival. Multiple methods of inhibiting MDSCs are currently under investigation. These can broadly be categorized into methods that a promote differentiation of MDSC into mature, non-suppressive cells (all trans retinoic acid, vitamin D, b decrease MDSC levels (sunitinib, gemcitabine, 5-FU, CDDO-Me, or c functionally inhibit MDSC (PDE-5 inhibitors, COX-2 inhibitors. Recently, several pre-clinical tumor models of combination therapy involving sunitinib plus vaccines and/or adoptive therapy have shown promise in MDSC inhibition and improved outcomes in the tumor bearing host. Current clinical trials are underway in RCC patients to assess not only the impact on clinical outcome, but how this combination can enhance anti-tumor immunity and reduce immune suppression. Decreasing immune suppression by MDSC in the cancer host may improve outcomes and prolong survival in this patient population.

  3. Characterization of Cell Wall Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Clinical Isolates Elucidates Hsp150p in Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang-Hung Hsu

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been described as an emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen. Fungal cell wall mannoproteins have been demonstrated to be involved in adhesion to inert surfaces and might be engaged in virulence. In this study, we observed four clinical isolates of S. cerevisiae with relatively hydrophobic cell surfaces. Yeast cell wall subproteome was evaluated quantitatively by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. We identified totally 25 cell wall proteins (CWPs from log-phase cells, within which 15 CWPs were quantified. The abundance of Scw10p, Pst1p, and Hsp150p/Pir2p were at least 2 folds higher in the clinical isolates than in S288c lab strain. Hsp150p is one of the members in Pir family conserved in pathogenic fungi Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. Overexpression of Hsp150p in lab strain increased cell wall integrity and potentially enhanced the virulence of yeast. Altogether, these results demonstrated that quantitative cell wall subproteome was analyzed in clinical isolates of S. cerevisiae, and several CWPs, especially Hsp150p, were found to be expressed at higher levels which presumably contribute to strain virulence and fungal pathogenicity.

  4. The Expanding Family of Bone Marrow Homing Factors for Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Stromal Derived Factor 1 Is Not the Only Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-chemokine stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1, which binds to the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, directs migration and homing of CXCR4+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs to bone marrow (BM and plays a crucial role in retention of these cells in stem cell niches. However, this unique role of SDF-1 has been recently challenged by several observations supporting SDF-1-CXCR4-independent BM homing. Specifically, it has been demonstrated that HSPCs respond robustly to some bioactive lipids, such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P, and migrate in response to gradients of certain extracellular nucleotides, including uridine triphosphate (UTP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, the responsiveness of HSPCs to an SDF-1 gradient is enhanced by some elements of innate immunity (e.g., C3 complement cascade cleavage fragments and antimicrobial cationic peptides, such as cathelicidin/LL-37 or β2-defensin as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Since all these factors are upregulated in BM after myeloblative conditioning for transplantation, a more complex picture of homing emerges that involves several factors supporting, and in some situations even replacing, the SDF-1-CXCR4 axis.

  5. Responsible implementation of expanded carrier screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Lidewij; Borry, Pascal; Chokoshvili, Davit; Cornel, Martina C; van El, Carla G; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Howard, Heidi C; Janssens, Sandra; Kayserili, Hülya; Lakeman, Phillis; Lucassen, Anneke; Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Vidmar, Lovro; de Wert, Guido; Dondorp, Wybo J; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-01-01

    This document of the European Society of Human Genetics contains recommendations regarding responsible implementation of expanded carrier screening. Carrier screening is defined here as the detection of carrier status of recessive diseases in couples or persons who do not have an a priori increased risk of being a carrier based on their or their partners' personal or family history. Expanded carrier screening offers carrier screening for multiple autosomal and X-linked recessive disorders, facilitated by new genetic testing technologies, and allows testing of individuals regardless of ancestry or geographic origin. Carrier screening aims to identify couples who have an increased risk of having an affected child in order to facilitate informed reproductive decision making. In previous decades, carrier screening was typically performed for one or few relatively common recessive disorders associated with significant morbidity, reduced life-expectancy and often because of a considerable higher carrier frequency in a specific population for certain diseases. New genetic testing technologies enable the expansion of screening to multiple conditions, genes or sequence variants. Expanded carrier screening panels that have been introduced to date have been advertised and offered to health care professionals and the public on a commercial basis. This document discusses the challenges that expanded carrier screening might pose in the context of the lessons learnt from decades of population-based carrier screening and in the context of existing screening criteria. It aims to contribute to the public and professional discussion and to arrive at better clinical and laboratory practice guidelines. PMID:26980105

  6. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  7. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banys, Malgorzata, E-mail: maggybanys@yahoo.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg D-22087 (Germany); Krawczyk, Natalia; Fehm, Tanja [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  8. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson David R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI.

  9. Regulations and ethical codes for clinical cell therapy trials in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hooshang Saberi; Nazi Derakhshanrad; Babak Arjmand; Jafar Ai; Masoud Soleymani; Amir Ali Hamidieh; Mohammad Taghi Joghataei; Zahid Hussain Khan; Seyed Hassan Emami Razavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The local regulations for conducting experimental and clinical cell therapy studies are dependent on the national and cultural approach to the issue, and may have many common aspects as well as differences with the regulations in other countries. The study reflects the latest national aspects of cell therapy in Iran and relevant regulations. Methods:The following topics are discussed in the article including sources of cell harvest, regulations for cell disposal, stem cell manufacturing, and economic aspects of stem cell, based on current practice in Iran. Results:All cell therapy trials in Iran are required to strictly abide with the ethical codes, national and local regulations, and safety requirements, as well as considering human rights and respect. Adherence to these standards has facilitated the conduct of human cell therapy trials for research, academic advancement, and therapy. Conclusions:The cell therapy trials based on the aforementioned regulations may be assumed to be ethical and they are candidates for clinical translations based on safety and efficacy issues.

  10. Clinical Analysis of 22 Cases of Pulmonary Large Cell Neuroendocrine Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe QIAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC is a rare primary malignant tumor. Due to poor understanding of its biologic behaviors, pathological features, image manifestations and clinical effects, clinical study is urgent. Analysis of clinical data of pulmonary LCNEC, in order to improve the clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods Retrospective analysis of 22 pulmonary LCNEC cases of clinical features, diagnosis, treatments and prognosis. Results Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma occurs in older men with heavy smoking history., clinical symptoms are cough, sputum, hemoptysis, and chest pain. Computed tomography (CT features are peripheral mass mainly, accompanied by heterogeneous density and necrosis. Immunohistochemical neuroendocrine differentiation markers Syn, CgA and CD56 positive expression rates were: 72.7%, 68.2% and 68.2%, respectively. 17 patients underwent surgical treatment, 10 patients received adjuvant therapy, 5 underwent palliative chemotherapy. Univariate analysis indicated that smoking index (P=0.029, lymph node metastasis (P=0.034, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM stage (P=0.005, treatment (P=0.047, postoperative chemotherapy (P=0.014 are prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis (P=0.045 and postoperative chemotherapy (P=0.024 are prognostic factors. Conclusion Pulmonary LCNEC is lack of specific clinical symptoms, and its pathological diagnosis depends on postoperative specimens, poor efficacy of various treatments is its current situation. Lymph node metastasis and postoperative chemotherapy are important prognostic factors.

  11. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell lymphoma: A critical analysis of clinical, morphologic and immunophenotypic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Munita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL, a subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL, is characterized by unique clinical and biological features. Its diagnosis remains a challenge as clinical presentation as well as pathologic findings are frequently misleading. Material and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic spectrum of 17 cases of histologically proven AITL. Result: The mean age was 54 years and male to female ratio was 2.4. Common clinical features included generalized lymphadenopathy (60%, hepatomegaly (70%, splenomegaly (50%, anemia (80% and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia (100%. Microscopically, three architectural patterns; pattern I (6%, pattern II (41% and pattern III (53% were observed. Bone marrow infiltration was seen in 60% cases and 30% cases revealed plasmacytosis. Absence of follicles, polymorphous infiltrate, extra-follicular follicular dendritic cell (FDC proliferation, high endothelial venules (HEV prominence and neoplastic T-cells were the diagnostic features of AITL. CD10 positivity (47%, clear cells in the background (59% admixture with large size CD20+ B-immunoblasts (35% and bone marrow plasmacytosis (50% were common observations. Conclusion: Awareness of various morphological and immunophenotypic complexities of AITL and distinction from reactive adenopathies and other types of lymphomas that mimic AITL is underscored in this study.

  12. Clinical efficacy of expanding flap for large hyperplastic scar on scalp%扩张皮瓣治疗头皮增生性瘢痕的临床效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 翟晓梅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy and safety of implantation of tissue expanders for large hyperplastic scar on scalp.Methods Between June 2011 and April 2013,a total of 23 patients with large hyperplastic scar received treatment with 31 tissue expanders.The scar size varied from 5.5 cm × 4.0 cm to 17.5 cm ×9.5 cm.The capacity was 50-400 ml for expanders,with the shape of kidney or ellipse.After tissue expansion for 6 to 8 weeks,the expander was removed and hyperplastic scars were resected,followed by the repair of defect with expanded flaps.Further more,the patients received postoperative superficial isotope irradiation after the surgery.Follow-up varied from 6 to 12 months.Results Thirty expanders,except l expander pocket that was removed ahead of time due to infection,were implanted successfully during the whole course of treatment.The main complication was expander exposure in 4 patients,which showed no significant influence on secondary surgery.Twenty patients reported relief of symptoms and achieved satisfactory outcomes,while 3 patients showed great suture tension and experienced delayed stitch removal,followed by the recurrence of hyperplastic scar after the operation.Conclusions The implantation of tissue expanders under the scalp skin is an ideal treatment option for large hyperplastic scar on scalp.Regional suture tension is a direct contributor to the recurrence of hyperplastic scar formation after surgical excision.%目的 探讨扩张皮瓣治疗头皮大面积增生性瘢痕的临床效果.方法 2011年6月至2013年4月,共收治头皮大面积增生性瘢痕患者23例,瘢痕面积最大17.5 cm×9.5 cm,最小5.5 cm×4.0 cm.共埋置31个扩张器,扩张器容量50~400 ml.视瘢痕形状选择肾形或椭圆形扩张器.经6~8周注水扩张后,行增生性瘢痕切除、扩张器取出和扩张皮瓣转移术.术后行放射性核素局部照射治疗,随访6~12个月.结果 除1个扩张器瘢痕下埋置后

  13. Clinical Benefit of Allogeneic Melanoma Cell Lysate-Pulsed Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine in MAGE-Positive Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Who-Whong; Chia, Whay Kuang;

    2009-01-01

    patients received a total of 161 vaccinations. Treatment was well tolerated and quality of life measurements did not vary much across time. One patient experienced partial response [5%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1-24%] and seven achieved stable disease (35%; 95% CI, 18-57%), one of whom also achieved......PURPOSE: We evaluated the clinical benefit of an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MCL)-pulsed autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in advanced colorectal cancer patients expressing at least one of six MAGE-A antigens overexpressed by the cell line source of the lysate. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: DCs...... were cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), pulsed with the allogeneic MCL, and matured using cytokines that achieved high CD83- and CCR7-expressing DCs. Each patient received up to 10 intradermal vaccinations (3-5 x 10(6) cells per dose) at biweekly intervals. RESULTS: Twenty...

  14. Status of stem cell based clinical trials in the treatment for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Chandra; Sarang, Shabari

    2013-11-01

    Rapidly increasing number of diabetic patients across the world is a great challenge to the current therapeutic approach. Although the traditional method of rendering exogenous insulin is an established method of treatment, it is not sufficient and often causes lethal hypoglycemia. There is also a good amount of success with whole organ transplantation or Islet cells' transplantation. But this technique is limited with regards the availability of donors. Currently, many clinicians and researchers are involved in clinical studies using various different stem cells from embryonic as well as adult sources for the treatment of diabetes. In this review we have tried to discuss the results of various clinical trials using stem cells. We have also tried to look at various stem cell types and the routes of injections that are currently being followed world wide.

  15. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Q. Daley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016. The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008 to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them.

  16. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, George Q; Hyun, Insoo; Apperley, Jane F; Barker, Roger A; Benvenisty, Nissim; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Breuer, Christopher K; Caulfield, Timothy; Cedars, Marcelle I; Frey-Vasconcells, Joyce; Heslop, Helen E; Jin, Ying; Lee, Richard T; McCabe, Christopher; Munsie, Megan; Murry, Charles E; Piantadosi, Steven; Rao, Mahendra; Rooke, Heather M; Sipp, Douglas; Studer, Lorenz; Sugarman, Jeremy; Takahashi, Masayo; Zimmerman, Mark; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-14

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016). The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008) to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them. PMID:27185282

  17. Clinical and pharmacologic aspects of blinatumomab in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portell CA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig A Portell, Candice M Wenzell, Anjali S Advani Leukemia Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults remains a challenging disease to treat, and novel therapies are needed. Precursor-B ALL comprises 80% of cases, and the CD19 antigen is expressed in nearly all precursor-B ALL patients. Bispecific T-cell-engaging antibodies are novel bioengineered proteins. The bispecific T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab engages polyclonal T cells to CD19-expressing B cells. By binding to both CD3 and CD19, blinatumomab physically brings these T cells in close proximity to malignant B cells and potentiates T-cell-induced cytotoxic cell kill. Blinatumomab requires continuous intravenous infusion due to its short half-life, the need for continuous exposure for the drug to exert sufficient efficacy, and lessened toxicity. A phase II trial of B-cell ALL patients with persistent or relapsed minimal residual disease demonstrated an 80% rate of complete molecular remission. Cytokine-release syndrome and central nervous system events, such as seizures and encephalopathy, are reversible toxicities. Promising results in B-cell ALL with minimal residual disease have led to further evaluation of this drug in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-cell ALL. Keywords: blinatumomab, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CD19, BiTE antibodies

  18. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  19. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  20. Clinical and Radiologic Signs of Relapsed Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor: Tissue Is the Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Homs, M Y V; Schreuder, H. W. R.; Jonges, G. N.; Witteveen, P. O.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant ovarian germ cell tumor is a rare disease, but with current treatment strategies including surgery and platinum based chemotherapy survival is excellent. After treatment, intensive followup is indicated to encounter tumor relapse at an early stage. This case describes a 22-year-old female with a history of common variable immune deficiency (CVID) who underwent a resection of a large ovarian germ cell tumor followed by 4 cycles of cisplatin and etoposide resulting in clinical complet...

  1. Concise Review: Clinical Translation of Wound Healing Therapies Based on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Wesley M.; Nesti, Leon J.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2011-01-01

    There is enormous worldwide demand for therapies to promote the efficient resolution of hard-to-heal wounds with minimal appearance of scarring. Recent in vitro studies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have identified numerous mechanisms by which these cells can promote the process of wound healing, and there is significant interest in the clinical translation of an MSC-based therapy to promote dermal regeneration. This review provides a systematic analysis of recent preclinical and clinica...

  2. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rituparna Maiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of "social pharmacology" is not covered by the so-called "Phase IV" alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the "life cycle" of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences.

  3. The Expanding Universe of Prion Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Joel C.; Aru Balachandran; David Westaway

    2006-01-01

    Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrP(C). Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of "mad cow disease" (BSE) the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases--including human d...

  4. Ambivalent journeys of hope: embryonic stem cell therapy in a clinic in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell therapy in non-Western countries such as India has received a lot of attention. Apart from media reports, there are a number of social science analyses of stem cell policy, therapy, and research, their ethical implications, and impact of advertising on patients. Nevertheless, in the media reports as well as in academic studies, experiences of patients, who undertake overseas journeys for stem cell therapy, have largely been either ignored or presented reductively, often as a "false hope." In this article, I analyze the experiences of patients and their "journeys of hope" to NuTech Mediworld, an embryonic stem cell therapy clinic in New Delhi, India. My analysis, which draws on my observations in the clinic and patients' experiences, instead of seeking to adjudicate whether embryonic stem cell therapy in clinics such as NuTech is right or wrong, true or false, focuses on how patients navigate and contest these concerns. I utilize Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's "concepts," lines of flight and deterritorialization, to highlight how embryonic stem cell therapy's "political economy of hope" embodies deterritorialization of several "regimes of truth" and how these deterritorializations impact patients' experiences.

  5. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples

  6. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  7. Amniotic fluid as a source of multipotent cells for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bruce K; Chan, Michael K; Liu, Li; Basch, Ross S

    2016-04-01

    Amniotic fluid cells (AFC) from 2nd trimester amniocentesis have been found to be a source of multipotent stem cells which might overcome the limitations of expansion, histocompatibility, tumorigenesis, and ethical issues associated with using human embryonic cells, umbilical cord, cord blood, bone marrow, and induced pluripotent cells. Previous work by our group and others demonstrated multipotency and the ability to grow well in culture. However, all these studies were done in media containing fetal calf serum. We sought to observe the properties of AFC grown in serum-free media as that would be required for clinical transplantation in humans. Fresh samples were obtained from three patients, and each sample divided into a culture whose cells were not exposed to fetal calf serum, and the other half into a standard culture medium containing fetal calf serum. Doubling time and stem cell marker expression by flow cytometry were assessed. Differentiation to neural, osteoid, and chondrogenic lineages was induced using appropriate media and confirmed by fluorescent microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry. There were no statistically significant differences between cells grown serum-free and in standard media in any of these parameters. The data supports the possibility of clinical use of AFC in stem cell transplantation. PMID:26115489

  8. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals. PMID:27379197

  9. Amniotic fluid as a source of multipotent cells for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bruce K; Chan, Michael K; Liu, Li; Basch, Ross S

    2016-04-01

    Amniotic fluid cells (AFC) from 2nd trimester amniocentesis have been found to be a source of multipotent stem cells which might overcome the limitations of expansion, histocompatibility, tumorigenesis, and ethical issues associated with using human embryonic cells, umbilical cord, cord blood, bone marrow, and induced pluripotent cells. Previous work by our group and others demonstrated multipotency and the ability to grow well in culture. However, all these studies were done in media containing fetal calf serum. We sought to observe the properties of AFC grown in serum-free media as that would be required for clinical transplantation in humans. Fresh samples were obtained from three patients, and each sample divided into a culture whose cells were not exposed to fetal calf serum, and the other half into a standard culture medium containing fetal calf serum. Doubling time and stem cell marker expression by flow cytometry were assessed. Differentiation to neural, osteoid, and chondrogenic lineages was induced using appropriate media and confirmed by fluorescent microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry. There were no statistically significant differences between cells grown serum-free and in standard media in any of these parameters. The data supports the possibility of clinical use of AFC in stem cell transplantation.

  10. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Medeiros Markoski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals.

  11. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals. PMID:27379197

  12. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals.

  13. Preparing clinical-grade myeloid dendritic cells by electroporation-mediated transfection of in vitro amplified tumor-derived mRNA and safety testing in stage IV malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allred Jacob B

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs have been used as vaccines in clinical trials of immunotherapy of cancer and other diseases. Nonetheless, progress towards the use of DCs in the clinic has been slow due in part to the absence of standard methods for DC preparation and exposure to disease-associated antigens. Because different ex vivo exposure methods can affect DC phenotype and function differently, we studied whether electroporation-mediated transfection (electrotransfection of myeloid DCs with in vitro expanded RNA isolated from tumor tissue might be feasible as a standard physical method in the preparation of clinical-grade DC vaccines. Methods We prepared immature DCs (IDCs from CD14+ cells isolated from leukapheresis products and extracted total RNA from freshly resected melanoma tissue. We reversely transcribed the RNA while attaching a T7 promoter to the products that we subsequently amplified by PCR. We transcribed the amplified cDNA in vitro and introduced the expanded RNA into IDCs by electroporation followed by DC maturation and cryopreservation. Isolated and expanded mRNA was analyzed for the presence of melanoma-associated tumor antigens gp100, tyrosinase or MART1. To test product safety, we injected five million DCs subcutaneously at three-week intervals for up to four injections into six patients suffering from stage IV malignant melanoma. Results Three preparations contained all three transcripts, one isolate contained tyrosinase and gp100 and one contained none. Electrotransfection of DCs did not affect viability and phenotype of fresh mature DCs. However, post-thaw viability was lower (69 ± 12 percent in comparison to non-electroporated cells (82 ± 12 percent; p = 0.001. No patient exhibited grade 3 or 4 toxicity upon DC injections. Conclusion Standardized preparation of viable clinical-grade DCs transfected with tumor-derived and in vitro amplified mRNA is feasible and their administration is safe.

  14. Animal experiments and clinical application of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Liu; Wei Liu; Baiyu Zhou; Jing Wang; Bing Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The olfactory epithelium can still generate new neurons after arresting its growth and development in the human body. Axons can still be generated and pass through peripheral tissue to reach the olfactory bulb. Thus, olfactory cells have been widely used in the repair of spinal cord injury.OBJECTIVE: Using animal experiments in conjunction with a clinical study of olfactory ensheathing cells, this paper was designed to clarify the function and application prospects of olfactory ensheathing cells, as well as the existing problems with their application. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the terms "olfactory ensheathing cells, spinal cord injury", we retrieved manuscripts published from January 1990 to June 2007. The languages were limited to English and Chinese. Inclusion criteria: studies addressing the characteristics, basic study, clinical application and prospects of olfactory ensheathing cells; studies that were recently published or were published in high-impact journals. Exclusion criteria: repetitive studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The included 29 manuscripts were primarily clinical or basic experimental studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: Following spinal cord injury, spinal neurons die, neurotrophic factors are lacking, and the existing glial scar and cavities hinder axonal growth. One method to repair spinal cord injury is to interfere with the above-mentioned factors based on animal experiments. Myelination and axonal regeneration are the keys to spinal cord injury therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells can secrete several neurotrophic factors, inhibit horizontal cell reactions, have noticeable neuroprotective effects, and possess a very strong reproductive activity, so they have many advantages in the fields of cell transplantation and gene therapy. However, there still exist many questions and uncertainties, such as the best time window and dose, as well as complications of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation; precise mechanism of action after olfactory

  15. Stem cell therapy for joint problems using the horse as a clinically relevant animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Betts, Dean H.

    2007-01-01

    of experimentally induced lesions. The horse lends itself as a good animal model of spontaneous joint disorders that are clinically relevant to similar human disorders. Equine stem cell and tissue engineering studies may be financially feasible to principal investigators and small biotechnology companies...

  16. Relationship between somatic cell count status and subsequent clinical mastitis in Dutch dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den B.H.P.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Lupindu, A.M.; Schaik, van G.; Frankena, K.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Nielen, M.

    2011-01-01

    High composite somatic cell counts (CSCC) in dairy cows may develop into clinical mastitis (CM), suggesting that prevention or intervention of high CSCC may prevent CM later in lactation. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between high CSCC in dairy cows and the first subse

  17. Clinical relevance of copy number profiling in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, Pauline M. W.; Noorlag, Rob; Braunius, Weibel W.; Moelans, Cathy B.; Rifi, Widad; Savola, Suvi; Koole, Ronald; Grolman, Wilko; van Es, RJJ; Willems, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Current conventional treatment modalities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are nonselective and have shown to cause serious side effects. Unraveling the molecular profiles of head and neck cancer may enable promising clinical applications that pave the road for personalized cancer tr

  18. B-Cell Receptor Epitope Recognition Correlates With the Clinical Course of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, Mascha; Mueller, Fabian; Jackst, Antje; Lechenne, Barbara; Pantic, Milena; Bacher, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Veelken, Hendrik; Mertelsmann, Roland; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Trepel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: B-cell receptors (BCRs) and their recognition of specific epitopes may play a pivotal role in the development and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In this study, the authors set up a model system to explore epitope reactivity and its clinical relevance in CLL. METHODS:

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Lipogems, a Reverse Story: from Clinical Practice to Basic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Carlo; Ricordi, Camillo; Caplan, Arnold I; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The idea that basic science should be the starting point for modern clinical approaches has been consolidated over the years, and emerged as the cornerstone of Molecular Medicine. Nevertheless, there is increasing concern over the low efficiency and inherent costs related to the translation of achievements from the bench to the bedside. These burdens are also perceived with respect to the effectiveness of translating basic discoveries in stem cell biology to the newly developing field of advanced cell therapy or Regenerative Medicine. As an alternative paradigm, past and recent history in Medical Science provides remarkable reverse stories in which clinical observations at the patient's bedside have fed major advances in basic research which, in turn, led to consistent progression in clinical practice. Within this context, we discuss our recently developed method and device, which forms the core of a system (Lipogems) for processing of human adipose tissue solely with the aid of mild mechanical forces to yield a microfractured tissue product.

  20. Tracking antigen-specific T-cells during clinical tolerance induction in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Aslam

    Full Text Available Allergen immunotherapy presents an opportunity to define mechanisms of induction of clinical tolerance in humans. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of changes in T cell responses during immunotherapy, but existing work has largely been based on functional T cell assays. HLA-peptide-tetrameric complexes allow the tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations based on the presence of specific T-cell receptors and when combined with functional assays allow a closer assessment of the potential roles of T-cell anergy and clonotype evolution. We sought to develop tools to facilitate tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations during wasp-venom immunotherapy in people with wasp-venom allergy. We first defined dominant immunogenic regions within Ves v 5, a constituent of wasp venom that is known to represent a target antigen for T-cells. We next identified HLA-DRB1*1501 restricted epitopes and used HLA class II tetrameric complexes alongside cytokine responses to Ves v 5 to track T-cell responses during immunotherapy. In contrast to previous reports, we show that there was a significant initial induction of IL-4 producing antigen-specific T-cells within the first 3-5 weeks of immunotherapy which was followed by reduction of circulating effector antigen-specific T-cells despite escalation of wasp-venom dosage. However, there was sustained induction of IL-10-producing and FOXP3 positive antigen-specific T cells. We observed that these IL-10 producing cells could share a common precursor with IL-4-producing T cells specific for the same epitope. Clinical tolerance induction in humans is associated with dynamic changes in frequencies of antigen-specific T-cells, with a marked loss of IL-4-producing T-cells and the acquisition of IL-10-producing and FOXP3-positive antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells that can derive from a common shared precursor to pre-treatment effector T-cells. The development of new approaches to track antigen

  1. Femoral midshaft fractures: expandable versus locked nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Tao; Song, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Xiao-Zhong; Zhou, Hai-Bin; Luo, Zong-Ping; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2015-04-01

    Femoral midshaft fracture is one of the most common clinical injuries and is often caused by high-energy traffic accidents. Intramedullary nailings, plates, and external fixators are all used as treatment alternatives for a variety of patients depending on fracture location, displacement, comminution, soft tissue condition, and local tradition. Locked intramedullary nailing is currently the preferred treatment method for most diaphyseal fractures and has good clinical results. The goal of this study was to compare expandable and locked intramedullary nailing for the treatment of AO type 32A and 32B1 femoral midshaft fractures. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 46 patients (33 men and 13 women; mean age, 32.3 years; range, 22-52 years) with femoral midshaft fractures who were divided into 2 groups-one treated with an expandable intramedullary nailing method and the other with a conventional locked intramedullary nailing. The 2 groups were compared with respect to operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, hospitalization time, healing time, and complications. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. The results of this study showed that all of the patients achieved bone union within 12 to 24 months. Expandable nailing performed better than locked nailing in operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, and healing time (P<.001). There was no difference in hospitalization time and no visible shortening or severe complications were observed in either group. Based on the results of this study, the expandable intramedullary nailing is an easy and effective treatment for AO type 32A and 32B1 diaphyseal femoral fractures. PMID:25901625

  2. Functional investigations on embryonic stem cells labeled with clinically translatable iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Liqin; Cao, Jianbo; Huang, Yue; Lin, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuqin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies.Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI

  3. Clinical significance of mast cells and IL-9 in B-NHL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封丽丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of mast cells and interleukin-9 (IL-9) in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) development and its clinical significance.Methods The expression level of CD117 in tumor tissues of 32 B-NHL patients was determined by Western blot.The infiltration of CD117+mast cells (MCs) in human B-NHL tumor tissues was observed by immunohistochemistry staining.To evaluate the correlations between the data from CD117+MCs and biological markers of human B-NHL,a Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) was cal-

  4. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Validation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Bolis, Sara; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The present chapter focuses on the validation of the following analytical methods for the control of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for cell therapy clinical trials: Microbiological control for cellular product Endotoxin assay Mycoplasma assay Cell count and viability Immunophenotype Clonogenic potential (CFU-F assay) In our lab, these methods are in use for product release, process control or control of the biological starting materials. They are described in detail in the accompanying Chapter 19.For each method, validation goals and strategy are presented, and a detailed experimental scheme is proposed. PMID:27236682

  5. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.C. Peck; J-P Goulet; F. Lobbezoo; E.L. Schiffman; P. Alstergren; G.C. Anderson; R. De Leeuw; R. Jensen; A. Michelotti; R. Ohrbach; A. Petersson; T. List

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for

  6. Review of clinical studies on dendritic cell-based vaccination of patients with malignant melanoma: assessment of correlation between clinical response and vaccine parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Hansen, Troels Holz; Andersen, Mads Hald;

    2009-01-01

    During the past years numerous clinical trials have been carried out to assess the ability of dendritic cell (DC) based immunotherapy to induce clinically relevant immune responses in patients with malignant diseases. A broad range of cancer types have been targeted including malignant melanoma w...

  7. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment).

  8. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Muthumani

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP. However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted.

  9. Ovarian cancer cell line panel (OCCP: clinical importance of in vitro morphological subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine M Beaufort

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease and remains the most lethal gynaecological malignancy in the Western world. Therapeutic approaches need to account for inter-patient and intra-tumoural heterogeneity and detailed characterization of in vitro models representing the different histological and molecular ovarian cancer subtypes is critical to enable reliable preclinical testing. There are approximately 100 publicly available ovarian cancer cell lines but their cellular and molecular characteristics are largely undescribed. We have characterized 39 ovarian cancer cell lines under uniform conditions for growth characteristics, mRNA/microRNA expression, exon sequencing, drug response for clinically-relevant therapeutics and collated all available information on the original clinical features and site of origin. We tested for statistical associations between the cellular and molecular features of the lines and clinical features. Of the 39 ovarian cancer cell lines, 14 were assigned as high-grade serous, four serous-type, one low-grade serous and 20 non-serous type. Three morphological subtypes: Epithelial (n = 21, Round (n = 7 and Spindle (n = 12 were identified that showed distinct biological and molecular characteristics, including overexpression of cell movement and migration-associated genes in the Spindle subtype. Comparison with the original clinical data showed association of the spindle-like tumours with metastasis, advanced stage, suboptimal debulking and poor prognosis. In addition, the expression profiles of Spindle, Round and Epithelial morphologies clustered with the previously described C1-stromal, C5-mesenchymal and C4 ovarian subtype expression profiles respectively. Comprehensive profiling of 39 ovarian cancer cell lines under controlled, uniform conditions demonstrates clinically relevant cellular and genomic characteristics. This data provides a rational basis for selecting models to develop

  10. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  11. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  12. Biomedical and Clinical Promises of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Jongkamonwiwat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders are characterized by the chronic and progressive loss of neuronal structures and functions. There is a variability of the onsets and causes of clinical manifestations. Cell therapy has brought a new concept to overcome brain diseases, but the advancement of this therapy is limited by the demands of specialized neurons. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been promised as a renewable resource for generating human neurons for both laboratory and clinical purposes. By the modulations of appropriate signalling pathways, desired neuron subtypes can be obtained, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide genetically matched neurons for treating patients. These hPSC-derived neurons can also be used for disease modeling and drug screening. Since the most urgent problem today in transplantation is the lack of suitable donor organs and tissues, the derivation of neural progenitor cells from hPSCs has opened a new avenue for regenerative medicine. In this review, we summarize the recent reports that show how to generate neural derivatives from hPSCs, and discuss the current evidence of using these cells in animal studies. We also highlight the possibilities and concerns of translating these hPSC-derived neurons for biomedical and clinical uses in order to fight against neurological disorders.

  13. Human gammadelta T cells from G-CSF-mobilized donors retain strong tumoricidal activity and produce immunomodulatory cytokines after clinical-scale isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Mario; Barfield, Raymond C; Iyengar, Rekha; Gatewood, Janet; Müller, Ingo; Holladay, Martha S; Houston, Jim; Leung, Wing; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2005-01-01

    Human gammadelta T cells are a small fraction of T cells that have been shown to exert major histocompatibility (MHC)-unrestricted natural cytotoxicity against a variety of solid tumors and some subsets of leukemias and lymphomas. They are also involved in the immune response to certain bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and expand significantly in CMV- or HSV-infected organ allografts. They are able to mediate antibody-dependent cytotoxicity and are not alloreactive, which makes them attractive candidates for cell-based immunotherapy. However, their frequency in peripheral blood is low and ex vivo expansion of gammadelta T cells is labor-extensive, does not always yield cells with full innate cytotoxic power, and has the potential for microbial contamination. Therefore, the authors developed a clinical-scale, automated cell purification method for the efficient enrichment of gammadelta T cells from leukapheresis products. Six leukapheresis products were purified for gammadelta T cells using a single-step immunomagnetic method. Purity and phenotype were assessed by flow cytometry. A standard Europium release assay was performed to determine the cytotoxic capacity of the cells. Cytokine production was measured using a multiplex sandwich immunoassay. The mean percentage of gammadelta T cells in the final product was 91%, with an average recovery of 63%. The cells showed a high co-expression of CD8, CD56, CD28, and CD11b/CD18. In some products an unusually high proportion of Vgamma9Vdelta1 T cells was found. The isolated cells were cytotoxic against the neuroblastoma cell line NB1691 and the erythroleukemic line K562 in vitro. They were able to produce a variety of immunomodulatory cytokines such as IFNgamma, TNFalpha, and MIP-1beta, but also GM-CSF and G-CSF when co-incubated in culture with and without various stimuli. In summary, the authors describe a rapid, automated, and efficient method for the large-scale enrichment of human gammadelta T cells. The

  14. Cancer immunotherapy utilizing gene-modified T cells: From the bench to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Connie P M; Yong, Carmen S M; Kershaw, Michael H; Slaney, Clare Y; Darcy, Phillip K

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the elimination and suppression of pathogens. Although the endogenous immune system is capable of immune surveillance resulting in the elimination of cancer cells, tumor cells have developed a variety of mechanisms to escape immune recognition often resulting in tumor outgrowth. The presence of immune infiltrate in tumors has been correlated with a good prognosis following treatment (Sato et al., 2005; Loi et al., 2013; Clemente et al., 1996; Galon et al., 2006). As such, immune cells such as T cells, have been harnessed in order to target cancer. Tumor reactive lymphocytes, called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) have been isolated and expanded from the tumor and reinfused back into patients for the treatment of melanoma. The promise of adoptive immunotherapy utilizing TILs as a robust treatment for cancer has been highlighted in patients with advanced melanoma with greater than 50% of patients responding to treatment (Dudley et al., 2005). Although TIL therapy has shown promising results in melanoma patients, it has proved difficult to translate this approach to other cancers, given that the numbers of TILs that can be isolated are generally low. To broaden this therapy for other cancers, T cells have been genetically modified to endow them with tumor reactivity using either a T cell receptor (TCR) (Parkhurst et al., 2009, 2011; Chinnasamy et al., 2011) or a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) (Grupp et al., 2013; Park et al., 2007). This review will outline the origins and development of adoptive immunotherapy utilizing TILs leading to genetic modification strategies to redirect T cells to cancer. Potential hurdles and novel strategies will be discussed for realizing the full potential of adoptive immunotherapy becoming a standard of care treatment for cancer. PMID:25595028

  15. Effects of saponins against clinical E. coli strains and eukaryotic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabski, Michał; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Lankoff, Anna; Kaca, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of saponins against CHO-K1 cells were measured by the MTT test, hemolysis assay and flow cytometry. Saponin from Quillaja saponaria has a cytotoxic effect at concentrations higher than 25 μg/mL and in the range of 12-50 μg/mL significantly increases the level of early apoptotic cells. Saponin at dose of 12 μg/mL enhances the six E. coli strains growth. We postulate that saponins increase the influx of nutrients from the medium into E. coli cells. Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics. In contrary, in the presence of saponins and antibiotics, more CFU/mL E. coli cells were observed. This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells. In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed. PMID:22500084

  16. Potential role of stem cells in severe spinal cord injury: current perspectives and clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paspala SA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Syed AB Paspala,1,2 Sandeep K Vishwakarma,1 Tenneti VRK Murthy,2 Thiriveedi N Rao,2 Aleem A Khan11PAN Research Foundation, CARE, 2The Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury (SCI along with new pharmacotherapy research offers the potential to restore function and ease the associated social and economic burden in the years ahead. Various sources of stem cells have been used in the treatment of SCI, but the most convincing results have been obtained with neural progenitor cells in preclinical models. Although the use of cell-based transplantation strategies for the repair of chronic SCI remains the long sought after holy grail, these approaches have been to date the most successful when applied in the subacute phase of injury. Application of cell-based strategies for the repair and regeneration of the chronically injured spinal cord will require a combinational strategy that may need to include approaches to overcome the effects of the glial scar, inhibitory molecules, and use of tissue engineering strategies to bridge the lesion. Nonetheless, cell transplantation strategies are promising, and it is anticipated that the Phase I clinical trials of some form of neural stem cell-based approach in SCI will commence very soon.Keywords: stem cell therapy, regeneration, spinal cord injury, cell dosing, cell tracking

  17. Clinical manufacturing of CAR T cells: foundation of a promising therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Rivière, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer patients with autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is one of the most promising adoptive cellular therapy approaches. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade CAR-T cell products is a prerequisite for the wide application of this technology. Product quality needs to be built-in within every step of the manufacturing process. We summarize herein the requirements and logistics to be considered, as well as the state of the art manufacturing platforms available. CAR-T cell therapy may be on the verge of becoming standard of care for a few clinical indications. Yet, many challenges pertaining to manufacturing standardization and product characterization remain to be overcome in order to achieve broad usage and eventual commercialization of this therapeutic modality. PMID:27347557

  18. B-Cell Depletion Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis: Experimental Rationale and Update on Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Daoussis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a systemic rheumatic disease with poor prognosis since therapeutic options are limited. Recent evidence from animal models suggests that B-cells may be actively involved in the fibrotic process. B-cells from tight skin mice, an animal model of scleroderma, display a “hyperresponsive” phenotype; treatment with rituximab (RTX significantly attenuates skin fibrosis in this animal model. In humans, B-cell infiltration is a prominent finding in most lung biopsies obtained from patients with SSc-associated interstitial lung disease. Several open label studies have assessed the clinical efficacy of RTX in SSc. In most patients skin fibrosis improved; lung function either improved or remained stable. Definite conclusions regarding the clinical efficacy of RTX in SSc cannot be drawn but further exploration with a multicenter, randomized study is warranted.

  19. Trivalent expanders and hyperbolic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ivrissimtzis, Ioannis; Vdovina, Alina

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a family of trivalent expanders which tessellate compact hyperbolic surfaces with large isometry groups. We compare this family with Platonic graphs and modifications of them and prove topological and spectral properties of these families.

  20. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kum Ja Lee,1 Vivian Chow,1 Ashley Weissman,2 Sunil Tulpule,3 Ibrahim Aldoss,4 Mojtaba Akhtari5 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, University of Southern California, 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Southern California Norris Cancer Hospital, Los Angeles, CA, 3Department of Medicine, Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, NJ, 4Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, 5Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for the Study of Blood Diseases, University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug

  1. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixin Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1 precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2 isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3 descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research.

  2. DEX: self-healing expanders

    OpenAIRE

    Pandurangan, Gopal; Robinson, Peter,; Trehan, Amitabh

    2015-01-01

    We present a fully-distributed self-healing algorithm DEX, that maintains a constant degree expander network in a dynamic setting. To the best of our knowledge, our algorithm provides the first efficient distributed construction of expanders --- whose expansion properties hold {\\em deterministically} --- that works even under an all-powerful adaptive adversary that controls the dynamic changes to the network (the adversary has unlimited computational power and knowledge of the entire network ...

  3. New model for gastroenteropancreatic large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: establishment of two clinically relevant cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Krieg

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel WHO-classification has been introduced that divided gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NEN according to their proliferation index into G1- or G2-neuroendocrine tumors (NET and poorly differentiated small-cell or large-cell G3-neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC. Our knowledge on primary NECs of the GEP-system is limited due to the rarity of these tumors and chemotherapeutic concepts of highly aggressive NEC do not provide convincing results. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable cell line model for NEC that could be helpful in identifying novel druggable molecular targets. Cell lines were established from liver (NEC-DUE1 or lymph node metastases (NEC-DUE2 from large cell NECs of the gastroesophageal junction and the large intestine, respectively. Morphological characteristics and expression of neuroendocrine markers were extensively analyzed. Chromosomal aberrations were mapped by array comparative genomic hybridization and DNA profiling was analyzed by DNA fingerprinting. In vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity was evaluated and the sensitivity against chemotherapeutic agents assessed. Both cell lines exhibited typical morphological and molecular features of large cell NEC. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that both cell lines retained their malignant properties. Whereas NEC-DUE1 and -DUE2 were resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide and oxaliplatin, a high sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil was observed for the NEC-DUE1 cell line. Taken together, we established and characterized the first GEP large-cell NEC cell lines that might serve as a helpful tool not only to understand the biology of these tumors, but also to establish novel targeted therapies in a preclinical setup.

  4. A robust and reproducible animal serum-free culture method for clinical-grade bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Anita; Oja, Sofia; Kilpinen, Lotta; Kaartinen, Tanja; Möller, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Korhonen, Matti; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Efficient xenofree expansion methods to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based culture methods are strongly encouraged by the regulators and are needed to facilitate the adoption of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. In the current study we established a clinically-compliant and reproducible animal serum-free culture protocol for bone marrow-(BM-) MSCs based on an optimized platelet-derived supplement. Our study compared two different platelet-derived supplements, platelet lysate PL1 versus PL2, produced by two different methods and lysed with different amounts of freeze-thaw cycles. Our study also explored the effect of a low oxygen concentration on BM-MSCs. FBS-supplemented BM-MSC culture served as control. Growth kinetics, differentiation and immunomodulatory potential, morphology, karyotype and immunophenotype was analysed. Growth kinetics in long-term culture was also studied. Based on the initial results, we chose to further process develop the PL1-supplemented culture protocol at 20 % oxygen. The results from 11 individual BM-MSC batches expanded in the chosen condition were consistent, yielding 6.60 × 10(9) ± 4.74 × 10(9) cells from only 20 ml of bone marrow. The cells suppressed T-cell proliferation, displayed normal karyotype and typical MSC differentiation potential and phenotype. The BM-MSCs were, however, consistently HLA-DR positive when cultured in platelet lysate (7.5-66.1 %). We additionally show that culture media antibiotics and sterile filtration of the platelet lysate can be successfully omitted. We present a robust and reproducible clinically-compliant culture method for BM-MSCs based on platelet lysate, which enables high quantities of HLA-DR positive MSCs at a low passage number (p2) and suitable for clinical use. PMID:25777046

  5. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  6. Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Novel Supportive Therapies for Oral Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Padial-Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality of the bone after infectious diseases, trauma, tumor, or congenital conditions. In these situations, cell transplantation technologies may help to overcome the limitations of autografts, xenografts, allografts, and alloplastic materials. A database search was conducted to include human clinical trials (randomized or controlled and case reports/series describing the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in the oral cavity for bone regeneration only specifically excluding periodontal regeneration. Additionally, novel advances in related technologies are also described. 190 records were identified. 51 articles were selected for full-text assessment, and only 28 met the inclusion criteria: 9 case series, 10 case reports, and 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Collectively, they evaluate the use of MSCs in a total of 290 patients in 342 interventions. The current published literature is very diverse in methodology and measurement of outcomes. Moreover, the clinical significance is limited. Therefore, the use of these techniques should be further studied in more challenging clinical scenarios with well-designed and standardized RCTs, potentially in combination with new scaffolding techniques and bioactive molecules to improve the final outcomes.

  7. Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Novel Supportive Therapies for Oral Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Valle, Francisco; Lanis, Alejandro; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M.; Wang, Hom-Lay; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality of the bone after infectious diseases, trauma, tumor, or congenital conditions. In these situations, cell transplantation technologies may help to overcome the limitations of autografts, xenografts, allografts, and alloplastic materials. A database search was conducted to include human clinical trials (randomized or controlled) and case reports/series describing the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the oral cavity for bone regeneration only specifically excluding periodontal regeneration. Additionally, novel advances in related technologies are also described. 190 records were identified. 51 articles were selected for full-text assessment, and only 28 met the inclusion criteria: 9 case series, 10 case reports, and 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Collectively, they evaluate the use of MSCs in a total of 290 patients in 342 interventions. The current published literature is very diverse in methodology and measurement of outcomes. Moreover, the clinical significance is limited. Therefore, the use of these techniques should be further studied in more challenging clinical scenarios with well-designed and standardized RCTs, potentially in combination with new scaffolding techniques and bioactive molecules to improve the final outcomes. PMID:26064899

  8. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

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    Lee, Saet-byul [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Junhoe [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Im-kyung [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joo Chun [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Joon [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Myun [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young, E-mail: kylee117@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsun, E-mail: jkim63@yuhs.ac [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  9. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as 51Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer

  10. A clinically attainable dose of L-asparaginase targets glutamine addiction in lymphoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Koichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ono, Asami; Kaga, Naoko; Isobe, Yasushi; Sasaki, Makoto; Taka, Hikari; Miyazono, Kohei; Komatsu, Norio

    2015-11-01

    L-asparaginase (L-ASNase) is an important branch of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and some types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, including natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoma. Although it mediates hydrolysis of asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln), which are variably required for cancer cell survival, the relative contribution of Asn and Gln depletion to the anti-tumor activity in therapeutic doses is unclear in ALL and malignant lymphoma. Here we demonstrate that L-ASNase exerts cytotoxicity through targeting the Gln addiction phenotype in lymphoid cell lines. A clinically attainable intermediate dose of L-ASNase induced massive apoptosis in ALL Jurkat and mantle cell lymphoma Jeko cell lines, while a low dose of L-ASNase effectively killed NK-cell lymphoma cells. In the lymphoid cell lines Jurkat and Jeco, deprivation of Gln but not Asn specifically suppressed cell growth and survival, and phenocopied the action of L-ASNase. L-ASNase treatment and Gln deprivation dramatically disrupted the refilling of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by intracellular glutamate (Glu) and disturbed the mitochondrial integrity, which were alleviated by various anaplerotic TCA cycle intermediates, suggesting a direct contribution of glutaminase activity of L-ASNase. The action of L-ASNase differs between Jurkat cells and NK-cell lymphoma cells, according to their dependence on Gln and Asn. Furthermore, we observed that high expression of glutaminase GLS1 is associated with increased sensivity to L-ASNase in pediatric B lineage ALL. Our results redefine L-ASNase as a therapeutic agent targeting Gln addiction in certain lymphoid cells and offer an additional basis for predicting L-ASNase sensitivity and engineering selective L-ASNase derivatives for leukemia and lymphoma.

  11. Role of Regulatory T cell in Clinical Outcome of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Yun-Peng Lin; Jie-Li Chen; Hong Li; Rong-Cai Jiang; Jian-Ning Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a life-threatening disease worldwide.Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) were involved in the immunological system in central nervous system.It is defined as a subpopulation of CD4+ cells that express CD25 and transcription factor forkhead box P3.The level of circulating Treg cells increases in a variety of pathologic conditions.The purpose of this study was to uncover the role of circulating Treg cells in TBI.Methods:A clinical study was conducted in two neurosurgical intensive care units of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital and Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University (Tianjin,China).Forty patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited from August 2013 to November 2013.Circulating Treg cells was detected on the follow-up period of 1,4,7,14,and 21 days after TBI.Blood sample (1 ml)was withdrawn in the morning and processed within 2 h.Results:There was no significant difference in the level of circulating Treg cells between TBI patients and normal controls during follow-up.TBI patients exhibited higher circulating Treg level than normal controls on the 1 st day after TBI.Treg level was decreased on the 4th day,climbed up on the 7th day and peaked on 14th day after TBI.Treg cells declined to the normal level on 21th day after TBI.The level of circulating Treg cells was significantly higher in survival TBI patients when compared to nonsurvival TBI patients.TBI patients with improved conditions exhibited significantly higher circulating Treg level when compared to those with deteriorated conditions.The circulating Treg level was correlated with neurologic recovery after TBI.A better neural recovery and lower hospital mortality were found in TBI patients with circulating Treg cells more than 4.91% in total CD4+ mononuclear cells as compared to those with circulating Treg cells less than 4.91% in total CD4+ mononuclear cells in the first 14 days.Conclusions:The level of circulating Treg cells is positively

  12. Deterministic and stochastic approaches in the clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have enormous intrinsic clinical value due to their multi-lineage differentiation capacity, support of hemopoiesis, immunoregulation and growth factors/cytokines secretion. MSCs have thus been the object of extensive research for decades. After completion of many pre-clinical and clinical trials, MSC-based therapy is now facing a challenging phase. Several clinical trials have reported moderate, non-durable benefits, which caused initial enthusiasm to wane, and indicated an urgent need to optimize the efficacy of therapeutic, platform-enhancing MSC-based treatment. Recent investigations suggest the presence of multiple in vivo MSC ancestors in a wide range of tissues, which contribute to the heterogeneity of the starting material for the expansion of MSCs. This variability in the MSC culture-initiating cell population, together with the different types of enrichment/isolation and cultivation protocols applied, are hampering progress in the definition of MSC-based therapies. International regulatory statements require a precise risk/benefit analysis, ensuring the safety and efficacy of treatments. GMP validation allows for quality certification, but the prediction of a clinical outcome after MSC-based therapy is correlated not only to the possible morbidity derived by cell production process, but also to the biology of the MSCs themselves, which is highly sensible to unpredictable fluctuation of isolating and culture conditions. Risk exposure and efficacy of MSC-based therapies should be evaluated by pre-clinical studies, but the batch-to-batch variability of the final medicinal product could significantly limit the predictability of these studies. The future success of MSC-based therapies could lie not only in rational optimization of therapeutic strategies, but also in a stochastic approach during the assessment of benefit and risk factors.

  13. Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches in the Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePacini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have enormous intrinsic clinical value due to their multi-lineage differentiation capacity, support of hemopoiesis, immunoregulation and growth factors/cytokines secretion. MSCs have thus been the object of extensive research for decades. After completion of many pre-clinical and clinical trials, MSC-based therapy is now facing a challenging phase. Several clinical trials have reported moderate, non-durable benefits, which caused initial enthusiasm to wane, and indicated an urgent need to optimize the efficacy of therapeutic, platform-enhancing MSC-based treatment. Recent investigations suggest the presence of multiple in vivo MSC ancestors in a wide range of tissues, which contribute to the heterogeneity of the starting material for the expansion of MSCs. This variability in the MSC culture-initiating cell population, together with the different types of enrichment/isolation and cultivation protocols applied, are hampering progress in the definition of MSC-based therapies. International regulatory statements require a precise risk/benefit analysis, ensuring the safety and efficacy of treatments. GMP validation allows for quality certification, but the prediction of a clinical outcome after MSC-based therapy is correlated not only to the possible morbidity derived by cell production process, but also to the biology of the MSCs themselves, which is highly sensible to unpredictable fluctuation of isolating and culture conditions.Risk exposure and efficacy of MSC-based therapies should be evaluated by pre-clinical studies, but the batch-to-batch variability of the final medicinal product could significantly limit the predictability of these studies. The future success of MSC-based therapies could lie not only in rational optimization of therapeutic strategies, but also in a stochastic approach during the assessment of benefit and risk factors.

  14. Expression and clinical significance of sulfiredoxin expression in cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan CHEN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To inquire into the expression and its clinical significance of sulfiredoxin (Srx in cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue. Methods SABC immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression levels of Srx in specimens of 104 cervical squamous cell carcinoma and the corresponding adjacent tissues, 15 cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN Ⅲ, and 20 normal cervical squamous cell epithelium tissue. The relationship between the expression of Srx protein and clinical pathological parameters of the cancer was also analyzed. Results The positive expression rates of Srx in CIN Ⅲ and cervical squamous cell carcinoma [73.3%(11/15 and 82.7%(86/104, respectively] were significantly higher than that in normal cervical tissue [35.0%(7/20, χ2=17.778, P=0.000]. Meanwhile, Srx expression in cervical cancer specimens was significantly higher than that in normal adjacent tissues (χ2=56.224, P=0.000. The positive expression of Srx in cervical squamous cell carcinoma was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, the depth of cancer invasion, and the infiltration of blood vessels (P0.05. Conclusion The higher expression of Srx protein might be a valuable marker for the early diagnosis and evaluation of prognosis in patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.11

  15. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Felipe Gonçalves; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate of about 50% in the first 30 days, with limited treatment possibilities. In the past two decades, the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (particularly mesenchymal stem cells and mononuclear cells) has been intensively investigated in preclinical models of different neurological diseases, including models of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. More recently, clinical studies, most of them small, unblinded, and nonrandomized, have suggested that the therapy with bone marrow-derived cells is safe and feasible in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This review discusses the available evidence on the use of bone marrow-derived cells to treat hemorrhagic strokes. Distinctive properties of animal studies are analyzed, including study design, cell dose, administration route, therapeutic time window, and possible mechanisms of action. Furthermore, clinical trials are also reviewed and discussed, with the objective of improving future studies in the field. PMID:27698671

  16. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Rosado-de-Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate