WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell elemental structure

  1. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility. (orig.)

  2. Structural elements design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Draycott, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Gives clear explanations of the logical design sequence for structural elements. The Structural Engineer says: `The book explains, in simple terms, and with many examples, Code of Practice methods for sizing structural sections in timber, concrete,masonry and steel. It is the combination into one book of section sizing methods in each of these materials that makes this text so useful....Students will find this an essential support text to the Codes of Practice in their study of element sizing'.

  3. Solar cell element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Uda, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Yasumitsu; Ikegami, Kiyoharu.

    1989-05-18

    In the existing CdS/CdTe-based solar cell element, nothing is formed except the component effective for generating electromotive force and the components necessary for leading, collecting and extracting the generated electricity, hence even when the element shows deterioration of its performance during its usage, it has been difficult to analyze the above situation. In addition, it has also a defect that its characteristic such as the transfer efficiency in the neighborhood of its glass substrate in connection also with its manufacturing process. In order to solve the above problematical points, this invention proposes, with regard to a CdS-based solar cell element composed by forming a thin film on its substrate, to make a blank space on the above substrate and form thereon a thin film which composes the solar cell element concerned alone or in a piling up manner. 4 figs.

  4. Modelling tumour cell proliferation from vascular structure using tissue decomposition into avascular elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besenhard, Maximilian O; Jarzabek, Monika; O'Farrell, Alice C; Callanan, John J; Prehn, Jochen Hm; Byrne, Annette T; Huber, Heinrich J

    2016-08-01

    Computer models allow the mechanistically detailed study of tumour proliferation and its dependency on nutrients. However, the computational study of large vascular tumours requires detailed information on the 3-dimensional vessel network and rather high computation times due to complex geometries. This study puts forward the idea of partitioning vascularised tissue into connected avascular elements that can exchange cells and nutrients between each other. Our method is able to rapidly calculate the evolution of proliferating as well as dead and quiescent cells, and hence a proliferative index, from a given amount and distribution of vascularisation of arbitrary complexity. Applying our model, we found that a heterogeneous vessel distribution provoked a higher proliferative index, suggesting increased malignancy, and increased the amount of dead cells compared to a more static tumour environment when a homogenous vessel distribution was assumed. We subsequently demonstrated that under certain amounts of vascularisation, cell proliferation may even increase when vessel density decreases, followed by a subsequent decrease of proliferation. This effect was due to a trade-off between an increase in compensatory proliferation for replacing dead cells and a decrease of cell population due to lack of oxygen supply in lowly vascularised tumours. Findings were illustrated by an ectopic colorectal cancer mouse xenograft model. Our presented approach can be in the future applied to study the effect of cytostatic, cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy and is ideally suited for translational systems biology, where rapid interaction between theory and experiment is essential. PMID:27155046

  5. A cut-cell finite volume - finite element coupling approach for fluid-structure interaction in compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid-structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  6. Aluminium structural elements

    OpenAIRE

    Švent, Nejc

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the structural analysis of aluminium structural members in accordance with the SIST EN 1999-1-1 standard. In the introduction, historical development of aluminium is summarized, as well as the processes of structural aluminium production and manufacture. Predominantly, resistance control checks of aluminium structural members are covered, with special attention to the major contrasts between aluminium and steel structural analyses. Finally, fundamental examples of resis...

  7. Electronic structure of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure of superheavy elements, from element 121 to 131, studied using the relativistic density-functional theory with quantum electrodynamical corrections (Berit interaction) by MacDonald and Vosko, is reported. These corrections give rise to a modification to previous results, and the g electron is found to appear from element 126. Since a recent study on molecular systems has clarified the surprising accuracy of the density-functional approach in evaluating the relative energy difference of ground and excited states, a further study of the electronic configuration of heavy elements using the relativistic density-functional theory and the further improvement of the theory are both awaited. (author)

  8. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lkhamsuren Bayarjargal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p; T stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments.

  9. Cell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands Review Quiz Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the Heart Blood Classification & Structure of Blood ...

  10. Logical elements in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremen, A

    1984-11-01

    Recognition processes with enhanced accuracy (as performed by structures like enzymes or ribosomes) are investigated using elementary ideas of statistical mechanics and related concepts of thermodynamics. The analysis starts from a formal definition of recognition and provides a correspondence with appropriate physical properties of the macromolecular logical elements. Transitions of the recognizing system between different modifications are a necessary feature of a more exacting recognition process. Rearrangement steps provide the process with higher accuracy by performing two physical operations: (1) rearranging the phase space of the system so that the "correct" states be better separated from the "wrong" states and the probability of occupation of the "correct" states be enhanced, (2) directing the process toward the more favourable modifications thus formed. Both operations are related to changes in the physical properties of the recognizing system. These changes can be expressed as differences of macromolecular Gibbs energy levels; if ligand binding or release participate in a step, directivity of the step depends also on the actual chemical potentials of the ligands in solution. The two operations just mentioned resemble two basic operations known to be necessary in electronic digital networks: directivity of control and signal standardization. An analysis of the entire reaction catalysed by a macromolecular logical element takes into account the requirements imposed by the logical functions as well as the need that the chemical potential of the product be not restricted to very low values. To satisfy these conditions, the reaction must be supported by a so-called non-specific reaction, usually implemented by the cleavage reaction of a nucleoside triphosphate. PMID:6513567

  11. Structural elements design manual working with Eurocodes

    CERN Document Server

    Draycott, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    Structural Elements Design Manual: Working With Eurocodes is the structural engineers 'companion volume' to the four Eurocodes on the structural use of timber, concrete, masonry and steelwork. For the student at higher technician or first degree level it provides a single source of information on the behaviour and practical design of the main elements of the building structure. With plenty of worked examples and diagrams, it is a useful textbook not only for students of structural and civil engineering, but also for those on courses in related subjects such as

  12. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  13. HTGR fuel element structural design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabalistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabalistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistent with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the USA is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development

  14. Fire resistance of stainless steel structural elements

    OpenAIRE

    Gomboši, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Graduation thesis represents behavior of structural elements made from stainless steel in case of fire. The general rules according to the European standard SIST EN 1993-1-2 to determine design resistance of the steel structural element for fire conditions are presented. The main focus was to determinate behavior of stainless steel column exposed to the standard fire. Buckling resistance of the column was calculated with a simplified method from the standard SIST EN 1993-1-2. Mech...

  15. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  16. Origin of complex crystal structures of elements at pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Ackland, G. J.; Macleod, I. R.; Degtyareva, O

    2003-01-01

    We present a unifying theory for the observed complex structures of the sp-bonded elements under pressure based on nearly free electron picture (NFE). In the intermediate pressure regime the dominant contribution to crystal structure arises from Fermi-surface Brillouin zone (FSBZ) interactions - structures which allow this are favoured. This simple theory explains the observed crystal structures, transport properties, the evolution of internal and unit cell parameters with pressure. We illust...

  17. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  18. Distribution of inorganic elements in single cells of Chara corallina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are actually 20 chemical elements necessary or beneficial for plant growth. Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen are supplied by air and water. The six macronutrients, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium., calcium, magnesium, and sulfur are required by plants in large amounts. The rest of the elements are required in trace amounts (micronutrients). Essential trace elements include boron, chlorine, copper, iron, manganese, sodium, zinc, molybdenum, and nickel. Beneficial mineral elements include silicon and cobalt. The functions of the inorganic elements closely related to their destinations in plant cells. Plant cells have unique structures, including a central vacuole, plastids, and a thick cell wall that surrounds the cell membrane. Generally, it is very difficult to determine concentrations of inorganic elements in a single plant cell. Chara corallina is a freshwater plant that inhabits temperate zone ponds and lakes. It consists of alternating nodes and internodes. Each internodal segment is a single large cell, up to 10 cm in length, and 1 mm in diameter. With this species it was possible to isolate subcellular fractions with surgical methods with minimal risk of cross contamination. In this study, concentrations of magnesium, calcium, manganese, iron, copper, zinc, and molybdenum in the cell wall, cytoplasm, and vacuole of single cells of Chara corallina were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The distribution characteristics of these elements in the cell components were discussed.

  19. Design elements of hot cell facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D. K.; Lee, K. S.; Baek, S. Y.; Ahn, Y. S.; Choo, Y. S

    1997-06-01

    Hot cell facility is necessary for the post-irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels and materials. Therefore many hot cell facilities have been constructed and operating to support the research and development on the nuclear technology. In this report, the design elements of the hot cell facility is reviewed and discussed. (author). 3 tabs., 12 figs

  20. Finite-Element Modeling For Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents study of finite-element mathematical modeling as used in analyzing stresses and strains at joints between thin, shell-like components (e.g., ducts) and thicker components (e.g., flanges or engine blocks). First approach uses global/local model to evaluate system. Provides correct total response and correct representation of stresses away from any discontinuities. Second approach involves development of special transition finite elements to model transitions between shells and thicker structural components.

  1. Will Finite Elements Replace Structural Mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a personal view regarding the need for a continued interest and activity in structural methods in general, while viewing finite elements and the computer as simply two specific tools for assisting in this endeavor. An attempt is made to provide some insight as to why finite element methods seem to have "won the war," and to give examples of their more (and less) intelligent use. Items addressed include a highlight of unnecessary limitations of many existing standard finite element codes and where it is felt that further development work is needed.

  2. Infinte Periodic Structure of Lightweight Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Sorokin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    models of a semi-infinite Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam structure with periodic variation of the cross-sectional properties are analyzed. In case of the Euler-Bernoulli beam, vibrational behavior is studied in two dimensions by finite element analysis and Floquet theory. Wave propagation within the...... proper dynamic assessment of lightweight buildings. Instead, this paper discusses and compares the use of finite element analysis and a wave approach based on Floquet theory. The present analysis has focus on the effect of periodicity on vibration transmission within semi-infinite beam structures. Two...... models and analytical approaches are compared and analyzed. A vibration-level distribution and propagation characteristics within the beam are presented for excitation frequencies up to 2 kHz....

  3. Binary Morphology With Spatially Variant Structuring Elements: Algorithm and Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Hedberg, Hugo; Dokladal, Petr; Öwall, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical morphology with spatially variant structuring elements outperforms translation-invariant structuring elements in various applications and has been studied in the literature over the years. However, supporting a variable structuring element shape imposes an overwhelming computational complexity, dramatically increasing with the size of the structuring element. Limiting the supported class of structuring elements to rectangles has allowed for a fast algorithm to be developed, which...

  4. Elemental Compositions of Over 80 Cell Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Beverley; Romanov, Alexandre; Romanova, Irina; Turbini, Laura J.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last few years, 85 cell phones have been disassembled, ground up, dissolved, and analyzed for elemental content, mainly for information about the metals present in the phones, but also for some metalloids and nonmetals. The following list of 38 elements were detected in some or all of the phones: Be, B, Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Y, Nb, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ta, W, Pt, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Er. Cadmium was never detected. This paper discusses the methods used for carrying out the analysis, proposes possible sources in the telephones for the elements of interest, the reasons for the interest in most of the elements, and method repeatability.

  5. BERSAFE: (BERkeley Structural Analysis by Finite Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERSAFE is a well-known finite element system which has been under continuous use and development for over 20 years. The BERSAFE system comprises an inter-compatible set of program modules covering static stress analysis, linear dynamics and thermal analysis. Data generation and results presentation modules are also available, along with special supporting functions including automatic crack growth through a model with adaptive meshing. The functionality of BERSAFE, is nowadays very advanced, both in engineering scope and finite element technology. It has seen many firsts, including the front solution and Virtual Crack Extension methods (VCE). More recent additions which have developed out of the Power Industry's requirements are a finite element computational fluid dynamics code, FEAT, and engineering design assessment procedures. These procedures include R6 and R5 for the assessment of the integrity of structures containing defects below and within the creep regime. To use all this software in a user-friendly manner, a new computational environment has been developed, called 'The Harness' which takes advantage of modern hardware and software philosophies. This provides the tool-kit to undertake complete problems, covering determination of fluid loads, structural analysis and failure assessment. In the following sections we describe briefly various components of the BERSAFE suite. (author)

  6. Computational structural analysis and finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kaveh, A

    2014-01-01

    Graph theory gained initial prominence in science and engineering through its strong links with matrix algebra and computer science. Moreover, the structure of the mathematics is well suited to that of engineering problems in analysis and design. The methods of analysis in this book employ matrix algebra, graph theory and meta-heuristic algorithms, which are ideally suited for modern computational mechanics. Efficient methods are presented that lead to highly sparse and banded structural matrices. The main features of the book include: application of graph theory for efficient analysis; extension of the force method to finite element analysis; application of meta-heuristic algorithms to ordering and decomposition (sparse matrix technology); efficient use of symmetry and regularity in the force method; and simultaneous analysis and design of structures.

  7. Nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures loaded in the short-term up until failure. A profound discussion of constitutive modelling on concrete is performed; a model, applicable for general stress states, is described and its predictions are compared with experimental data. This model is implemented in the AXIPLANE-program applicable for axisymmetrick and plane structures. The theoretical basis for this program is given. Using the AXIPLANE-program various concrete structures are analysed up until failure and compared with experimental evidence. These analyses include panels pressure vessel, beams failing in shear and finally a specific pull-out test, the Lok-Test, is considered. In these analyses, the influence of different failure criteria, aggregate interlock, dowel action, secondary cracking, magnitude of compressive strenght, magnitude of tensile strenght and of different post-failure behaviours of the concrete are evaluated. Moreover, it is shown that a suitable analysis of the theoretical data results in a clear insight into the physical behaviour of the considered structures. Finally, it is demonstrated that the AXISPLANE-program for widely different structures exhibiting very delicate structural aspects gives predictions that are in close agreement with experimental evidence. (author)

  8. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  9. Electrical connection structure for a superconductor element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallouet, Nicolas; Maguire, James

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical connection structure for a superconductor element cooled by a cryogenic fluid and connected to an electrical bushing, which bushing passes successively through an enclosure at an intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and the temperature of the cryogenic fluid, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, said bushing projecting outside the ambient temperature enclosure. According to the invention, said intermediate enclosure is filled at least in part with a solid material of low thermal conductivity, such as a polyurethane foam or a cellular glass foam. The invention is applicable to connecting a superconductor cable at cryogenic temperature to a device for equipment at ambient temperature.

  10. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  11. Work on the development of the structure of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is meant to give a roundup of development work concerning fuel element structure as support and cladding of fuel rods. The fuel element structure is a link between reactor vessel and the power-producing fuel rods, i.e. both the reactor arrangement and fuel rods influence the design of the fuel element structure, whereas the fuel element structure also determine marginal conditions for plant and fuel rods. (orig./RW)

  12. Incorporation of trace elements into hair structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examining blood and urine provides an immense insight into human diseases. It is natural to hope that the hair studies will be added routinely to the examinations. Human head hair is a recording filament which can reflect metabolic changes of many elements over a long period of time. The idea of hair analysis is very inviting, because hair is easily samples, shipped and analyzed. In this paper the authors propose a method for the determination of some diffusion parameters from experimental data on the distribution of trace element concentrations in hair and then a method for the determination of the radial diffusion constants of Se, Zn and Pb. The authors' model of hair structure with respect to diffusion is based on the supposition of cross-sectional homogeneity as well as the longitudinal homogeneity of hair. This supposition implies nonisotropic diffusion in hair which is described by two diffusion constants. Diffusion constants can be determined by experiment on wetting hair in solvents or by measurements of natural contamination of hair in air. The first type of experiments can be arranged in various ways to separate radial diffusion from the longitudinal one and, consequently, to determine two diffusion constants from various sets of experiments. The authors' aim is to consider only radial diffusion in hair and to determine the radial diffusion constants of Se, Zn and Pb

  13. Trace elements in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis (employed as a complementary technique) have been used to determine the concentration of 11 elements in blood samples and its components erythrocytes and plasma obtained from three groups of subjects in Nigeria viz: sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects, subjects with sickle cell trait and normal control subjects. The results suggest that SCA subjects have significantly higher concentrations of Na, Cl, Ca and Cu in their whole blood and erythrocytes and a higher concentration of Cl and Cu in their plasma relative to control subjects. Furthermore, a significantly lower concentration of K, Fe, Zn, Se, Br and Rb were found in the whole blood and erythrocytes of the SCA subjects as compared to the controls while the concentration of K and Fe in the plasma of the SCA subjects were however, found to be significantly higher than that of the control group. The study also shows that there were no significant differences between the concentration of these 11 elements in the group with sickle cell trait and the normal control group. (author) 20 refs.; 4 tabs

  14. Analysis of trace elements in chicken embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scanning proton microprobe (SPM) with high resolution and high sensitivity was applied to analyze trace elements in chicken embryo forebrain neutron cell and skeletal muscle myotube cell. The absorption of the two different cells to zinc ions, correlation of elements and trace elemental distributions in the cells were studied. The results indicate that the absorptive capacity of the chicken embryo forebrain neuron cell to zinc ions is larger than that of the chicken embryo skeletal muscle myotube cell, and the concentrations of intracellular trace elements such as Cr, Fe, Ni are explicitly higher. The correlations of elements such as S and Zn or Fe and Zn are positive, but the correlations of P and Ni or Cr and Fe are negative. From the maps of cellular elemental distribution the contents of the different elements are different in the intracellular parts, for example, the contents of the elements phosphorus, sulfur, potassium in the cell membranes are higher than that in the cells

  15. Tensegrity finite element models of mechanical tests of individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursa, Jiri; Lebis, Radek; Holata, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of a vascular smooth muscle cell is based on models published recently; it comprehends elements representing cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, and a complex tensegrity structure representing the cytoskeleton. In contrast to previous models of eucaryotic cells, this tensegrity structure consists of several parts. Its external and internal parts number 30 struts, 60 cables each, and their nodes are interconnected by 30 radial members; these parts represent cortical, nuclear and deep cytoskeletons, respectively. This arrangement enables us to simulate load transmission from the extracellular space to the nucleus or centrosome via membrane receptors (focal adhesions); the ability of the model was tested by simulation of some mechanical tests with isolated vascular smooth muscle cells. Although material properties of components defined on the basis of the mechanical tests are ambiguous, modelling of different types of tests has shown the ability of the model to simulate substantial global features of cell behaviour, e.g. "action at a distance effect" or the global load-deformation response of the cell under various types of loading. Based on computational simulations, the authors offer a hypothesis explaining the scatter of experimental results of indentation tests. PMID:22508025

  16. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR HIGH-SPEED FLOW-STRUCTURE INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wiroj LIMTRAKARN; Pramote DECHAUMPHAI

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive finite element method for high-speed flow-structure interaction is presented. The cell-centered finite element method is combined with an adaptive meshing technique to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for high-speed compressible flow behavior. The energy equation and the quasi-static structural equations for aerodynamically heated structures are solved by applying the Galerkin finite element method. The finite element formulation and computational procedure are described. Interactions between the high-speed flow, structural heat transfer, and deformation are studied by two applications of Mach 10 flow over an inclined plate, and Mach 4 flow in a channel.

  17. Finite Element Vibration and Dynamic Response Analysis of Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings, and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element vibration and dynamic response analysis of engineering structures that were published from 1994 to 1998. It contains 539 citations. The following types of structures are included: basic structural systems; ground structures; ocean and coastal structures; mobile structures; and containment structures.

  18. Seismic evaluation of a hot cell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the structural capacity of and the seismic demand on an existing hot cell structure in a nuclear facility is described. An ANSYS finite-element model of the cell was constructed, treating the walls as plates and the floor and ceiling as a system of discrete beams. A modal analysis showed that the fundamental frequencies of the cell walls lie far above the earthquake frequency range. An equivalent static analysis of the structure was performed. Based on the analysis it was demonstrated that the hot cell structure, would readily withstand the evaluation basis earthquake

  19. Finite element analysis for general elastic multi-structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Jianguo; SHI; Zhongci; XU; Yifeng

    2006-01-01

    A finite element method is introduced to solve the general elastic multi-structure problem, in which the displacements on bodies, the longitudinal displacements on plates and the longitudinal displacements on beams are discretized using conforming linear elements, the rotational angles on beams are discretized using conforming elements of second order, the transverse displacements on plates and beams are discretized by the Morley elements and the Hermite elements of third order, respectively. The generalized Korn's inequality is established on related nonconforming element spaces, which implies the unique solvability of the finite element method. Finally, the optimal error estimate in the energy norm is derived for the method.

  20. Teaching Finite Element Method of Structural Line Elements Assisted by Open Source FreeMat

    OpenAIRE

    Waluyo Adi Siswanto; Agung Setyo Darmawan

    2012-01-01

    One of the important objectives in teaching finite element method at introductory level is to bring students into the comprehension of finite element procedures. This study presents a strategy of teaching structural line elements involving an open source computer-aided learning tool FreeMat integrated with another open source CALFEM finite element toolbox. FreeMat, which is a programming based learning tool, is used together with other higher level learning tools; Open/Libre Office Spreadshee...

  1. Vertical velocity structure and geometry of clear air convective elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. R.; Arnold, A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses observations of individual convective elements with a high-power narrow-beam scanning radar, an FM-CW radar, and an acoustic sounder, including the determination of the vertical air velocity patterns of convective structures with the FM-CW radar and acoustic sounder. Data are presented which link the observed velocity structure and geometrical patterns to previously proposed models of boundary layer convection. It is shown that the high-power radar provides a clear three-dimensional picture of convective cells and fields over a large area with a resolution of 150 m, where the convective cells are roughly spherical. Analysis of time-height records of the FM-CW radar and acoustic sounder confirms the downdraft-entrainment mechanism of the convective cell. The Doppler return of the acoustic sounder and the insect-trail slopes on FM-CW radar records are independent but redundant methods for obtaining the vertical velocity patterns of convective structures.

  2. Prefabricated elements and structures: Developments, tests and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Goltermann, Per

    2014-01-01

    Danish concrete structures are often built with prefabricated elements, joined together on the site and this provides a large challenge to constantly improve and optimize the elements, the joints and the models. DTU Byg has been active in the development, testing and modelling of new elements, joints and models and a number of results and experiences are presented in the paper.

  3. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  4. RILEM TC : reinforcement of timber elements in existing structures

    OpenAIRE

    Tannert, Thomas; Branco, Jorge M.; Riggio, Mariapaola

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on the activities of the RILEM technical committee “Reinforcement of Timber Elements in Existing Structures”. The main objective of the committee is to coordinate the efforts to improve the reinforcement practice of timber structural elements. Recent developments related to structural reinforcements can be grouped into three categories: (i) addition of new structural systems to support the existing structure; (ii) configuration of a composite system; and (iii)...

  5. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; Boer, de André; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controll

  6. Cell packing structures

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2015-03-03

    This paper is an overview of architectural structures which are either composed of polyhedral cells or closely related to them. We introduce the concept of a support structure of such a polyhedral cell packing. It is formed by planar quads and obtained by connecting corresponding vertices in two combinatorially equivalent meshes whose corresponding edges are coplanar and thus determine planar quads. Since corresponding triangle meshes only yield trivial structures, we focus on support structures associated with quad meshes or hex-dominant meshes. For the quadrilateral case, we provide a short survey of recent research which reveals beautiful relations to discrete differential geometry. Those are essential for successfully initializing numerical optimization schemes for the computation of quad-based support structures. Hex-dominant structures may be designed via Voronoi tessellations, power diagrams, sphere packings and various extensions of these concepts. Apart from the obvious application as load-bearing structures, we illustrate here a new application to shading and indirect lighting. On a higher level, our work emphasizes the interplay between geometry, optimization, statics, and manufacturing, with the overall aim of combining form, function and fabrication into novel integrated design tools.

  7. Structural analysis of reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of fuel-element modeling is presented that traces the development of codes for the prediction of light-water-reactor and fast-breeder-reactor fuel-element performance. It is concluded that although the mathematical analysis is now far advanced, the development and incorporation of mechanistic constitutive equations has not kept pace. The resultant reliance on empirical correlations severely limits the physical insight that can be gained from code extrapolations. Current efforts include modeling of alternate fuel systems, analysis of local fuel-cladding interactions, and development of a predictive capability for off-normal behavior. Future work should help remedy the current constitutive deficiencies and should include the development of deterministic failure criteria for use in design

  8. Reliability of Structural Systems with Correlated Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1982-01-01

    Calculation of the probability of failure of a system with correlation members is usually a difficult and time-consuming numerical problem. However, for some types of systems with equally correlated elements this calculation can be performed in a simple way. This has suggested two new methods bas...... on so-called average and equivalent correlation coefficients. By using these methods approximate values for the probability of failure can easily be calculated. The accuracy of these methods is illustrated with examples.......Calculation of the probability of failure of a system with correlation members is usually a difficult and time-consuming numerical problem. However, for some types of systems with equally correlated elements this calculation can be performed in a simple way. This has suggested two new methods based...

  9. Fastening elements in concrete structures - numerical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ozbolt, Josko; Eligehausen, Rolf

    1993-01-01

    Anchoring elements such as headed and expansion studs and grouted or undercut anchors, are often used for local transfer of loads into concrete members. In order to better understand the failure mechanism, a large number of experiments have been carried out in the past. However, due to the complicated three-dimensional load transfer a very few or no numerical studies have been performed for a number of different fastening situations i.e. influence of the embedment depth, crack-width inftuence...

  10. Structural analysis with the finite element method linear statics

    CERN Document Server

    Oñate, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD Linear Statics Volume 1 : The Basis and Solids Eugenio Oñate The two volumes of this book cover most of the theoretical and computational aspects of the linear static analysis of structures with the Finite Element Method (FEM). The content of the book is based on the lecture notes of a basic course on Structural Analysis with the FEM taught by the author at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Barcelona, Spain for the last 30 years. Volume1 presents the basis of the FEM for structural analysis and a detailed description of the finite element formulation for axially loaded bars, plane elasticity problems, axisymmetric solids and general three dimensional solids. Each chapter describes the background theory for each structural model considered, details of the finite element formulation and guidelines for the application to structural engineering problems. The book includes a chapter on miscellaneous topics such as treatment of inclined supports, elas...

  11. Structural Elements in Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" is not only a masterpiece of modern literature but also a work that exemplifies many ideas of structural family therapy. Examines how Kafka's novella embodies concepts such as parentified children, enmeshment, intergenerational boundaries, coalitions and triangles, structural dysfunction, and structural…

  12. Mechanics of structural elements theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Slivker, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Using the variational approach, this book presents the variational principles and methods of analysis for applied elasticity and structural mechanics. Oriented towards experts in civil engineering, researchers, and software developers, this book is also useful to students of engineering, and to professors of structural analysis.

  13. Statistical study on the strength of structural materials and elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strength data for structural materials and elements including concrete, reinforcing steel, structural steel, plywood elements, reinforced concrete beams, reinforced concrete columns, brick masonry elements, and concrete masonry walls were statistically analyzed. Sample statistics were computed for these data, and distribution parameters were derived for normal, lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Goodness-of-fit tests were performed on these distributions. Most data, except those for masonry elements, displayed fairly small dispersion. Dispersion in data for structural materials was generally found to be smaller than for structural elements. Lognormal and Weibull distributions displayed better overall fits to data than normal distribution, although either Weibull or lognormal distribution can be used to represent the data analyzed. (auth)

  14. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; de Boer; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controller design. The reduced structural model is combined with an acoustic model which uses the radiation mode concept. For a test case consisting of a rectangular plate with one piezo patch the model re...

  15. Influence of different sulfur to selenium ratios on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigate the effect of different elemental selenium to elemental sulfur ratios on the chalcopyrite phase formation in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films. The films are formed by the stacked elemental layer process. The structural and electronic properties of the thin films and solar cells are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, spectral photoluminescence as well as current-voltage, and quantum efficiency measurements. The influence of different S/(S+Se) ratios on the anion incorporation and on the Ga/In distribution is investigated. We find a homogenous sulfur concentration profile inside the film from the top surface to the bottom. External quantum efficiency measurements show that the band edge of the solar cell device is shifted to shorter wavelength, which enhances the open-circuit voltages. The relative increase of the open-circuit voltage with S/(S+Se) ratio is lower than expected from the band gap energy trend, which is attributed to the presence of S-induced defects. We also observe a linear decrease of the short-circuit current density with increasing S/(S+Se) ratio which can be explained by a reduced absorption. Above a critical S/(S+Se) ratio of around 0.61, the fill factor drops drastically, which is accompanied by a strong series resistance increase which may be attributed to changes in the back contact or p-n junction properties.

  16. Influence of different sulfur to selenium ratios on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B. J., E-mail: bjm.mueller@web.de [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Zimmermann, C.; Haug, V., E-mail: veronika.haug@de.bosch.com; Koehler, T.; Zweigart, S. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Hergert, F. [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, D-14772 Brandenburg (Germany); Herr, U., E-mail: ulrich.herr@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-11-07

    In this study, we investigate the effect of different elemental selenium to elemental sulfur ratios on the chalcopyrite phase formation in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films. The films are formed by the stacked elemental layer process. The structural and electronic properties of the thin films and solar cells are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, spectral photoluminescence as well as current-voltage, and quantum efficiency measurements. The influence of different S/(S+Se) ratios on the anion incorporation and on the Ga/In distribution is investigated. We find a homogenous sulfur concentration profile inside the film from the top surface to the bottom. External quantum efficiency measurements show that the band edge of the solar cell device is shifted to shorter wavelength, which enhances the open-circuit voltages. The relative increase of the open-circuit voltage with S/(S+Se) ratio is lower than expected from the band gap energy trend, which is attributed to the presence of S-induced defects. We also observe a linear decrease of the short-circuit current density with increasing S/(S+Se) ratio which can be explained by a reduced absorption. Above a critical S/(S+Se) ratio of around 0.61, the fill factor drops drastically, which is accompanied by a strong series resistance increase which may be attributed to changes in the back contact or p-n junction properties.

  17. Response Surface Stochastic Finite Element Method of Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Response Surface Method (RSM has been applied to structural reliability problems successfully in many areas. Finite Element Method (FEM is one of the most widely used computational methods, which permit the analysis and design of large-scale engineering systems. In order to obtain a reliability analysis method of composite structure with satisfactory accuracy and computational efficiency, RSM and FEM were combined by secondary development of ABAQUS. Response Surface Stochastic Finite Element Method (RSSFEM which can solve the reliability problems of composite structure was developed. The numerical accuracy and the computational efficiency of the developed method were demonstrated by comparison with Monte-Carlo Stochastic Finite Element Method (MCSFEM.

  18. Alpha Decay, Shell Structure, and New Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENZhong-Zhou; TAIFei; SHENWen-Qing

    2003-01-01

    We systematically analyze the experimental data of alpha decay in even-even heavy nuclei far from stability and find that the Geiger-Nuttall law brea~s for an isotopic chain when its neutron number is across a marc number or there is a deformed subshell. This break can be used to identify new magic numbers of superheavy nuclei. It is also discovered that there is a new linear relation between the logarithm of half-life and the reciprocal of the square root of decay energy for N = 126 and N = 152 isotones. It could be a new law of alpha decay for nuclei with magic neutron numbers but the physics behind it is to be explored. The significance of these researches for the search of new elements is discussed.

  19. Results of galois field elements multipliers structural complexity evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Hlukhova, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Scalable multiplier for Galois field GF(2m) elements core generator operation is examined. The multiplier uses type 2 Gaussian normal basis for Galois field elements presentation and forms m-bit (m≤998) result by n-bit portions. Generated cores hardware complexity allows their implementation in FPGA for any m and n values. But for big m and n values implementation is impossible because of high structural complexity. The method for such multipliers structural complexity estimation is propos...

  20. sp3-hybridized framework structure of group-14 elements discovered by genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Group-14 elements, including C, Si, Ge, and Sn, can form various stable and metastable structures. Finding new metastable structures of group-14 elements with desirable physical properties for new technological applications has attracted a lot of interest. Using a genetic algorithm, we discovered a new low-energy metastable distorted sp3-hybridized framework structure of the group-14 elements. It has P42/mnm symmetry with 12 atoms per unit cell. The void volume of this structure is as large as 139.7Å3 for Si P42/mnm, and it can be used for gas or metal-atom encapsulation. Band-structure calculations show that P42/mnm structures of Si and Ge are semiconducting with energy band gaps close to the optimal values for optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications. With metal-atom encapsulation, the P42/mnm structure would also be a candidate for rattling-mediated superconducting or used as thermoelectric materials.

  1. Finite-element method for above-core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional finite-element models for the treatment of the nonlinear, transient response of a fast breeder reactor's above-core structures are described. For purposes of treating arbitrarily large rotations, node orientations are described by unit vectors and the deformable elements are treated by a corotational formulation in which the coordinate system is embedded in the elements. Deformable elements may be connected either to nodes directly or through rigid bodies. The time integration is carried out by the Newmark β method. These features have been incorporated to form the finite-element program SAFE/RAS (Safety Analysis by Finite Elements/Reactor Analysis and Safety Division). Computations are presented for semianalytical comparisons, simple scoping studies, and Stanford Research Institute (SRI) test comparisons

  2. Application of a finite element algorithm for high speed viscous flows using structured and unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemaganti, Gururaja R.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1990-01-01

    A higher-order streamline upwinding Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is employed for high speed viscous flow analysis using structured and unstructured meshes. For a Mach 8.03 shock interference problem, successive mesh adaptation was performed using an adaptive remeshing method. Results from the finite element algorithm compare well with both experimental data and results from an upwind cell-centered method. Finite element results for a Mach 14.1 flow over a 24 degree compression corner compare well with experimental data and two other numerical algorithms for both structured and unstructured meshes.

  3. Incommensurate host-guest structures in compressed elements: Hume—Rothery effects as origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of the incommensurate structure in the element Ba under pressure 15 years ago was followed by findings of a series of similar structures in other compressed elements. Incommensurately modulated structures of the host-guest type consist of a tetragonal host structure and a guest structure. The guest structure forms chains of atoms embedded in the channels of host atoms so that the axial ratio of these subcells along the c axis is not rational. Two types of the host-guest structures have been found so far: with the host cells containing 8 atoms and 16 atoms; in these both types the guest cells contain 2 atoms. These crystal structures contain a non-integer number of atoms in their unit cell: tI11* in Bi, Sb, As, Ba, Sr, Sc and tI19* in Na, K, Rb. We consider here a close structural relationship of these host-guest structures with the binary alloy phase Au3Cd5-tI32. This phase is related to the family of the Hume-Rothery phases that is stabilized by the Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interaction. From similar considerations for alkali and alkaline-earth elements a necessary condition for structural stability emerges in which the valence electrons band overlaps with the upper core electrons and the valence electron count increases under compression.

  4. COUPLING OF FINITE ELEMENT AND BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS FOR THE SCATTERING BY PERIODIC CHIRAL STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Habib Ammari; Gang Bao

    2008-01-01

    Consider a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave incident on a biperiodic structure in R3. The periodic structure separates two homogeneous regions. The medium inside the structure is chiral and nonhomogeneous. In this paper, variational formulations coupling finite element methods in the chiral medium with a method of integral equations on the periodic interfaces are studied. The well-posedness of the continuous and discretized problems is established. Uniform convergence for the coupling variational approximations of the model problem is obtained.

  5. Stochastic Finite Elements in Reliability-Based Structural Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Engelund, S.

    Application of stochastic finite elements in structural optimization is considered. It is shown how stochastic fields modelling e.g. the modulus of elasticity can be discretized in stochastic variables and how a sensitivity analysis of the reliability of a structural system with respect to...

  6. Stochastic Finite Elements in Reliability-Based Structural Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Engelund, S.

    1995-01-01

    Application of stochastic finite elements in structural optimization is considered. It is shown how stochastic fields modelling e.g. the modulus of elasticity can be discretized in stochastic variables and how a sensitivity analysis of the reliability of a structural system with respect to...

  7. Finite element thermal analysis of convectively-cooled aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, A. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design complexity and size of convectively-cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic transports necessitate the use of large general purpose computer programs for both thermal and structural analyses. Generally thermal analyses are based on the lumped-parameter finite difference technique, and structural analyses are based on the finite element technique. Differences in these techniques make it difficult to achieve an efficient interface. It appears, therefore, desirable to conduct an integrated analysis based on a common technique. A summary is provided of efforts by NASA concerned with the development of an integrated thermal structural analysis capability using the finite element method. Particular attention is given to the development of conduction/forced-convection finite element methodology and applications which illustrate the capabilities of the developed concepts.

  8. Application of global elements to a reinforced concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dimensioning of nuclear facilities requires to take into account the possible risk of earthquakes. However such installations are generally complex structures with reinforced concrete poles, walls, beams and porches. In this study, a seismic analysis of such a structure is proposed. The use of the Castem 2000 global element code was attempted to dynamically simulate the behaviour of the reinforced concrete elements. However, no suitable modeling has been found for the storeys, the functioning of which being dominated by carrying walls. Concerning the porch-type storeys, monotonous static loads were simulated and provided information on the local and global behaviour of these structures. Thus, representative global elements could be realized for these structures. Results obtained are satisfactory for these storeys which essentially undergo a bending deformation. (J.S.)

  9. Hybrid open public space of landscape elements and built structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Bence

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The trend today in the cities in Europe and elsewhere is in combining landscape elements, built structure and different uses into a complex urban structure. Physical and program interweaving of landscape elements and built structure enables the consumers daily practice of leisure programs – relaxation, recreation and experiencing other cultural, educational and social events in the public green space. On the basis of determinate social changes and new approaches in urban planning practice, analyses of architectural and urban case studies from the point of view of integrating the landscape elements into the urban structure, the article defines the phenomenon of hybrid open public space and proposes methodical guidelines for the planning.

  10. RSW Mixed Element Cell-Centered Medium Mesh

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This RSW gridset is designed as the medium size mixed element grid for use with cell-centered unstructured meshes. UG3 : Grid File Name = rsw_med_mixedcc.b8.ugrid...

  11. Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur to Sulfite by Thiobacillus thiooxidans Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Isamu; Chan, C W; Takeuchi, T L

    1992-01-01

    Thiobacillus thiooxidans cells oxidized elemental sulfur to sulfite, with 1 mol of O2 consumption per mol of sulfur oxidized to sulfite, when the oxidation of sulfite was inhibited with 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide.

  12. Investigation of the photovoltaic cell/ thermoelectric element hybrid system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotfas, D. T.; Cotfas, P. A.; Machidon, O. M.; Ciobanu, D.

    2016-06-01

    The PV/TEG hybrid system, consisting of the photovoltaic cells and thermoelectric element, is presented in the paper. The dependence of the PV/TEG hybrid system parameters on the illumination levels and the temperature is analysed. The maxim power values of the photovoltaic cell, of the thermoelectric element and of the PV/TEG system are calculated and a comparison between them is presented and analysed. An economic analysis is also presented.

  13. Multibody Finite Element Method and Application in Hydraulic Structure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Su; Yebin Zhao; Yusong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Multibody finite element method is proposed for analysis of contact problems in hydraulic structure. This method is based on the block theory of discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA) method and combines advantages of finite element method (FEM) and the displacement compatibility equation in classical elastic mechanics. Each single block is analyzed using FEM in corresponding local coordinate system and all contacting blocks need to satisfy the displacement compatibility requirement between...

  14. Finite elements for the thermomechanical calculation of massive structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper examines the fine element analysis of thermal stress and deformation problems in massive structures. To this end compatible idealizations are utilized for heat conduction and static analysis in order to minimize the data transfer. For transient behaviour due to unsteady heat flow and/or inelastics material processes the two computational parts are interwoven in form of an integrated software package for finite element analysis of thermomechanical problems in space and time. (orig.)

  15. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  16. Finite element analysis of structures through unified formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, Erasmo; Petrolo, Marco; Zappino, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a computational tool widely used to design and analyse  complex structures. Currently, there are a number of different approaches to analysis using the FEM that vary according to the type of structure being analysed: beams and plates may use 1D or 2D approaches, shells and solids 2D or 3D approaches, and methods that work for one structure are typically not optimized to work for another. Finite Element Analysis of Structures Through Unified Formulation deals with the FEM used for the analysis of the mechanics of structures in the case of linear elasticity. The novelty of this book is that the finite elements (FEs) are formulated on the basis of a class of theories of structures known as the Carrera Unified Formulation (CUF). It formulates 1D, 2D and 3D FEs on the basis of the same ''fundamental nucleus'' that comes from geometrical relations and Hooke''s law, and presents both 1D and 2D refined FEs that only have displacement variables as in 3D elements. It also covers 1D...

  17. Finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures - Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop is related to the finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures. It is composed of three sessions. The first session (which title is: the use of finite element analysis in safety assessments) comprises six papers which titles are: Historical Development of Concrete Finite Element Modeling for Safety Evaluation of Accident-Challenged and Aging Concrete Structures; Experience with Finite Element Methods for Safety Assessments in Switzerland; Stress State Analysis of the Ignalina NPP Confinement System; Prestressed Containment: Behaviour when Concrete Cracking is Modelled; Application of FEA for Design and Support of NPP Containment in Russia; Verification Problems of Nuclear Installations Safety Software of Strength Analysis (NISS SA). The second session (title: concrete containment structures under accident loads) comprises seven papers which titles are: Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis; What Kind of Prediction for Leak rates for Nuclear Power Plant Containments in Accidental Conditions; Influence of Different Hypotheses Used in Numerical Models for Concrete At Elevated Temperatures on the Predicted Behaviour of NPP Core Catchers Under Severe Accident Conditions; Observations on the Constitutive Modeling of Concrete Under Multi-Axial States at Elevated Temperatures; Analyses of a Reinforced Concrete Containment with Liner Corrosion Damage; Program of Containment Concrete Control During Operation for the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant; Static Limit Load of a Deteriorated Hyperbolic Cooling Tower. The third session (concrete structures under extreme environmental load) comprised five papers which titles are: Shear Transfer Mechanism of RC Plates After Cracking; Seismic Back Calculation of an Auxiliary Building of the Nuclear Power Plant Muehleberg, Switzerland; Seismic Behaviour of Slightly Reinforced Shear Wall Structures; FE Analysis of Degraded Concrete

  18. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel

  19. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Reddy, K Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y; Hemker, Kevin J; Goddard, William A

    2016-08-19

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β-B). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β-B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ-B, is based on the Cmcm orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ-B structure is 13.8  meV/B more stable than β-B. The τ-B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B_{57} units to nearby B_{12} units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ-B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure. PMID:27588864

  20. Finite Element Vibration Analysis of Laminated Composite Folded Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guha Niyogi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A nine-noded Lagrangian plate bending finite element that incorporates first-order transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia is used to predict the free and forced vibration response of laminated composite folded plate structures. A 6 × 6 transformation matrix is derived to transform the system element matrices before assembly. The usual five degrees-of-freedom per node is appended with an additional drilling degree of freedom in order to fit the transformation. The present finite element results show good agreement with the available semi-analytical solutions and finite element results. Parametric studies are conducted for free and forced vibration analysis for laminated folded plates, with reference to crank angle, fibre angle and stacking sequence. The natural frequencies and mode shapes, and forced vibration responses furnished here may serve as a benchmark for future investigations.

  1. SOME ELEMENTS OF STRUCTURALISM AND ITS APPLICATION TO LITERARY THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    John LYE

    2011-01-01

    Structuralism is a mode of thinking and a method of analysis practiced in 20th century social sciences and humanities or it is a general approach in various academic disciplines. In this article John Lye has dealt with the subject of “Some Elements of Structuralism and its Application to Literary Theory”. Text has consisted of subtitles as “I-General Principles”, “II-Structuralism, Culture and Texts”, “III-Sturcturalism and Literature” and “IV-Structural Analysis”. Author has mentioned from...

  2. Criteria for structural verification of fast reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and functional criteria and relative verifications of PEC reactor fuel element are presented and discussed. Particular attention has been given to differentiate the structural verifications of low neutronic damage zones from those high neutronic damage ones. The structural verification criteria, which had already been presented at the 8th SMIRT Seminar Conference in Paris, have had some modifications during the Safety Report preparation. Finally some necessary activities are indicated for structural criteria validation, in particular for irradiated components, and for converging towards a European fast reactor code. (author). 3 refs, 6 tabs

  3. Picornavirus IRES elements: RNA structure and host protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Diaz-Toledano, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements were discovered in picornaviruses. These elements are cis-acting RNA sequences that adopt diverse three-dimensional structures and recruit the translation machinery using a 5' end-independent mechanism assisted by a subset of translation initiation factors and various RNA binding proteins termed IRES transacting factors (ITAFs). Many of these factors suffer important modifications during infection including cleavage by picornavirus proteases, changes in the phosphorylation level and/or redistribution of the protein from the nuclear to the cytoplasm compartment. Picornavirus IRES are amongst the most potent elements described so far. However, given their large diversity and complexity, the mechanistic basis of its mode of action is not yet fully understood. This review is focused to describe recent advances on the studies of RNA structure and RNA-protein interactions modulating picornavirus IRES activity. PMID:25617758

  4. True Stress-True Strain Models for Structural Steel Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Arasaratnam, P.; K. S. Sivakumaran; Tait, M J

    2011-01-01

    A standard uniaxial tensile test, which establishes the engineering stress-strain relationship, in general, provides the basic mechanical properties of steel required by a structural designer. Modern numerical analysis techniques used for analysis of large strain problems such as failure analysis of steel structures and elements metal forming, metal cutting, and so forth, will require implementation and use of true stress-true strain material characterization. This paper establishes a five st...

  5. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  6. Welding device for nuclear fuel assembly structure elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device has two parallel assembling positions next to each other. The welding robot is carried by a carriage with displacement parallel to the guide tubes and has enough degrees of freedom to move from one assembling position to the other and have access to the structural elements

  7. 2-D Finite Element Analysis of Massive RC Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saabye Ottosen, Niels

    1982-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of concrete structures using finite elements is discussed. The applications include a thick-walled top-closure for a pressure vessel as well as the delicate problems of beams failing in shear. The top-closure analysis evaluates the effect of two different failure criteria and...

  8. 2-D Finite Element Analysis of Massive RC Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saabye Ottosen, Niels

    1982-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of concrete structures using finite elements is discussed. The applications include a thick-walled top-closure for a pressure vessel as well as the delicate problems of beams failing in shear. The top-closure analysis evaluates the effect of two different failure criteria and m...

  9. Variation of Mixed Hodge Structure and Primitive elements

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmati, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behaviour of polarization form in the variation of mixed Hodge structure associated to isolated hypersurface singularities. The contribution characterizes a modification of Grothendieck residue as the polarization on the extended fiber in this case. We also provide a discussion on primitive elements to explain conjugation operator in these variations, already existed in the literature.

  10. Finite element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  11. Finite-element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ajay; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  12. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention

  13. Correlative Imaging of Structural and Elemental Composition of Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Heine, R.; Xu, F.; Suhonen, H.; Helfen, L.; Rosenhahn, A.; Gorniak, T.; Kirchen, S.; Schwartz, T.; Baumbach, T.

    2013-10-01

    Synchrotron-based phase contrast tomography (holotomography) and scanning hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) are combined to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structural and corresponding elemental distribution of bacterial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples were fixed without contrast agents or microtomal sectioning. Within an intact microbial community single bacteria are clearly resolved, and their morphology can be directly visualized together with the elemental content. Such 3D set of complementary information at cellular level is essential for gaining a deeper understanding of biofilm evolution aiming to develop potential strategies on biofilm growth control and prevention.

  14. Hypersensitive transition spectrum of f-element and coordination structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some f-f transitions of Ln(An) metallic ions have particular super-sensitivity to the change of coordination environments. This is called super-sensitive transitions. Based on the irreducible tensor operator method, a computation model and corresponding computer program for calculating the hypersensitive transition spectrum of f-element were developed. By comparing the theoretical spectra of all possible coordination structures with experimental one, the possible coordination structures of complex can be determined. The coordination structures of Nd3+, Er3+ hydrate and their extraction complex with H(DEHP) were successfully determined by this method, and the experimental spectra were also assigned

  15. Engineering computation of structures the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Maria Augusta; Roseiro, Luis; Cirne, José; Leal, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    This book presents theories and the main useful techniques of the Finite Element Method (FEM), with an introduction to FEM and many case studies of its use in engineering practice. It supports engineers and students to solve primarily linear problems in mechanical engineering, with a main focus on static and dynamic structural problems. Readers of this text are encouraged to discover the proper relationship between theory and practice, within the finite element method: Practice without theory is blind, but theory without practice is sterile. Beginning with elasticity basic concepts and the classical theories of stressed materials, the work goes on to apply the relationship between forces, displacements, stresses and strains on the process of modeling, simulating and designing engineered technical systems. Chapters discuss the finite element equations for static, eigenvalue analysis, as well as transient analyses. Students and practitioners using commercial FEM software will find this book very helpful. It us...

  16. Simplified Finite Element Modelling of Acoustically Treated Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfagni, M.; Citti, P.; Pierini, M.

    1997-07-01

    The application of non-optimized damping and phono-absorbent materials to automotive systems has not proved fully satisfactory in abating noise and vibration. The objective of this work was to develop a simple finite element modelling procedure that would allow optimizing structures such as a car body-in-white in terms of vibroacoustic behavior from the design stage. A procedure was developed to determine the modifications to be made in the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics in the finite element (FE) modelling of a metal structure meshed with shell elements so that the model would describe the behavior of the acoustically treated structure. To validate the modifications, a numerical-experimental comparison of the velocities on the vibrating surface was carried out, followed by a numerical-experimental comparison of the sound pressures generated by the vibrating plate. In the comparison a simple monopole model was used, in which each area of vibrating surface could be likened to a point source. The simulation and experimental procedures, previously validated for the metal structure, were then applied to multi-layered panels. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated velocities and sound pressures resulted for all the multi-layered panel configurations examined.

  17. Finite Element Based HWB Centerbody Structural Optimization and Weight Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a scalable structural model suitable for Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) centerbody analysis and optimization. The geometry of the centerbody and primary wing structure is based on a Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) surface model of the aircraft and a FLOPS compatible parameterization of the centerbody. Structural analysis, optimization, and weight calculation are based on a Nastran finite element model of the primary HWB structural components, featuring centerbody, mid section, and outboard wing. Different centerbody designs like single bay or multi-bay options are analyzed and weight calculations are compared to current FLOPS results. For proper structural sizing and weight estimation, internal pressure and maneuver flight loads are applied. Results are presented for aerodynamic loads, deformations, and centerbody weight.

  18. A Curved, Elastostatic Boundary Element for Plane Anisotropic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Klang, Eric C.

    2001-01-01

    The plane-stress equations of linear elasticity are used in conjunction with those of the boundary element method to develop a novel curved, quadratic boundary element applicable to structures composed of anisotropic materials in a state of plane stress or plane strain. The curved boundary element is developed to solve two-dimensional, elastostatic problems of arbitrary shape, connectivity, and material type. As a result of the anisotropy, complex variables are employed in the fundamental solution derivations for a concentrated unit-magnitude force in an infinite elastic anisotropic medium. Once known, the fundamental solutions are evaluated numerically by using the known displacement and traction boundary values in an integral formulation with Gaussian quadrature. All the integral equations of the boundary element method are evaluated using one of two methods: either regular Gaussian quadrature or a combination of regular and logarithmic Gaussian quadrature. The regular Gaussian quadrature is used to evaluate most of the integrals along the boundary, and the combined scheme is employed for integrals that are singular. Individual element contributions are assembled into the global matrices of the standard boundary element method, manipulated to form a system of linear equations, and the resulting system is solved. The interior displacements and stresses are found through a separate set of auxiliary equations that are derived using an Airy-type stress function in terms of complex variables. The capabilities and accuracy of this method are demonstrated for a laminated-composite plate with a central, elliptical cutout that is subjected to uniform tension along one of the straight edges of the plate. Comparison of the boundary element results for this problem with corresponding results from an analytical model show a difference of less than 1%.

  19. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  20. Influence of coolant motion on structure of hardened steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper is focused on volumetric hardening process using liquid low melting point metal as a coolant. Effect of convective motion of the coolant on material structure after hardening is investigated. Comparison with results obtained for model neglecting motion of liquid is executed. Mathematical and numerical model based on Finite Element Metod is described. Characteristic Based Split (CBS method is used to uncouple velocities and pressure and finally to solve Navier-Stokes equation. Petrov-Galerkin formulation is employed to stabilize convective term in heat transport equation. Phase transformations model is created on the basis of Johnson-Mehl and Avrami laws. Continuous cooling diagram (CTPc for C45 steel is exploited in presented model of phase transformations. Temporary temperatures, phases participation, thermal and structural strains in hardening element and coolant velocities are shown and discussed.

  1. Electoral structure of building foundations in nuclear fuel element plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant structures of nuclear fuel elements have a substantial burden. This requires analysis of the selection of the proper foundation for building support for a variety of different soil conditions found in two locations, first at a location near the nuclear power plant in Jepara and the second location BATAN Serpong area. Expected to know the location of soil conditions, we can determined the type of foundation that will be used based on the criteria requirements of the building. (author)

  2. Detection, placement and tracking loads on structural elements

    OpenAIRE

    Baeza de los Santos, Francisco Javier; Ivorra Chorro, Salvador; Zornoza Gómez, Emilio; García Andión, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Comunicación presentada en XXXVII IAHS World Congress on Housing, Santander, 26-29 Octubre 2010. This paper presents an analytical, numerical and experimental approach to detect, measure, locate and track moving loads in a structural element using discrete strain measures. An analytical model considering an Euler-Bernoulli beam was first studied in simple supported beam. Then a computer gorithm was implemented by using numerical models to automatically detect, locate and track different co...

  3. Isogeometric Finite Element Code Development for Analysis of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Hitesh

    2013-01-01

    This research endeavor develops Isogeometric approach for analysis of composite structures and take advantage of higher order continuity, smoothness and variation diminishing property of Nurbs basis for stress analysis of composite and sandwich beams and plates. This research also computes stress concentration factor in a composite plate with a hole.Isogeometric nonlinear/linear finite element code is developed for static and dynamic analysis of laminated composite plates. Nurbs linear, quadr...

  4. Mortar for covering structural elements, with high acustic performance levels

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez de Rojas, M.I.; Olaya Adán, Manuel; Frías Rojas, Moisés; Olmeda, J.; Frutos Vázquez, Borja; Rivera Lozano, Julián; Esteban, J. Luis

    2011-01-01

    [EN] The incorporation of a covering mortar based on cement and granulated coke with particle diameters between 1 and 6 mm, into structural elements such as a brickwork extrados, gives a dual effect of enhanced acoustic insulation. This effect is due to the increase in the mass by the spraying of the mortar and to acoustic absorption as a consequence of the porous network of the material applied. The acoustic performance levels achieved exceed those of the same configuration as a double wall ...

  5. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of the Structure of Door Seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-cai; ZHU Xun-sheng; ZHOU Chi-xing

    2005-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of the seal structure on door closing force, nonlinear finite element method is introduced to analyze compression deformation of a door seal for SANTANA (name of the car made by Shanghai Volkswagen Co. Ltd). MSC. Marc software is used to analyze the large deformation of the seal and the compression test is done to prove the computational results. The results show that the compression loads of the door seal are larger than the standard value of Shanghai Volkswagen Co. Ltd and the seal structure needs to be optimized. There are consistent relationships between calculating results and experimental results and the simulation method is effective.

  6. Thermomechanical finite element analysis of hot water boiler structure

    OpenAIRE

    Živković Dragoljub S.; Milčić Dragan S.; Banić Milan S.; Milosavljević Peđa M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents an application of the Finite Elements Method for stress and strain analysis of the hot water boiler structure. The aim of the research was to investigate the influence of the boiler scale on the thermal stresses and strains of the structure of hot water boilers. Results show that maximum thermal stresses appear in the zone of the pipe carrying wall of the first reversing chamber. This indicates that the most critical part of the boiler are weld spots of the smoke pipe...

  7. RSW Mixed Element Cell-Centered Fine Mesh

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a RSW mixed-element unstructured fine mesh for cell-centered solvers. UG3 : Grid File Name = rsw_fine_mixedcc.b8.ugrid UG3 : Quad Surface Faces= 28968 UG3 :...

  8. A Discrete-Element Approach for Blood Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer; Marshall, Jeffrey

    2006-11-01

    An efficient computational model for simulation of the individual dynamics of adhering blood cells is discussed. Each cell is represented as a discrete particle so that the model can extend existing discrete-element approaches for dense particulate fluid flows to account for receptor-ligand binding of particles, elliptical particle shape, and deformation of the particles due to shear forces. Capabilities of the method in simulating large numbers of particles are illustrated through simulations of the formation of red blood cell rouleaux in shear flow. The effects of several factors, such as aspect ratio of the elliptical particle, shear rate, strength of the cell adhesion force, and hematocrit are investigated. Comparison of the discrete-element results with results of a level-set approach which computes the entire flow field about a small number of cells is used to develop an improved model of the effect of nearby red blood cells on the cell drag force expression. The method is also being applied to examine the influence of red blood cells on other components of the blood, such as platelet dispersion and activation in high shear regions.

  9. Cell-Sediment Separation and Elemental Stoichiometries in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, M.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Lee, Z. M.; Anbar, A. D.; Elser, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Better understanding of the coupling of major biogeochemical cycles requires knowledge of the cellular elemental composition of key microbes. This is difficult in benthic sediments and mats, because of the contributions of non-living components. We are particularly interested in microbial extremophiles, and therefore sought to determine and interpret bulk and cellular elemental ratios in complex field-collected sediment samples from diverse hot spring ecosystems of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). These samples covered a broad range of temperature, pH, and chemical composition. We also sought to extend stoichiometric analysis to a broader suite of elements, including metals (Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, etc.) of biological importance (Sterner and Elser, 2002). To overcome the challenge of rigorously isolating communities from their complex mineral matrices (Havig et al., 2011), we adapted a cell-sediment separation procedure from Amalfitano and Fazi (2008). The method involves chemical (use of a detergent and a chelating agent) and physical methods (stirring, gentle sonication, and gradient centrifugation) to break the microbe-mineral bonds. C and N elemental and isotopic abundances were determined by elemental analysis - isotope ratio - mass spectrometry (EA-IR-MS), while P, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Mo contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We sought to assess the existence of an "Extended Redfield Ratio" (ERR) for these microbes; that is, to establish the multi-element stoichiometric envelope within which extremophilic microbes must operate. Elemental and isotopic mass balance analyses of cultured E. coli before and after separation showed that our procedure preserved cellular C, N, P, Fe, and trace metal contents: neither loss of these elements (e.g., by cell lysis) nor contamination by reagents were observed. On the other hand, cation-forming elements (Na, Mg, K, Ca), were not conserved. Cell

  10. Contents of selected elements in the mineral structure of gallstones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwapuliński Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this work, the problem of occurrence and co-occurrence of titanium, lithium, molybdenum, strontium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium in the choleliths of the inhabitants of Częstochowa and Bielsko-Biała district has been presented. The choice of research area was determined by the different mineral structure of suspended dust in the air, as well as the average different occurrence of some other minerals in suspended dust in the air. The aim of the studies was to define the level of accumulation and coincidention of Ti, Li, Mo, Sr, Ca, Mg, Na, K in deposits in the gallbladder. Materials and methods. The content of these particular elements in the gall bladder deposits obtained during cholecystectomy was assessed by means of inductive coupled plasma – atomic emission spectrometry (ICP – AES with accuracy to 0,01 µg/g. Results. The presence of selected elements in the mineral structure of gall bladder deposits is illustrated by the vast statistical characteristic of their occurrence in the inhabitants of Częstochowa and Bielsko-Biała district. This is also documented by the course of quotient changes of the individual element’s content, compared to their sum in the function of changes of their average content in the gall bladder deposits. Conclusions. The level of examined elements in gallbladder deposits was different according to place of living and gender, those differences being better discriminated by geometrical averages.

  11. Automated identification of elemental ions in macromolecular crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent-picking procedure in phenix.refine has been extended and combined with Phaser anomalous substructure completion and analysis of coordination geometry to identify and place elemental ions. Many macromolecular model-building and refinement programs can automatically place solvent atoms in electron density at moderate-to-high resolution. This process frequently builds water molecules in place of elemental ions, the identification of which must be performed manually. The solvent-picking algorithms in phenix.refine have been extended to build common ions based on an analysis of the chemical environment as well as physical properties such as occupancy, B factor and anomalous scattering. The method is most effective for heavier elements such as calcium and zinc, for which a majority of sites can be placed with few false positives in a diverse test set of structures. At atomic resolution, it is observed that it can also be possible to identify tightly bound sodium and magnesium ions. A number of challenges that contribute to the difficulty of completely automating the process of structure completion are discussed

  12. Micro-Computed Tomography and Finite Element Method Study of Open-Cell Porous Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wejrzanowski Tomasz; Skibinski Jakub; Cwieka Karol; Kurzydlowski Krzysztof J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper the characterization of structure and properties of open-cell porous materials by high-resolution x-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) and finite element method (FEM) is addressed. The unique properties of open porosity foams make them interesting in a range of applications in science and engineering such as energy absorbers, lightweight construction materials or heat insulators. Consequently, a detailed knowledge of structure as well as mechanical properties (i.e. Young...

  13. Elasto-viscoplastic finite element model for prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a computational model, based on the finite element method, for the study of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures under plane stress states. It comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete and steel relaxation are considered. Elasto-viscoplastic constitutive models are used to describe the behavior of the materials. The model includes prestressing and no prestressing reinforcement, on situation with pre- and post-tension with and without bond. A set of prestressed concrete slab elements were tested under instantaneous and long-term loading. The experimental data for deflections, deformations and ultimate strength are used to compare and validate the results obtained through the proposed model. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  14. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Kriegeskotte, C.; Fartmann, M.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Lipinsky, D.

    2006-07-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN 2-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  15. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlinghaus, H.F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: arlinghaus@uni-muenster.de; Kriegeskotte, C. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Fartmann, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Wittig, A. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Sauerwein, W. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Lipinsky, D. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2006-07-30

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN{sub 2}-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  16. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  17. Extended Finite Element Method for Fracture Analysis of Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammadi, Soheil

    2008-01-01

    This important textbook provides an introduction to the concepts of the newly developed extended finite element method (XFEM) for fracture analysis of structures, as well as for other related engineering applications.One of the main advantages of the method is that it avoids any need for remeshing or geometric crack modelling in numerical simulation, while generating discontinuous fields along a crack and around its tip. The second major advantage of the method is that by a small increase in number of degrees of freedom, far more accurate solutions can be obtained. The method has recently been

  18. The Distinct Element Method - Application to Structures in Jointed Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.P.; Glen, L.; Blair, S.; Heuze, F.

    2001-11-30

    The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is a meshfree method with applications to rock mechanics, mining sciences, simulations of nuclear repositories, and the stability of underground structures. Continuum mesh-based methods have been applied successfully to many problems in geophysics. Even if the geology includes fractures and faults, when sufficiently large length scales are considered a continuum approximation may be sufficient. However, a large class of problems exist where individual rock joints must be taken into account. This includes problems where the structures of interest have sizes comparable with the block size. In addition, it is possible that while the structure may experience loads which do no measurable damage to individual blocks, some joints may fail. This may launch smaller blocks as dangerous projectiles or even cause total failure of a tunnel. Traditional grid-based continuum approaches are wholly unsuited to this class of problem. It is possible to introduce discontinuities or slide lines into existing grid-based methods, however, such limited approaches can break down when new contacts form between blocks. The distinct element method (DEM) is an alternative, meshfree approach. The DEM can directly approximate the block structure of the jointed rock using arbitrary polyhedra. Using this approach, preexisting joints are readily incorporated into the DEM model. In addition, the method detects all new contacts between blocks resulting from relative block motion. We will describe the background of the DEM and review previous application of the DEM to geophysical problems. Finally we present preliminary results from a investigation into the stability of underground structures subjected to dynamic loading.

  19. Finite element assessment of precast concrete slab using ANSYS structural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete is used widely in all types of construction. In particular, it is the first choice material for the construction of various industries, due to its affordability, durability, heat resistance, strength, etc. Based on this, understanding the response of concrete structural components for all types of loading is crucial to the development of an overall safe and efficient structure. Various methods have been used to study the response of concrete structural components to various loading regimes. Experimental based testing has been widely used as a means to analyse individual components; this method is, however, extremely time consuming and can be quite costly. Presently, the use of finite element analysis has increased due to increasing knowledge and capabilities of computer software and hardware. It has now become the best method to analyse concrete structural components. In this study, a locally available precast concrete slab, termed the Trasaaco Fast Floor System, that is both reinforced and pre-stressed is analysed for its nonlinear behaviour under external imposed vertical loading conditions using the finite element (FE) method. The FE commercial software ANSYS 13.0, is used for the analysis. Load-deflection responses and the crack patterns at critical stages of loading are studied. The results from the ANSYS programme are compared with technical data obtained from the Trasacco Group. The comparison shows the ANSYS programme to satisfactorily predict the behavioural responses of the fast floor slab system up to failure. In addition, the results obtained confirm the fact that Trasaaco Fast Floor System can be potentially used to support the required loading regime for heavy industrial structures, like nuclear power plant facilities.

  20. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Neil H; Lee, Gloria; Sherer, Nicholas A; Martini, K Michael; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Kuhlman, Thomas E

    2016-06-28

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE's orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  1. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  2. Live imaging of companion cells and sieve elements in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Cayla

    Full Text Available The phloem is a complex tissue composed of highly specialized cells with unique subcellular structures and a compact organization that is challenging to study in vivo at cellular resolution. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy and subcellular fluorescent markers in companion cells and sieve elements, for live imaging of the phloem in Arabidopsis leaves. This approach provided a simple framework for identifying phloem cell types unambiguously. It highlighted the compactness of the meshed network of organelles within companion cells. By contrast, within the sieve elements, unknown bodies were observed in association with the PP2-A1:GFP, GFP:RTM1 and RTM2:GFP markers at the cell periphery. The phloem lectin PP2-A1:GFP marker was found in the parietal ground matrix. Its location differed from that of the P-protein filaments, which were visualized with SEOR1:GFP and SEOR2:GFP. PP2-A1:GFP surrounded two types of bodies, one of which was identified as mitochondria. This location suggested that it was embedded within the sieve element clamps, specific structures that may fix the organelles to each another or to the plasma membrane in the sieve tubes. GFP:RTM1 was associated with a class of larger bodies, potentially corresponding to plastids. PP2-A1:GFP was soluble in the cytosol of immature sieve elements. The changes in its subcellular localization during differentiation provide an in vivo blueprint for monitoring this process. The subcellular features obtained with these companion cell and sieve element markers can be used as landmarks for exploring the organization and dynamics of phloem cells in vivo.

  3. A new program for calculating matrix elements in atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution of many problems concerning the electronic structure of atoms requires the evaluation of the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian operator, including the electrostatic interaction. These matrix elements may be expressed as weighted sums of radial integrals. The program we describe in this paper evaluates the coefficients of the Slater integrals and, if these are given, computes all the matrix elements for a given set of configurations. This program has nearly the same purposes as Hibbert's program and is also based on the Racach techniques. The main difference between this algorithm and the cited one is the method used to calculate the recoupling coefficients. While Hibbert's programs use Burke's algorithm to calculate these coefficients, in our program they are computed using the graphical techniques developed by Jucys et al. According to this method, that we describe in another paper the formulae needed to calculate the recoupling coefficients are previously derived and simplified (as a first step of the program). The use of this method may considerably reduce the running time, specially in the case of large configuration interaction matrices. (orig.)

  4. Finite element analysis of microelectrotension of cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Chilman; Butler, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Electric fields can be focused by micropipette-based electrodes to induce stresses on cell membranes leading to tension and poration. To date, however, these membrane stress distributions have not been quantified. In this study, we determine membrane tension, stress, and strain distributions in the vicinity of a microelectrode using finite element analysis of a multiscale electro-mechanical model of pipette, media, membrane, actin cortex, and cytoplasm. Electric field forces are coupled to me...

  5. Multi-Dimensional Astrophysical Structural and Dynamical Analysis; 1, Development of a Nonlinear Finite Element Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D L

    1999-01-01

    A new field of numerical astrophysics is introduced which addresses the solution of large, multidimensional structural or slowly-evolving problems (rotating stars, interacting binaries, thick advective accretion disks, four dimensional spacetimes, etc.). The technique employed is the Finite Element Method (FEM), commonly used to solve engineering structural problems. The approach developed herein has the following key features: 1. The computational mesh can extend into the time dimension, as well as space, perhaps only a few cells, or throughout spacetime. 2. Virtually all equations describing the astrophysics of continuous media, including the field equations, can be written in a compact form similar to that routinely solved by most engineering finite element codes. 3. The transformations that occur naturally in the four-dimensional FEM possess both coordinate and boost features, such that (a) although the computational mesh may have a complex, non-analytic, curvilinear structure, the physical equations stil...

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Wrinkled Membrane Structures for Sunshield Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John D.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The deployable sunshield is an example of a gossamer structure envisioned for use on future space telescopes. The basic structure consists of multiple layers of pretensioned, thin-film membranes supported by deployable booms. The prediction and verification of sunshield dynamics has been identified as an area in need of technology development due to the difficulties inherent in predicting nonlinear structural behavior of the membranes and because of the challenges involved. in ground testing of the full-scale structure. This paper describes a finite element analysis of a subscale sunshield that has been subjected to ground testing in support of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The analysis utilizes a nonlinear material model that accounts for wrinkling of the membranes. Results are presented from a nonlinear static preloading analysis and subsequent dynamics analyses to illustrate baseline sunshield structural characteristics. Studies are then described which provide further insight into the effect of membrane. preload on sunshield dynamics and the performance of different membrane modeling techniques. Lastly, a comparison of analytical predictions and ground test results is presented.

  7. A finite element model for nonlinear structural earthquake analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the analysis of damage in reinforced concrete structures subjected to earthquakes, we propose a numerical model capable of describing the non-linear behaviour of reinforced concrete beams and columns under alternate cyclic loading, which can be efficiently used also in dynamic analysis: with the assumption of a local uniaxial state of stress, we are able to obtain the rapidity needed for the time integration of the dynamic equations of equilibrium for real structures, within a time interval corresponding to a seismic action. The model is presented: path-dependant constitutive material law and finite element formulation. An short example of validation serves to evaluate some characteristics of the model. A methodology is then developed to extend the applicability of the model for limit cases, regarding slenderness and semi-rigid limit conditions. (author)

  8. Finite element analysis of loaded structures at very high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitbach, G.

    1989-05-01

    At very high temperatures loaded metallic structures undergo creep deformations. The generated creep strains are connected with stress relaxations, stress redistributions and/or progressive deformations. In mainly load controlled situations the behaviour of the material can be described by a non-linear viscous flow law (Norton power play). A stress-deformation analysis of complex structures can be carried out by finite element codes in which the mentioned constitutive equation is implemented. The code PERMAS-VISCOUS was used to analyse the stress state of a notched tension bar and the deformation behaviour of a reformer tube of HTR under external pressure undergoing a creep collapse. The relation to experimental findings is also given. (orig./HP).

  9. Finite element analysis of loaded structures at very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At very high temperatures loaded metallic structures undergo creep deformations. The generated creep strains are connected with stress relaxations, stress redistributions and/or progressive deformations. In mainly load controlled situations the behaviour of the material can be described by a non-linear viscous flow law (Norton power play). A stress-deformation analysis of complex structures can be carried out by finite element codes in which the mentioned constitutive equation is implemented. The code PERMAS-VISCOUS was used to analyse the stress state of a notched tension bar and the deformation behaviour of a reformer tube of HTR under external pressure undergoing a creep collapse. The relation to experimental findings is also given. (orig./HP)

  10. Thermomechanical finite element analysis of hot water boiler structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Dragoljub S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an application of the Finite Elements Method for stress and strain analysis of the hot water boiler structure. The aim of the research was to investigate the influence of the boiler scale on the thermal stresses and strains of the structure of hot water boilers. Results show that maximum thermal stresses appear in the zone of the pipe carrying wall of the first reversing chamber. This indicates that the most critical part of the boiler are weld spots of the smoke pipes and pipe carrying plate, which in the case of significant scale deposits can lead to cracks in the welds and water leakage from the boiler. The nonlinear effects were taken into account by defining the bilinear isotropic hardening model for all boiler elements. Temperature dependency was defined for all relevant material properties, i. e. isotropic coefficient of thermal expansion, Young’s modulus, and isotropic thermal conductivity. The verification of the FEA model was performed by comparing the measured deformations of the hot water boiler with the simulation results. As a reference object, a Viessmann - Vitomax 200 HW boiler was used, with the installed power of 18.2 MW. CAD modeling was done within the Autodesk Inventor, and stress and strain analysis was performed in the ANSYS Software.

  11. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  12. Repetitive elements dynamics in cell identity programming, maintenance and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Bodega, Beatrice

    2014-12-01

    The days of \\'junk DNA\\' seem to be over. The rapid progress of genomics technologies has been unveiling unexpected mechanisms by which repetitive DNA and in particular transposable elements (TEs) have evolved, becoming key issues in understanding genome structure and function. Indeed, rather than \\'parasites\\', recent findings strongly suggest that TEs may have a positive function by contributing to tissue specific transcriptional programs, in particular as enhancer-like elements and/or modules for regulation of higher order chromatin structure. Further, it appears that during development and aging genomes experience several waves of TEs activation, and this contributes to individual genome shaping during lifetime. Interestingly, TEs activity is major target of epigenomic regulation. These findings are shedding new light on the genome-phenotype relationship and set the premises to help to explain complex disease manifestation, as consequence of TEs activity deregulation.

  13. Modeling cell-in-cell structure into its biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    He, M-f; Wang, S.; Y Wang; Wang, X-n

    2013-01-01

    Although cell-in-cell structure was noted 100 years ago, the molecular mechanisms of ‘entering' and the destination of cell-in-cell remain largely unclear. It takes place among the same type of cells (homotypic cell-in-cell) or different types of cells (heterotypic cell-in-cell). Cell-in-cell formation affects both effector cells and their host cells in multiple aspects, while cell-in-cell death is under more intensive investigation. Given that cell-in-cell has an important role in maintainin...

  14. Element decoupling of 7 T dipole body arrays by EBG metasurface structures: Experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshkainen, Anna A.; Derzhavskaya, Tatyana A.; Glybovski, Stanislav B.; Voogt, Ingmar J.; Melchakova, Irina V.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Raaijmakers, Alexander J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Metasurfaces are artificial electromagnetic boundaries or interfaces usually implemented as two-dimensional periodic structures with subwavelength periodicity and engineered properties of constituent unit cells. The electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) effect in metasurfaces prevents all surface modes from propagating in a certain frequency band. While metasurfaces provide a number of important applications in microwave antennas and antenna arrays, their features are also highly suitable for MRI applications. In this work we perform a proof-of-principle experiment to study finite structures based on mushroom-type EBG metasurfaces and employ them for suppression of inter-element coupling in dipole transceive array coils for body imaging at 7 T. We firstly show experimentally that employment of mushroom structures leads to reduction of coupling between adjacent closely-spaced dipole antenna elements of a 7 T transceive body array, which reduces scattering losses in neighboring channels. The studied setup consists of two active fractionated dipole antennas previously designed by the authors for body imaging at 7 T. These are placed on top of a body-mimicking phantom and equipped with the manufactured finite-size periodic structure tuned to have EBG properties at the Larmor frequency of 298 MHz. To improve the detection range of the B1 + field distribution of the top elements, four additional elements were positioned along the bottom side of the phantom. Bench measurements of a scattering matrix showed that coupling between the two top elements can be considerably reduced depending on the distance to the EBG structure. On the other hand, the measurements performed on a 7 T MRI machine indicated redistribution of the B1 + field due to interaction between the dipoles with the structure. When the structure is located just over two closely spaced dipoles, one can reach a very high isolation improvement of -14 dB accompanied by a strong field redistribution. In contrast, when put

  15. Seismic analysis of rectangular liquid storage structure with submerged objects by a coupled finite element-boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seismic analysis of rectangular liquid storage structure is performed by using a coupled boundary element-finite method. The method models the liquid motion as the irrotation motion of ideal fluid by boundary element method. Coupling with finite element method for the containing structure is performed by using compatibility and equilibrium conditions along the interface of the fluid and structure interaction system such as sloshing motion, hydrodynamic pressure, displacement, effect of submerged objects are investigated and compared between two-and three-dimensional analysis results. (author). 6 refs., 12 figs

  16. Metallographic examination of irradiated nuclear fuel elements at Radiometallurgy Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometallurgy Hot Cells at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, are fully equipped to carry out detailed metallographic examination of irradiated fuel elements. Procedures have been standardi.sed for the various steps needed in the preparation of samples suitable for metallographic observation. Existing facilities afford estimation of various parameters, like grain size and other structural changes in fuel and cladding materials, corrosion aspects and the various types of hydride formation in zircaloy clad, pellet clad interaction between fuel and clad which will help in assessing the actual behaviour of fuel elements during operation. (author)

  17. Electronic structure and chemistry of the heaviest elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the development of relativistic molecular codes has allowed for an adequate description of the electronic structure of the very heavy element compounds, and for the interpretation and prediction of their molecular properties. Most of the theoretical investigations for compounds, interesting from the experimental point of view, have been carried out using the LDF methods. The studied species were group 4, 5 and 6 gas-phase compounds of the transactinides along with their lighter homologs, and their complexes in aqueous solutions. As a result of these calculations, trends within the transition-element groups and within the beginning of the transactinide series for molecular properties such as ionicity, covalence, stability towards oxidation or reduction, crystal-field and spin-orbit effects, bonding, and the influence of relativistic effects on them have been established. In combination with some other models, these calculations allowed for predicting properties measured experimentally: volatility of compounds, redox potentials in solutions and complex formation. Especially promising were predictions of equilibria of reaction using the DS-DV method. Agreement between results of the calculations and experiment confirmed the necessity of doing relativistic MO calculations and the unreliability of the straightforward extrapolations of properties within the chemical groups. (orig.)

  18. Electronic structure and chemistry of the heaviest elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershina, V. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Fricke, B. [Kassel Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    Progress in the development of relativistic molecular codes has allowed for an adequate description of the electronic structure of the very heavy element compounds, and for the interpretation and prediction of their molecular properties. Most of the theoretical investigations for compounds, interesting from the experimental point of view, have been carried out using the LDF methods. The studied species were group 4, 5 and 6 gas-phase compounds of the transactinides along with their lighter homologs, and their complexes in aqueous solutions. As a result of these calculations, trends within the transition-element groups and within the beginning of the transactinide series for molecular properties such as ionicity, covalence, stability towards oxidation or reduction, crystal-field and spin-orbit effects, bonding, and the influence of relativistic effects on them have been established. In combination with some other models, these calculations allowed for predicting properties measured experimentally: volatility of compounds, redox potentials in solutions and complex formation. Especially promising were predictions of equilibria of reaction using the DS-DV method. Agreement between results of the calculations and experiment confirmed the necessity of doing relativistic MO calculations and the unreliability of the straightforward extrapolations of properties within the chemical groups. (orig.)

  19. Edge Detection in Multispectral Images Based on Structural Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghasemi Naraghi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the first steps of feature extraction is edge detection. There are various methods for edge detection such as sobel operator, log method and canny operator. These methods have disadvantages such as create noise and discontinues edge and image smoothing. With the notice of the daily growth multi spectral images processing and describe of these images have become very important. Because of the existence of many details of these images, necessity to robust algorithms caused to present a method to extract featureof an object. In this article An improve method for edge detection has been purposed. In this method edge is detected by morphology’s operator and their combination and with the use of various structure elements of images in satellite and remote sensing.

  20. Structure of nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless double- decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Rath

    2010-08-01

    The structure of nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required for the study of neutrinoless double- decay within light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism is disassembled in the PHFB model. The NTMEs are calculated using a set of HFB intrinsic wave functions, the reliability of which has been previously established by obtaining an overall agreement between the theoretically calculated spectroscopic properties and the available experimental data. Presently, we study the role of short-range correlations, radial evolution of NTMEs and deformation effects due to quadrupolar correlations. In addition, limits on effective light neutrino mass $\\langle m_{} \\rangle$ are extracted from the observed limits on half-lives $T_{1/2}^{0}$ of neutrinoless double- decay.

  1. Aerial measurements of convection cell elements in heated lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Aleman, E.; Salaymeh, S. R.; Brown, T. B.; Garrett, A. J.; Nichols, L. S.; Pendergast, M. M.

    2008-03-01

    Power plant-heated lakes are characterized by a temperature gradient in the thermal plume originating at the discharge of the power plant and terminating at the water intake. The maximum water temperature discharged by the power plant into the lake depends on the power generated at the facility and environmental regulations on the temperature of the lake. Besides the observed thermal plume, cloud-like thermal cells (convection cell elements) are also observed on the water surface. The size, shape and temperature of the convection cell elements depends on several parameters such as the lake water temperature, wind speed, surfactants and the depth of the thermocline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Clemson University are collaborating to determine the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and thermal convection intensity. Laboratory experiments at Clemson University have demonstrated a simple relationship between the surface heat flux and the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations. Similar results were observed in the aerial thermal imagery SRNL collected at different locations along the thermal plume and at different elevations. SRNL will present evidence that the results at Clemson University are applicable to cooling lakes.

  2. Nature of the elements transporting long-chain fatty acids through the red cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Inge Norby; Bojesen, Eigil

    1998-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, red cell membrane, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport......Docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, red cell membrane, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport...

  3. Protein structure prediction: assembly of secondary structure elements by basin-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Vancea, Ioan; Kamat, Sanjay G; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-10-20

    The prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure remains a challenging task. One possible approach to this problem is the application of basin-hopping global optimization combined with an all-atom force field. In this work, the efficiency of basin-hopping is improved by introducing an approach that derives tertiary structures from the secondary structure assignments of individual residues. This approach is termed secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping and benchmarked for three miniproteins: trpzip, trp-cage and ER-10. For each of the three miniproteins, the secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping approach successfully and reliably predicts their three-dimensional structure. When it is applied to larger proteins, correctly folded structures are obtained. It can be concluded that the assembly of secondary structure elements using basin-hopping is a promising tool for de novo protein structure prediction. PMID:25056272

  4. Future Launch Vehicle Structures - Expendable and Reusable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obersteiner, M. H.; Borriello, G.

    2002-01-01

    Further evolution of existing expendable launch vehicles will be an obvious element influencing the future of space transportation. Besides this reusability might be the change with highest potential for essential improvement. The expected cost reduction and finally contributing to this, the improvement of reliability including safe mission abort capability are driving this idea. Although there are ideas of semi-reusable launch vehicles, typically two stages vehicles - reusable first stage or booster(s) and expendable second or upper stage - it should be kept in mind that the benefit of reusability will only overwhelm if there is a big enough share influencing the cost calculation. Today there is the understanding that additional technology preparation and verification will be necessary to master reusability and get enough benefits compared with existing launch vehicles. This understanding is based on several technology and system concepts preparation and verification programmes mainly done in the US but partially also in Europe and Japan. The major areas of necessary further activities are: - System concepts including business plan considerations - Sub-system or component technologies refinement - System design and operation know-how and capabilities - Verification and demonstration oriented towards future mission mastering: One of the most important aspects for the creation of those coming programmes and activities will be the iterative process of requirements definition derived from concepts analyses including economical considerations and the results achieved and verified within technology and verification programmes. It is the intention of this paper to provide major trends for those requirements focused on future launch vehicles structures. This will include the aspects of requirements only valid for reusable launch vehicles and those common for expendable, semi-reusable and reusable launch vehicles. Structures and materials is and will be one of the

  5. Further finite element structural analysis of FAST Load Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FAST (Fusion Advanced Study Torus) machine is a compact high magnetic field tokamak, that will allow to study in an integrated way the main operational issues relating to plasma-wall interaction, plasma operation and burning plasma physics in conditions relevant for ITER and DEMO. The present work deals with the structural analysis of the machine Load Assembly for a proposed new plasma scenario (10 MA – 8.5 T), aimed to increase the operational limits of the machine. A previous paper has dealt with an integrated set of finite element models (regarding a former reference scenario: 6.5 MA – 7.5 T) of the load assembly, including the Toroidal and Poloidal Field Coils and the supporting structure. This set of models has regarded the evaluation of magnetic field values, the evaluation of the electromagnetic forces and the temperatures in all the current-carrying conductors: these analysis have been a preparatory step for the evaluation of the stresses of the main structural components. The previous models have been analyzed further on and improved in some details, including the computation of the out-of-plane electromagnetic forces coming from the interaction between the poloidal magnetic field and the current flowing in the toroidal magnets. After this updating, the structural analysis has been executed, where all forces and temperatures, coming from the formerly mentioned most demanding scenario (10 MA – 8.5 T) and acting on the tokamak's main components, have been considered. The two sets of analysis regarding the reference scenario and the extreme one have been executed and a useful comparison has been carried on. The analyses were carried out by using the FEM code Ansys rel. 13

  6. Microlocalization of 239Pu in structural elements of the interalveolar septa after inhalation of its various compounds and pentacin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of 239 Pu mictodistribution in the structural elements of the interalveolar septa after inhalation of three plutonium compounds different in solubility is made. Thirty minutes after the inhalation 55.3-85.3% of plutonium (dioxide>nitrate>=citrate) was revealed in rhe cells, predominantly in the microphages. More than half of the isotope found in the noncellular elements, lies in the surface layer of the alveoli and the intercellular matter. First 239Pu is seen as ''stars'' of tracks (dioxide), mainly (nitrate) or exclusively (citrate) as individual tracks. The different extent of plutonium elimination from the interalveolar septa (dioxide239Pu from the cells is mainly determined by its escape from the macrophages (dioxide) or from all cellular elements (nitrate, citrate). Pentacin accelates elimination of plutonium from the most of the structural elements of the interalveolar septa (citrate>nitrate)

  7. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production. PMID:26464461

  8. Finite element-finite difference thermal/structural analysis of large space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Eskew, William F.; Rogers, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique of automated and efficient thermal-structural processing of truss structures that interfaces the finite element and finite difference method was developed. The thermal-structural analysis tasks include development of the thermal and structural math models, thermal analysis, development of an interface and data transfer between the models, and finally an evaluation of the thermal stresses and displacements in the structure. Consequently, the objective of the developed technique was to minimize the model development time, in order to assure an automatic transfer of data between the thermal and structural models as well as to minimize the computer resources needed for the analysis itself. The method and techniques described are illustrated on the thermal/structural analysis of the Space Station Freedom main truss.

  9. An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitgirard, S; Borchert, M; Andrault, D; Appel, K; Mezouar, M; Liermann, H-P

    2012-01-01

    Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth. PMID:22299967

  10. An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

  11. Nuclear structure studies towards superheavy elements and perspectives with AGATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of theoretical approaches have been used to calculate the shell closure of spherical Super Heavy Elements (SHE) but the predictions of the location of the 'island of stability' vary from Z=114 to 120 and 126, with neutron numbers around N=172 or N=184 depending on the model employed. A deformed minimum around Z=108 and N=162 is predicted and an increase of the half-life of Hassium (Z=108) is experimentally observed when approaching the neutron number N=162. Super heavy nuclei are produced with very low cross-section (a few picobarns) and this makes their spectroscopic study impossible with today's beam intensities and detectors. However, important information can be obtained from the structure of mid-shell deformed nuclei (Z∼104) where selected single particle orbitals, which lie close to the spherical shell gap in SHE, are close to the Fermi level. The information will come from decay and in-beam spectroscopy. A promising area of progress, using the state-of-the art instruments, is represented by the observation of rotational gamma-ray transitions in No and Fm isotopes showing the deformed character of these nuclei. One of the objectives and focus of the nuclear structure community is related to the investigation of Single particle excitations beyond the N=152 neutron gap and collective properties of heavier systems towards Z∼104. The IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project of electron and gamma-ray spectroscopy studies of heavy nuclei at the FLNR. This project benefits from the radioactive actinide targets uniquely available at Dubna and from the very intense stable beams provided by the U400 cyclotron. This offers a unique opportunity for the study of nuclei above Z=100 along an isotopic chain approaching N=162. In this contribution, the emphasis will be on the GABRIELA project and its issues. I will finally point out the perspectives with the new generation of gamma detectors such as AGATA

  12. Finite element modeling of multilayered structures of fish scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Kennedy, Alan J

    2014-12-01

    The interlinked fish scales of Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar) and Polypterus senegalus (gray and albino bichir) are effective multilayered armor systems for protecting fish from threats such as aggressive conspecific interactions or predation. Both types of fish scales have multi-layered structures with a harder and stiffer outer layer, and softer and more compliant inner layers. However, there are differences in relative layer thickness, property mismatch between layers, the property gradations and nanostructures in each layer. The fracture paths and patterns of both scales under microindentation loads were different. In this work, finite element models of fish scales of A. spatula and P. senegalus were built to investigate the mechanics of their multi-layered structures under penetration loads. The models simulate a rigid microindenter penetrating the fish scales quasi-statically to understand the observed experimental results. Study results indicate that the different fracture patterns and crack paths observed in the experiments were related to the different stress fields caused by the differences in layer thickness, and spatial distribution of the elastic and plastic properties in the layers, and the differences in interface properties. The parametric studies and experimental results suggest that smaller fish such as P. senegalus may have adopted a thinner outer layer for light-weighting and improved mobility, and meanwhile adopted higher strength and higher modulus at the outer layer, and stronger interface properties to prevent ring cracking and interface cracking, and larger fish such as A. spatula and Arapaima gigas have lower strength and lower modulus at the outer layers and weaker interface properties, but have adopted thicker outer layers to provide adequate protection against ring cracking and interface cracking, possibly because weight is less of a concern relative to the smaller fish such as P. senegalus. PMID:25300062

  13. Structural finite element analysis of ITER In-wall shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The In-wall shielding (IWS) located between two shells of the vacuum vessel is part of the vacuum vessel of ITER. The function of the IWS is to provide neutron shielding and to reduce toroidal field ripple. The IWS plates are fastened using M30 bolts to hold them securely and the IWS blocks are mounted to the support ribs using the brackets and M20 bolts. The paper presents a structural finite element analysis of one sample IWS block carried out using ANSYS* to establish the benchmark analysis procedure of the IWS blocks. Boundary conditions are set taking into account the assembly procedure of the IWS blocks. The analysis is carried out in three load steps (1). Pretension on M30 (2). Pretension on M30 and M20 and (3) pretension on M30 and M20 plus Electromagnetic forces, dynamic forces, Seismic forces, etc. The stresses and displacements of individual IWS components are evaluated against their allowable stress limits as per an ASME guideline. The ITER-India’s results of analysis are compared with the ITER-IO’s results for the worst category 3-load step 3 and they are found comparable. This establishes the analysis procedure to be used for all of the IWS blocks

  14. Stochastic structural model of rock and soil aggregates by continuum-based discrete element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yuannian; ZHAO; Manhong; LI; Shihai; J.G.; Wang

    2005-01-01

    This paper first presents a stochastic structural model to describe the random geometrical features of rock and soil aggregates. The stochastic structural model uses mixture ratio, rock size and rock shape to construct the microstructures of aggregates,and introduces two types of structural elements (block element and jointed element) and three types of material elements (rock element, soil element, and weaker jointed element)for this microstructure. Then, continuum-based discrete element method is used to study the deformation and failure mechanism of rock and soil aggregate through a series of loading tests. It is found that the stress-strain curve of rock and soil aggregates is nonlinear, and the failure is usually initialized from weaker jointed elements. Finally, some factors such as mixture ratio, rock size and rock shape are studied in detail. The numerical results are in good agreement with in situ test. Therefore, current model is effective for simulating the mechanical behaviors of rock and soil aggregates.

  15. [Mobile genetic element MDG4 (gypsy) in Drosophila melanogaster. Features of structure and regulation of transposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusulidu, L K; Karpova, N N; Razorenova, O V; Glukhov, I A; Kim, A I; Liubomirskaia, N V; Il'in, Iu V

    2001-12-01

    Distribution of two structural functional variants of the MDG4 (gypsy) mobile genetic element was examined in 44 strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The results obtained suggest that less transpositionally active MDG4 variant is more ancient component of the Drosophila genome. Using Southern blotting, five strains characterized by increased copy number of MDG4 with significant prevalence of the active variant over the less active one were selected for further analysis. Genetic analysis of these strains led to the suggestion that some of them carry factors that mobilize MDG4 independently from the cellular flamenco gene known to be responsible for transposition of this element. Other strains probably contained a suppressor of the flam- mutant allele causing active transpositions of the MDG4. Thus, the material for studying poorly examined relationships between the retrovirus and the host cell genome was obtained. PMID:11785284

  16. Element Decoupling of 7T Dipole Body Arrays by EBG Metasurface Structures: Experimental Verification

    CERN Document Server

    Hurshkainen, Anna A; Glybovski, Stanislav B; Voogt, Ingmar J; Melchakova, Irina V; Berg, Cornelis A T van den; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces are artificial electromagnetic boundaries or interfaces usually implemented as two-dimensional periodic structures with subwavelength periodicity and engineered properties of constituent unit cells. The electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) effect in metasurfaces prevents all surface modes from propagating in a certain frequency band. While metasurfaces provide a number of important applications in microwave antennas and antenna arrays, their features are also highly suitable for MRI applications. In this work we manufacture and experimentally study finite samples based on mushroom-type EBG metasurfaces and employ them for suppression of inter-element coupling in dipole transmit coil arrays for body imaging at 7T. We show experimentally that employment of the samples EBG leads to reduction of coupling between adjacent closely-spaced dipole antenna elements of a 7T transmit/receive body array, which reduces scattering losses in neighboring channels and thereby improves the B1+ efficiency. The setup consis...

  17. Infinite elements for soil-structure interaction analysis in multi-layered halfspaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Chung Bang; Kim, Jae Min [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Shin Chu [Korea High Speed Rail Construction Authority, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents the theoretical aspects of a computer code (KIESSI) for soil-structure interaction analysis in a multi-layered halfspace using infinite elements. The shape functions of the infinite elements are derived from approximate expressions of the analytical solutions. Three different infinite elements are developed. They are the horizontal, the vertical and the comer infinite elements (HIE, VIE and CIE). Numerical example analyses are presented for demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed infinite elements.

  18. Structure of a conjugative element in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, M.N.; Priebe, S.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have cloned and mapped a 69-kilobase (kb) region of the chromosome of Streptococcus pneumoniae DP1322, which carries the conjugative Omega(cat-tet) insertion from S. pneumoniae BM6001. This element proved to be 65.5 kb in size. Location of the junctions was facilitated by cloning a preferred target region from the wild-type strain Rx1 recipient genome. This target site was preferred by both the BM6001 element and the cat-erm-tet element from Streptococcus agalactiae B109. Within the BM6001 element cat and tet were separated by 30 kb, and cat was flanked by two copies of a sequence that was also present in the recipient strain Rx1 DNA. Another sequence at least 2.4 kb in size was found inside the BM6001 element and at two places in the Rx1 genome. Its role is unknown. The ends of the BM6001 element appear to be the same as those of the B109 element, both as seen after transfer to S. pneumoniae and as mapped by others in pDP5 after transposition in Streptococcus faecalis. No homology is seen between the ends of the BM6001 element and no evidence found suggesting that it ever circularizes.

  19. Numerical modeling of the dynamic behavior of structures under impact with a discrete elements / finite elements coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    That study focuses on concrete structures submitted to impact loading and is aimed at predicting local damage in the vicinity of an impact zone as well as the global response of the structure. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) seems particularly well suited in this context for modeling fractures. An identification process of DEM material parameters from macroscopic data (Young's modulus, compressive and tensile strength, fracture energy, etc.) will first be presented for the purpose of enhancing reproducibility and reliability of the simulation results with DE samples of various sizes. Then, a particular interaction, between concrete and steel elements, was developed for the simulation of reinforced concrete. The discrete elements method was validated on quasi-static and dynamic tests carried out on small samples of concrete and reinforced concrete. Finally, discrete elements were used to simulate impacts on reinforced concrete slabs in order to confront the results with experimental tests. The modeling of a large structure by means of DEM may lead to prohibitive computation times. A refined discretization becomes required in the vicinity of the impact, while the structure may be modeled using a coarse FE mesh further from the impact area, where the material behaves elastically. A coupled discrete-finite element approach is thus proposed: the impact zone is modeled by means of DE and elastic FE are used on the rest of the structure. An existing method for 3D finite elements was extended to shells. This new method was then validated on many quasi-static and dynamic tests. The proposed approach is then applied to an impact on a concrete structure in order to validate the coupled method and compare computation times. (author)

  20. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF WOOD FIBER CELL WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phichit Somboon

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of the wood fiber cell wall under mechanical treatment in refining was simulated dynamically using a finite element method. The effect of the amplitude and frequency of impacts on the mechanical breakdown of the fiber wall structure was examined. The proposed model of the fiber cell wall was constructed from elementary microfibrils in various orientations embedded in isotropic lignin. The fatigue of the cell wall was simulated under normal refiner mechanical pulping conditions. A cyclic load was applied on the model fiber through a hemispherical grit proposed to be applied on the surface on refiner segments. Changes in the elastic modulus of the cell wall were analyzed to determine the potential for cell wall breakdown. An increase in the amplitude of applied forces and frequency of impacts was found to have a significant influence on the reduction of the elastic modulus of the wall structure. A high frequency of impacts increased the stiffness of the cell wall, but resulted in faster reduction of the elastic modulus. At a lower amplitude of impacts, efficient breakdown of the cell wall using grits was achieved with a high frequency of impacts or a high rotational speed of refiners.

  1. Study on the fragility of structure with several elements in its story. Part 2: structure with ductile elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship among the fragility of element, that of story and that of system, is examined using the Monte Carlo simulation. In this study, 2-story models whose stories consist of 2 ductile elements are employed. A method is proposed which includes a nonlinear effect into the evaluation of elements capacities. This method does not require the nonlinear MCS, therefore saving computational efforts. Also, a method to estimate the stories and the system fragilities is proposed. (author). 2 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Free vibration analysis of laminated plate/shell structures based on FSDT with a stabilized nodal-integrated quadrilateral element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Van, H.; Mai-Duy, N.; Tran-Cong, T.

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports numerical analyses of free vibration of laminated composite plate/shell structures of various shapes, span-to-thickness ratios, boundary conditions and lay-up sequences. The method is based on a novel four-node quadrilateral element, namely MISQ20, within the framework of the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT). The element is built by incorporating a strain smoothing method into the bilinear four-node quadrilateral finite element where the strain smoothing operation is based on mesh-free conforming nodal integration. The bending and membrane stiffness matrices are based on the boundaries of smoothing cells while the shear term is evaluated by 2×2 Gauss quadrature. Through several numerical examples, the capability, efficiency and simplicity of the element are demonstrated. Convergence studies and comparison with other existing solutions in the literature suggest that the present element is robust, computationally inexpensive and free of locking.

  3. Study on the fragility of structure with several elements in its story. Part 1: structure with brittle elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship among the fragility of element, that of story and that of system, is examined using the Monte Carlo simulation. In this study, 2-story models whose stories consist of 2 brittle elements are employed. Through the simulation, the feature of the failure of brittle elements is derived. From this results, 2 methods to evaluate the fragility of brittle element are presented. Also, a method to estimate the fragilities of the story and the system are presented. (author). 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Functional analysis of the sea urchin-derived arylsulfatase (Ars)-element in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Watanabe, Sachiko; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Sato, Masahiro; Akasaka, Koji

    2006-09-01

    An insulator is a DNA sequence that has both enhancer-blocking activity, through its ability to modify the influence of neighboring cis-acting elements, and a barrier function that protects a transgene from being silenced by surrounding chromatin. Previously, we isolated and characterized a 582-bp-long element from the sea urchin arylsulfatase gene (Ars). This Ars-element was effective in sea urchin and Drosophila embryos and in plant cells. To investigate Ars-element activity in mammalian cells, we placed the element between the cytomegalovirus enhancer and a luciferase (luc) expression cassette. In contrast to controls lacking the Ars-element, NIH3T3 and 293T cells transfected with the element-containing construct displayed reduced luciferase activities. The Ars-element therefore acts as an enhancer-blocking element in mammalian cells. We assessed the barrier activity of the Ars-element using vectors in which a luc expression cassette was placed between two elements. Transfection experiments demonstrated that luc activity in these vectors was approximately ten-fold higher than in vectors lacking elements. Luc activities were well maintained even after 12 weeks in culture. Our observations demonstrate that the Ars-element has also a barrier activity. These results indicated that the Ars-element act as an insulator in mammalian cells. PMID:16923122

  5. The Structure of a Rigorously Conserved RNA Element within the SARS Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Michael P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  6. Elemental structure in Si(110)-'16x2' revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic structures of the clean Si(110)-'16x2' surface are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). High-resolution STM images reveal that the elemental structure in the '16x2' is a pair of pentagons. In the empty-states images the elemental structure is clearly resolved in ten protrusions, while in eight in the filled-states images. In order to clarify the atomic arrangement of the pentagons, we pay attention to the disordered area where the elemental structures are isolated on the bulk-terminated surface. The bulk-terminated surface structure, on which the pentagons are located, is well understood by the rotational-relaxation structural model. In consideration of the registry of the pentagon for the rotational-relaxation structure, a 'tetramer-interstitial' model is proposed for the elemental structure, together with three other possible structural models

  7. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of FEA revealed that, to account for these EI features for bound liposome systems (50-500 nm diameter), one needs to assume much lower tBLM conductivities of the submembrane space, which separates the electrode surface and the phospholipid bilayer. Alternatively, FEA

  8. SSI-FEBEM: A computer program for dynamic soil-structure interaction analysis using finite element and boundary element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, G.; Wang, S.; Chouw, N.

    1991-04-01

    SSI-FEBEM is a computer program for dynamic soil-structure (or structure-soil-structure) interaction analysis in the frequency domain. The program SAP IV (FEM) and the program SSI 2D/3D (BEM) have been integrated into a new program, which allows a coupling of finite and boundary elements. It is applicable to two- and three-dimensional problems. In this manual, the theoretical concept for both FEM and BEM, as used in the program, are briefly introduced. Details of the coupling of FE and BE, are also discussed. However, emphasis is directed towards the use of the computer program concerning data input and output. Finally, several examples on soil-structure interaction (SSI) and structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI), together with their data are presented. (orig.). [Deutsch] SSI-FEBEM ist ein Programm zur Berechnung der dynamischen Antwort eines Systems Bauwerk-Boden (oder Bauwerk-Boden-Bauwerk) im Frequenzbereich. Das Programm besteht aus dem Programm SAP IV (FEM) und dem Programm SSI 2D/3D (BEM) und koppelt Finite Elemente und Randelemente. Zwei- und dreidimensionale Probleme koennen damit behandelt werden. In dem vorliegenden Bericht werden die theoretischen Grundlagen der angewendeten Methode der Finiten Elemente und der Randelemente kurz vorgestellt und deren Kopplung beschrieben. Der Bericht ist als Benutzerhandbuch anzusehen. Er beinhaltet auch Beispiele der Wechselwirkung zwischen Bauwerk und Baugrund (SSI) und zwischen Bauwerk-Boden-Bauwerk (SSSI). (orig.).

  9. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Florida Peninsula Province (050) Positive Structural Elements

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Positive Structural Elements coverage maps, in the form of polygons, are known structural highs within the province that commonly define a basin proper or...

  10. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  11. Element-by-element model updating of large-scale structures based on component mode synthesis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie-xin; Xia, Yong; Lin, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-qing

    2016-02-01

    Component mode synthesis (CMS) method is developed and applied to the element-by-element model updating of large-scale structures in this study. Several lowest frequencies and mode shapes of the global structure are obtained with the free interface CMS method by employing the several lowest frequencies and mode shapes of each substructure individually. In this process, the removal of higher modes is compensated by the residual modes. The eigensensitivity of the global structure is then assembled from the eigensensitivities of each substructure to the updating element parameters. Subsequently, the global model is updated using the sensitivity-based optimization technique. The application of the present method to an 11-floor frame structure and to a large-scale structure demonstrates its accuracy and efficiency. The computational time required by the substructuring method to calculate the eigensensitivity matrices is significantly reduced, as compared with that consumed by the conventional global-based approach. Selection of the number of master modes is also proposed.

  12. Efficient Finite Element Analysis of Inelastic Structures with Iterative Solvers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quint, K.J.; Hartmann, S.; Duintjer Tebbens, Jurjen; Meister, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2008), s. 10331-10332. ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100300703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : inexact multilevel- Newton * diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta * finite element analysis * linear solver * preconditioning * adaptive stopping criterion Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  13. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Daar, E. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libya); Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z<15 such as Na and F whereas elements with z>15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  14. A three-dimensional finite element model of an adherent eukaryotic cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGarry J. G.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stimulation is known to cause alterations in the behaviour of cells adhering to a substrate. The mechanisms by which forces are transduced into biological responses within the cell remain largely unknown. Since cellular deformation is likely involved, further understanding of the biomechanical origins of alterations in cellular response can be aided by the use of computational models in describing cellular structural behaviour and in determining cellular deformation due to imposed loads of various magnitudes. In this paper, a finite element modelling approach that can describe the biomechanical behaviour of adherent eukaryotic cells is presented. It fuses two previous modelling approaches by incorporating, in an idealised geometry, all cellular components considered structurally significant, i.e. prestressed cytoskeleton, cytoplasm, nucleus and membrane components. The aim is to determine if we can use this model to describe the non-linear structural behaviour of an adherent cell and to determine the contribution of the various cellular components to cellular stability. Results obtained by applying forces (in the picoNewton range to the model membrane nodes suggest a key role for the cytoskeleton in determining cellular stiffness. The model captures non-linear structural behaviours such as strain hardening and prestress effects (in the region of receptor sites, and variable compliance along the cell surface. The role of the cytoskeleton in stiffening a cell during the process of cell spreading is investigated by applying forces to five increasingly spread cell geometries. Parameter studies reveal that material properties of the cytoplasm (elasticity and compressibility also have a large influence on cellular stiffness. The computational model of a single cell developed here is proposed as one that is sufficiently complex to capture the non-linear behaviours of the cell response to forces whilst not being so complex that the parameters

  15. Aircraft wing structural design optimization based on automated finite element modelling and ground structure approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weizhu; Yue, Zhufeng; Li, Lei; Wang, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    An optimization procedure combining an automated finite element modelling (AFEM) technique with a ground structure approach (GSA) is proposed for structural layout and sizing design of aircraft wings. The AFEM technique, based on CATIA VBA scripting and PCL programming, is used to generate models automatically considering the arrangement of inner systems. GSA is used for local structural topology optimization. The design procedure is applied to a high-aspect-ratio wing. The arrangement of the integral fuel tank, landing gear and control surfaces is considered. For the landing gear region, a non-conventional initial structural layout is adopted. The positions of components, the number of ribs and local topology in the wing box and landing gear region are optimized to obtain a minimum structural weight. Constraints include tank volume, strength, buckling and aeroelastic parameters. The results show that the combined approach leads to a greater weight saving, i.e. 26.5%, compared with three additional optimizations based on individual design approaches.

  16. Distortional Mechanics of Thin-Walled Structural Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim

    number of degrees of freedom. This means that the classical Vlasov thin-walled beam theory for open and closed cross sections is generalized as part of a semi-discretization process by including distortional displacement fields. A novel finite-element-based displacement approach is used in combination...... homogeneous and non-homogeneous differential equations and the related solutions. The developed semi-discretization approach to Generalized Beam Theory (GBT) is furthermore extended to include the geometrical stiffness terms for column buckling analysis based on an initial stress approach. Through variations......-section displacement mode shapes and buckling load factor are given. In order to handle arbitrary boundary conditions as well as the possibility to add concentrated loads as nodal loads the formulation of a generalized onedimensional semi-discretized thin-walled beam element including distortional contributions is...

  17. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  18. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  19. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabar, W.; Daar, E.; Bunk, O.; Farquharson, M. J.; Laklouk, A.; Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C.; Gundogdu, O.; Bradley, D. A.

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  20. Blood lead: Its effect on trace element levels and iron structure in hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: LY@sinap.ac.cn; Li, Y.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zou, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Normura, M. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba 305 (Japan); Zhu, G.Y. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2008-08-15

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate its effects on trace elements and the iron structure in hemoglobin. Blood samples were collected from rats that had been exposed to lead. The concentration of trace elements in whole blood and blood plasma was determined by ICP-MS and the results indicate that lead exists mainly in the red blood cells and only about 1-3% in the blood plasma. Following lead exposure, the concentrations of zinc and iron in blood decrease, as does the hemoglobin level. This indicates that the heme biosynthetic pathway is inhibited by lead toxicity and that lead poisoning-associated anemia occurs. The selenium concentration also decreases after lead exposure, which may lead to an increased rate of free radical production. The effect of lead in the blood on iron structure in hemoglobin was determined by EXAFS. After lead exposure, the Fe-O bond length increases by about 0.07 A and the Fe-Np bond length slightly increases, but the Fe-N{sub {epsilon}} bond length remains unchanged. This indicates that the blood content of Hb increases, but that the content of HbO{sub 2} decreases.

  1. A combined wet/dry sipping cell for TRIGA fuel element tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined wet/dry sipping cell for the investigation of research reactor fuel elements was developed and tested. It is capable of detecting temperature-dependent cladding failures through the release of gaseous fission products. Several TRIGA fuel elements were tested both in the wet in the dry sipping mode. Some elements released fission gases only above 75deg C. (orig.)

  2. A new structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group V elements

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Li; Weidong Luo

    2016-01-01

    The elemental two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and black phosphorus have attracted considerable attention due to their fascinating physical properties. Structurally they possess the honeycomb or distorted honeycomb lattices, which are composed of six-atom rings. Here we find a new structure of 2D allotropes of group V elements composed of eight-atom rings, which we name as the octagonal tiling (OT) structure. First-principles calculations indicate that the...

  3. Philosophy of mathematics and deductive structure in Euclid's elements

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Ian

    2006-01-01

    A survey of Euclid's Elements, this text provides an understanding of the classical Greek conception of mathematics. It offers a well-rounded perspective, examining similarities to modern views as well as differences. Rather than focusing strictly on historical and mathematical issues, the book examines philosophical, foundational, and logical questions.Although comprehensive in its treatment, this study represents a less cumbersome, more streamlined approach than the classic three-volume reference by Sir Thomas L. Heath (also available from Dover Publications). To make reading easier and to f

  4. Non-contact remote monitoring technique of reactor structural elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at development of technique to measure and estimate, at high precision, fine machining scratch, crack and so on formed on grinding tubular elements, especially inner faces of small diameter tube at an optical mirror grade, and at establishment of estimation technique on reliability and soundness of the tubular elements. In this fiscal year, on optical type non-contact monitoring technique, investigations on optical illumination condition and holding accuracy required for the non-contact holding mechanism were conducted by using a sensor head trially produced in 1995 fiscal year. And, in order to realize a high precision non-contact holding in a tube of optical detection system to upgrade static holding properties (holding stiffness, holding attitude, and so on) of pneumatic type inner tube non-contact holding mechanism, realization of increase in supplying air pressure and experiments using a holding mechanism to increase pore numbers of air injecting nozzle were conducted. And, on materials surface technique, effect of difference in pre-machining method (cutting and bright annealing) at inner face of small diameter stainless tube on their smooth machining property was examined. (G.K.)

  5. Structural elements and organization of the ancestral translational machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, R.; Srinivasan, S.; McDonald, J.; Raghunathan, G.; Shibata, M.

    1987-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the primitive translational apparatus have been studied in light of present day protein biosynthesis. Using the structural information available from the contemporary system as a key to its function, both the structural necessities for an early adaptor and the multipoint recognition properties of such adaptors have been investigated. This was done by first critically examining the potential feasibility of right- and left-handed hairpin adaptor models. Second, a molecular model of the contemporary transpeptidation complex has been constructed in order to ascertain the structural requirements of the adaptor molecule needed for peptidyl transfer. Third, a model of the tRNATyr-tyrosyl tRNA synthetase complex including the positioning of the disordered region is proposed. This model is used to illustrate those required recognition properties of aminoacyl synthetase which lead to a perspective on the structure of the ancestor synthetase.

  6. Inverse Finite Element Method Investigation for Adaptive Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research project is evaluating an innovative technique that uses fiber optic strain sensors to measure structural deformations and full field strains. An...

  7. Study of trace elements in cells using SPM, SR-XRM and PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements play important roles in cells. Nuclear techniques as traditional PIXE, SPM and SR-XRM provide solid tools for quantitative element analysis. The article presents element-distribution maps of endometrium, nerve cell and relative quantity tables. Advantages of PIXE, SPM and SR-XRM techniques, especially in application to cell biology, are discussed. PIXE has a large beam and is convenient in measuring a large quantity of samples. SPM gives element-distribution maps owing to its high resolution. SR-XRM tells quantity of elements by its good sensitivity and nondestructive irradiation. The combination of PIXE, SPM and SR-XRM demonstrates that Zn is a component of cell membrane and is proved to be a complementary way which will open vast vistas for cell analysis. (author)

  8. Some keys elements to structure the hybrid silicon oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to use the intermolecular interactions properties of the organic fragments of the organo-silane to control the structuration of these hybrids from the molecular passing from the supramolecular. In this work, formation mechanisms of these solids are approached and discussed in terms of the organic fragment structure, the auto-association properties and the experimental conditions (temperature, solvent, catalyst, process...). (O.M.)

  9. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  10. Structure Motivator: A tool for exploring small three-dimensional elements in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leader David P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures incorporate characteristic three-dimensional elements defined by some or all of hydrogen bonding, dihedral angles and amino acid sequence. The software application, Structure Motivator, allows interactive exploration and analysis of such elements, and their resolution into sub-classes. Results Structure Motivator is a standalone application with an embedded relational database of proteins that, as a starting point, can furnish the user with a palette of unclassified small peptides or a choice of pre-classified structural motifs. Alternatively the application accepts files of data generated externally. After loading, the structural elements are displayed as two-dimensional plots of dihedral angles (φ/ψ, φ/χ1 or in combination for each residue, with visualization options to allow the conformation or amino acid composition at one residue to be viewed in the context of that at other residues. Interactive selections may then be made and structural subsets saved to file for further sub-classification or external analysis. The application has been applied both to classical motifs, such as the β-turn, and ‘non-motif’ structural elements, such as specific segments of helices. Conclusions Structure Motivator allows structural biologists, whether or not they possess computational skills, to subject small structural elements in proteins to rapid interactive analysis that would otherwise require complex programming or database queries. Within a broad group of structural motifs, it facilitates the identification and separation of sub-classes with distinct stereochemical properties.

  11. A boundary element model for structural health monitoring using piezoelectric transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, for the first time, the boundary element method (BEM) is used for modelling smart structures instrumented with piezoelectric actuators and sensors. The host structure and its cracks are formulated with the 3D dual boundary element method (DBEM), and the modelling of the piezoelectric transducers implements a 3D semi-analytical finite element approach. The elastodynamic analysis of the structure is performed in the Laplace domain and the time history is obtained by inverse Laplace transform. The sensor signals obtained from BEM simulations show excellent agreement with those from finite element modelling simulations and experiments. This work provides an alternative methodology for modelling smart structures in structural health monitoring applications. (paper)

  12. APPLICATION OF VIRTUAL LAMINATED ELEMENT IN THE TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION OF STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐兴; 李芳; 凌道盛

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the topology optimization design of structures composed of plane stress elements. The authors' proposed method of topology optimization by virtual laminated element is based on the Evolutionary Structural Optimization (ESO) method of linear elasticity, but dose not require formation of as many elements as the conventional ESO method. The presented method has the important feature of reforming the stiffness matrix in generating optimum topology. Calculation results showed that this algorithm is simple and effective and can be applied for topology optimization of structures.

  13. Rapid detection of delamination areas in laminated structural elements by means of optically monitored strain solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Dreiden, G. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Samsonov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Modern structural elements are often made of laminated polymer materials or composites on the base of polymer matrices. The proper functioning of these elements may be of vital importance especially in automotive and aerospace industries, in gas and oil transportation. The major problem in their performance is a possibility of a sudden and irreversible delamination caused by various factors. We propose and study a NDT approach aimed to detect delamination areas in adhesively bonded layered structural elements made of different materials. The proposed approach is evaluated by use of holographic detection and monitoring of the evolution of bulk strain solitons generated in such structures.

  14. Structural elements in the Girk1 subunit that potentiate G protein-gated potassium channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Mirkovic, Kelsey; Wickman, Kevin

    2012-12-26

    G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (Girk/K(IR)3) channels mediate the inhibitory effect of many neurotransmitters on excitable cells. Girk channels are tetramers consisting of various combinations of four mammalian Girk subunits (Girk1 to -4). Although Girk1 is unable to form functional homomeric channels, its presence in cardiac and neuronal channel complexes correlates with robust channel activity. This study sought to better understand the potentiating influence of Girk1, using the GABA(B) receptor and Girk1/Girk2 heteromer as a model system. Girk1 did not increase the protein levels or alter the trafficking of Girk2-containing channels to the cell surface in transfected cells or hippocampal neurons, indicating that its potentiating influence involves enhancement of channel activity. Structural elements in both the distal carboxyl-terminal domain and channel core were identified as key determinants of robust channel activity. In the distal carboxyl-terminal domain, residue Q404 was identified as a key determinant of receptor-induced channel activity. In the Girk1 core, three unique residues in the pore (P) loop (F137, A142, Y150) were identified as a collective potentiating influence on both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent channel activity, exerting their influence, at least in part, by enhancing mean open time and single-channel conductance. Interestingly, the potentiating influence of the Girk1 P-loop is tempered by residue F162 in the second membrane-spanning domain. Thus, discontinuous and sometime opposing elements in Girk1 underlie the Girk1-dependent potentiation of receptor-dependent and receptor-independent heteromeric channel activity. PMID:23236146

  15. Finite element method in density functional theory electronic structure calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vackář, Jiří; Čertík, Ondřej; Cimrman, R.; Novák, M.; Šipr, Ondřej; Plešek, Jiří

    Berlin : Springer, 2012 - (Hoggan, P.; Brändas, E.; Maruani, J.; Piecuch, P.; Delgado- Barrio , G.), s. 199-217 ISBN 978-94-007-2075-6. - (Progress in Theoretical Chemistry and Physics. vol. 12) R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0853; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : finite-element method * pseudopotentials * density functional theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.springerlink.com/content/p7k3j7047720270r/

  16. Broadband Analysis of Microwave Structures by Enhanced Finite-Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Raida; Motl, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the broadband modeling of microwave structures by finite-element methods. The attention is turned to original enhancements of accuracy, efficiency and stability of finite-element codes. The partial improvements are based on novel approximations both in the spatial domain and in the time one, in the adoption of complex frequency hopping, fast frequency sweep and envelope finite-element techniques. In the paper, a possible hybridization of approaches is discussed. Proposed ...

  17. THE ESSENCE OF KAIZEN’S THEORETICAL, METHODOLOGICAL AND STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanich E. A.; Rybyantseva M. S.; Moiseenko A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of kaizen’s methodological foundations are becoming increasingly important because of existence of multiple interpretations of kaizen, uncertainty of its elements. Kaizen is at the crossroads of accounting and management. It consists of elements that may be divided into groups: theoretical, methodical and structural. Theoretical elements define the methodological essence and consist of subjects, objects, principles, functions, etc. Classification identifies are allocated: aspec...

  18. Associative structures in animal learning: dissociating elemental and configural processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Robert C; Iordanova, Mihaela D; Good, Mark

    2014-02-01

    The central concern of associative learning theory is to provide an account of behavioral adaptation that is parsimonious in addressing three key questions: (1) under what conditions does learning occur, (2) what are the associative structures involved, and (3) how do these affect behavior? The principle focus here is on the second question, concerning associative structures, but we will have cause to touch on the others in passing. This question is one that has exercised theorists since Pavlov's descriptions of the conditioning process, where he identifies the shared significance of the study of conditioned reflexes for psychologists and neuroscientists alike. PMID:23769767

  19. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  20. Composite structure of wood cells in petrified wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Jakub [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Florek, Marek [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Kwiatek, Wojciech [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Lekki, Janusz [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Chevallier, Pierre [LPS, CEN Saclay et LURE, Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 209D, F-91405 Orsay (France); Zieba, Emil [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Mestres, Narcis [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB), Campus de la UAB, E-08193-Bellaterra (Spain); Dutkiewicz, E.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Kuczumow, Andrzej [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-04-28

    Special kinds of petrified wood of complex structure were investigated. All the samples were composed of at least two different inorganic substances. The original cell structure was preserved in each case. The remnants of the original biological material were detected in some locations, especially in the cell walls. The complex inorganic structure was superimposed on the remnant organic network. The first inorganic component was located in the lumena (l.) of the cells while another one in the walls (w.) of the cells. The investigated arrangements were as follows: calcite (l.)-goethite-hematite (w.)-wood from Dunarobba, Italy; pyrite (l.)-calcite (w.)-wood from Lukow, Poland; goethite (l.)-silica (w.)-wood from Kwaczala, Poland. The inorganic composition was analysed and spatially located by the use of three spectral methods: electron microprobe, X-ray synchrotron-based microprobe, {mu}-PIXE microprobe. The accurate mappings presenting 2D distribution of the chemical species were presented for each case. Trace elements were detected and correlated with the distribution of the main elements. In addition, the identification of phases was done by the use of {mu}-Raman and {mu}-XRD techniques for selected and representative points. The possible mechanisms of the described arrangements are considered. The potential synthesis of similar structures and their possible applications are suggested.

  1. Analysis of morphological structuring elements generated using adaptive resonance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, John P.; Sungar, Nilgun; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we consider the formation of morphological templates using adaptive resonance theory. We examine the role of object variability and noise on the clustering of different sized objects as a function of the vigilance parameter. We demonstrate that the fuzzy adaptive resonance theory is robust in the presence of noise but that for poor choice of vigilance there is a proliferation of prototypical categories. We apply the technique to detection of abnormal cells in pap smears.

  2. The correlation of structure elements of criminal procedural law

    OpenAIRE

    Khashieva Tanzila Magomedovna

    2015-01-01

    In this scientific article the author pays particular attention to the issue of classification of criminal procedure norms. The author determines the staging regulated by the norms subinstitutes and institutes of criminal procedure law activities as the main ground for the given variant of the structure of criminal procedure law.

  3. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    The application of wood as a construction material when building multi-storey buildings has many advantages, e.g., light weight, sustainability and low energy consumption during the construction and lifecycle of the building. However, compared to heavy structures, it is a greater challenge to bui...

  4. FINITE ELEMENT APPROXIMATIONS FOR SCHR(O)DINGER EQUATIONS WITH APPLICATIONS TO ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE COMPUTATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Gao Gong; Lihua Shen; Dier Zhang; Aihui Zhou

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, both the standard finite element discretization and a two-scale finite element discretization for SchrSdinger equations are studied. The numerical analysis is based on the regularity that is also obtained in this paper for the Schrodinger equations. Very satisfying applications to electronic structure computations are provided, too.

  5. Multisymplectic Structure-Preserving in Simple Finite Element Method in High Dimensional Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yong-Qiang; LIU Zhen; PEI Ming; ZHENG Zhu-Jun

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we study a finite element scheme of some semi-linear elliptic boundary value problems inhigh-dimensional space. With uniform mesh, we find that, the numerical scheme derived from finite element method cankeep a preserved multisymplectic structure.

  6. Myriad Triple-Helix-Forming Structures in the Transposable Element RNAs of Plants and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-05-10

    The ENE (element for nuclear expression) is a cis-acting RNA structure that protects viral or cellular noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A) tail or 3'-terminal A-rich tract. We expanded the roster of nine known ENEs by bioinformatic identification of ∼200 distinct ENEs that reside in transposable elements (TEs) of numerous non-metazoan and one fish species and in four Dicistrovirus genomes. Despite variation within the ENE core, none of the predicted triple-helical stacks exceeds five base triples. Increased accumulation of reporter transcripts in human cells demonstrated functionality for representative ENEs. Location close to the poly(A) tail argues that ENEs are active in TE transcripts. Their presence in intronless, but not intron-containing, hAT transposase genes supports the idea that TEs acquired ENEs to counteract the RNA-destabilizing effects of intron loss, a potential evolutionary consequence of TE horizontal transfer in organisms that couple RNA silencing to splicing deficits. PMID:27134163

  7. Optimized parallel computing for cellular automaton–finite element modeling of solidification grain structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical implementation of a three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton (CA)–finite element (FE) model has been developed for the prediction of solidification grain structures. For the first time, it relies on optimized parallel computation to solve industrial-scale problems (centimeter to meter long) while using a sufficiently small CA grid size to predict representative structures. Several algorithm modifications and strategies to maximize parallel efficiency are introduced. Improvements on a real case simulation are measured and discussed. The CA–FE implementation here is demonstrated using 32 computing units to predict grain structure in a 2.08 m × 0.382 m × 0.382 m ingot involving 4.9 billion cells and 1.6 million grains. These numerical improvements permit tracking of local changes in texture and grain size over real-cast parts while integrating interactions with macrosegregation, heat flow and fluid flow. Full 3D is essential in all these analyses, and can be dealt with successfully using the implementation presented here. (paper)

  8. Bonding in elemental boron: a view from electronic structure calculations using maximally localized Wannier functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Gygi, Francois; Reed, John; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    Boron exhibits the most complex structure of all elemental solids, with more than 300 atoms per unit cell arranged in interconnecting icosahedra, and some crystallographic positions occupied with a probability of less than one. The precise determination of the ground state geometry of boron---the so-called β-boron structure--has been elusive and its electronic and bonding properties have been difficult to rationalize. Using lattice model Monte Carlo optimization techniques and ab-initio simulations, we have shown that a defective, quasi-ordered β solid is the most stable structure at zero as well as finite T. In the absence of partially occupied sites (POS), the perfect β-boron crystal is unstable; the presence of POS lower its internal energy below that of an ordered α-phase, not mere an entropic effect. We present a picture of the intricate and unique bonding in boron based on maximally localized Wannier (MLWF) functions, which indicates that the presence of POS provides a subtle, yet essential spatial balance between electron deficient and fully saturated bonds. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  9. Bejing synchrotron radiation TXRF facility and its applications on trace element study of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, Beijing synchrotron radiation TXRF facility and experimental method were described. The minimum detection limits of some elements were tested by using several kinds of standard reference materials. The feasibility of using TXRF in biomedical field is discussed. With this technique small intestine cells of both normal and radiated white mice were analyzed, and the elemental average contents of each single cell are also given. The results indicated that the contents of some trace elements for normal and radiated white mice are greatly different, which may be used to provide valuable reference for clinic medicine. On the other hand, the trace elements of cells of lung and cervix cancer before and after apoptosis were determined by SRTXRF and the changes of trace elements in these cells were discussed. (author)

  10. Probabilistic structural analysis using a general purpose finite element program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riha, D. S.; Millwater, H. R.; Thacker, B. H.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient method to predict the probabilistic response for structural response quantities, such as stress, displacement, natural frequencies, and buckling loads, by combining the capabilities of MSC/NASTRAN, including design sensitivity analysis and fast probability integration. Two probabilistic structural analysis examples have been performed and verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulation of the analytical solution. The first example consists of a cantilevered plate with several point loads. The second example is a probabilistic buckling analysis of a simply supported composite plate under in-plane loading. The coupling of MSC/NASTRAN and fast probability integration is shown to be orders of magnitude more efficient than Monte Carlo simulation with excellent accuracy.

  11. Behaviour and design of aluminium alloy structural elements

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Meini; 蘇玫妮

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium alloys are nonlinear metallic materials with continuous stress-strain curves that are not well represented by the simplified elastic, perfectly plastic material model used in most existing design specifications. The aims of this study are to develop a more efficient design method for aluminium alloy structures by rationally exploiting strain hardening. The key components of this study include laboratory testing, numerical modelling and development of design guidance for aluminium al...

  12. Thermo-plastic finite element analysis for metal honeycomb structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhanling

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with thermal-plastic analysis for the metal honeycomb structure. The heat transfer equation and thermal elastoplastic constitutive equation of a multilayer panel are established and studied numerically using ANSYS software. The paper elucidates that only the outer skin produces easily plastic deformation, and the outer skin still exists some residual stress and residual deformation after cooling. The dynamic evolution of plastic deformation and material performance degradation under high energy thermal load are revealed.

  13. ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca Asensio, Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Cuenca Asensio, E. (2012). ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE [Tesis doctoral no publicada]. Universitat Politècnica de València. doi:10.4995/Thesis/10251/18326. Palancia

  14. Recognition on space photographs of structural elements of Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W.

    1971-01-01

    Gemini and Apollo photographs provide illustrations of known structural features of the peninsula and some structures not recognized previously. An apparent transform relationship between strike-slip and normal faulting is illustrated by the overlapping vertical photographs of northern Baja California. The active Agua Blanca right-lateral strike-slip fault trends east-southeastward to end at the north end of the Valle San Felipe and Valle Chico. The uplands of the high Sierra San Pedro Martir are a low-relief surface deformed by young faults, monoclines, and warps, which mostly produce west-facing steps and slopes; the topography is basically structural. The Sierra Cucapas of northeasternmost Baja California and the Colorado River delta of northwesternmost Sonora are broken by northwest-trending strike-slip faults. A strike-slip fault is inferred to trend northward obliquely from near Cabo San Lucas to La Paz, thence offshore until it comes ashore again as the Bahia Concepcion strike-slip fault.

  15. Finite element modeling of nanotube structures linear and non-linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar; Muhammad, Ibrahim Dauda

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to modeling carbon structures such as graphene and carbon nanotubes using finite element methods, and addresses the latest advances in numerical studies for these materials. Based on the available findings, the book develops an effective finite element approach for modeling the structure and the deformation of grapheme-based materials. Further, modeling processing for single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated in detail.

  16. Fracture strength of structural glass elements: analytical and numerical modelling, testing and design

    OpenAIRE

    Haldimann, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    For centuries, the use of glass in buildings was essentially restricted to functions such as windows and glazing. Over the last decades, continuous improvements in production and refining technologies have enabled glass elements to carry more substantial superimposed loads and therefore achieve a more structural role. The structural design of such elements, however, remains problematic. Current widely used design methods suffer from notable shortcomings. They are, for instance, not applicable...

  17. Vibration modeling of sandwich structures using solid-shell finite elements

    OpenAIRE

    KPEKY, Fessal; Boudaoud, Hakim; Chalal, Hocine; ABED-MERAIM, Farid; Daya, El Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new finite element modeling for vibration of sandwich structures with soft core. Indeed, several approaches have been adopted in the literature to accurately model these types of structures, but show some limitations in certain configurations of high contrast of material properties or geometric aspect ratios between the different layers. In these situations, it is generally well-known that the use of higher-order or three-dimensional finite elements is mor...

  18. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Alison W. Roberts; Eric M Roberts; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperm...

  19. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  20. Structured Extended Finite Element Methods of Solids Defined by Implicit Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belytschko, T; Mish, K; Moes, N; Parimi, C

    2002-11-17

    A paradigm is developed for generating structured finite element models from solid models by means of implicit surface definitions. The implicit surfaces are defined by radial basis functions. Internal features, such as material interfaces, sliding interfaces and cracks are treated by enrichment techniques developed in the extended finite element method (X-FEM). Methods for integrating the weak form for such models are proposed. These methods simplify the generation of finite element models. Results presented for several examples show that the accuracy of this method is comparable to standard unstructured finite element methods.

  1. Protein GB1 Folding and Assembly from Structural Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Linse

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Folding of the Protein G B1 domain (PGB1 shifts with increasing salt concentration from a cooperative assembly of inherently unstructured subdomains to an assembly of partly pre-folded structures. The salt-dependence of pre-folding contributes to the stability minimum observed at physiological salt conditions. Our conclusions are based on a study in which the reconstitution of PGB1 from two fragments was studied as a function of salt concentrations and temperature using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Salt was found to induce an increase in β-hairpin structure for the C-terminal fragment (residues 41 – 56, whereas no major salt effect on structure was observed for the isolated N-terminal fragment (residues 1 – 41. In line with the increasing evidence on the interrelation between fragment complementation and stability of the corresponding intact protein, we also find that salt effects on reconstitution can be predicted from salt dependence of the stability of the intact protein. Our data show that our variant (which has the mutations T2Q, N8D, N37D and reconstitutes in a manner similar to the wild type displays the lowest equilibrium association constant around physiological salt concentration, with higher affinity observed both at lower and higher salt concentration. This corroborates the salt effects on the stability towards denaturation of the intact protein, for which the stability at physiological salt is lower compared to both lower and higher salt concentrations. Hence we conclude that reconstitution reports on molecular factors that govern the native states of proteins.

  2. Non-linear finite element analysis in structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rust, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    This monograph describes the numerical analysis of non-linearities in structural mechanics, i.e. large rotations, large strain (geometric non-linearities), non-linear material behaviour, in particular elasto-plasticity as well as time-dependent behaviour, and contact. Based on that, the book treats stability problems and limit-load analyses, as well as non-linear equations of a large number of variables. Moreover, the author presents a wide range of problem sets and their solutions. The target audience primarily comprises advanced undergraduate and graduate students of mechanical and civil engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for practising engineers in industry.

  3. Ultralight X-type lattice sandwich structure (Ⅱ): Micromechanics modeling and finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG QianCheng; CHEN AiPing; CHEN ChangQing; LU TianJian

    2009-01-01

    The methods of homogenization and finite elements are employed to predict the effective elastic con-stants and stress-strain responses of a new type of lattice structure, the X-structure proposed by the authors in a companion paper. It is shown that in most cases the predictions by the equivalent ho-mogenization theory agree well with the experimental and 3-dimensional finite element calculated re-sults. The theoretical and numerical study supports the argument that the X-structure is superior to the pyramid lattice structure in terms of mechanical strength.

  4. Ultralight X-type lattice sandwich structure (Ⅱ):Micromechanics modeling and finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The methods of homogenization and finite elements are employed to predict the effective elastic constants and stress-strain responses of a new type of lattice structure,the X-structure proposed by the authors in a companion paper. It is shown that in most cases the predictions by the equivalent homogenization theory agree well with the experimental and 3-dimensional finite element calculated results. The theoretical and numerical study supports the argument that the X-structure is superior to the pyramid lattice structure in terms of mechanical strength.

  5. Structural evaluation of a nickel base super alloy metal foam via NDE and finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, G.; Garg, Mohit; Young, P. G.

    2008-03-01

    Cellular materials are known to be useful in the application of designing light but stiff structures. This applies to various components used in various industries such as rotorcraft blades, car bodies or portable electronic devices. Structural application of the metal foam is typically confined to light weight sandwich panels, made up of thin solid face sheets and a metallic foam core. The resulting high-stiffness structure is lighter than that constructed only out of the solid metal material. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads and the role of the foam core is separate the face sheets to carry some of the shear stresses, while remaining integral with the face sheet. Many challenges relating to the fabrication and testing of these metal foam panels continue to exist due to some mechanical properties falling short of their theoretical potential. Hence in this study, a detailed three dimensional foam structure is generated using series of 2D Computer Tomography (CT) scans, on Haynes 25 metal foam. Series of the 2D images are utilized to construct a high precision solid model including all the fine details within the metal foam as detected by the CT scanning technique. Subsequently, a finite element analysis is then performed on an as fabricated metal foam microstructures to evaluate the foam structural durability and behavior under tensile and compressive loading conditions. The analysis includes a progressive failure analysis (PFA) using GENOA code to further assess the damage initiation, propagation, and failure. The open cell metal foam material is a cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten alloy that combines excellent high-temperature strength with good resistance to oxidizing environments up to 1800 °F (980 °C) for prolonged exposures. The foam is formed by a powder metallurgy process with an approximate 100 pores per inch (PPI).

  6. Cellular Structures in the Flow Over the Flap of a Two-Element Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Steven A.; Katz, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Flow visualization information and time dependent pressure coefficients were recorded for the flow over a two-element wing. The investigation focused on the stall onset; particularly at a condition where the flow is attached on the main element but separated on the flap. At this condition, spanwise separation cells were visible in the flow over the flap, and time dependent pressure data was measured along the centerline of the separation cell. The flow visualizations indicated that the spanwise occurrence of the separation cells depends on the flap (and not wing) aspect ratio.

  7. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  8. Stochastic Finite Element Analysis of Non-Linear Structures Modelled by Plasticity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2003-01-01

    A Finite Element Reliability Method (FERM) is introduced to perform reliability analyses on two-dimensional structures in plane stress, modeled by non-linear plasticity theory. FERM is a coupling between the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM). FERM can be used...... the structure, a discretisation into random elements/variables is introduced. To this purpose, both the Midpoint (MP) and the Spatial Average (SA) approach are considered. The failure probability is obtained iteratively based on a first order Taylor series expansion of the limit state function. Thus...

  9. Structural basis of VDR–DNA interactions on direct repeat response elements

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Paul L.; Gewirth, Daniel T.

    2002-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) forms homo- or heterodimers on response elements composed of two hexameric half-sites separated by 3 bp of spacer DNA. We describe here the crystal structures at 2.7–2.8 Å resolution of the VDR DNA-binding region (DBD) in complex with response elements from three different promoters: osteopontin (SPP), canonical DR3 and osteocalcin (OC). These structures reveal the chemical basis for the increased affinity of VDR for the SPP response element, and for the poor stab...

  10. Efficient Analysis of Structures with Rotatable Elements Using Model Order Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fotyga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel full-wave technique which allows for a fast 3D finite element analysis of waveguide structures containing rotatable tuning elements of arbitrary shapes. Rotation of these elements changes the resonant frequencies of the structure, which can be used in the tuning process to obtain the S-characteristics desired for the device. For fast commutations of the response as the tuning elements are rotated, the 3D finite element method is supported by multilevel model-order reduction, orthogonal projection at the boundaries of macromodels and the operation called macromodels cloning. All the time-consuming steps are performed only once in the preparatory stage. In the tuning stage, only small parts of the domain are updated, by means of a special meshing technique. In effect, the tuning process is performed extremely rapidly. The results of the numerical experiments confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method.

  11. STARS: A general-purpose finite element computer program for analysis of engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) is primarily an interactive, graphics-oriented, finite-element computer program for analyzing the static, stability, free vibration, and dynamic responses of damped and undamped structures, including rotating systems. The element library consists of one-dimensional (1-D) line elements, two-dimensional (2-D) triangular and quadrilateral shell elements, and three-dimensional (3-D) tetrahedral and hexahedral solid elements. These elements enable the solution of structural problems that include truss, beam, space frame, plane, plate, shell, and solid structures, or any combination thereof. Zero, finite, and interdependent deflection boundary conditions can be implemented by the program. The associated dynamic response analysis capability provides for initial deformation and velocity inputs, whereas the transient excitation may be either forces or accelerations. An effective in-core or out-of-core solution strategy is automatically employed by the program, depending on the size of the problem. Data input may be at random within a data set, and the program offers certain automatic data-generation features. Input data are formatted as an optimal combination of free and fixed formats. Interactive graphics capabilities enable convenient display of nodal deformations, mode shapes, and element stresses.

  12. Cell Secretion: Current Structural and Biochemical Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  13. Finite Element Analysis for Satellite Structures Applications to Their Design, Manufacture and Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelal, Gasser F; Gad, Ahmed H

    2013-01-01

    Designing satellite structures poses an ongoing challenge as the interaction between analysis, experimental testing, and manufacturing phases is underdeveloped. Finite Element Analysis for Satellite Structures: Applications to Their Design, Manufacture and Testing explains the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to perform design of satellite structures. By layering detailed practical discussions with fully developed examples, Finite Element Analysis for Satellite Structures: Applications to Their Design, Manufacture and Testing provides the missing link between theory and implementation.   Computational examples cover all the major aspects of advanced analysis; including modal analysis, harmonic analysis, mechanical and thermal fatigue analysis using finite element method. Test cases are included to support explanations an a range of different manufacturing simulation techniques are described from riveting to shot peening to material cutting. Mechanical design of a satellites structures are covered...

  14. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morshed, Nader [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A method to automatically identify possible elemental ions in X-ray crystal structures has been extended to use support vector machine (SVM) classifiers trained on selected structures in the PDB, with significantly improved sensitivity over manually encoded heuristics. In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  15. Femoral bone mesoscale structural architecture prediction using musculoskeletal and finite element modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A T M; Villette, C.; Modenese, L.

    2015-01-01

    Through much of the anatomical and clinical literature bone is studied with a focus on its structural architecture, while it is rare for bone to be modelled using a structural mechanics as opposed to a continuum mechanics approach in the engineering literature. A novel mesoscale structural model of the femur is presented in which truss and shell elements are used to represent trabecular and cortical bone, respectively. Structural optimisation using a strain-based bone adaptation algorithm is ...

  16. Application of ADINA fluid element for transient response analysis of fluid-structure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure propagation and Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) in 3D space were simulated by general purpose finite element program ADINA using the displacement-based fluid element which presumes inviscid and compressible fluid with no net flow. Numerical transient solution was compared with the measured data of an FSI experiment and was found to fairly agree with the measured. In the next step, post analysis was conducted for a blowdown experiment performed with a 1/7 scaled reactor pressure vessel and a flexible core barrel and the code performance was found to be satisfactory. It is concluded that the transient response of the core internal structure of a PWR during the initial stage of LOCA can be analyzed by the displacement-based finite fluid element and the structural element. (orig.)

  17. Structural elements regulating amyloidogenesis: a cholinesterase model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    Full Text Available Polymerization into amyloid fibrils is a crucial step in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative syndromes. Amyloid assembly is governed by properties of the sequence backbone and specific side-chain interactions, since fibrils from unrelated sequences possess similar structures and morphologies. Therefore, characterization of the structural determinants driving amyloid aggregation is of fundamental importance. We investigated the forces involved in the amyloid assembly of a model peptide derived from the oligomerization domain of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, AChE(586-599, through the effect of single point mutations on beta-sheet propensity, conformation, fibrilization, surfactant activity, oligomerization and fibril morphology. AChE(586-599 was chosen due to its fibrilization tractability and AChE involvement in Alzheimer's disease. The results revealed how specific regions and residues can control AChE(586-599 assembly. Hydrophobic and/or aromatic residues were crucial for maintaining a high beta-strand propensity, for the conformational transition to beta-sheet, and for the first stage of aggregation. We also demonstrated that positively charged side-chains might be involved in electrostatic interactions, which could control the transition to beta-sheet, the oligomerization and assembly stability. Further interactions were also found to participate in the assembly. We showed that some residues were important for AChE(586-599 surfactant activity and that amyloid assembly might preferentially occur at an air-water interface. Consistently with the experimental observations and assembly models for other amyloid systems, we propose a model for AChE(586-599 assembly in which a steric-zipper formed through specific interactions (hydrophobic, electrostatic, cation-pi, SH-aromatic, metal chelation and polar-polar would maintain the beta-sheets together. We also propose that the stacking between the strands in the beta-sheets along the fiber axis could

  18. Effect of Large Negative Phase of Blast Loading on Structural Response of RC Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zubair Iman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural response of reinforced concrete (RC elements for analysis and design are often obtained using the positive phase of the blast pressure curve disregarding the negative phase assuming insignificant contribution from the negative phase of the loading. Although, some insight on the effect of negative phase of blast pressure based on elastic single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF analysis was presented before, the influence of negative phase on different types of resistance functions of SDOF models and on realistic finite element analysis has not been explored. In this study, the effects of inclusion of pulse negative phase on structural response of RC elements from SDOF analysis and from more detailed finite element analysis have been investigated. Investigation of SDOF part has been conducted using MATLAB code that utilizes non-linear resistance functions of SDOF model. Detailed numerical investigation using finite element code DIANA was conducted on the significance of the negative phase on structural response. In the FE model, different support stiffness was used to explore the effect of support stiffness on the structural response due to blast negative phase. Results from SDOF and FE analyses present specific situations where the effect of large negative phase was found to be significant on the structural response of RC elements.

  19. Advanced Design of Composite Steel-Concrete Structural element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D. R. Panchal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite framing system consisting of steel beams acting interactively with metal deck-concrete slab and concrete encased composite columns, has been as a viable alternative to the conventional steel or reinforced concrete system in the high-rise construction. However, in Indian context, it is comparatively new and no appropriate design codes are available for the same. Complications in the analysis and design of composite structures have led numerous researchers to develop simplified methods so as to eliminate a number of large scale tests needed for the design. In the present work, a simplified method of composite slabs, beams and columns design is used and software is developed with pre- and post- processing facilities in VB.NET. All principal design checks are incorporated in the software. The full and partial shear connection and the requirement for transverse reinforcement are also considered. To facilitate direct selection of steel section, a database is prepared and is available at the back end with the properties of all standard steel sections. Screen shots are included in the paper to illustrate the method employed for selecting the appropriate section and shear connectors and thus to verify the design adequacy.

  20. Finite element modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with MSC/NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Brian D.; Babuska, Vit

    1997-06-01

    Techniques for modeling structures containing piezoelectric ceramics with MSC/NASTRAN are presented. Unlike other finite element programs such as ANSYS and ABAQUS, MSC/NASTRAN offers no piezoelectric coupled-field elements with which to model smart structures directly. Rather, the analogy between piezoelectric strain and thermally induced strain, which allows temperature change to model piezoelectric voltage actuation, must be used. The application and limitations of this method are discussed. To overcome some of the limitations in modeling piezoelectric effects with the thermal analogy, one and two dimensional finite elements which include piezoelectric coupling were developed and integrated into MSC/NASTRAN as dummy elements. The dummy elements offer an alternative method for modeling piezoelectric structural members. As actuators, the elements support charge and voltage actuation in both static and dynamic analyses. When used as sensors, both strain and strain rate outputs are supported. The elements can be used for modal, transient, and frequency response solutions and facilitate combined thermal and piezoelectric loading.

  1. Kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements based on screw theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuantao; Wang, Sanmin; Mills, James K.; Zhi, Changjian

    2014-07-01

    Because the deployable structures are complex multi-loop structures and methods of derivation which lead to simpler kinematic and dynamic equations of motion are the subject of research effort, the kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements are presented based on screw theory and the principle of virtual work respectively. According to the geometric characteristic of the deployable structure examined, the basic structural unit is the common scissor-like-element(SLE). First, a spatial deployable structure, comprised of three SLEs, is defined, and the constraint topology graph is obtained. The equations of motion are then derived based on screw theory and the geometric nature of scissor elements. Second, to develop the dynamics of the whole deployable structure, the local coordinates of the SLEs and the Jacobian matrices of the center of mass of the deployable structure are derived. Then, the equivalent forces are assembled and added in the equations of motion based on the principle of virtual work. Finally, dynamic behavior and unfolded process of the deployable structure are simulated. Its figures of velocity, acceleration and input torque are obtained based on the simulate results. Screw theory not only provides an efficient solution formulation and theory guidance for complex multi-closed loop deployable structures, but also extends the method to solve dynamics of deployable structures. As an efficient mathematical tool, the simper equations of motion are derived based on screw theory.

  2. A finite element analysis of a 3D auxetic textile structure for composite reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the finite element analysis of an innovative 3D auxetic textile structure consisting of three yarn systems (weft, warp and stitch yarns). Different from conventional 3D textile structures, the proposed structure exhibits an auxetic behaviour under compression and can be used as a reinforcement to manufacture auxetic composites. The geometry of the structure is first described. Then a 3D finite element model is established using ANSYS software and validated by the experimental results. The deformation process of the structure at different compression strains is demonstrated, and the validated finite element model is finally used to simulate the auxetic behaviour of the structure with different structural parameters and yarn properties. The results show that the auxetic behaviour of the proposed structure increases with increasing compression strain, and all the structural parameters and yarn properties have significant effects on the auxetic behaviour of the structure. It is expected that the study could provide a better understanding of 3D auxetic textile structures and could promote their application in auxetic composites. (paper)

  3. Axisymmetric finite element analyses of the KKP-II containment and reactor pressure vessel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two refined axisymmetric finite element models were used for the dynamic seismic analyses of the KKP-II Containment and RPV structures, using a postulated ground motion time history. One model was established primarily for the response of the containment structure, whereas the other was used for the response of the reactor pressure vessel plus internals. (Auth.)

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of the Promoter Element for Dengue Virus RNA Replication ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lodeiro, María F.; Filomatori, Claudia V.; Andrea V Gamarnik

    2008-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the dengue virus (DENV) genome contains two defined elements essential for viral replication. At the 5′ end, a large stem-loop (SLA) structure functions as the promoter for viral polymerase activity. Next to the SLA, there is a short stem-loop that contains a cyclization sequence known as the 5′ upstream AUG region (5′UAR). Here, we analyzed the secondary structure of the SLA in solution and the structural requirements of this element for viral replicatio...

  5. Structural variations in aromatic 2-electron three-membered rings of the main group elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dibyendu Mallick; Eluvathingal D Jemmis

    2015-02-01

    Structural variations of different 2-aromatic three-membered ring systems of main group elements, especially group 14 and 13 elements as compared to the classical description of cyclopropenyl cation has been reviewed in this article. The structures of heavier analogues as well as group 13 analogues of cyclopropenyl cation showed an emergence of dramatic structural patterns which do not conform to the generalnorms of carbon chemistry. Isolobal analogies between the main group fragments have been efficiently used to explain the peculiarities observed in these three-membered ring systems.

  6. Finite element simulation of mechanical behaviour of nickel-based metallic foam structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaoua, Sid-Ali; Dahmoun, Djaffar; Belhadj, Abd-Elmouneim [Laboratoire des Sciences et de Genie des Materiaux (LSGM), Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El-Allia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Azzaz, Mohammed [Laboratoire des Sciences et de Genie des Materiaux (LSGM), Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El-Allia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)], E-mail: azzaz@wissal.dz

    2009-03-05

    In this paper, numerical simulation by finite elements is performed in order to study the mechanical behaviour of foam structures subjected to tension loading. The anisotropic cellular model of Gibson and Ashby is taken like reference in our simulation. The foam structure, constituted by struts and connection stems, is modelled by space beam finite elements. This led to a parametric analysis showing the evolution of foam Young modulus according to some geometrical parameters of the cellular network structure, such as shape and dimensions of cross-section, connection stem length.

  7. Finite element simulation of mechanical behaviour of nickel-based metallic foam structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, numerical simulation by finite elements is performed in order to study the mechanical behaviour of foam structures subjected to tension loading. The anisotropic cellular model of Gibson and Ashby is taken like reference in our simulation. The foam structure, constituted by struts and connection stems, is modelled by space beam finite elements. This led to a parametric analysis showing the evolution of foam Young modulus according to some geometrical parameters of the cellular network structure, such as shape and dimensions of cross-section, connection stem length

  8. Molecules and Models The molecular structures of main group element compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, Arne

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a systematic description of the molecular structures and bonding in simple compounds of the main group elements with particular emphasis on bond distances, bond energies and coordination geometries. The description includes the structures of hydrogen, halogen and methyl derivatives of the elements in each group, some of these molecules are ionic, some polar covalent. The survey of molecules whose structures conform to well-established trends is followed byrepresentative examples of molecules that do not conform. We also describe electron donor-acceptor and hydrogen bonded co

  9. Finite Element Approach for Analyses of Flanking Noise Transmission within Lightweight Panel Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens; Andersen, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the analysis of noise transmission in a lightweight panel structure. The analysis is based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA) employing solid elements for the structure. The analysis focuses on flanking noise transmission in panel structures of finite size. A parametric study is...... and different designs of the ribs regarding the energy contained within the panel strip. The paper presents an analysis of vibrational energy transmission for an isotropic periodic panel strip excited by a concentrated force. The computations are carried out in frequency domain in the range below 2 kHz....

  10. GEOMETRICALLY NONLINEAR FE FORMULATIONS FOR THE MACRO-ELEMENT UNIPLET OF FOLDABLE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈务军; 付功义; 何艳丽; 董石麟

    2002-01-01

    Geometrically nonlinear stiffness matrix due to large displacement-small strain was firstly formulated ex-plicitly for the basic components of pantographic foldable structures,namely, the uniplet, derived from a three-node beam element. The formulation of the uniplet stiffness matrix is based on the precise nonlinear finite elementtheory and the displacement-harmonized and internal force constraints are applied directly to the deformationmodes of the three-node beam element. The formulations were derived in general form, and can be simplified forparticular foldable structures, such as flat, cylindrical and spherical structures. Finally, two examples were pre-sented to illustrate the applications of the stiffness matrix evolved.

  11. THE MACRO AND MICRO STRUCTURAL IMPACT OF THE ETHNIC ELEMENT IN BIRDA-MORAVIȚA PLAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RALUCA NARCISA COVACI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Macro and Micro Structural Impact of the Ethnic Element in Birda-Moravița Plain. The article aims to perform an evaluation of the ethnic specificity both at regional level (macro structurally and at the level of the most representative localities (micro structurally. In Birda-Moravița Plain, both regionally and on a commune level, the ethnic element registered major variations throughout the analysed censuses. These variations were caused especially by a strong migration wave. The main consequence of this wave was the transition from a heterogeneous ethnic structure to a higher degree of homogeneity and to an assimilation by the Romanians of the other ethnic elements.

  12. Fast lane recognition based on morphological multi-structure element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tao; Fan, Yang-Yu; Huang, Lian-Bing

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes a lane detection algorithm based on multi-structure element model of morphological. The innovative point of the algorithm lies in the facts that the flexible structure has the multi-structure elements that lane model features have, and that the algorithm adopts the morphological filtering principle to extract the pixels in the image, which is similar to the lane model. In the algorithm, the interested area is extracted by a model of trapezium from original image, which is detected by the operator of Canny, and the lanes are extracted by the structure elements, which have similar characteristics to that of lane model. Several lines are detected by Hough transformation, then the traffic lanes are reconstructed. Experiments show that this algorithm is simple and robust, and can efficiently detect the lane mask accurately and quickly.

  13. Second-order two-scale finite element algorithm for dynamic thermo-mechanical coupling problem in symmetric structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Qiang; Cui, Junzhi

    2016-06-01

    The new second-order two-scale (SOTS) finite element algorithm is developed for the dynamic thermo-mechanical coupling problems in axisymmetric and spherical symmetric structures made of composite materials. The axisymmetric structure considered is periodic in both radial and axial directions and homogeneous in circumferential direction. The spherical symmetric structure is only periodic in radial direction. The dynamic thermo-mechanical coupling model is presented and the equivalent compact form is derived. Then, the cell problems, effective material coefficients and the homogenized thermo-mechanical coupling problem are obtained successively by the second-order asymptotic expansion of the temperature increment and displacement. The homogenized material obtained is manifested with the anisotropic property in the circumferential direction. The explicit expressions of the homogenized coefficients in the plane axisymmetric and spherical symmetric cases are given and both the derivation of the analytical solutions of the cell functions and the quasi-static thermoelasticity problems are discussed. Based on the SOTS method, the corresponding finite-element procedure is presented and the unconditionally stable implicit algorithm is established. Some numerical examples are solved and the mutual interaction between the temperature and displacement field is studied under the condition of structural vibration. The computational results demonstrate that the second-order asymptotic analysis finite-element algorithm is feasible and effective in simulating and predicting the dynamic thermo-mechanical behaviors of the composite materials with small periodic configurations in axisymmetric and spherical symmetric structures. This may provide a vital computational tool for analyzing composite material internal temperature distribution and structural deformation induced by the dynamic thermo-mechanical coupling response under strong aerothermodynamic environment.

  14. Optical Fiber Element of Sensors with Biolumiscent Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrbová, Hana; Kuncová, Gabriela; Pospíšilová, Marie

    Prague: Institute of Photonics and Electronics ASCR, v. v. i, 2010, s. 85. ISBN 978-80-86269-20-7. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors - EUROPT(R)ODE X /10./. Prague (CZ), 28.03.2010-31.03.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 892; GA MŠk ME 893 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : bioluminiscence * optical fiber element * pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics http://www.congressprague.cz/en/kongresy/ee2010.html

  15. Direct elemental analysis of cancer cell lines by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elemental content of Cu, Fe and Zn in two human adenocarcinoma cell lines was investigated by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. Cancer cells were sedimented directly to the quartz plates using a modified cytospin slide holder setup. Special glass stands and caps were also constructed to hold the quartz plates with the cells during the vapour-phase microwave assisted digestion. The method was validated by analysis of certified reference materials. The signal-to-noise ratio was optimized by washing the cells with different solutions. The technique was applied to the determination of Cu, Fe and Zn content of HT-29 and HCA-7 colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Dry mass of the centrifuged cells were determined and the elemental analysis data reported for the two cell lines were referred either to cell numbers, to the total protein content or to the dry mass

  16. Cell-type-specific control elements of the lymphotropic papovavirus enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Erselius, J R; Jostes, B; Hatzopoulos, A K; Mosthaf, L; Gruss, P

    1990-01-01

    Lymphotropic papovavirus (LPV) exhibits a highly restricted host range, in which only cells of primate B-lymphocyte origin are permissive for infection. Its enhancer element contributes to this tropism, since transcriptional potentiation is confined to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Nuclear extracts from B and T cells, but not from HeLa cells, contain protein factors that interact specifically with the LPV 63-base-pair enhancer repeat, as demonstrated by DNase I footprinting and gel reta...

  17. Intracellular vesicles as reproduction elements in cell wall-deficient L-form bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Briers, Yves; Staubli, Titu; Schmid, Markus C; Wagner, Michael; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall-deficient bacteria, or L-forms, represent an extreme example of bacterial plasticity. Stable L-forms can multiply and propagate indefinitely in the absence of a cell wall. Data presented here are consistent with the model that intracellular vesicles in Listeria monocytogenes L-form cells represent the actual viable reproductive elements. First, small intracellular vesicles are formed along the mother cell cytoplasmic membrane, originating from local phospholipid accumulation. During...

  18. Shape Optimization of ‘S’ Type Load Cell Using Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. S. M. Ghanvat; Prof. H. G. Patil

    2012-01-01

    In this work 'S' type load cell is considered for shape optimization by using finite element method. The shape optimization is carried out to minimize the weight of 'S' type load cell without exceeding allowable strain. The intention of the work is to create the geometry of ‘S’ type load cell to find out the optimum solution. FEM software ANSYS is used for shape optimization of ‘S’ type load cell. If the stress

  19. Optimization of Demand Hotspot Capacities using Switched Multi-Element Antenna Equipped Small Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Finn, Danny; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Claussen, Holger; Luiz A. DaSilva

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents switched Multi- Element Antennas (MEAs) as a simple, yet effective, method of enhancing the performance of small cell heterogeneous networks and compensating for the small cell base station sub-optimal placement. The switched MEA system is a low-cost system which enables the small cell to dynamically direct its transmission power toward locations of high user density, in other words demand hotspots. Our simulation results show that small cell base stations equipped with sw...

  20. Cell structures on the blob algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Ryom-Hansen, Steen

    2009-01-01

    We consider the $ r = 0 $ case of the conjectures by Bonnaf\\'e, Geck, Iancu and Lam on cellular structures on the Hecke algebra of type $ B $. We show that this case induces the natural cell structure on the blob algebra $ b_n $ by restriction to one-line bipartitions.

  1. Challenges in Integrating Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Methods for Realistic Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Zagidulin, Dmitri; Rauser, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities and expertise related to the development of links between nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) at Glenn Research Center (GRC) are demonstrated. Current tools to analyze data produced by computed tomography (CT) scans are exercised to help assess the damage state in high temperature structural composite materials. A utility translator was written to convert velocity (an image processing software) STL data file to a suitable CAD-FEA type file. Finite element analyses are carried out with MARC, a commercial nonlinear finite element code, and the analytical results are discussed. Modeling was established by building MSC/Patran (a pre and post processing finite element package) generated model and comparing it to a model generated by Velocity in conjunction with MSC/Patran Graphics. Modeling issues and results are discussed in this paper. The entire process that outlines the tie between the data extracted via NDE and the finite element modeling and analysis is fully described.

  2. Dynamic test and finite element model updating of bridge structures based on ambient vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of bridge structures are the basis of structural dynamic response and seismic analysis,and are also an important target of health condition monitoring.In this paper,a three-dimensional finite-element model is first established for a highway bridge over a railroad on No.312 National Highway.Based on design drawings,the dynamic characteristics of the bridge are studied using finite element analysis and ambient vibration measurements.Thus,a set of data is selected based on sensitivity analysis and optimization theory;the finite element model of the bridge is updated.The numerical and experimental results show that the updated method is more simple and effective,the updated finite element model can reflect the dynamic characteristics of the bridge better,and it can be used to predict the dynamic response under complex external forces.It is also helpful for further damage identification and health condition monitoring.

  3. THE ESSENCE OF KAIZEN’S THEORETICAL, METHODOLOGICAL AND STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksanich E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of kaizen’s methodological foundations are becoming increasingly important because of existence of multiple interpretations of kaizen, uncertainty of its elements. Kaizen is at the crossroads of accounting and management. It consists of elements that may be divided into groups: theoretical, methodical and structural. Theoretical elements define the methodological essence and consist of subjects, objects, principles, functions, etc. Classification identifies are allocated: aspects of the review, areas for improvement, resources, spheres and others. A list of classical kaizen tools is pointed out within the classification according to the degree of modernity. Kaizen should be considered in unity of groups of elements: theoretical (objects, subjects, principles, functions and classification bases, structural (lean production and controlling and methodical. Kaizen’s principles, functions and classification are the author’s elaboration

  4. Structural analysis of composite wind turbine blades nonlinear mechanics and finite element models with material damping

    CERN Document Server

    Chortis, Dimitris I

    2013-01-01

    This book concerns the development of novel finite elements for the structural analysis of composite beams and blades. The introduction of material damping is also an important aspect of composite structures and it is presented here in terms of their static and dynamic behavior. The book thoroughly presents a new shear beam finite element, which entails new blade section mechanics, capable of predicting structural blade coupling due to composite coupling and/or internal section geometry. Theoretical background is further expanded towards the inclusion of nonlinear structural blade models and damping mechanics for composite structures. The models effectively include geometrically nonlinear terms due to large displacements and rotations, improve the modeling accuracy of very large flexible blades, and enable the modeling of rotational stiffening and buckling, as well as, nonlinear structural coupling. Validation simulations on specimen level study the geometric nonlinearities effect on the modal frequencies and...

  5. The structure of floral elements of Anchusa officinalis L. creating attractants for insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Chwil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study involved the measurement of size and the micromorphology of the floral elements of Anchusa officinalis L. which are attractants for insects. The structure of the epidermis on the surface of the calyx, petals, throat scales, pistil and nectary were analysed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. For light microscopy observations, semi-permanent slides were prepared, which were treated with Lugol's iodine solution, Sudan III and fluoroglucine. The dark violet lobes of the corolla of Anchusa officinalis, with a velvety surface, and the throat scales, contrasting with them, belong to the most important optical attractants which lure insects from large distances. The dark pink colouring of the sepals additionally increases the attractiveness of the flowers. The epidermis covering the calyx formed different-sized non-glandular trichomes as well as glandular trichomes. The glandular trichomes were composed of a uni - or bicellular leg and a unicellular head. The colour of the corolla petals was determined by anthocyanins accumulated in the epidermal cells and in the more deeply situated parenchyma. The velvety surface was formed by the conical papillae, densely growing from the adaxial epidermis. The pink-violet throat scales with white hairs, covering the inlet to the tube of the corolla, were found at the inlet to the corolla throat. The longest trichomes on the surface of the scales were located in their lower and middle parts, whereas the shortest ones at their tips. The epidermis of the central part of the throat scales formed small papillae. The trichomes had thin cell walls, large vacuoles, numerous plastids and lipid droplets. The two-parted stigma of the pistil was covered by characteristic expanded outgrowths with wavy edges which performed the functions of structures facilitating the capture of pollen grains. As a result of the present study it was found that the structures affecting the attractiveness of the

  6. The investigation about embodiment of vertical isolation structure. An embodiment of the structural plan of damper element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to realize the concept of a vertical isolation system (common deck system), research and development on the vertical isolation structure is now underway. In its first step, structure plans of each of the isolation element and the damper element will be drawn up, and in the next step, tests on these elements will be planed, executed, analyzed, and evaluated, to be reflected to the structure plan. In this report, the structure plan and test plan of damper element is reported. At first, it was concluded in the previous work that the steel-materials damper which can be evaluated by Ramberg-Osgood type is applicable to the vertical isolation system required performance. Then, based on this results, the form range of a damper which satisfies was surveyed from both cross section thickness and distribution of strain by analysis. Next, in order to check the performance (limit a damping capability, load carrying capacity, fatigue strength, and deformability) of an actual damper element based on this analysis result, the test plan for actual scale model was drawn up. (author)

  7. Structural Stability and Dynamics of FGM Plates Using an Improved 8-ANS Finite Element

    OpenAIRE

    Weon-Tae Park

    2016-01-01

    I investigate the vibration and buckling analysis of functionally graded material (FGM) structures, using a modified 8-node shell element. The properties of FGM vary continuously through the thickness direction according to the volume fraction of constituents defined by sigmoid function. The modified 8-ANS shell element has been employed to study the effect of power law index on dynamic analysis of FGM plates with various boundary conditions and buckling analysis under combined loads, and int...

  8. The development of a modular finite element program for analysis of soil-structure interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Clark Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The development of SAGE, a modular finite element program for analysis of soilstructure interaction, is described. The modular structure of the program makes it easy to validate, easy to understand, easy to modify, and easy to extend. Issues affecting the development of the program are discussed. Newton-Raphson iteration, and its application to finite element analysis is described. Methods for improving the convergence behavior ofNewton-Raphson iteration are discussed. The m...

  9. A 2d field solver for periodic structures with special corner elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2d finite element field solver has been written which allows quasi-periodic boundary conditions, making it ideal for calculating traveling waves in periodic structures. Special elements are used at corners for improved accuracy. Comparisons with URMEL, URMEL-T, SUPERFISH and analytic solutions are made, showing that this code yields better eigenvalues than the URMELs despite the use of a coarser mesh. 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Biquartic Finite Volume Element Metho d Based on Lobatto-Guass Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yan-ni; Chen Yan-li

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a biquartic finite volume element method based on Lobatto-Guass structure is presented for variable coefficient elliptic equation on rectangular partition. Not only the optimal H1 and L2 error estimates but also some super-convergent properties are available and could be proved for this method. The numer-ical results obtained by this finite volume element scheme confirm the validity of the theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of this method.

  11. Application of finite discrete element method in dynamic analysis of masonry structures

    OpenAIRE

    NIKOLIĆ, Željana; Smoljanović, Hrvoje; Zivaljić, Nikolina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the numerical models for dynamic analysis of dry stone masonry structures strengthened with clamps and bolts and confined masonry structures based on finite discrete element method (FDEM). The proposed models considers the effects of the behavior of masonry structures due to dynamic action, crack initiation and propagation, energy dissipation mechanisms due to nonlinear effects, inertial effects due to motion, contact impact and attaining state of the re...

  12. Capital structure as an element of the corporate governance system in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyuk, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers the problems of corporate governance in Ukraine during the process of transformation of the structure of corporate ownership. Capital structure, as an element of the system of corporate governance, is investigated. A tight connection between concentration of shareholders equity, equity cost and capital structure (financial leverage) has been found as a result of research. The higher the concentration of shareholders equity, the larger the share of debt in the capital struc...

  13. Memristor memory element based on ZnO thin film structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, A. R.; Elbakyan, E. Y.; Guo, R.; Hovsepyan, R. K.

    2015-08-01

    The memristor element for random access memory (resistance random access memory - ReRAM) was developed and investigated. The developed structure consists of a Schottky diode (1D) based on Pt/ZnO:Ga/ZnO/Pt heterostructure and a memristor (1R) based on Pt/ZnO:Ga/ZnO/ZnO:Li/Pt heterostructure. Thus the unipolar memristor memory element of 1D1R type was obtained. The heterostructures were produced by the electron-beam vacuum deposition method. The laboratory samples of the memory elements were prepared and their characteristics were studied. The proposed device has a high stability and withstands 1000 switching cycles without derating.

  14. Bim from Laser Clouds and Finite Element Analysis: Combining Structural Analysis and Geometric Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, L.; Banfi, F.; Brumana, R.; Gusmeroli, G.; Oreni, D.; Previtali, M.; Roncoroni, F.; Schiantarelli, G.

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes the use of BIM models derived from point clouds for structural simulation based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Although BIM interoperability has reached a significant level of maturity, the density of laser point clouds provides very detailed BIM models that cannot directly be used in FEA software. The rationalization of the BIM towards a new finite element model is not a simple reduction of the number of nodes. The interconnections between the different elements and their materials require a particular attention: BIM technology includes geometrical aspects and structural considerations that allow one to understand and replicate the constructive elements and their mutual interaction. The information must be accurately investigated to obtain a finite element model suitable for a complete and detailed structural analysis. The aim of this paper is to prove that a drastic reduction of the quality of the BIM model is not necessary. Geometric data encapsulated into dense point clouds can be taken into consideration also for finite element analysis.

  15. Salinas - An implicit finite element structural dynamics code developed for massively parallel platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BHARDWAJ, MANLJ K.; REESE,GARTH M.; DRIESSEN,BRIAN; ALVIN,KENNETH F.; DAY,DAVID M.

    2000-04-06

    As computational needs for structural finite element analysis increase, a robust implicit structural dynamics code is needed which can handle millions of degrees of freedom in the model and produce results with quick turn around time. A parallel code is needed to avoid limitations of serial platforms. Salinas is an implicit structural dynamics code specifically designed for massively parallel platforms. It computes the structural response of very large complex structures and provides solutions faster than any existing serial machine. This paper gives a current status of Salinas and uses demonstration problems to show Salinas' performance.

  16. Static and dynamic analysis of isotropic shell structures by the spectral finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with certain problems related to static and modal analysis of isotropic shell structures by the use of the approach known in the literature as the time-domain spectral finite element method. Although recently this spectral approach has been widely reported as a very powerful numerical tool used to solve various wave propagation problems, its properties make it very well suited to solve static and modal problems. The robustness and effectiveness of the spectral approach has been successfully demonstrated by the authors in the case of a thin-walled spherical shell structure representing a pressure vessel. Static and modal responses of the structure have been investigated by the use of transversally deformable shell-type spectral finite elements and the results of this investigation have been compared to known analytical solutions as well as those obtained by the use of commercially available software for the finite element method.

  17. Shape and Stress Sensing of Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Structures Using an Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerracchio, Priscilla; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The marked increase in the use of composite and sandwich material systems in aerospace, civil, and marine structures leads to the need for integrated Structural Health Management systems. A key capability to enable such systems is the real-time reconstruction of structural deformations, stresses, and failure criteria that are inferred from in-situ, discrete-location strain measurements. This technology is commonly referred to as shape- and stress-sensing. Presented herein is a computationally efficient shape- and stress-sensing methodology that is ideally suited for applications to laminated composite and sandwich structures. The new approach employs the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) as a general framework and the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) as the underlying plate theory. A three-node inverse plate finite element is formulated. The element formulation enables robust and efficient modeling of plate structures instrumented with strain sensors that have arbitrary positions. The methodology leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that are solved efficiently for the unknown nodal displacements. These displacements are then used at the finite element level to compute full-field strains, stresses, and failure criteria that are in turn used to assess structural integrity. Numerical results for multilayered, highly heterogeneous laminates demonstrate the unique capability of this new formulation for shape- and stress-sensing.

  18. The interaction between membrane structure and wind based on the discontinuous boundary element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Small disturbance potential theory is widely used in solving aerodynamic problems with low Mach numbers, and it plays an important role in engineering design. Concerning structure wind engineering, the body of the structure is in a low velocity wind field, with a low viscosity of air and thin boundary layer, therefore, the tiny shear stress caused by the boundary layer can be ignored, only wind pressure being considered. In this paper, based on small disturbance potential theory, the fluid-structure interaction between the wind and membrane structure is analyzed by joint utilization of the boundary element method (BEM) and finite element method (FEM) through a loose-coupling procedure. However, the boundary of flow field to be calculated is not fully smooth, corners and edges still exist, so the discontinuous boundary element is introduced. Furthermore, because a large scale boundary element equation set with a nonsymmetrical coefficient matrix must be solved, this paper imports a preconditioning GMRES (the generalized minimum residual) iterative algorithm, which takes full advantage of the boundary element method. Several calculation examples have verified the correctness and soundness of the treatments mentioned above.

  19. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  20. Geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements by terrestrial laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Yu-Wei; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, three-dimensional (3D) terrestrial laser scanning technologies with higher precision and higher capability are developing rapidly. The growing maturity of laser scanning has gradually approached the required precision as those have been provided by traditional structural monitoring technologies. Together with widely available fast computation for massive point cloud data processing, 3D laser scanning can serve as an efficient structural monitoring alternative for civil engineering communities. Currently most research efforts have focused on integrating/calculating the measured multi-station point cloud data, as well as modeling/establishing the 3D meshes of the scanned objects. Very little attention has been spent on extracting the information related to health conditions and mechanical states of structures. In this study, an automated numerical approach that integrates various existing algorithms for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements were established. Specifically, adaptive meshes were employed for classifying the point cloud data of the structural elements, and detecting the associated damages from the calculated eigenvalues in each area of the structural element. Furthermore, kd-tree was used to enhance the searching efficiency of plane fitting which were later used for identifying the boundaries of structural elements. The results of geometric identification were compared with M3C2 algorithm provided by CloudCompare, as well as validated by LVDT measurements of full-scale reinforced concrete beams tested in laboratory. It shows that 3D laser scanning, through the established processing approaches of the point cloud data, can offer a rapid, nondestructive, remote, and accurate solution for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Living Adherent Cells :Relationship with Structure and Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.; FODIL; S.; Féréol; E.; PLANUS; V.M.; LAURENT; B.; LOUIS; D.; ISABEY

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionMechanical properties of living cells are dependent on a variety of intracellular and/or extracellular factors (e.g., spatial organization of cytoskeleton (CSK) elements; internal tension; actomyosin contraction; contribution of proximal and/or more distal environment...). Because these factors are involved in biological processes as important as cell adhesion, locomotion, cell contraction, signalization, understanding the relationships between cell mechanical properties, structure and functio...

  2. Finite Element Simulation of Photoacoustic Pressure in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell Using Lossy Boundary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lopes, Natasha; Willatzen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) is used to simulate the photoacoustic signal in a cylindrical resonant photoacoustic cell. Simulations include loss effects near the cell walls that appear in the boundary conditions for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation governing the acoustic pressure. Reasonably...

  3. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  4. Global analysis of sensitivity of bioretention cell design elements to hydrologic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-wei SUN

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of sensitivity of bioretention cell design elements to their hydrologic performances is meaningful in offering theoretical guidelines for proper design. Hydrologic performance of bioretention cells was facilitated with consideration of four metrics: the overflow ratio, groundwater recharge ratio, ponding time, and runoff coefficients. The storm water management model (SWMM and the bioretention infiltration model RECARGA were applied to generating runoff and outflow time series for calculation of hydrologic performance metrics. Using a parking lot to build a bioretention cell, as an example, the Morris method was used to conduct global sensitivity analysis for two groups of bioretention samples, one without underdrain and the other with underdrain. Results show that the surface area is the most sensitive element to most of the hydrologic metrics, while the gravel depth is the least sensitive element whether bioretention cells are installed with underdrain or not. The saturated infiltration rate of planting soil and the saturated infiltration rate of native soil are the other two most sensitive elements for bioretention cells without underdrain, while the saturated infiltration rate of native soil and underdrain size are the two most sensitive design elements for bioretention cells with underdrain.

  5. Finite element method analysis of elastic wave propagation in 3 dimensional structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known to be very complicated to obtain an efficient solution of elastic wave propagation in a three dimensional structure. In this paper the finite element method has been implemented to evaluate the displacement waveform for elastic wave by modeling for some interacting the three dimensional structure. In this experiment meshing method, time increasement, damping factor, boundary condition and loading condition has been discussed specially. Our FEM results are agreed with the wave form Laser Interferometer Displacement Sensor and the Ray Tracing method simulation. from these results the applicability of finite element method was illustrated.

  6. Structure of inverse elements of Clifford algebra of dimension at most two to the fifth power

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuka; Yamaguchi, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    A Clifford algebra of two to the fifth power dimension is applicable to computer graphics. In particular, one needs to compute inverse elements of the Clifford algebra. The inverse formulas for elements of Clifford algebras of dimensions less than or equal to two the fifth power are known by direct calculation. The formulas have some structure. However, we did not know the reason for the formulas have the structure. In this paper, we give the reason by some anti-isomorphisms on subspaces of C...

  7. Calcium exchange, structure, and function in cultured adult myocardial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells digested from adult rat heart and cultured for 14 days demonstrate all the structural elements, in mature form, associated with the process of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. The transverse tubular (TT) system is well developed with an extensive junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR). In nonphosphate-containing buffer contraction of the cells is lost as rapidly as zero extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]0) solution is applied and a negative contraction staircase is produced on increase of stimulation frequency. Structurally and functionally the cells have the characteristics of adult cells in situ. 45Ca exchange and total 45Ca measurement in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-buffered perfusate define three components of cellular Ca: 1) a rapidly exchangeable component accounting for 36% of total Ca, 2) a slowly exchangeable component (t/sub 1/2/ 53 min) accounting for 7% total Ca, and 3) the remaining 57% cellular Ca is inexchangeable (demonstrates no significant exchange within 60 min). The slowly exchangeable component can be increased 10-fold within 60 min by addition of phosphate to the perfusate. The Ca distribution and exchange characteristics are little different from those of 3-day cultures of neonatal rat heart previously studied. The results suggest that the cells are representative of adult cells in situ and that both sarcolemmal-bound and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca contribute to the component of Ca that is rapidly exchangeable

  8. Structural incorporation of trivalent f-elements into trioctahedral smectite; Kristallchemischer Einbau trivalenter f-Elemente in trioktaedrische Smectite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, H.

    2005-12-15

    understand the mechanism of f-element incorporation into the clay structure in detail. (orig.)

  9. The MYC 3' Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennoll, Sherri A; Eshelman, Melanie A; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3' Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3' WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3' WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3' WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3' WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  10. Finite element model updating for large span spatial steel structure considering uncertainties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Jun; ZHU Yan-huang; ZHOU Feng; LI Hui; OU Jin-ping

    2010-01-01

    In order to establish the baseline finite element model for structural health monitoring,a new method of model updating was proposed after analyzing the uncertainties of measured data and the error of finite element model.In the new method,the finite element model was replaced by the multi-output support vector regression machine(MSVR).The interval variables of the measured frequency were sampled by Latin hypercube sampling method.The samples of frequency were regarded as the inputs of the trained MSVR.The outputs of MSVR were the target values of design parameters.The steel structure of National Aquatic Center for Beijing Olympic Games was introduced as a case for finite element model updating.The results show that the proposed method can avoid solving the problem of complicated calculation.Both the estimated values and associated uncertainties of the structure parameters can be obtained by the method.The static and dynamic characteristics of the updated finite element model are in good agreement with the measured data.

  11. Cell structural parameters of potato tuber tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zdunek A.; Pawlak K.; Król A.; Gancarz M.; Czachor H.; Konstankiewicz K.

    2002-01-01

    The present study reviews results of research on the quantitative determination of cell structural parameters such as: surface area, perimeter, Ferret's diameters, elongation, compac- tion, for the parenchyma of potato tuber, taking into consideration inner and outer core tissues. Tissue images were obtained for the samples in their natural state without any preparation using an optic confocal microscope. The quantitative analysis of the microscopic image of the cross-sections of the cell's s...

  12. A lumped mass finite element method for vibration analysis of elastic plate-plate structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The fully discrete lumped mass finite element method is proposed for vibration analysis of elastic plate-plate structures.In the space directions,the longitudinal displacements on plates are discretized by conforming linear elements,and the transverse displacements are discretized by the Morley element.By means of the second order central difference for discretizing the time derivative and the technique of lumped masses,a fully discrete lumped mass finite element method is obtained,and two approaches to choosing the initial functions are also introduced.The error analysis for the method in the energy norm is established,and some numerical examples are included to validate the theoretical analysis.

  13. Finite element formulation for fluid-structure interaction in three-dimensional space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A development is presented for a three-dimension hexahedral hydrodynamic finite-element. Using trilinear shape functions and assuming a constant pressure field in each element, simple relations were obtained for internal nodal forces. Because the formulation was based upon a rate approach it was applicable to problems involving large displacements. This element was incorporated into an existing plate-shell finite element code. Diagonal mass matrices were used and the resulting discrete equations of motion were solved using explicit temporal integrator. Results for several problems were presented which compare numerical predictions to closed form analytical solutions. In addition, the fluid-structure interaction problem of a fluid-filled, cylindrical vessel containing internal cylinders was studied. The internal cylinders were cantilever supported from the top cover of the vessel and were periodically located circumferentially at a fixed radius. A pressurized cylindrical cavity located at the bottom of the vessel at its centerline provided the loading

  14. Modeling of thin structures in eddy current testing with shell elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, A.; Santandrea, L.; Le Bihan, Y.; Marchand, C.

    2010-11-01

    The modeling and design of eddy currents sensors for non-destructive testing applications, generally, requires numerical methods. Among these methods, the finite element method is one of the most used. Indeed, it presents a great capability to treat a large variety of configurations. However, in the study of eddy current testing problems, the existence of structures that have a geometrical dimension smaller than the others (thin air gaps, coatings...) will lead to difficulties related to the meshing process. The introduction of particular elements such as shell elements allows to simplify the modeling of these problems. In this paper, the shell elements are used in two different 2D axisymmetric formulations, the electric formulation a* and the magnetic formulation t-ϕ in order to simulate the behaviour of the electromagnetic fields. The results obtained with the two formulations are compared with analytical solutions.

  15. Modal Experiments and Finite Element Analysis of the Bolted Structure Considering Interface Stiffness and Prtension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Li-dui; DUAN Shu-lin; WU Ji; WU Qi-li; XING Hui

    2012-01-01

    It is particularly important to evaluate natural frequencies and natural modes of the structure of bolted joints to avoid the failures of the structure due to the resonance. The vibration characteristics of bolted structures are closely connected to surface roughness of contact interfaces, the magnitude of pretension of the bolts and the number of clamping bolts. In this paper, the effect of the factors above on the natural frequencies of bolted structures is sys- tematically investigated by experiments. Then, the finite element method is applied to analyze the effect. Finally, the numerical method is validated by experimental measurements of the natural frequencies.

  16. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  17. High accuracy electromagnetic field solvers for cylindrical waveguides and axisymmetric structures using the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some two-dimensional finite element electromagnetic field solvers are described and tested. For TE and TM modes in homogeneous cylindrical waveguides and monopole modes in homogeneous axisymmetric structures, the solvers find approximate solutions to a weak formulation of the wave equation. Second-order isoparametric lagrangian triangular elements represent the field. For multipole modes in axisymmetric structures, the solver finds approximate solutions to a weak form of the curl-curl formulation of Maxwell's equations. Second-order triangular edge elements represent the radial (ρ) and axial (z) components of the field, while a second-order lagrangian basis represents the azimuthal (φ) component of the field weighted by the radius ρ. A reduced set of basis functions is employed for elements touching the axis. With this basis the spurious modes of the curl-curl formulation have zero frequency, so spurious modes are easily distinguished from non-static physical modes. Tests on an annular ring, a pillbox and a sphere indicate the solutions converge rapidly as the mesh is refined. Computed eigenvalues with relative errors of less than a few parts per million are obtained. Boundary conditions for symmetric, periodic and symmetric-periodic structures are discussed and included in the field solver. Boundary conditions for structures with inversion symmetry are also discussed. Special corner elements are described and employed to improve the accuracy of cylindrical waveguide and monopole modes with singular fields at sharp corners. The field solver is applied to three problems: (1) cross-field amplifier slow-wave circuits, (2) a detuned disk-loaded waveguide linear accelerator structure and (3) a 90 degrees overmoded waveguide bend. The detuned accelerator structure is a critical application of this high accuracy field solver. To maintain low long-range wakefields, tight design and manufacturing tolerances are required

  18. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liolios, Angelos; Liolios, Asterios; Hatzigeorgiou, George; Radev, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction) on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC) frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  19. Structural stochastic multiresonance in a hierarchical network of coupled threshold elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural stochastic multiresonance is observed in hierarchical networks with a tree-like structure, with non-dynamical threshold elements placed in the nodes and interacting along the edges of the network, driven by a common slowly varying periodic signal and independent noise sources. If the amplitude of the periodic signal is close to the threshold double maxima of the signal-to-noise ratio in the output of the top elements occur for a narrow range of the strength of connections, depending on the number of layers and the branching factor of the network. Additional maximum occurs at small noise intensities due to averaging of inputs received by the top elements from many branches of the network.

  20. Experimental verification of structural models to analyze the nonlinear dynamics of LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local fault situations in LMFBR cores may produce severe pressure pulses within one fuel element. The fact cannot be ignored that these pressures can have peaks and impulses that may expand and rupture the wrapper around the element. This will impulsively load the surrounding subassemblies and possibly the control rods due to extreme coolant pressure gradients and/or subassembly collision forces. Fast reactor safety requires this mechanical propagation process through the core to be analyzed, and therefore appropriate models and solution methods are needed to simulate the nonlinear structural dynamics of one typical hexagonal fuel element. The aim of this paper is to outline one- and two-dimensional structural models and discuss their capabilities and suitability for multirow core calculations. For this purpose static and impulsive single subassembly loading experiments are described and typical results are reported and compared with numerical predictions. (Auth.)

  1. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liolios Angelos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  2. Experimental validation of multistep quantitative crack damage assessment for truss structures by finite element model updating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a multistep damage quantification method has been experimentally validated by quantifying crack damage of load-carrying members of truss structures based on experimental vibration records. Damage quantifications are still challenging tasks for difficulties in interpreting response signals measured from engineering structures. Open crack depth is parameterized as a damage variable. The open crack in Euler–Bernoulli beam element is modeled by introducing local flexibility coefficients to the uncracked beam element with joint rotational flexibility. Mode shapes and natural frequencies measured from experimental modal testing of a damaged laboratory-size truss bridge are used in the finite element model updating for damage quantification. Predetermined curves derived for hollow circular sections with open crack are used to estimate crack depths from updated local flexibility coefficients. According to experimental validation test, the proposed approach is proven to be viable in quantifying crack damage. (paper)

  3. Application of the multi-scale finite element method to wave propagation problems in damaged structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, F.; Ruzzene, M.

    2011-04-01

    This work illustrates the possibility to extend the field of application of the Multi-Scale Finite Element Method (MsFEM) to structural mechanics problems that involve localized geometrical discontinuities like cracks or notches. The main idea is to construct finite elements with an arbitrary number of edge nodes that describe the actual geometry of the damage with shape functions that are defined as local solutions of the differential operator of the specific problem according to the MsFEM approach. The small scale information are then brought to the large scale model through the coupling of the global system matrices that are assembled using classical finite element procedures. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated through selected numerical examples that constitute classical problems of great interest to the structural health monitoring community.

  4. Modelling of interaction between a snow mantle and a flexible structure using a discrete element method

    OpenAIRE

    Nicot, F.; M. Gay

    2002-01-01

    The search of improvement of protective techniques against natural phenomena such as snow avalanches continues to use classic methods for calculating flexible structures. This paper deals with a new method to design avalanche protection nets. This method is based on a coupled analysis of both net structure and snow mantle by using a Discrete Element Method. This has led to the development of computational software so that...

  5. Finite element response sensitivity and reliability analysis of Soil-Foundation-Structure-Interaction (SFSI) systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Quan

    2008-01-01

    Performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) has emerged as a powerful method of analysis and design philosophy in earthquake engineering and is leading the way to a new generation of seismic design guidelines. PBEE requires a comprehensive understanding of the earthquake response of Soil-Foundation-Structure-Interaction (SFSI) systems when damage occurs in the structural system during the earthquake. In the context of PBEE, this research combines finite element (FE) modeling and seismic r...

  6. Finite Element Modeling of FRC/UHPFRC in Support Of Innovative Structural Applications

    OpenAIRE

    SORELLI, LG; TOUTLEMONDE, F

    2005-01-01

    This work analyses two structural applications of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) experimentally investigated at the Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussées, Paris. First, the structural behavior of tunnel lining segments made of FRC, tested in a configuration corresponding to the possibly critical in situ laying loading, was analyzed by means of a finite element model which implements Hillerborg's fracture mechanics criterion. The effect of fiber distribution on the material parameters wa...

  7. Structural and functional analysis of the visna virus Rev-response element.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiley, L S; Cullen, B R

    1992-01-01

    The distantly related lentiviruses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and visna virus each encode a posttranscriptional regulatory protein, termed Rev, that is critical for expression of the viral structural proteins. We genetically mapped the cis-acting target sequence for visna virus Rev, the visna virus Rev-response element or RRE-V, to a complex 176-nucleotide RNA stem-loop structure that coincides with sequences encoding the N terminus of the transmembrane component of envelope....

  8. Optimal Layout Design using the Element Connectivity Parameterization Method: Application to Three Dimensional Geometrical Nonlinear Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Joung, Young Soo; Kim, Yoon Young

    2005-01-01

    The topology design optimization of “three-dimensional geometrically-nonlinear” continuum structures is still a difficult problem not only because of its problem size but also the occurrence of unstable continuum finite elements during the design optimization. To overcome this difficulty, the ele...

  9. Aromatization of Propane over Element-Alumosilicate Catalysts with ZSM-5 Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosmerikova, L. N.; Volynkina, A. N.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    A method of hydrothermal crystallization of alkaline alumosilicagels is used to manufacture element-alumosilicates with ZSM-5 structure. Their physicochemical and acid properties are investigated and their catalytic activity in the course of propane conversion to aromatic hydrocarbons is determined. The Ga-alumosilicate is found to be the most efficient zeolite catalyst for propane aromatization.

  10. Soil-structure interaction analysis of HTTR building by a finite element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the applicability of the simplified model (sway-rocking model with the embedment effect) for dynamic response evaluation of the embedded HTTR structure is examined by comparing the results with those by a detailed model using finite element method (FEM). In the FEM modelling, the structure is modeled into the beams with lumped masses, and the soil is modeled as two dimensional finite elements. This model has the wave transmitting boundary for the side and the viscous boundaries for the bottom and the surfaces of out-of-plane. Earthquake response of the structure obtained by the finite element model is compared with that by the simplified model. As a result, the maximum response values and the floor response spectra by the finite element model are nearly equal to or a little smaller than those by the simplified model. It may be concluded that the simplified model is applicable to the dynamic response analysis of the embedded HTTR structure for the evaluation of the design seismic forces. (author). 4 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  11. Ufo-element presentation in metamodel structure of triune continuum paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Ukrayinets, О.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes results of UFO-element formal description in metamodel structure of Triune Continuum Paradigm. This can promote the solution of a problem of development of methods of mutual system-object UFO- and UML-models transformation for providing of more effective information systems designing, in particular, for visual modelling CASE-tools Rational Rose and UFO-Toolkit integration.

  12. Topological Design for Acoustic-Structure Interaction Problems with a Mixed Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    to subdomain interfaces evolving during the optimization process. In this paper, we propose to use a mixed finite element formulation with displacements and pressure as primary variables (u/p formulation) which eliminates the need for explicit boundary representation. In order to describe the...... dimensional acoustic-structure interaction problems are optimized to show the validity of the proposed method....

  13. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2016-06-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ- ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  14. Efficient 2-D Gray-Scale Dilations and Erosions with Arbitrary Flat Structuring Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbach, Erik R.; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2006-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is presented for the computation of gray-scale morphological operations with 2-D structuring elements (S.E.). The required computing time is independent of the image content and of the number of gray levels used. For circular S.E.s, it always outperforms the only existing comp

  15. Efficient 2-D Grayscale Morphological Transformations With Arbitrary Flat Structuring Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbach, Erik R.; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is presented for the computation of grayscale morphological operations with arbitrary 2-D flat structuring elements (S.E.). The required computing time is independent of the image content and of the number of gray levels used. It always outperforms the only existing comparable

  16. Quantitative assay of element mass inventories in single cell biological systems with micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogrinc, Nina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); LOTRIČ Metrology, Selca 163, SI-4227 Selca (Slovenia); Pelicon, Primož, E-mail: primoz.pelicon@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vavpetič, Primož; Kelemen, Mitja; Grlj, Nataša; Jeromel, Luka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomić, Sergej [Medical Faculty of the Military Medical Academy, University of Defense, Crnotravska 17, Belgrade (Serbia); Čolić, Miodrag [Medical Faculty of the Military Medical Academy, University of Defense, Crnotravska 17, Belgrade (Serbia); Medical Faculty, University of Niš, Boulevard of Dr. Zoran Djindjić 81, 18000 Niš (Serbia); Beran, Alfred [Dipartimento di Oceanografia Biologica, Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e Geofisica Sperimentale, Via Auguste Piccard 54, 34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Elemental concentrations in micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) maps of elements in biological tissue slices have been determined using auxiliary information on the sample matrix composition from EBS (Elastic Backscattering Spectroscopy) and STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy). The thin sample approximation may be used for evaluating micro-PIXE data in cases, where X-ray absorption in the sample can be neglected and the mass of elements in a selected area can be estimated. The resulting sensitivity amounts to an impressive 10{sup −12} g of the selected elements. Two cases are presented as examples. In the first, we determined the total mass of gold nanoparticles internalized by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). In the second, an inventory of the mass of elements in the micro-particulate material adsorbed at the wall of the lorica of the microzooplankton species Tintinnopsis radix has been created.

  17. Quantitative assay of element mass inventories in single cell biological systems with micro-PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental concentrations in micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) maps of elements in biological tissue slices have been determined using auxiliary information on the sample matrix composition from EBS (Elastic Backscattering Spectroscopy) and STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy). The thin sample approximation may be used for evaluating micro-PIXE data in cases, where X-ray absorption in the sample can be neglected and the mass of elements in a selected area can be estimated. The resulting sensitivity amounts to an impressive 10−12 g of the selected elements. Two cases are presented as examples. In the first, we determined the total mass of gold nanoparticles internalized by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). In the second, an inventory of the mass of elements in the micro-particulate material adsorbed at the wall of the lorica of the microzooplankton species Tintinnopsis radix has been created

  18. Semianalytic Design Sensitivity Analysis of Nonlinear Structures With a Commercial Finite Element Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A finite element package is often used as a daily design tool for engineering designers in order to analyze and improve the design. The finite element analysis can provide the responses of a system for given design variables. Although finite element analysis can quite well provide the structural behaviors for given design variables, it cannot provide enough information to improve the design such as design sensitivity coefficients. Design sensitivity analysis is an essential step to predict the change in responses due to a change in design variables and to optimize a system with the aid of the gradient-based optimization techniques. To develop a numerical method of design sensitivity analysis, analytical derivatives that are based on analytical differentiation of the continuous or discrete finite element equations are effective but analytical derivatives are difficult because of the lack of internal information of the commercial finite element package such as shape functions. Therefore, design sensitivity analysis outside of the finite element package is necessary for practical application in an industrial setting. In this paper, the semi-analytic method for design sensitivity analysis is used for the development of the design sensitivity module outside of a commercial finite element package of ANSYS. The direct differentiation method is employed to compute the design derivatives of the response and the pseudo-load for design sensitivity analysis is effectively evaluated by using the design variation of the related internal nodal forces. Especially, we suggest an effective method for stress and nonlinear design sensitivity analyses that is independent of the commercial finite element package is also discussed. Numerical examples are illustrated to show the accuracy and efficiency of the developed method and to provide insights for implementation of the suggested method into other commercial finite element packages

  19. Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL) Reveals the Sequential Differentiation of Sieve Element-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yuki; Nurani, Alif Meem; Saito, Chieko; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Saito, Masato; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2016-06-01

    Cell differentiation is a complex process involving multiple steps, from initial cell fate specification to final differentiation. Procambial/cambial cells, which act as vascular stem cells, differentiate into both xylem and phloem cells during vascular development. Recent studies have identified regulatory cascades for xylem differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying phloem differentiation is largely unexplored due to technical challenges. Here, we established an ectopic induction system for phloem differentiation named Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL). Our results verified similarities between VISUAL-induced Arabidopsis thaliana phloem cells and in vivo sieve elements. We performed network analysis using transcriptome data with VISUAL to dissect the processes underlying phloem differentiation, eventually identifying a factor involved in the regulation of the master transcription factor gene APL Thus, our culture system opens up new avenues not only for genetic studies of phloem differentiation, but also for future investigations of multidirectional differentiation from vascular stem cells. PMID:27194709

  20. DMPD: Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1492121 Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements ...html) (.csml) Show Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting ...DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. PubmedID 1492121 Title Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role

  1. Handbook of the band structure of elemental solids from Z = 1 to Z = 112

    CERN Document Server

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitris A

    2015-01-01

    This handbook presents electronic structure data and tabulations of Slater-Koster parameters for the whole periodic table. This second edition presents data sets for all elements up to Z = 112, Copernicium, whereas the first edition contained only 53 elements. In this new edition, results are given for the equation of state of the elements together with the parameters of a Birch fit, so that the reader can regenerate the results and derive additional information, such as Pressure-Volume relations and variation of Bulk Modulus with Pressure. For each element, in addition to the equation of state, the energy bands, densities of states, and a set of tight-binding parameters is provided. For a majority of elements, the tight-binding parameters are presented for both a two- and three-center approximation. For the hcp structure, new three-center tight-binding results are given. Other new material in this edition include: energy bands and densities of states of all rare-earth metals, a discussion of the McMillan-Gas...

  2. Algorithms and data structures for massively parallel generic adaptive finite element codes

    KAUST Repository

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    Today\\'s largest supercomputers have 100,000s of processor cores and offer the potential to solve partial differential equations discretized by billions of unknowns. However, the complexity of scaling to such large machines and problem sizes has so far prevented the emergence of generic software libraries that support such computations, although these would lower the threshold of entry and enable many more applications to benefit from large-scale computing. We are concerned with providing this functionality for mesh-adaptive finite element computations. We assume the existence of an "oracle" that implements the generation and modification of an adaptive mesh distributed across many processors, and that responds to queries about its structure. Based on querying the oracle, we develop scalable algorithms and data structures for generic finite element methods. Specifically, we consider the parallel distribution of mesh data, global enumeration of degrees of freedom, constraints, and postprocessing. Our algorithms remove the bottlenecks that typically limit large-scale adaptive finite element analyses. We demonstrate scalability of complete finite element workflows on up to 16,384 processors. An implementation of the proposed algorithms, based on the open source software p4est as mesh oracle, is provided under an open source license through the widely used deal.II finite element software library. © 2011 ACM 0098-3500/2011/12-ART10 $10.00.

  3. Finite element analysis of fluid-structure interaction in buried liquid-conveying pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱庆杰; 陈艳华; 刘廷权; 代兆立

    2008-01-01

    Long distance buried liquid-conveying pipeline is inevitable to cross faults and under earthquake action,it is necessary to calculate fluid-structure interaction(FSI) in finite element analysis under pipe-soil interaction.Under multi-action of site,fault movement and earthquake,finite element model of buried liquid-conveying pipeline for the calculation of fluid structure interaction was constructed through combinative application of ADINA-parasolid and ADINA-native modeling methods,and the direct computing method of two-way fluid-structure coupling was introduced.The methods of solid and fluid modeling were analyzed,pipe-soil friction was defined in solid model,and special flow assumption and fluid structure interface condition were defined in fluid model.Earthquake load,gravity and displacement of fault movement were applied,also model preferences.Finite element research on the damage of buried liquid-conveying pipeline was carried out through computing fluid-structure coupling.The influences of pipe-soil friction coefficient,fault-pipe angle,and liquid density on axial stress of pipeline were analyzed,and optimum parameters were proposed for the protection of buried liquid-conveying pipeline.

  4. Large scale nonlinear numerical optimal control for finite element models of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Christine A.; Liao, Li-Zhi

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of large scale numerical optimal control algorithms for nonlinear systems and their application to finite element models of structures. This work is based on our expansion of the optimal control algorithm (DDP) in the following steps: improvement of convergence for initial policies in non-convex regions, development of a numerically accurate penalty function method approach for constrained DDP problems, and parallel processing on supercomputers. The expanded constrained DDP algorithm was applied to the control of a four-bay, two dimensional truss with 12 soft members, which generates geometric nonlinearities. Using an explicit finite element model to describe the structural system requires 32 state variables and 10,000 time steps. Our numerical results indicate that for constrained or unconstrained structural problems with nonlinear dynamics, the results obtained by our expanded constrained DDP are significantly better than those obtained using linear-quadratic feedback control.

  5. Text localization using standard deviation analysis of structure elements and support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagoris Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A text localization technique is required to successfully exploit document images such as technical articles and letters. The proposed method detects and extracts text areas from document images. Initially a connected components analysis technique detects blocks of foreground objects. Then, a descriptor that consists of a set of suitable document structure elements is extracted from the blocks. This is achieved by incorporating an algorithm called Standard Deviation Analysis of Structure Elements (SDASE which maximizes the separability between the blocks. Another feature of the SDASE is that its length adapts according to the requirements of the application. Finally, the descriptor of each block is used as input to a trained support vector machines that classify the block as text or not. The proposed technique is also capable of adjusting to the text structure of the documents. Experimental results on benchmarking databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Structure and representation of data elements on factual database - SIST activity in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A factual database has a variety of forms and types of data structure that produces various kinds of records composed of a great number of data items, which differ from file to file. Second, a factual database needs higher speciality in preparation on content analysis, and users wish to process download-ed data successively for analysis, diagnosis, simulation, projecting, design, linguistic processing and so on. A meaningful quantitative datum can be divided into some consistent sub-elements. In addition to this fine structure of data elements, representation of data elements is also very important to integrate factual data on to public files. In this paper we shall discuss problems and thoughts about the structure and representation of data elements contained in numerical information on a practical basis. The guideline discussed here is under draft by sponsorship of the Government and is being implemented to build database of space experiments. The guideline involves expression, unification, notification and handling of data for numerical information in machine readable form, such as numerical value, numerical formula, graphics, semi-quantitative value, significant figures, ranged data, accuracy and precision, conversion of unit, semi-quantitative values, error information and so on. (author)

  7. Experimental Studies on Finite Element Model Updating for a Heated Beam-Like Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaipeng Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was made for the identification procedure of time-varying modal parameters and the finite element model updating technique of a beam-like thermal structure in both steady and unsteady high temperature environments. An improved time-varying autoregressive method was proposed first to extract the instantaneous natural frequencies of the structure in the unsteady high temperature environment. Based on the identified modal parameters, then, a finite element model for the structure was updated by using Kriging meta-model and optimization-based finite-element model updating method. The temperature-dependent parameters to be updated were expressed as low-order polynomials of temperature increase, and the finite element model updating problem was solved by updating several coefficients of the polynomials. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the time-varying modal parameter identification method and showed that the instantaneous natural frequencies of the updated model well tracked the trends of the measured values with high accuracy.

  8. Development of plasticity and damage in vibrating structural elements performing guided rigid-body motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstmayr, J.; Holl, H.J.; Irschik, H. [Inst. of Mechanics and Machine Design, Johannes Kepler University of Linz (Austria)

    2001-03-01

    A numerical algorithm for studying the development of plastic and damaged zones in a vibrating structural element with a large, guided rigid-body motion is presented. Beam-type elements vibrating in the small-strain regime are considered. A machine element performing rotatory motions, similar to an element of a slider-crank mechanism, is treated as a benchmark problem. Microstructural changes in the deforming material are described by the mesolevel variables of plastic strain and damage, which are consistently included into a macroscopic analysis of the overall beam motion. The method is based on an eigenstrain formulation, considering plastic strain and damage to contribute to an eigenstrain loading of a linear elastic background structure. Rigid-body coordinates are incorporated into this beam-type structural formulation, and an implicit numerical scheme is presented for iterative computation of the eigenstrains from the mesolevel constitutive behavior. Owing to the eigenstrain formulation, any of the existing constitutive models with internal variables could in principle be implemented. Linear elastic/perfectly plastic behavior is exemplarily treated in a numerical study, where plastic strain is connected to the Kachanov damage parameter by a simple damage law. Inelastic effects like plastic shakedown and damage-induced low-cycle rupture are shown to occur in the examplary problems. (orig.)

  9. Retrotransposition of limited deletion type of intracisternal A-particle elements in the myeloid leukemia cells of C3H/He mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The murine genome has about 1,000 copies of DNA elements for the intracisternal A-particle (IAP) that resembles a retrovirus. We previously reported that the genomic DNA of the cells from radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) lines derived from C3H/He inbred mice was frequently rearranged by the integration of the IAP element. In this study, 8 IAP elements from the characteristic integration sites in 6 cell lines of radiation-induced AML from different mice were characterized and compared in structure with 114 IAP elements isolated from the normal C3H/He genome. One of the 8 elements was a full-length type I IAP, and 7 were of type-IΔ1 with a common deletion site. Although the type IΔ1 form is a minor population accounting for about 6% of total genomic IAP elements, it is predominantly retrotransposed in the AML cells from different C3H/He mice. This indicates that limited populations of the IAP elements contribute to the unique retrotransposition in AML cells. (author)

  10. Influence of Finite Element Size in Residual Strength Prediction of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Karayev, Kazbek Z.; Nordman, Paul S.; Razi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of failure load to the element size used in a progressive failure analysis (PFA) of carbon composite center notched laminates is evaluated. The sensitivity study employs a PFA methodology previously developed by the authors consisting of Hashin-Rotem intra-laminar fiber and matrix failure criteria and a complete stress degradation scheme for damage simulation. The approach is implemented with a user defined subroutine in the ABAQUS/Explicit finite element package. The effect of element size near the notch tips on residual strength predictions was assessed for a brittle failure mode with a parametric study that included three laminates of varying material system, thickness and stacking sequence. The study resulted in the selection of an element size of 0.09 in. X 0.09 in., which was later used for predicting crack paths and failure loads in sandwich panels and monolithic laminated panels. Comparison of predicted crack paths and failure loads for these panels agreed well with experimental observations. Additionally, the element size vs. normalized failure load relationship, determined in the parametric study, was used to evaluate strength-scaling factors for three different element sizes. The failure loads predicted with all three element sizes provided converged failure loads with respect to that corresponding with the 0.09 in. X 0.09 in. element size. Though preliminary in nature, the strength-scaling concept has the potential to greatly reduce the computational time required for PFA and can enable the analysis of large scale structural components where failure is dominated by fiber failure in tension.

  11. Effect of Superficial Atmospheric Corrosion Upon the Internal Stresses in Structural Steel Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Monel Leiba; Budescu, M.; Elena Axinte; Elena-Carmen Teleman

    2006-01-01

    A research program is presented showing the stress status determined by the corrosion phenomenon inside a specimen of a structural steel element. Several stains are studied their diameters ranging from 1~mm to 6~mm and thickness of the corroded layer under 0.5~mm. The physical modeling is the result of testing in laboratory the phenomenon of superficial atmospheric corrosion and the numerical modeling was developed under a FEM program, ALGOR. A number of 3,200 finite elements of BRICK type we...

  12. Role of mineralogical structure of sediments in accumulation of radionuclides and trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar distributions for 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 210Po, 238,239,240Pu, 137Cs and trace elements were obtained in sediment samples collected along the Romanian sector of the Danube River and the Black Sea coast during 1994. The radionuclide and trace element accumulation in the investigated samples is discussed with respect to their geochemical behavior and the mineralogical structure of the samples. The latter, investigated by X-ray diffraction and cation exchange capacity of the same samples, proves to be an important factor in the selection of sampling sites for monitoring the pollution of river basins and the sea. (author)

  13. A 3D analysis of reinforced concrete structures by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamental features of a computational model, based on the finite element methods, for the analysis of concrete structure are presented. The study comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete are considered. The reinforcement is inserted in the finite element model using an embedded model. A smeared crack model is used for the concrete cracking, which considers the contribution of concrete between cracks and allows the closing the cracks closing. The computational code MPGS (Multi-Purpose Graphic System) is used, to make easy the analysis and interpretation of the numeric results. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  14. ALE Fractional Step Finite Element Method for Fluid-Structure Nonlinear Interaction Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A computational procedure is developed to solve the problems of coupled motion of a structure and a viscous incompressible fluid. In order to incorporate the effect of the moving surface of the structure as well as the free surface motion, the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is employed as the basis of the finite element spatial discretization. For numerical integration in time, the fraction step method is used. This method is useful because one can use the same linear interpolation function for both velocity and pressure. The method is applied to the nonlinear interaction of a structure and a tuned liquid damper. All computations are performed with a personal computer.

  15. A Structured Population Model of Cell Differentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Doumic, Marie; Perthame, Benoit; Zubelli, Jorge P

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze several aspects of a new model for cell differentiation. It assumes that differentiation of progenitor cells is a continuous process. From the mathematical point of view, it is based on partial differential equations of transport type. Specifically, it consists of a structured population equation with a nonlinear feedback loop. This models the signaling process due to cytokines, which regulate the differentiation and proliferation process. We compare the continuous model to its discrete counterpart, a multi-compartmental model of a discrete collection of cell subpopulations recently proposed by Marciniak-Czochra et al. in 2009 to investigate the dynamics of the hematopoietic system. We obtain uniform bounds for the solutions, characterize steady state solutions, and analyze their linearized stability. We show how persistence or extinction might occur according to values of parameters that characterize the stem cells self-renewal. We also perform numerical simulations and discuss the q...

  16. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue-induced damage is one of the most uncertain and extremely unpredictable failure mechanisms for a large variety of structural systems (e.g., aerospace, automotive, offshore, and civil structures) subjected to stochastic and cyclic loading during service life. Among these systems, composite lightweight aerospace structures -- such as fighter aircrafts and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) -- are particularly sensitive to both fatigue- induced and impact-induced damage. Within this scenari...

  17. Identification of two regulatory elements controlling Fucosyltransferase 7 transcription in murine CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Matthias; Ratsch, Boris A; Mardahl, Maibritt; Schröter, Micha F; Engelbert, Dirk; Triebus, Julia; Hamann, Alf; Syrbe, Uta

    2014-11-01

    Fucosyltransferase VII encoded by the gene Fut7 is essential in CD4(+) T cells for the generation of E- and P-selectin ligands (E- and P-lig) which facilitate recruitment of lymphocytes into inflamed tissues and into the skin. This study aimed to identify regulatory elements controlling the inducible Fut7 expression in CD4(+) T cells that occurs upon activation and differentiation of naive T cells into effector cells. Comparative analysis of the histone modification pattern in non-hematopoetic cells and CD4(+) T cell subsets revealed a differential histone modification pattern within the Fut7 locus including a conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) identified by cross-species conservation comparison suggesting that regulatory elements are confined to this region. Cloning of the CNS located about 500 bp upstream of the Fut7 locus, into a luciferase reporter vector elicited reporter activity after transfection of the αβ-WT T cell line, but not after transfection of primary murine CD4(+) Th1 cells. As quantification of different Fut7 transcripts revealed a predominance of transcripts lacking the first exons in primary Th1 cells we searched for an alternative promoter. Cloning of an intragenic region spanning a 1kb region upstream of exon 4 into an enhancer-containing vector indeed elicited promoter activity. Interestingly, also the CNS enhanced activity of this intragenic minimal promoter in reporter assays in primary Th1 cells suggesting that both elements interact in primary CD4(+) T cells to induce Fut7 transcription. PMID:24915132

  18. Elemental analysis in cultured cells, tobacco and grape, treated with aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relationship between Al toxicity and the Al, Fe and B amount of element in tobacco and grape cells are discussed. Al and Fe were analyzed by neutron activation analysis and B was analyzed by prompt gamma-ray analysis. Callose content was also measured as an indicator of cell damage induced Al toxicity. When tobacco cells were incubated in 1 mM and 300 μM Al solution, the pattern of callose formation was much similar to that of Fe accumulation than that of Al accumulation in tobacco cells, suggesting that the increase of Fe content induced toxic effect along with Al incorporated into the cells. However, this tendency was not observed in grape cells. Boron content did not show any relation to those of Al or Fe throughout the Al treatment in both tobacco and grape cells. (author)

  19. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  20. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  1. Local equivalent welding element to predict the welding deformations of plate-type structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of welding joint, the residual strain be-haviors of material under constraint and temperature circulation, as well as the activating mechanism of welding process, this paper addresses a new type welding element for numerical simulation of welding deformation, which is called the LEWE (the local equivalent welding element). This element can describe the basic char-acteristics of welded seam: the local position points of inherent strain, the equiva-lent size, the bending radius (or bending angle) from inherent strain, etc. It could be used to predict the welding deformation of plate-type structure. The comparisons between the computed deflection of welded plate and its experiment measurement are present. The results showed that the LEWE possesses a potential to simulate the deformation of welding process high-efficiently and precisely.

  2. Photoelectron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy of cytoskeletal elements in the same cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nadakavukaren, K K; Chen, L. B.; Habliston, D L; Griffith, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    Pt K2 rat kangaroo epithelial cells and Rat-1 fibroblasts were grown on conductive glass discs, fixed, and permeabilized, and the cytoskeletal elements actin, keratin, and vimentin were visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. After the fluorescence microscopy, the cells were postfixed and dehydrated for photoelectron microscopy. The contrast in these photoelectron micrographs is primarily topographical in origin, and the presence of fluorescent dyes at low density does not contribute signi...

  3. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  4. Coupling equivalent plate and finite element formulations in multiple-method structural analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Gary L.; Norwood, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A coupled multiple-method analysis procedure for use late in conceptual design or early in preliminary design of aircraft structures is described. Using this method, aircraft wing structures are represented with equivalent plate models, and structural details such as engine/pylon structure, landing gear, or a 'stick' model of a fuselage are represented with beam finite element models. These two analysis methods are implemented in an integrated multiple-method formulation that involves the assembly and solution of a combined set of linear equations. The corresponding solution vector contains coefficients of the polynomials that describe the deflection of the wing and also the components of translations and rotations at the joints of the beam members. Two alternative approaches for coupling the methods are investigated; one using transition finite elements and the other using Lagrange multipliers. The coupled formulation is applied to the static analysis and vibration analysis of a conceptual design model of a fighter aircraft. The results from the coupled method are compared with corresponding results from an analysis in which the entire model is composed of finite elements.

  5. A Macro-Element for Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses of Shallow Foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzigogos, Charisis; Salençon, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to present some aspects of the development of a "macro-element" for dynamic soil-structure interaction analyses of shallow foundations. Initially the concept of "macro-element" is introduced and is illustrated with the aid of a very simple example originating from structural engineering. Then the link is made with the modeling of the dynamic response of shallow foundations and the objectives and structure of such a tool are described with reference to the specific configuration of a circular footing resting on the surface of a heterogeneous purely cohesive soil. The principal features of the "macro-element" are then presented; the soil-structure interaction domain is reduced to a point that coincides with the center of the footing and all the (material and geometric) non-linearities are lumped at this point. A discussion on the most appropriate way to treat these non-linearities is undertaken based on experience gained with earlier works. It is suggested that the non-linearities be i...

  6. Combined effect of passive damping element and soil-structure interaction on dynamic behaviour of tall slender structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hračov, Stanislav; Macháček, Michael

    Plzeň: University of West Bohemia, 2015 - (Adámek, V.), s. 39-40 ISBN 978-80-261-0568-8. [Computational Mechanics 2015. Conference with International Participation. /31./. Špičák (CZ), 09.11.2015-11.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-41574P Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : passive damping element * tall slender structures * dynamic behaviour Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  7. Thermo-mechanical finite element analyses of bolted cask lid structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of complex bolted cask lid structures under mechanical or thermal accident conditions is important for the evaluation of cask integrity and leak-tightness in package design assessment according to the Transport Regulations or in aircraft crash scenarios. In this context BAM is developing methods based on Finite Elements to calculate the effects of mechanical impacts onto the bolted lid structures as well as effects caused by severe fire scenarios. I n case of fire it might be not enough to perform only a thermal heat transfer analysis. The complex cask design in connection with a severe hypothetical time-temperature-curve representing an accident fire scenario will create a strong transient heating up of the cask body and its lid system. This causes relative displacements between the seals and its counterparts that can be analyzed by a so-called thermo-mechanical calculation. Although it is currently not possible to correlate leakage rates with results from deformation analyses directly an appropriate Finite Element model of the considered type of metallic lid seal has been developed. For the present it is possible to estimate the behaviour of the seal based on the calculated relative displacements at its seating and the behaviour of the lid bolts under the impact load or the temperature field respectively. Except of the lid bolts the geometry of the cask and the mechanical loading is axial-symmetric which simplifies the analysis considerably and a two-dimensional Finite Element model with substitute lid bolts may be used. The substitute bolts are modelled as one-dimensional truss or beam elements. An advanced two-dimensional bolt submodel represents the bolts with plane stress continuum elements. This paper discusses the influence of different bolt modelling on the relative displacements at the seating of the seals. Besides this, the influence of bolt modelling, thermal properties and detail in geometry of the two-dimensional Finite Element models on

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of non-linear structural dynamics of fast breeder reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descriptions are presented of theoretical and experimental studies of the deformation behaviour of fast-breeder fuel elements as a consequence of extreme impulsive stresses produced by an incident. The starting point for the studies is the assumption that local disturbances in a fuel element have resulted in a thermal interaction between fuel and sodium and in a corresponding increase in pressure. On the basis of the current state of knowledge, the possibility cannot be ruled out that this pressure build-up may lead to the bursting of the fuel-element wrapper, to the propagation of pressure in the core, and to coherent structural movements and deformations. A physical model is established for the calculation of the dynamic response of elastic-plastic beam systems, and the differential equations of p motion for the discrete equivalent system are derived with the aid of D'Alembert's principle. On this basis and with the aid of a semi-empirical pin-bundle model, an appropriate computer program allows a static and dynamic analysis to be obtained for a complete fuel element. In the experimental part of the study, a description is given of static and impulsive loading tests on 1:1 SNR-like fuel-element models. Making use of measured impact forces and of known material characteristics, it was possible to a large extent for the experiments to be reproduced by calculations. In agreement with existing experience from explosion experiments on 1:1 core models, the results (of relevance for fast-breeder safety and in particular the SNR-300) show that only local limited deformations occur and that the compact fuel-element and core structure constitutes an effective inherent barrier in the presence of extreme incident stresses. (author)

  9. μ-CT-based finite element analysis on imperfections in open-celled metal foam: Mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study digitally identifies and repairs defects produced in the manufacturing of an open-cell metal foam for the first time. Finite element calculations are based on microcomputed tomography data of actual samples. The effective Young’s modulus and 0.2% offset yield strength are calculated and equivalent plastic strain is used to identify weakness within the material. In areas of high plastic deformation, the structure is digitally repaired locally and the calculations are repeated in order to quantify the change in material properties.

  10. A novel E2 box-GATA element modulates Cdc6 transcription during human cells polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaboa, Nuria; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Martinez, Pilar; Bornstein, Rafael; Calés, Carmela

    2004-01-01

    Cdc6 is a key regulator of the strict alternation of S and M phases during the mitotic cell cycle. In mammalian and plant cells that physiologically become polyploid, cdc6 is transcriptionally and post-translationally regulated. We have recently reported that Cdc6 levels are maintained in megakaryoblastic HEL cells, but severely downregulated by ectopic expression of transcriptional repressor Drosophila melanogaster escargot. Here, we show that cdc6 promoter activity is upregulated during megakaryocytic differentiation of HEL endoreplicating cells, and that Escargot interferes with such activation. Transactivation experiments showed that a 1.7 kb region located at 2800 upstream cdc6 transcription initiation site behaved as a potent enhancer in endoreplicating cells only. This activity was mainly dependent on a novel cis-regulatory element composed by an E2 box overlapping a GATA motif. Ectopic Escargot could bind this regulatory element in vitro and endogenous GATA-1 and E2A formed specific complexes in megakaryoblastic cells as well as in primary megakaryocytes. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that both transcription factors were occupying the E2 box/GATA site in vivo. Altogether, these data suggest that cdc6 expression could be actively maintained during megakaryocytic differentiation through transcriptional mechanisms involving specific cis- and trans-regulatory elements. PMID:15590906

  11. Trace element distribution in the hair of some sickle cell anemia patients and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hair samples of some young sickle cell anemia (SCA) and Control patients in Nigeria were analyzed for 12 elements, viz, Se, Hg, Cr, Fe, Zn, Co, Cu, Br, As, Sb, Na, and Sc, using instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). With the exception of Cu, which was found to be significantly higher in the hair of SCA patients (at the 0.05 level of the t-test), there were generally no significant differences in elemental concentrations within the two groups. A preliminary study of the elemental contents of the fingernails of the same subjects showed a higher abundance of most of the elements in nail than in hair. These preliminary results were compared with similar studies form some other parts of the world

  12. Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained

  13. Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin

    1999-11-08

    A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained.

  14. Determination of trace elements in BCR single cell protein via destructive neutron activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of some trace elements in single cell protein (SCP), a product of BP Research Centre at Sunbury-at-Thames, England, was determined by neutron activation analysis. The SCP-samples were irradiated in the reactor of the Interuniversity Reactor Institute at Delft in a neutron flux of 1.0x1013 n/cm2s for 12 hours. Samples of Bowen's Kale were used as reference material. After a decay of two or three days the samples were chemically destroyed, and the trace elements were separated. The quantity of the following elements was determined by measuring the γ-activity by means of a scintillation counter: antimony, cadmium, mercury, arsenic and selenium. The amounts of these elements in the SCP and in the reference material were tabled

  15. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth. PMID:26213205

  16. Establishing in vitro Zinnia elegans cell suspension culture with high tracheary elements differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twumasi, P.; Schel, J.H.N.; Ieperen, van W.; Woltering, E.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Zinnia elegans mesophyll cell culture is a useful system for xylogenesis studies. The system is associated with highly synchronous tracheary element (TE) differentiation, making it more suitable for molecular studies requiring larger amounts of molecular isolates, such as mRNA and proteins and f

  17. Shell-structure influence on the multinucleon transfer in nucleon transfer matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the experimental data on the charge (mass) distributions of products in nuclear reactions with heavy ions [1], dependence of yield of fragments on their isotope numbers and ones of projectile- and target nuclei [2], and cross sections of the formation of evaporation residues at synthesis of new superheavy elements [3] shows that the individual peculiarities (shell structure, N/Z-ratio) of interacting nuclei play decisive role at formation and evolution of dinuclear system. Therefore, the appropriate microscopic model should be used for the theoretical analysis of the above mentioned effects. The main quantities which must be included into model are the realistic scheme of single-particle states, nucleon separation energy, single-particle matrix elements of nucleon transitions in nuclei and nucleon exchange between them caused by influence of the mean-field of partner-nucleus. In this work the nucleon transfer matrix elements were calculated for the Wood-Saxon potential for spherical nucleus. The eigenvalues and wave functions of single-particle states were obtained by numerical solving Schroedinger's equation. The integral estimation of the matrix elements is found by comparing the calculated width of the charge distributions of the reaction products with the experimental data. In the early paper [4], the same matrix elements were calculated analytically using an approximation for wave functions: authors have used wave functions of the spherical potential well. The numerical values of squares of proton transfer matrix elements found in this work are nearly in coincidence with that presented in [4]. There is a difference between curves of dependencies of the matrix elements under discussion on the relative distance between centres of nuclei when this distance is smaller than sum of nuclei radii. (author)

  18. Development of Finite Elements for Two-Dimensional Structural Analysis Using the Integrated Force Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method has been developed in recent years for the analysis of structural mechanics problems. This method treats all independent internal forces as unknown variables that can be calculated by simultaneously imposing equations of equilibrium and compatibility conditions. In this paper a finite element library for analyzing two-dimensional problems by the Integrated Force Method is presented. Triangular- and quadrilateral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary domain configurations are presented. The element equilibrium and flexibility matrices are derived by discretizing the expressions for potential and complementary energies, respectively. The displacement and stress fields within the finite elements are independently approximated. The displacement field is interpolated as it is in the standard displacement method, and the stress field is approximated by using complete polynomials of the correct order. A procedure that uses the definitions of stress components in terms of an Airy stress function is developed to derive the stress interpolation polynomials. Such derived stress fields identically satisfy the equations of equilibrium. Moreover, the resulting element matrices are insensitive to the orientation of local coordinate systems. A method is devised to calculate the number of rigid body modes, and the present elements are shown to be free of spurious zero-energy modes. A number of example problems are solved by using the present library, and the results are compared with corresponding analytical solutions and with results from the standard displacement finite element method. The Integrated Force Method not only gives results that agree well with analytical and displacement method results but also outperforms the displacement method in stress calculations.

  19. Finite element analysis of the flange structure in the reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: In the AP1000 Reactor system, many devices sustain the pressure. Purpose: The sealing function of these devices is essential to ensure the structural integrity of the reactor system. Methods: In the ASME code, Waters method is adopted for the design of sealing structure. Although Waters code is very reliable, it can't show the details of the deflection and stress distribution of the sealing structure under pressure. In this paper, a finite element method is developed to evaluate the typical sealing structure. The preload of the bolt and the spring back behavior of the gasket are also simulated by a proposed equivalent method. Results: With the finite element model, the spring back of the gasket, the deflection of the flange and the stress distribution of the sealing structure are predicted. Conclusions: Finally, The quantitative correlation between gasket spring back and inner pressure of the device is obtained, which provide a useful reference for the design of the sealing structure. (authors)

  20. Application of Flame-Sprayed Coatings as Heating Elements for Polymer-Based Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera-Valle, Adrián; McDonald, André

    2015-10-01

    Flame-sprayed nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) and nickel-chromium (NiCr) coatings were deposited on fiber-reinforced polymer composites for use as heating elements of structures that were exposed to cold environments. Electrical current was applied to the coatings to increase the surface temperature by way of Joule heating. The surface temperature profiles of the coatings were measured under free and forced convection conditions at different ambient temperatures, ranging from -25 to 23 °C. It was found that at ambient air temperatures below 0 °C, the surface temperature of the coating remained above 0 °C for both the forced and free convection conditions, and there was a nearly homogeneous temperature distribution over the coating surface. This suggests that flame-sprayed coatings could be used as heating elements to mitigate ice accretion on structures, without the presence of areas of localized high temperature.

  1. Three-dimensionality of space in the structure of the periodic table of chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the dimension of the 3D homogeneous and isotropic Euclidean space, and the electron spin on the self-organization of the electron systems of atoms of chemical elements is considered. It is shown that the finite dimension of space creates the possibility of periodicity in the structure of an electron cloud, while the value of the dimension determines the number of stable systems of electrons at different levels of the periodic table of chemical elements and some characteristics of the systems. The conditions for the stability of systems of electrons and the electron system of an atom as a whole are considered. On the basis of the results obtained, comparison with other hierarchical systems (nanostructures and biological structures) is performed

  2. STIFFNESS EQUATION OF FINITE SEGMENT FOR FLEXIBLE BEAM-FORMED STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The finite segment modelling for the flexible beam-formed structural elemens is presented,in which the discretization views of the finite segment method and the difference from the finite element method are introduced. In terms of the nodal model, the joint properties are described easily by the model of the finite segment method,and according to the element properties,the assumption of the small strain is only met in the finite segment method, i. e., the geometric nonlinear deformation of the flexible bodies is allowable.Consequently, the finite segment method is very suited to the flexible multibody structure. The finite segment model is used and the arc differentiation is adopted for the differential beam segments.The stiffness equation is derived by the use of the principle of virtual work. The new modelling method shows its normalization, clear physical and geometric meanings and simple computational process.

  3. Implicit finite element structural dynamic formulation for long-duration accidents in reactor piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This taper describes an implicit three-dimensional finite-element formulation for the structural analysis of reactor piping system. The numerical algorithm considers hoop, flexural, axial, and torsion modes of the piping structures. It is unconditionally stable and can be used for calculation of piping response under static or long duration dynamic loads. The method uses a predictor-corrector, successive iterative scheme which satisfies the equilibrium equations. A set of stiffness equations representing the discretized equations of motion are derived to predict the displacement increments. The calculated displacement increments are then used to correct the element nodal forces. The algorithm is fairly general, and is capable of treating large displacements and elastic-plastic materials with thermal and strain-rate effects. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Implicit finite element structural dynamic formulation for long-duration accidents in reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This taper describes an implicit three-dimensional finite-element formulation for the structural analysis of reactor piping system. The numerical algorithm considers hoop, flexural, axial, and torsion modes of the piping structures. It is unconditionally stable and can be used for calculation of piping response under static or long duration dynamic loads. The method uses a predictor-corrector, successive iterative scheme which satisfies the equilibrium equations. A set of stiffness equations representing the discretized equations of motion are derived to predict the displacement increments. The calculated displacement increments are then used to correct the element nodal forces. The algorithm is fairly general, and is capable of treating large displacements and elastic-plastic materials with thermal and strain-rate effects. 7 refs., 7 figs

  5. Mitigation of Flanking Noise Transmission in Periodic Structures of Lightweight Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal

    through structural junctions and radiates into neighbouring rooms. To diminish the flanking transmission of sound, frames are usually designed with single or double studs or constructed with layers of foam or another viscoelastic material. This thesis is investigating the behaviour of flanking noise......Lightweight structures becoming increasingly popular within the building industry and hence they requires immediate attention to address their vibro-acoustic behaviour. Flanking noise transmission is one of the main concerns while using lightweight panels in buildings, since sound can travel...... elements are considered for describing flanking noise transmission through panels. It is assumed that the ribs are fully fixed to the plates in case of various frame designs, and a parametric study is carried out on the centre panel with regard to various spacing between the ribs. Solid finite elements...

  6. Structure-acoustic finite element analyses for noise reduction investigations of launcher payload compartment structures made of CFRP sandwich material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, M.; Schweickert, G.; Strobel, F.

    1991-10-01

    An investigation of the noise reduction properties of the Ariane 5 Speltra payload compartment structure is reported. The low frequency noise reduction was calculated by the Finite Element Method (FEM) with a formulation for fluid structure interaction (FE code PERMAS-FS). The results of the different analysis steps including uncoupled and coupled analysis are presented. The uncoupled structure and cavity dynamics results were compared to closed form solutions with good agreement. The introduction of external field effects, i.e. radiation damping and scattering, was performed by using closed form solutions for cylinder type structures. The analyses were performed for 2 different test cylinders and the Speltra cylindrical part. The test cylinder results were compared with the measured noise reductions and good agreement was obtained.

  7. Prediction of the nonlinear dynamic response of structural components using finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three finite element computer programs (EURDYN) for nonlinear dynamic analysis of two- and three-dimensional structures are described. The convected co-ordinate technique suggested by Belytschko, combined with a lumped-explicit scheme for marching in time, results in a very efficient tool for obtaining nonlinear dynamic responses due to blast loading. Although only simple examples are discussed in the present paper, the program capabilities do cover a large range of problems in the field of fast-reactor engineering. (orig.)

  8. Non-linear finite element assessment analysis of a modern heritage structure

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sorace; Terenzi, G

    2011-01-01

    A synthesis of a non-linear finite element structural assessment enquiry carried out on a monumental modern heritage building is reported in this paper. The study includes a buckling analysis of the slender steel beams constituting a mushroom-type roof, and an ?integral" seismic pushover analysis of the supporting R/C columns. The computational solutions obtained for the steel roof beams are compared to the results derived from a calculation of the critical stress of beam panels, and the glob...

  9. Virtual examinations of alloying elements influence on alloy structural steels mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; R. Honysz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper introduces analysis results of selected alloying elements influence on mechanical properties of alloy structural steels for quenching and tempering.Design/methodology/approach: Investigations were performed in virtual environment with use of materials science virtual laboratory. Virtual investigations results were verified in real investigative laboratory.Findings: Materials researches performed with use of material science virtual laboratory in range of determining the mec...

  10. Continuum and finite element techniques for soil-structure interaction analysis of deeply embedded foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews some of the basic principles of soil-structure interaction, and discusses the advantages and limitations of the lumped parameter and finite element approaches. An approach is presented for extending the lumped parameter model to include deeply embedded foundations. Finally, the State-of-the-Art of field and laboratory measurements of dynamic subsoil properties is briefly presented (cross-hole technique and resonant column testing)

  11. Multiscale Nonconforming Finite Element Computation to Small Periodic Composite Materials of Elastic Structures on Anisotropic Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The small periodic elastic structures of composite materials with the multiscale asymptotic expansion and homogenized method are discussed. A nonconforming Crouzeix-Raviart finite element is applied to calculate every term of the asymptotic expansion on anisotropic meshes. The approximation scheme to the higher derivatives of the homogenized solution is also derived. Finally, the optimal error estimate in ·h for displacement vector is obtained.

  12. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  13. Multiphysics Simulation of Left Ventricular Filling Dynamics Using Fluid-Structure Interaction Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Sugiura, Seiryo; Kafuku, Hidenobu; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2004-01-01

    To relate the subcellular molecular events to organ level physiology in heart, we have developed a three-dimensional finite-element-based simulation program incorporating the cellular mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling and its propagation, and simulated the fluid-structure interaction involved in the contraction and relaxation of the human left ventricle. The FitzHugh-Nagumo model and four-state model representing the cross-bridge kinetics were adopted for cellular model. Both vent...

  14. A generalized threading model using integer programming that allows for secondary structure element deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrott, Kyle; Guo, Jun-tao; Olman, Victor; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    Integer programming is a combinatorial optimization method that has been successfully applied to the protein threading problem. We seek to expand the model optimized by this technique to allow for a more accurate description of protein threading. We have developed and implemented an expanded model of integer programming that has the capability to model secondary structure element deletion, which was not possible in previous version of integer programming based optimization. PMID:17503397

  15. Elements of solid state electronics based on soi-structures and si whiskers for cryogenic temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Druzhinin A. A.; Osrovskkii I. P.; Khoverko Yu. M.; Koretskyy R. N.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the study results of electrical properties of polycrystalline silicon films in silicon-on-insulator structures and Si whiskers in the temperature range of 4,2—70 K obtained by impedance measurements in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 250 kHz and the possibility of their use in solid-state electronics, functioning at cryogenic temperatures. Characteristics of samples obtained with impedance measurements allow to predict certain specifications of reactive elements of solid ...

  16. Asynchronous Communication: Investigating the Influences of Relational Elements and Background on the Framing Structure of Emails

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Awad AlAfnan

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the influences of relational elements and the background of communicators on the framing structure of email messages that were exchanged in an educational Institute in Malaysia. The investigation revealed that social distance played a more significant role than power relations as Malaysian respondents are, generally, more polite to distant colleagues than they are to close colleagues regardless of their organizational position. It was also revealed that the ethnic backgrou...

  17. Solving the Fuzzy BiLevel Linear Programming with Multiple Followers through Structured Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyue Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal solution of fuzzy bilevel linear programming with multiple followers (MFFBLP model is shown to be equivalent to the optimal solution of the bilevel linear programming with multiple followers by using fuzzy structured element theory. The optimal solution to this model is found out by adopting the Kuhn-Tucker approach. Finally, an illustrative numerical example for this model is also provided to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Finite element model validation of bridge based on structural health monitoring—Part I: Response surface-based finite element model updating

    OpenAIRE

    Zhouhong Zong; Xiaosong Lin; Jie Niu

    2015-01-01

    In the engineering practice, merging statistical analysis into structural evaluation and assessment is a tendency in the future. As a combination of mathematical and statistical techniques, response surface (RS) methodology has been successfully applied to design optimization, response prediction and model validation. With the aid of RS methodology, these two serial papers present a finite element (FE) model updating and validation method for bridge structures based on structural health monit...

  19. Micro and nanofluidic structures for cell sorting and genomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Keith J.

    Microfluidic systems promise rapid analysis of small samples in a compact and inexpensive format. But direct scaling of lab bench protocols on-chip is challenging because laminar flows in typical microfluidic devices are characterized by non-mixing streamlines. Common microfluidic mixers and sorters work by diffusion, limiting application to objects that diffuse slowly such as cells and DNA. Recently Huang et.al. developed a passive microfluidic element to continuously separate bio-particles deterministically. In Deterministic Lateral Displacement (DLD), objects are sorted by size as they transit an asymmetric array of microfabricated posts. This thesis further develops DLD arrays with applications in three broad new areas. First the arrays are used, not simply to sort particles, but to move streams of cells through functional flows for chemical treatment---such as on-chip immunofluorescent labeling of blood cells with washing, and on-chip E.coli cell lysis with simultaneous chromosome extraction. Secondly, modular tiling of the basic DLD element is used to construct complex particle handling modes that include beam steering for jets of cells and beads. Thirdly, nanostructured DLD arrays are built using Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) and continuous-flow separation of 100 nm and 200 nm size particles is demonstrated. Finally a number of ancillary nanofabrication techniques were developed in support of these overall goals, including methods to interface nanofluidic structures with standard microfluidic components such as inlet channels and reservoirs, precision etching of ultra-high aspect ratio (>50:1) silicon nanostructures, and fabrication of narrow (˜ 35 nm) channels used to stretch genomic length DNA.

  20. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Y. Shiyou; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; A.R. Pinto; C. R. Valêncio

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preproc...

  1. Structural Stability and Dynamics of FGM Plates Using an Improved 8-ANS Finite Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weon-Tae Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I investigate the vibration and buckling analysis of functionally graded material (FGM structures, using a modified 8-node shell element. The properties of FGM vary continuously through the thickness direction according to the volume fraction of constituents defined by sigmoid function. The modified 8-ANS shell element has been employed to study the effect of power law index on dynamic analysis of FGM plates with various boundary conditions and buckling analysis under combined loads, and interaction curves of FGM plates are carried out. To overcome shear and membrane locking problems, the assumed natural strain method is employed. In order to validate and compare the finite element numerical solutions, the reference results of plates based on Navier’s method, the series solutions of sigmoid FGM (S-FGM plates are compared. Results of the present study show good agreement with the reference results. The solutions of vibration and buckling analysis are numerically illustrated in a number of tables and figures to show the influence of power law index, side-to-thickness ratio, aspect ratio, types of loads, and boundary conditions in FGM structures. This work is relevant to the simulation of wing surfaces, aircrafts, and box structures under various boundary conditions and loadings.

  2. Unusual 5'-regulatory structure and regulation of the murine Mlc1 gene: Lack of promoter-specific functional elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Henseler

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The MLC1 gene is involved in an autosomal recessive neurological disorder, megalencephalic leucoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC, which is characterized by macrocephaly during the first year of life and swollen white matter (leucoencephaly. Variants of MLC1 have also been associated with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder. Currently, little is known about the encoded protein (MLC1. Judging from its similarity to other known proteins, it may serve as a trans-membrane transporter. However, the function of the encoded protein and its gene regulation has not been investigated successfully so far. We investigated the 5’ region of the murine Mlc1 with respect to regulatory elements for gene expression. A promoter search and an in silico analysis were conducted. Luciferase reporter gene constructs with potential promoter regions were created to study promoter activity in vitro. We found two alternative first exons for the murine Mlc1 but were not able to detect any promoter activity for the investigated reporter gene constructs in different cell lines, thus pointing to the presence of essential cis-acting elements far outside of the region. In silico analysis indicated an uncommon promoter structure for Mlc1, with CCAAT-boxes representing the only noticeable elements.

  3. In Vitro Selection of Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements from Amino Acid Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an in vitro selection method for obtaining molecular recognition elements (MREs) that specifically bind to individual cell types with high affinity. MREs are selected from initial large libraries of different nucleic or amino acids. This review outlines the construction of peptide and antibody fragment libraries as well as their different host types. Common methods of selection are also reviewed. Additionally, examples of cancer cell MREs are discussed, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26436100

  4. Nuclear toxicology file: cell response to the steady or radioactive chemical elements exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular response to an exposure in a toxic element is made at different levels. The first level is the agent detoxication by its elimination or its neutralization. The second level is the repair of the damages caused by this agent (for example the DNA repair). The third level is the control of the cellular death programmed to eliminate the irreparably damaged cells.Finally, the hurt cell can inform the nearby cells by producing molecular effectors inducing an abscopal or bystander effect. (N.C.)

  5. Design and analysis of laminated structures of revolution using a finite element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present in the first part a method for the design of filament wound cylindrical vessels. This method is based upon an incremental winding path which can be adapted to any type of ends and capable of making thick walls. The second part deals with the structural analysis of axisymmetric composite structures. The theory introduces a fictitious material in place of the actual material whose characteristics are obtained from the general characteristics of the real material. This formulation takes into account the shear effects, the bending in-plane coupling effect, and the variation of curvature through the thickness. This model is used to develop a specific finite element program. (author)

  6. Modelling of interaction between a snow mantle and a flexible structure using a discrete element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nicot

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of improvement of protective techniques against natural phenomena such as snow avalanches continues to use classic methods for calculating flexible structures. This paper deals with a new method to design avalanche protection nets. This method is based on a coupled analysis of both net structure and snow mantle by using a Discrete Element Method. This has led to the development of computational software so that avalanche nets can be easily designed. This tool gives the evolution of the forces acting in several parts of the work as a function of the snow situation.

  7. Soil-structure interaction analysis by finite element methods state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of soil-structure interaction effects during earthquakes for nuclear power plant structures are usually made by one of two methods - either by means of an idealized complete interaction analysis involving consideration of a compatible variation of motions in the structure and the adjacent soil, or by means of an inertial interaction analysis in which the motions in the adjacent soil are assumed to be the same at all points above the foundation depth. For surface structures, the distribution of free-field motions with depth in the underlying soils has no influence on the structural response and thus, provided the analyses are made in accordance with good practice, good results may be obtained by either method of approach. For embedded structures, however, consideration of the variation of motions with depth is essential if adequate evaluations of soil and structural response are to be obtained without undue conservatism. The finite element analysis procedure is particularly well suited for evaluating the response of embedded structures since it can readily provide consideration of the variation of soil characteristics with depth, the different non-linear deformation and energy absorbing capacities of the various soil strata, the variation of motions with depth in accordance with the general principles of engineering mechanics, the three-dimensional nature of the problem and the effects of adjacent structures on each other

  8. DNA-protein interaction at erythroid important regulatory elements of MEL cells by in vivo footprinting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using ligation-mediated PCR method to study the status of DNA-protein interaction at hypersensitive site 2 of locus control Region and β maj promoter of MEL cell line before and after induction, MEL cell has been cultured and induced to differentiation by Hemin and DMSO, then the live cells have been treated with dimethyl sulfate. Ligation mediated PCR has been carried out following the chemical cleavage. The results demonstrate that before and after induction, the status of DNA-protein interaction at both hypersensitive site 2 and β maj promoter change significantly, indicating that distal regulatory elements (locus control region, hypersensitive sites) as well as proximal regulatory elements (promoter, enhancer) of β -globin gene cluster participate in the regulation of developmental specificity.

  9. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Volatile Trace Elements in H Chondrites: Implications for Parent Body Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1993-07-01

    The perception among meteoriticists is that contents of the volatile trace elements systematically decrease with shock and particularly petrologic type. This perception affects views that investigators have of the early history and structure of the H chondrite parent body. Measurement of a variety of volatile trace elements in a statistically significant number of samples accompanied by chemometric data analysis techniques developed for interpretation of trace- element data [1] should maximize the amount of genetic information available from the volatile trace elements and offer clues to the early thermal history of the H chondrite parent body. Volatile trace-element data exist for 58 H chondrite falls: the complete dataset includes Co, Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, and In (listed in increasing order of volatility) [2,3]. This dataset includes 13 H4, 32 H5, and 13 H6 chondrites, which cover the full range of shock facies from a through f. To examine the effect that shock has on volatile trace-element concentrations in H4-6 chondrites, we have compared data for the least-shocked samples (shock facies a-b) with the most shocked samples (shock facies c-f) using both univariate (Student's t-test) and multivariate techniques (linear discriminant analysis). The results demonstrate no reason to doubt the null hypothesis of no difference in volatile trace-element composition between shocked and unshocked H4-6 chondrites at any reasonable significance level. This situation contrasts sharply with the strong difference found between shocked and unshocked L chondrites [4]. The role of shock in establishing volatile trace- element contents in H and L chondrites clearly differs. Univariate comparisons between H4, H5, and H6 chondrites demonstrate that only Cs varies significantly with petrologic type (prob. > F 0.0006) with concentration decreasing monotonically with increasing petrographic type. Box- and-whisker plots of volatile trace-element contents reveal a general

  10. Damage detection in composite structures based on optical fibre strain sensing and finite element model updating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosenzo, G.; Dalton, T. [Stokes Research Inst., Univ. of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Whelan, M.P. [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    A prototype system for condition monitoring of composite structures is described that relies on the on-line measurement of dynamic strains in order to detect any deterioration in performance due to the accumulation of damage. Strain data from both long gauge and point optical fibre sensors are employed to update finite element models of the analysed structures. Together with Bragg grating point sensors, an innovative Fabry-Perot interferometric long gauge strain sensor is proposed. The cavity of these sensors consists of a pair of matched Bragg grating reflectors allowing a number of sensors of the desired length to be wavelength multiplexed on a single fibre, with the advantage of minimum intrusivity in composite materials while retaining sensing capability over the whole structure. A heterodyne based demodulation system, tailored for these sensors, has been employed. Gradient based optimisation algorithms have been utilised to update structural Finite Elements models based on the output from the fibre optic sensors and strain based modal analyses. These procedures were used to detect the location of areas with known modifications of the stiffness properties in composite structures and showed good results, as the damaged areas have been correctly located. The comparison with results obtained using more conventional updating techniques shows the validity of the dynamic strain data approach in the damage detection field. (orig.)

  11. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  12. How complex elements can form cell membrane and modular network collectively

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, D

    2006-01-01

    One degree of freedom is sufficient for intra-elements. In Japan, a huge project studying soft matter involves a budget of the order of a billion yen. This is just one aspect showing the world-wide interest in non-equilibrium elements whose internal dynamics interacts with macroscopic or mesoscopic order of elements. The elements in this paper denote symptoms such as a bacterium having an internal network of genes and proteins, a reactive droplet in reaction-diffusion systems, a neuron in networks, etc. These elements exhibit not only spatio-temporal patterns but also collective functions. For instance, the cohort migration of mammalian cells forms tissue patterns, and the Proteus mirabilis effectively invades human urothelial cells by swarming. Further, swarm intelligence has been extensively studied in order to enable a collection of simple robots to perform advanced tasks. Here, we show a simple model derived by means of mathematical techniques to study the cross-cutting phenomenon underlying the above sys...

  13. Study of solid solution strengthening of alloying element with phase structure factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET), the phase structure factors, nA and nB, of the carbon-containing structural units with mass fraction of carbon (wC) below 0.8% and the mono-alloy structural units with wC at 0.2% in austenite and martensite are calculated. The solid solution strengthening brought by C-containing interstitial solid solution and alloy-substitutional solid solution in γ-Fe and α-Fe is discussed at electron structural level. The coefficient (s) of solid solution strengthening is advanced according to the bonding force between atoms. The study shows that when the criterion is applied to the carbonaceous or alloying element-containing solid solution the results of calculation will coincide with the experimental result very well.

  14. Topology optimization of adaptive fluid-actuated cellular structures with arbitrary polygonal motor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jun; Tang, Liang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-05-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the fast and efficient design method for plant bioinspired fluidic cellular materials and structures composed of polygonal motor cells. Here we developed a novel structural optimization method with arbitrary polygonal coarse-grid elements based on multiscale finite element frameworks. The fluidic cellular structures are meshed with irregular polygonal coarse-grid elements according to their natural size and the shape of the imbedded motor cells. The multiscale base functions of solid displacement and hydraulic pressure are then constructed to bring the small-scale information of the irregular motor cells to the large-scale simulations on the polygonal coarse-grid elements. On this basis, a new topology optimization method based on the resulting polygonal coarse-grid elements is proposed to determine the optimal distributions or number of motor cells in the smart cellular structures. Three types of optimization problems are solved according to the usages of the fluidic cellular structures. Firstly, the proposed optimization method is utilized to minimize the system compliance of the load-bearing fluidic cellular structures. Second, the method is further extended to design biomimetic compliant actuators of the fluidic cellular materials due to the fact that non-uniform volume expansions of fluid in the cells can induce elastic action. Third, the optimization problem focuses on the weight minimization of the cellular structure under the constraints for the compliance of the whole system. Several representative examples are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed polygon-based topology optimization method of the smart materials.

  15. Finite-Element Modeling of Viscoelastic Cells During High-Frequency Cyclic Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Holdsworth

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction refers to the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to local loads and forces. The process of mechanotransduction plays an important role both in maintaining tissue viability and in remodeling to repair damage; moreover, it may be involved in the initiation and progression of diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. An understanding of the mechanisms by which cells respond to surrounding tissue matrices or artificial biomaterials is crucial in regenerative medicine and in influencing cellular differentiation. Recent studies have shown that some cells may be most sensitive to low-amplitude, high-frequency (i.e., 1–100 Hz mechanical stimulation. Advances in finite-element modeling have made it possible to simulate high-frequency mechanical loading of cells. We have developed a viscoelastic finite-element model of an osteoblastic cell (including cytoskeletal actin stress fibers, attached to an elastomeric membrane undergoing cyclic isotropic radial strain with a peak value of 1,000 µstrain. The results indicate that cells experience significant stress and strain amplification when undergoing high-frequency strain, with peak values of cytoplasmic strain five times higher at 45 Hz than at 1 Hz, and peak Von Mises stress in the nucleus increased by a factor of two. Focal stress and strain amplification in cells undergoing high-frequency mechanical stimulation may play an important role in mechanotransduction.

  16. Effect of Trace Elements in Alcohol Beverages on the Type of Radiation-induced Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments of radioprotective agents are important issues for minimizing the troubles and the effective treatments in radiotherapy. But few agents are useful in clinical and practical fields. It was shown that trace elements in alcohol beverages might have radioprotective effect. In this study, the types of cell death of lymphocytes according to the commercial alcohol beverage was investigated. Normal healthy volunteers ingested distilled water, beer or soju containing 8.15 mg·dl-1 ethyl ahcohol, respectively. After 2 hours, their blood were sampled with their consents. Fraction of lymphocytes was isolated by density gradient method with Histopaque-1077 (Sigma) and irradiated with dose from 0.5 to 5 Gy. After 60 hour incubation, the cells were harvested and analysed by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased by dose dependent manner. Cell viability of beer group was reduced about 15% compared with control group. Apoptosis in soju group was reduced about 20% compared with control group. Apoptosis of beer and control groups are similar. Necrosis of soju group significantly increased about 35% compared with control group. Early apoptosis of beer group was increased compared with control group. Early apoptosis of soju group was decreased about 25% compared with control group. Late apoptosis of beer and control group was increased by dose dependent manner. Late apoptosis of soju group was increased about 20-30% compared with control group. Late apoptosis of soju was increased and the radioprotective effect of soju was minimal because late apoptosis induced the cell necrosis. In case of soju trace elements, total cell apoptosis was decreased about 20% and early cell apoptosis was remarkably low. In this case, mitotic cells death may be dominant mechanism. Therefore, trace elements in soju may not be effective radioprotective agents

  17. Structural relationships between highly conserved elements and genes in vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available Large numbers of sequence elements have been identified to be highly conserved among vertebrate genomes. These highly conserved elements (HCEs are often located in or around genes that are involved in transcription regulation and early development. They have been shown to be involved in cis-regulatory activities through both in vivo and additional computational studies. We have investigated the structural relationships between such elements and genes in six vertebrate genomes human, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish and tetraodon and detected several thousand cases of conserved HCE-gene associations, and also cases of HCEs with no common target genes. A few examples underscore the potential significance of our findings about several individual genes. We found that the conserved association between HCE/HCEs and gene/genes are not restricted to elements by their absolute distance on the genome. Notably, long-range associations were identified and the molecular functions of the associated genes do not show any particular overrepresentation of the functional categories previously reported. HCEs in close proximity are found to be linked with different set of gene/genes. The results reflect the highly complex correlation between HCEs and their putative target genes.

  18. Material properties assignment to finite element models of bone structures: a new method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, C; Mantovani, R; Viceconti, M

    1998-12-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is widely adopted to investigate the mechanical behaviour of bone structures. Computed tomography (CT) data are frequently used to generate FE models of bone. If properly calibrated, CT images are capable of providing accurate information about the bone morphology and tissue density. The aim of this work was to develop a special program able to read a CT data set as well as the FEA mesh generated from it, and to assign to each element of the mesh the material properties derived from the bone tissue density at the element location. The program was tested on phantom data sets and was adopted to evaluate the effects of the discrete description of the bone material properties. A three-dimensional FE model was generated automatically from a 16 bit CT data set of a distal femur acquired in vivo. The strain energy density (SED) was evaluated for each model element for increasing model complexity (number of different material cards assigned to the model). The computed SED were strongly dependent on the material mapping strategy. PMID:10223642

  19. Finite element analysis of structural response of superconducting magnet for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the proposal Tokamak fusion reactor, the superconducting unit consists of an assembly of D-shaped magnets standing vertically and arranged in a toroidal configuration. Each magnet is a composite structure comprised of Nb-22%Ti and Nb-48%Ti, and stabilizing metals such as copper and aluminum or stainless steel held together by reinforced epoxies which also serve as insulators and spacers. The magnets are quite large, typically 15-20 meters in diameter with rectangular cross sections around 0.93x2m. Under static loading condition, the magnet is subjected to dead weight and large magnetic field forces, which may induce high stresses in the structure. Furthermore, additional stresses due to earthquake must also be considered for the design of the component. Both static and dynamic analyses of a typical field magnet have been performed by use of the finite element method. The magnet was assumed to be linearly elastic with equivalent homogeneous material properties. Various finite element models have been considered in order to better represent the structure for a particular loading case. For earthquake analysis, the magnet was assumed to be subjected to 50% of the El Centro 1940 earthquake and the dynamic response was obtained by the displacement spectrum analysis procedure. In the paper, numerical results are presented and the structure behavior of the magnet under static and dynamic loading conditions is discussed

  20. Considerations in the identification of functional RNA structural elements in genomic alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blencowe Benjamin J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate identification of novel, functional noncoding (nc RNA features in genome sequence has proven more difficult than for exons. Current algorithms identify and score potential RNA secondary structures on the basis of thermodynamic stability, conservation, and/or covariance in sequence alignments. Neither the algorithms nor the information gained from the individual inputs have been independently assessed. Furthermore, due to issues in modelling background signal, it has been difficult to gauge the precision of these algorithms on a genomic scale, in which even a seemingly small false-positive rate can result in a vast excess of false discoveries. Results We developed a shuffling algorithm, shuffle-pair.pl, that simultaneously preserves dinucleotide frequency, gaps, and local conservation in pairwise sequence alignments. We used shuffle-pair.pl to assess precision and recall of six ncRNA search tools (MSARI, QRNA, ddbRNA, RNAz, Evofold, and several variants of simple thermodynamic stability on a test set of 3046 alignments of known ncRNAs. Relative to mononucleotide shuffling, preservation of dinucleotide content in shuffling the alignments resulted in a drastic increase in estimated false-positive detection rates for ncRNA elements, precluding evaluation of higher order alignments, which cannot not be adequately shuffled maintaining both dinucleotides and alignment structure. On pairwise alignments, none of the covariance-based tools performed markedly better than thermodynamic scoring alone. Although the high false-positive rates call into question the veracity of any individual predicted secondary structural element in our analysis, we nevertheless identified intriguing global trends in human genome alignments. The distribution of ncRNA prediction scores in 75-base windows overlapping UTRs, introns, and intergenic regions analyzed using both thermodynamic stability and EvoFold (which has no thermodynamic component was

  1. Effect of Superficial Atmospheric Corrosion Upon the Internal Stresses in Structural Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monel Leiba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A research program is presented showing the stress status determined by the corrosion phenomenon inside a specimen of a structural steel element. Several stains are studied their diameters ranging from 1~mm to 6~mm and thickness of the corroded layer under 0.5~mm. The physical modeling is the result of testing in laboratory the phenomenon of superficial atmospheric corrosion and the numerical modeling was developed under a FEM program, ALGOR. A number of 3,200 finite elements of BRICK type were created and the evolution of normal and tangential stresses was scrutinized under the process of loosing elementary material transformed into scrap. Stresses in the damaged sphere were graphically put into evidence and determined with accuracy due to the performances of the program, showing the local perturbations and the pattern of stress concentrators. The studies showed the importance of reproducing with both physical and mathematical methods the intricate mechanism and sometimes unpredictable effects of corrosion phenomenon upon the structural steel elements.

  2. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  3. Superheavy Element Chemistry by Relativistic Density Functional Theory Electronic Structure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsevskii, A. V.; Polyaev, A. V.; Demidov, Yu. A.; Mosyagin, N. S.; Lomachuk, Yu. V.; Titov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Two-component density functional theory in its non-collinear formulation combined with the accurate relativistic electronic structure model defined by shape-consistent small-core pseudopotentials (PP/RDFT) provides a robust basis of efficient computational schemes for predicting energetic and structural properties of complex polyatomic systems including superheavy elements (SHEs). Because of the exceptional role of thermochromatography in the experiments on the "chemical" identification of SHEs with atomic numbers Z ≥ 112, we focus on the description of the adsorption of single SHE atoms on the surfaces of solids through cluster modeling of adsorption complexes. In some cases our results differ significantly from those of previous theoretical studies. The results of systematic comparative studies on chemical bonding in simple molecules of binary compounds of SHEs and their nearest homologs with most common light elements, obtained at the PP/RDFT level and visualized through the "chemical graphs", provide the understanding of the general chemistry of SHEs which at present cannot be derived from the experimental data. These results are used to discuss the main trends in changing chemical properties of the elements in the given group of the periodic table and demonstrate the specificity of SHEs.

  4. A solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  5. A solid-shell Cosserat point element (SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element (SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  6. A Spectral Element Approach for Modeling of Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. As the setup of wave based SHM systems may be very difficult and time consuming there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore a flat shell spectral element approach is presented in this contribution. By including electromechanical coupling an SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. The focus of this contribution is the analysis of the effect of delaminations on propagating waves. A forward increment Lagrange multiplier method is used to simulate contact within the delaminated area. A model validation is performed using measured data of an anisotropic CFRP-plate.

  7. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Si

    In contrast to conventional non-destructive evaluation methods, dynamics-based damage detection methods are capable of rapid integrity evaluation of large structures and have received considerable attention from aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering communities in recent years. However, the identifiable damage size using dynamics-based methods is determined by the number of sensors used, level of measurement noise, accuracy of structural models, and signal processing techniques. In this thesis we study dynamics of structures with damage and then derive and experimentally verify new model-independent structural damage detection methods that can locate small damage to structures. To find sensitive damage detection parameters we develop a higher-order beam element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, bending moments, and shear forces at all nodes, and a higher-order rectangular plate element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, and bending and twisting moments at all nodes. These two elements are used to study the dynamics of beams and plates. Results show that high-order spatial derivatives of high-frequency modes are important sensitive parameters that can locate small structural damage. Unfortunately the most powerful and popular structural modeling technique, the finite element method, is not accurate in predicting high-frequency responses. Hence, a model-independent method using dynamic responses obtained from high density measurements is concluded to be the best approach. To increase measurement density and reduce noise a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to provide non-contact, dense, and accurate measurements of structural vibration velocities. To avoid the use of structural models and to extract sensitive detection parameters from experimental data, a brand-new structural damage detection method named BED (Boundary-Effect Detection) is developed for pinpointing damage locations using Operational

  8. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S.; Hartzell, J.; Savin, E.

    2016-09-01

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  9. A simple boundary element formulation for shape optimization of 2D continuous structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the design of nuclear equipment like pressure vessels, steam generators, and pipelines, among others, it is very important to optimize the shape of the structural systems to withstand prescribed loads such as internal pressures and prescribed or limiting referential values such as stress or strain. In the literature, shape optimization of frame structural systems is commonly found but the same is not true for continuous structural systems. In this work, the Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied to simple problems of shape optimization of 2D continuous structural systems. The proposed formulation is based on the BEM and on deterministic optimization methods of zero and first order such as Powell's, Conjugate Gradient, and BFGS methods. Optimal characterization for the geometric configuration of 2D structure is obtained with the minimization of an objective function. Such function is written in terms of referential values (such as loads, stresses, strains or deformations) prescribed at few points inside or at the boundary of the structure. The use of the BEM for shape optimization of continuous structures is attractive compared to other methods that discretized the whole continuous. Several numerical examples of the application of the proposed formulation to simple engineering problems are presented. (authors)

  10. Structural correlates of rotavirus cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa H Abdelhakim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell entry by non-enveloped viruses requires translocation into the cytosol of a macromolecular complex--for double-strand RNA viruses, a complete subviral particle. We have used live-cell fluorescence imaging to follow rotavirus entry and penetration into the cytosol of its ∼ 700 Å inner capsid particle ("double-layered particle", DLP. We label with distinct fluorescent tags the DLP and each of the two outer-layer proteins and track the fates of each species as the particles bind and enter BSC-1 cells. Virions attach to their glycolipid receptors in the host cell membrane and rapidly become inaccessible to externally added agents; most particles that release their DLP into the cytosol have done so by ∼ 10 minutes, as detected by rapid diffusional motion of the DLP away from residual outer-layer proteins. Electron microscopy shows images of particles at various stages of engulfment into tightly fitting membrane invaginations, consistent with the interpretation that rotavirus particles drive their own uptake. Electron cryotomography of membrane-bound virions also shows closely wrapped membrane. Combined with high resolution structural information about the viral components, these observations suggest a molecular model for membrane disruption and DLP penetration.

  11. Investigation of the two-element airfoil with flap structure for the vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aerodynamic performance of Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is not as simple as its structure because of the large changing range of angle of attack. We have designed a new kind of two-element airfoil for VAWT on the basis of NACA0012. CFD calculation has been confirmed to have high accuracy by comparison with the experiment data and Xfoil result. The aerodynamic parameter of two-element airfoil has been acquired by CFD calculation in using the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model and the Simple scheme. The relationship between changings of angle of attack and flap's tilt angle has been found and quantified. The analysis will lay the foundation for further research on the control method for VAWT

  12. A study of applicability of soil-structure interaction analysis method using boundary element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. K. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    In this study, a numerical method for Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis using FE-BE coupling method is developed. The total system is divided into two parts so called far field and near field. The far field is modeled by boundary element formulation using the multi-layered dynamic fundamental solution and coupled with near field modeled by finite elements. In order to verify the seismic response analysis, the results are compared with those of other commercial code. Finally, several SSI analyses which induced seismic loading are performed to examine the dynamic behavior of the system. As a result, it is shown that the developed method can be an efficient numerical method for solving the SSI analysis.

  13. Finite Element Reliability Analysis of Chloride Ingress into Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of the reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in maintenance and repair actions. Further, a reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. In the present paper the Finite Element Reliability Method (FERM) is employed for...... obtaining the probability of exceeding a critical chloride concentration level at the reinforcement bars, both using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) and the First Order Reliability Method (FORM). The chloride ingress is modelled by the Finite Element Method (FEM) and the diffusion coefficient, surface chloride...... concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modelled by stochastic fields, which are discretized using the Expansion Optimum Linear Estimation (EOLE) approach. The response gradients needed for FORM analysis are derived analytically using the Direct Differentiation Method (DDM). As an example, a bridge pier...

  14. Finite-element-model updating using computational intelligence techniques applications to structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) are widely used to understand the dynamic behaviour of various systems. FEM updating allows FEMs to be tuned better to reflect measured data and may be conducted using two different statistical frameworks: the maximum likelihood approach and Bayesian approaches. Finite Element Model Updating Using Computational Intelligence Techniques applies both strategies to the field of structural mechanics, an area vital for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering. Vibration data is used for the updating process. Following an introduction a number of computational intelligence techniques to facilitate the updating process are proposed; they include: • multi-layer perceptron neural networks for real-time FEM updating; • particle swarm and genetic-algorithm-based optimization methods to accommodate the demands of global versus local optimization models; • simulated annealing to put the methodologies into a sound statistical basis; and • response surface methods and expectation m...

  15. Development of a moderately sized finite element program for nonlinear structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    AGGIE 1 is a computer program for predicting the linear and nonlinear, static and dynamic structural response of two- and three-dimensional continuum solids. The program is based on isoparametric finite elements and allows for 2-D plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric analyses and general 3-D analyses. Large strain kinematics is based on the total Lagrangian formulation. Materially nonlinear models include several elastic-plastic work-hardening models as well as an incompressible Mooney-Rivlin model. Included in this report is a brief description of the theoretical bases of the program, the material models used, the element library and the overall program organization. Instructions for data input preparation are given in detail. Several sample problems are given along with the required program input and program generated solutions.

  16. Structural Performance of Light Weight Multicellular FRP Composite Bridge Deck Using Finite Element Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woraphot Prachasaree; Pongsak Sookmanee

    2012-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials having advantages such as higher strength to weight than conventional engineering materials,non-corrosiveness and modularization,which should help engineers to obtain more efficient and cost effective structural materials and systems.Currently,FRP composites are becoming more popular in civil engineering applications.The objectives of this research are to study performance and behavior of light weight multi-cellular FRP composite bridge decks (both module and system levels) under various loading conditions through finite element modeling,and to validate analytical response of FRP composite bridge decks with data from laboratory evaluations.The relative deflection,equivalent flexural rigidity,failure load (mode) and load distribution factors (LDF) based on FE results have been compared with experimental data and discussed in detail.The finite element results showing good correlations with experimental data are presented in this work.

  17. Finite element analysis of dynamic stability of skeletal structures under periodic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    THANA Hemantha Kumar; AMEEN Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the dynamic stability problem of columns and frames subjected to axially applied periodic loads. Such a structure can become unstable under certain combinations of amplitudes and frequencies of the imposed load acting on its columns/beams. These are usually shown in the form of plots which describe regions of instability. The finite element method (FEM) is used in this work to analyse dynamic stability problems of columns. Two-noded beam elements are used for this purpose.The periodic loading is decomposed into various harmonics using Fourier series expansion. Computer codes in C++ using object oriented concepts are developed to determine the stability regions of columns subjected to periodic loading. A number of numerical examples are presented to illustrate the working of the program. The direct integration of the equations of motions of the discretised system is carried out using Newmark's method to verify the results.

  18. Stress analysis of disconnected structures in contact through finite element gaps. [SAASGAPS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadter, J.T.; Weiss, R.O.

    1976-07-01

    A numerical procedure is presented for analyzing thermal stress problems of disconnected structures in contact across separations or gaps. The new procedure is called SAASGAPS, an adaptation of the basic SAAS III computer program. The SAAS program uses the finite element method and allows analyses of plane and axisymmetric bodies with temperature dependent material properties, subject to thermal and mechanical loads. A secant modulus approach with a bilinear stress-strain curve is used for elastic-plastic problems. The SAASGAPS version contains all of the features of the original SAAS program. A special gap element is used together with a stress invariance principle to model the contact process. The iterative procedure implemented in SAASGAPS is described. Results are discussed for five problems involving frictionless contact. Two of these problems are associated with the thermal stress analysis of the heat shield for the Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. Input instructions for the program are described in an appendix.

  19. Investigation of the two-element airfoil with flap structure for the vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    The aerodynamic performance of Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is not as simple as its structure because of the large changing range of angle of attack. We have designed a new kind of two-element airfoil for VAWT on the basis of NACA0012. CFD calculation has been confirmed to have high accuracy by comparison with the experiment data and Xfoil result. The aerodynamic parameter of two-element airfoil has been acquired by CFD calculation in using the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model and the Simple scheme. The relationship between changings of angle of attack and flap's tilt angle has been found and quantified. The analysis will lay the foundation for further research on the control method for VAWT.

  20. Wave propagation in cracked frame structures by the spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifard, Ramezan Ali; Khaleseh Ranjbar, Reza; Mohebi, Benyamin

    2014-09-01

    This paper deals with the detection of crack in frame structures based on Euler-Bernoulli beams theorem by the Spectral Element Method. The effect of cracking is modeled using Castigliano's theorem and laws of fracture mechanics as mass-less rotational and translational springs which are embedded in different locations of the steel frame structure in both beam and column. The crack location is revealed precisely without prior knowledge of their positions in frame structure. This means that there is no necessity to know the location and the node number which is assigned to crack. Finally the effect of crack when it is embedded simultaneously in both beam and column members, is also studied.

  1. Structural evolution of Ni-20Cr alloy during ball milling of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez B, I.; Trapaga M, L. G. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Martinez F, E. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Cerrada de Cecati s/n, Col. Santa Catarina Azcapotzalco, 02250 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Zoz, H., E-mail: israelbaez@gmail.co [Zoz GmbH, D-57482, Wenden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The ball milling (B M) of blended Ni and Cr elemental powders was carried out in a Simoloyer performing on high-energy scale mode at maximum production to obtain a nano structured Ni-20Cr alloy. The phase transformations and structural changes occurring during mechanical alloying were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (Om). A gradual solid solubility of Cr and the subsequent formation of crystalline metastable solid solutions described in terms of the Avrami-Ero fe ev kinetics model were calculated. The XRD analysis of the structure indicates that cumulative lattice strain contributes to the driving force for solid solution between Ni and Cr during B M. Microstructure evolution has shown, additionally to the lamellar length refinement commonly observed, the folding of lamellae in the final processing stage. Om observations revealed that the lamellar spacing of Ni rich zones reaches a steady value near 500 nm and almost disappears after 30 h of milling. (Author)

  2. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hangjun; Wang, Jingli; Hu, Lily; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Deen, Dennis F

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia. PMID:10933058

  3. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  4. Research on seismic analysis method of large joint structures in nuclear power plant using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In design of modern nuclear power plants, the finite element method is regarded as an important numerical simulation tool for seismic analysis and evaluation of all kinds of equipment. For those large, complicated joint structures with considerable equipment, a total three-dimensional finite element model requires huge computer resources, beyond the abilities of most currently used computers. Therefore, it is required to study dynamic characteristics of each sub-structure and to establish appropriately simplified three-dimensional mechanical models which can be used for finite element simulation. In this paper, the seismic analysis method for large joint structures is given to deal with a crane-joint structure. The equivalent static method and response spectra method are used to analyze such structure. Finally, these sub-structures are evaluated based the regulations of nuclear codes to ensure the structure integrity of the crane-joint structure when subjected to the ultimate safety ground motions. (authors)

  5. An automatic granular structure generation and finite element analysis of heterogeneous semi-solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hamid; Larouche, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The quality of cast metal products depends on the capacity of the semi-solid metal to sustain the stresses generated during the casting. Predicting the evolution of these stresses with accuracy in the solidification interval should be highly helpful to avoid the formation of defects like hot tearing. This task is however very difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the material. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of a metal during solidification using a mesh generation technique of the heterogeneous semi-solid material for a finite element analysis at the microscopic level. This task is done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain in which the granular structure of the solid phase is generated surrounded by an intergranular and interdendritc liquid phase. Some basic solid grains are first constructed and projected in the 2D domain with random orientations and scale factors. Depending on their orientation, the basic grains are combined to produce larger grains or separated by a liquid film. Different basic grain shapes can produce different granular structures of the mushy zone. As a result, using this automatic grain generation procedure, we can investigate the effect of grain shapes and sizes on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the semi-solid material. The granular models are automatically converted to the finite element meshes. The solid grains and the liquid phase are meshed properly using quadrilateral elements. This method has been used to simulate the microstructure of a binary aluminium-copper alloy (Al-5.8 wt% Cu) when the fraction solid is 0.92. Using the finite element method and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state for the liquid phase, the transient mechanical behaviour of the mushy zone under tensile loading has been investigated. The stress distribution and the bridges, which are formed during the tensile loading, have been detected.

  6. Quantitative determination of element distributions in silicon based thin film solar cells using SNMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastel, M; Breuer, U; Holzbrecher, H; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J; Kubon, M; Wagner, H

    1995-10-01

    The determination of elemental distributions in thin film solar cells based on amorphous silicon using electron beam SNMS is possible by quantifying the measured ion intensities. The relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) for all elements measured have to be known. The RSFs have been determined experimentally using implantation and bulk standards with known concentrations of the interesting elements. The measured RSFs have been compared with calculated RSFs. The model used for the calculation of the RSFs takes into account the probability for electron impact ionization and the dwell time of the neutrals inside the postionization region. The comparison between measured and calculated RSF shows, that this model is capable to explain the RSFs for most elements. Differences between calculated and measured values can be explained by the formation of hydride and fluoride molecules (in case of H and F) and influences of the angular distribution of the sputtered neutrals in case of Al. The experimentally determined RSFs have been used for a quantification of depth profiles of the i-, buffer-, p- and front contact layers of a-Si solar cells. PMID:15048522

  7. Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskarshamn 1 is the oldest nuclear plant in operation in Sweden. It was designed and erected at the end of the 1960's. During the last five years an extensive upgrading process of the power plant has been carried out. Within the frame of one of these upgrading projects the outer and inner Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSN) have been replaced. As a consequence of these replacements it was necessary to make an overhaul investigation of the basic general concept regarding pipe rupture descriptions and rupture locations, in order to attain a design of the pipe whip restraints in accordance with requirements of modern standards. In this paper two application examples regarding finite element analysis of concrete containment structures under accident loading conditions are presented. Each example includes a brief introduction of the problem and the object of the commission. The finite element model and the structural response analysis are described and the results are discussed. The application examples are: 1. Non-linear structural analysis of a reinforced concrete culvert affected by internal over-pressurization and impulse load effects of pipe rupture reactions. 2. Non-linear thermal stress analysis around a steel penetration of a reactor containment

  8. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Meier, R.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bishop, S. [US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  9. Finite element analysis of the impact response of reinforced concrete structures using DYNA3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinforced concrete structures in nuclear installations are potentially subject to accidental impact from external or internally generated hazards. These include: soft impacts such as aircraft crash on containment structures; and hard impacts such as heavy dropped loads on pond floors, or plant-generated fragments on structural and protective walls. The explicit finite element code DYNA3D has been used extensively for analysis of the response of structures to dynamic loadings, and a constitutive material model for reinforced concrete has been developed within DYNA3D to represent local cracking and crushing due to impact loads, as well as treating the elastic and plastic global response modes of the structure. This model has been extensively validated against impact tests for simulated aircraft impact on containment structures, but more recent interest has concentrated on analysis of hard impacts on floors and walls. Whilst a simplified constitutive model is adequate for the response to soft impacts, in which the dominant response mode is flexural, the local damage and high rates experienced in hard impacts have required further development of the material model. This paper describes the main features of the constitutive model, and presents the results of a validation case of a heavy dropped load on a reinforced concrete floor. (author)

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Layered Fiber Composite Structures Accounting for the Material's Microstructure and Delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Bertram; Simon, Jaan-Willem; Reese, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    The present paper focuses on composite structures which consist of several layers of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). For such layered composite structures, delamination constitutes one of the major failure modes. Predicting its initiation is essential for the design of these composites. Evaluating stress-strength relation based onset criteria requires an accurate representation of the through-the-thickness stress distribution, which can be particularly delicate in the case of shell-like structures. Thus, in this paper, a solid-shell finite element formulation is utilized which allows to incorporate a fully three-dimensional material model while still being suitable for applications involving thin structures. Moreover, locking phenomena are cured by using both the EAS and the ANS concept, and numerical efficiency is ensured through reduced integration. The proposed anisotropic material model accounts for the material's micro-structure by using the concept of structural tensors. It is validated by comparison to experimental data as well as by application to numerical examples.

  11. Translation of LINE-1 DNA elements in vitro and in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LINE-1(L1) family of interspread DNA sequences found throughout the human genome (L1 Homo sapiens, L1Hs) includes active transposable elements. Current models for the mechanism of transposition involve reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate and utilization of element-encoded proteins. The authors report that an antiserum against the polypeptide encoded by the L1Hs 5' open reading frame (ORF1) detects, in human cells, an endogenous ORF1 protein as well as the ORG1 product of an appropriate transfecting recombinant vector. The endogenous polypeptide is most abundant in teratocarcinoma and choriocarcinoma cells, among those cell lines tested; it appears to be a single species of ∼38 kDa. In contrast, RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNAs representing full-length, polyadenylylated cytoplasmic L1Hs RNA yield, upon in vitro translation, ORF1 products of slightly different sizes. This is consistent with the fact that the various cDNAs are different and represent transcription of different genomic L1Hs elements. In vitro studies additionally suggest that translation of ORF1 is initiated at the first AUG codon. Finally, in no case was an ORF1-ORF2 fusion protein detected

  12. Translation of LINE-1 DNA elements in vitro and in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibold, D.M.; Swergold, G.D.; Thayer, R.E.; Singer, M.F.; Fanning, T.G. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Dombroski, B.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The LINE-1(L1) family of interspread DNA sequences found throughout the human genome (L1 Homo sapiens, L1Hs) includes active transposable elements. Current models for the mechanism of transposition involve reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate and utilization of element-encoded proteins. The authors report that an antiserum against the polypeptide encoded by the L1Hs 5{prime} open reading frame (ORF1) detects, in human cells, an endogenous ORF1 protein as well as the ORG1 product of an appropriate transfecting recombinant vector. The endogenous polypeptide is most abundant in teratocarcinoma and choriocarcinoma cells, among those cell lines tested; it appears to be a single species of {approx}38 kDa. In contrast, RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNAs representing full-length, polyadenylylated cytoplasmic L1Hs RNA yield, upon in vitro translation, ORF1 products of slightly different sizes. This is consistent with the fact that the various cDNAs are different and represent transcription of different genomic L1Hs elements. In vitro studies additionally suggest that translation of ORF1 is initiated at the first AUG codon. Finally, in no case was an ORF1-ORF2 fusion protein detected.

  13. Inverse estimation of rat vertebrae stiffness using large-scale micro-structural finite element models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroušek, Ondřej; Zlámal, Petr; Jandejsek, Ivan; Kytýř, Daniel; Schmidt, D.

    Kippen: Civil-Comp Press, 2013 - (Topping, B.; Iványi, P.). (Civil-Comp Proceedings. 102). ISBN 978-1-905088-57-7. ISSN 1759-3433. [International Conference on Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering Computing /14./. Cagliari (IT), 03.09.2013-06.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2305 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : large-scale finite element simulation * trabecular bone * whole bone models * inverse stiffness calculation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  14. Testing the big bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1991-06-01

    In this series of lectures, several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, detailed discussion is presented regarding nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances and neutrino counting; the dark matter problems; and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments will also be made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing'' and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it. 126 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Development of an Image Fringe Zero Selection System for Structuring Elements with Stereo Vision Disparity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When performing image operations involving Structuring Element (SE) and many transforms it is required that the outside of the image be padded with zeros or ones depending on the operation. This paper details how this can be achieved with simulated hardware using DSP Builder in Matlab with the intention of migrating the design to HDL (Hardware Description Language) and implemented on an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). The design takes few resources and does not require extra memory to account for the change in size of the output image.

  16. Finite element method and isogeometric analysis in electronic structure calculations: convergence study

    CERN Document Server

    Cimrman, Robert; Kolman, Radek; Tůma, Miroslav; Vackář, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    We compare convergence of isogeometric analysis (IGA), a spline modification of finite element method (FEM), with FEM in the context of our real space code for ab-initio electronic structure calculations of non-periodic systems. The convergence is studied on simple sub-problems that appear within the density functional theory approximation to the Schr\\"odinger equation: the Poisson problem and the generalized eigenvalue problem. We also outline the complete iterative algorithm seeking a fixed point of the charge density of a system of atoms or molecules, and study IGA/FEM convergence on a benchmark problem of nitrogen atom.

  17. Structural elements of collapses in shallow water flows with horizontally nonuniform density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms and structural elements of instability whose evolution results in the occurrence of the collapse are studied in the scope of the rotating shallow water model with a horizontally nonuniform density. The diagram stability based on the integral collapse criterion is suggested to explain system behavior in the space of constants of motion. Analysis of the instability shows that two collapse scenarios are possible. One scenario implies anisotropic collapse during which the contact area of a collapsing drop-like fragment with the bottom contracts into a rotating segment. The other implies isotropic contraction of the area into a point

  18. Structural elements and collapse regimes in 3D flows on a slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms and structural elements of an instability whose development results in the collapse of flow fragments have been studied in the scope of the Hamilton version of the “shallow water” 3D model on a slope. The study indicated that the 3D model differs from its 2D analog in a more varied set of collapsing solutions. In particular, the solutions describing anisotropic collapse, during which the area of a collapsing fragment in contact with the slope contracts into a segment rather than a point, exist together with the solutions describing radially symmetric (isotropic) collapse.

  19. Photoelectron spectra and electronic structure of β-diketonates of p- and d-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to results of studying electronic structure of β-diketonates of metals and β-diketones by the method of gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy. Manifestation of covalence of metal-ligand bonds in PE spectra and change of covalence in series and groups of d-elements of the periodic table are analysed. It is shown that ionization energy of outer valence electrons doesn't reflect in all cases effective charges of ligands, due to the influence of molecular potential. 35 refs.; 7 figs.; 12 tabs

  20. LIGHT-WEIGHT LOAD-BEARING STRUCTURES REINFORCED BY CORE ELEMENTS MADE OF SEGMENTS AND A METHOD OF CASTING SUCH STRUCTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a light-weight load-bearing structure, reinforced by core elements (2) of a strong material constituting one or more compression or tension zones in the structure to be cast, which core (2) is surrounded by or adjacent to a material of less strength compared to the core (2......), where the core (2) is constructed from segments (1) of core elements (2) assembled by means of one or more prestressing elements (4). The invention further relates to a method of casting of light-weight load-bearing structures, reinforced by core elements (2) of a strong material constituting one or...... more compression or tension zones in the structure to be cast, which core (2) is surrounded by or adjacent to a material of less strength compared to the core (2), where the core (2) is constructed from segments (1) of core elements (2) assembled and hold together by means of one or more prestressing...

  1. Numerical study of viscoelastic polymer flow in simplified pore structures using stabilised finite element model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, M.; Wegner, J.; Ganzer, L. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE

    2013-08-01

    Polymer flooding, as an EOR method, has become one of the most important driving forces after water flooding. The conventional believe is that polymer flooding can only improve sweep efficiency, but it has no contribution to residual oil saturation reduction. However, experimental studies indicated that polymer solution can also improve displacement efficiency and decrease residual oil saturation. To get a better understanding of the mechanism to increase the microscopic sweep efficiency and the displacement efficiency, theoretical studies are required. In this paper, we studied the viscoelasticity effect of polymer by using a numerical simulator, which is based on Finite Element Analysis. Since it is showed experimentally that the first normal stress difference of viscoelastic polymer solution is higher than the second stress difference, the Oldroyd-B model was selected as the constitutive equation in the simulation. Numerical modelling of Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluids is notoriously difficult. Standard Galerkin finite element methods are prone to numerical oscillations, and there is no convergence as the elasticity of fluid increases. Therefore, we use a stabilised finite element model. In order to verify our model, we first built up a model with the same geometry and fluid properties as presented in literature and compared the results. Then, with the tested model we simulated the effect of viscoelastic polymer fluid on dead pores in three simplified pore structures, which are contraction structure, expansion structure and expansion-contraction structure. Correspondingly, the streamlines and velocity contours of polymer solution, with different Reynolds numbers (Re) and Weissenberg numbers (We), flowing in these three structures are showed. The simulation results indicate that the viscoelasticity of polymer solution is the main contribution to increase the micro-scale sweep efficiency. With higher elasticity, the velocity of polymer solution is getting bigger at

  2. Response of nuclear power plant civil structures to travelling seismic waves by the rigid finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents only the results related to the first part of the research program directed toward the development of engineering methods and computer programs for assessing the effects of travelling seismic waves on the response of nuclear power plant civil structures. Phenomena related to travelling seismic waves are briefly summarized on the basis of many foregoing studies. Two basic approximate methods - direct and indirect - currently being used in a dynamic analysis and taking structure-soil interaction and travelling wave effects into account are discussed as well. In the second part of the paper, the rigid or hybrid finite element model and method are proposed for this purpose. Both the structure and the soil are modelled not only by means of conventional deformable finite elements, but as well considerably using rigid finite elements in a single system. The hybrid finite element method proposed herein is basically the direct method which can efficiently simulate structure-soil interaction and travelling wave effects. The corresponding single finite element system has three differently discretizated subsystems: the structure, the near-field and the far-field of the soil. An accurate using of the rigid finite elements in the structure and in the far-field of the soil permits to reduce essentially the total number of degrees of freedom for all the system which is the most important advantage in comparison with the classical finite element modelling. (orig./HP)

  3. Simulation of dislocation accumulation in ULSI cells with STI structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Tetsuya; Sato, Michihiro; Maruizumi, Takuya; Kitagawa, Isao

    2003-06-30

    Periodic structure of the shallow trench isolation (STI) type ULSI cells is generally used for the latest semiconductor devices. However, dislocations sometimes accumulate in the electron channel when the device size becomes small, and they have an enormous effect on the electronic state and obstruct the device from normal operation. In this paper, we numerically model the periodic structure of the STI type ULSI cells, and analyze the plastic slip that takes place during the oxidation process of oxide film area. The slip deformation is analyzed by a crystal plasticity analysis software, which has been developed on the basis of finite element technique, and we evaluate the accumulation of dislocations that accompany plastic slip. The results show stress concentrations at the shoulder part of the device area and the bottom corners of the trench for the device isolation, and the high stresses at these area cause plastic slip and dislocation accumulation. The direction of these dislocation lines are shown to be mostly parallel to the trench direction and dislocations are approximately 60 deg. mixed type.

  4. Simulation of dislocation accumulation in ULSI cells with STI structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Tetsuya; Sato, Michihiro; Maruizumi, Takuya; Kitagawa, Isao

    2003-06-01

    Periodic structure of the shallow trench isolation (STI) type ULSI cells is generally used for the latest semiconductor devices. However, dislocations sometimes accumulate in the electron channel when the device size becomes small, and they have an enormous effect on the electronic state and obstruct the device from normal operation. In this paper, we numerically model the periodic structure of the STI type ULSI cells, and analyze the plastic slip that takes place during the oxidation process of oxide film area. The slip deformation is analyzed by a crystal plasticity analysis software, which has been developed on the basis of finite element technique, and we evaluate the accumulation of dislocations that accompany plastic slip. The results show stress concentrations at the shoulder part of the device area and the bottom corners of the trench for the device isolation, and the high stresses at these area cause plastic slip and dislocation accumulation. The direction of these dislocation lines are shown to be mostly parallel to the trench direction and dislocations are approximately 60° mixed type.

  5. Trace element structure of the most widespread plants of genus PulmonariaFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Kruglov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this work was a comparative research of trace element structure of various organs of three Pulmonaria species. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of the most widespread plants of genus Pulmonaria such as Pulmonaria officinalis L., Pulmonaria obscura Dumort. and Pulmonaria mollis Wulf. ex Hornem., which were collected in ending of flowering and were used as the research objects. The amount of trace elements (B, K, P, V, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Si, Zn, Ag, Al, Ba, Br, Cr, I, Ni, Se, Sr, and Ti was determined by means of mass spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma. Results: The data clustering has shown that floral shoots and rosellate leaves possess essentially various trace element status. At the same time, the trace elements′ status of organs of researched plants poorly depends on a taxonomic position of the plant. Thereupon, it is obvious that pharmacological activity is defined by organs of plants from which medicines were made, but not by a species of the used plant. Conclusions: The significant distinction in pharmacological activity of preparations depends on the trace elements′ status of used medicinal vegetative raw materials.

  6. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  7. Element-specific X-ray phase tomography of 3D structures at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Claire; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Scagnoli, Valerio; Holler, Mirko; Huthwelker, Thomas; Menzel, Andreas; Vartiainen, Ismo; Müller, Elisabeth; Kirk, Eugenie; Gliga, Sebastian; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J

    2015-03-20

    Recent advances in fabrication techniques to create mesoscopic 3D structures have led to significant developments in a variety of fields including biology, photonics, and magnetism. Further progress in these areas benefits from their full quantitative and structural characterization. We present resonant ptychographic tomography, combining quantitative hard x-ray phase imaging and resonant elastic scattering to achieve ab initio element-specific 3D characterization of a cobalt-coated artificial buckyball polymer scaffold at the nanoscale. By performing ptychographic x-ray tomography at and far from the Co K edge, we are able to locate and quantify the Co layer in our sample to a 3D spatial resolution of 25 nm. With a quantitative determination of the electron density we can determine that the Co layer is oxidized, which is confirmed with microfluorescence experiments. PMID:25839287

  8. Analytical studies on local damage to reinforced concrete structures under impact loading by discrete element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a new analytical approach for assessing local damage to reinforced concrete structures subjected to impact load, by applying the discrete element method (DEM). It first outlines the basis concept and analytical formulation of the DEM. Next, it discusses the results of simulation analyses of concrete material tests, uni-axial compression tests and tensile splitting tests conducted to determine appropriate analytical parameters such as material constants, failure criteria and strength increase factors depending on strain rate. Finally, the adaptability of the DEM to local damage to reinforced concrete structures impacted by rigid and deformable missiles is verified through simulation analyses of various types of impact tests. Furthermore, the various impact response characteristics and failure mechanisms, such as impact forces, penetration behavior, reduction in missile velocity and energy transfer process, which are difficult to obtain experimentally, are analytically evaluated by the DEM. (orig.)

  9. Nanohairs and nanotubes: Efficient structural elements for gecko-inspired artificial dry adhesives

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2009-08-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the development of gecko-inspired synthetic dry adhesives is presented, with particular emphasis on two major structural elements of nanohairs and nanotubes. With the advance of nanofabrication techniques, recently developed dry adhesives made of nanohairs and nanotubes show excellent adhesion strength, smart directional adhesion as well as rough surface adaptability by better mimicking gecko foot hairs. After a brief description of the requirements for high-performance artificial dry adhesives, a variety of synthetic adhesives are described based on materials and structural features of the gecko-inspired nanostructures. In addition, current challenges and future directions towards an optimized synthetic dry adhesive are presented. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Elements of the Chicxulub Impact Structure as Revealed in SRTM and Surface GPS Topographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsland, Gary L.; Sanchez, Gary; Kobrick, Michael; Cardador, Manuel Hurtado

    2003-01-01

    Pope et al. [1] utilized the elevations from the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) gravity data files to show that the main component of the surface expression of the Chicxulub Impact Structure is a roughly semi-circular, lowrelief depression about 90 km in diameter. They also identified other topographic features and the elements of the buried impact, which possibly led to the development of these features. These are summarized in Table 1. Kinsland et al. [2] presented a connection between these topographic anomalies, small gravity anomalies and buried structure of the impact. Very recently we have acquired digital topography data from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Our subset covers 6 square degrees from 20deg N 91degW to 22deg N 88degW (corner to corner) with a pixel size of about 90m. This area includes all of the identified portion of the crater on land.

  11. The anti corrosive design of structural metallic elements in buildings with large exploitation period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion deterioration in metallic structural elements, with the consistent loss of his physical and mechanical properties, is cause by errors in the design or fabrication, that allows the accumulation of humidity and contaminants in the surfaces, or acceleration zones of the corrosion processes, as the bimetalics pairs. The aggressiveness of the environment and the productive processes that develop in industrial installations, causes the apparition of premature failures that engage the edification use. The identification of design errors is the first step in the conservation of these structures. the elimination and made a project adapted to the proper installations conditions, is essential procedures to prolong the edification useful life with an optimum and rational use of the resources that destined for this end. The investigation is about the results obtained in the diagnostic and the conservation of industrial installment, with large exploitation periods, in which existed evidences of failures by corrosion, specifically to the elimination of errors of design. (Author) 12 refs

  12. X-ray and finite element analysis of deformation response of closed-cell metal foam subjected to compressive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-lapse X-ray computed microtomography was employed to quantify the deformation behaviour of closed-cell aluminium foam. The specimen was incrementally loaded and tomographically scanned using a custom X-ray tomographic device to capture the deforming microstructure. Because of the very small thickness of the cell walls and the high ratio between pore size and cell wall thickness cone-beam reconstruction procedure was applied. A finite element (FE) model was developed based on the reconstructed three-dimensional data. The FE model was used for two purposes: i) the nodal points were used for tracking the displacements of the deforming structure, ii) verification of the material model for description of the foam's deformational behaviour. Digital volumetric correlation (DVC) algorithm was used on data obtained from the time-lapse tomography to provide a detailed description of the evolution of deformation in the complex structure of aluminium foam. The results from DVC demonstrate the possibility to use the complex microstructure of the aluminium foam as a random pattern for the correlation algorithm. The underlying FE model enables easy comparison between experimental results and results obtained from numerical simulations used for evaluation of proposed constitutive models.

  13. Finite element analysis of micropipette aspiration considering finite size and compressibility of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YongSheng; Chen, WeiYi

    2013-11-01

    Micropipette aspiration (MA) is widely applied in cell mechanics, however, at small deformations a common model corresponding to the MA is the half-space model wherein the finite cell size and cell compressibility are neglected. This study extends the half-space model by accounting for the influence of cell geometry and compressibility (sphere model). Using a finite element analysis of cell aspiration into a micropipette, an elastic approximation formula of the aspirated length was derived for the sphere model. The approximation formula includes the geometry parameter ξ of the sphere model ( ξ= R/ a, R is the radius of the cell, and a is the inner radius of the micropipette) and the Poisson's ratio v of the cell. The results indicate that the parameter ξ and Poisson's ratio v markedly affect the aspirated length, particularly for small ξ and v. When ξ→∞ and v→0.5, the approximation formula tends to the analytical solution for the half-space model. In the incompressible case ( v = 0.5), within the general experimental range ( ξ varying from 2 to 4), the difference between the analytical solution and the approximate one is significant, and is up to 29% of the approximation solution when ξ = 2. Additionally, parametere was introduced to evaluate the error of elastic moduli between the half-space model and sphere model. Based on the approximation formula, the ξ thresholds, beyond which e becomes larger than 10% and 20%, were derived.

  14. Cell Area and Strut Distribution Changes of Bent Coronary Stents: A Finite Element Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yang; WU Wei; YANG Da-zhi; QI Min

    2009-01-01

    Coronary stents are metal coils or mesh tubes delivered to blocked vessels through catheters, which are expanded by balloons to reopen and scaffold target vessels. Recently,special drugs are carried by stents (drug-eluting stents) to further reduce in-stent restenosis rate after stenting procedure. However,continual study on biomechanical characteristics of stents is necessary for better interactions between stents and tissue, or to provide a more suitable drug loading platform for drug-eluting stents. The purpose of this paper is to show how finite element methods can be used to study cell area and strut distribution changes of bent coronary stents. A same bending deformation was applied to two commercial coronary stent models by a rigid curved vessel. Results show that the stent design influenced the changes of cell area and strut distribution under bending situation. The stent with links had more cell area changes at outer curvature, and the stent with peak-peak (><) strut design could have strut contact and overlapping at inner curvature. In conclusion, this finite element method can be used to study and compare cell area and strut distribution changes of bent stents,and to provide a convenient tool for designers in testing and improving biomechanical characteristics of new stents.

  15. Finite Element Implementation of a Structurally-Motivated Constitutive Relation for the Human Abdominal Aortic Wall with and without Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Lönn, L;

    2011-01-01

    The structural integrity of the abdominal aorta is maintained by elastin, collagen, and vascular smooth muscle cells. Changes with age in the structure can lead to develop-ment of aneurysms. This paper presents initial work to capture these changes in a finite element model (FEM) of a structural-ly-motivated...... anisotropic constitutive relation for the “four fiber family” arterial model. First a 2D implementation is used for benchmarking the FEM implementation to fitted biaxial stress-strain data obtained experimentally from four different groups of persons; 19-29 years, 30-60 years, 61-79 years and abdominal aortic...... maximum axial and hoop stress in the group of AAA patients was 94.9 kPa (±0.283 kPa) and 94.3 kPa (±0.224 kPa) at maximum stretch ratios of 1.043 and 1.037, respectively. In the 3D simulations, the maximum stress is also found to occur in the AAA patient group, with the highest stress in the...

  16. EDGE DETECTION METHOD OF REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY OF MULTI-STRUCTURE ELEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hui; DU Pei-jun; ZHAO Chang-sheng; SHU Ning

    2004-01-01

    This paper puts forward an effective,specific algorithm for edge detection.Based on multi-structure elements of gray mathematics morphology,in the light of difference between noise and edge shape of RS images,the paper establishes multi-structure elements to detect edge by utilizing the grey form transformation principle.Compared with some classical edge detection operators,such as Sobel Edge Detection Operator,LOG Edge Detection Operator,and Canny Edge Detection Operator,the experiment indicates that this new algorithm possesses very good edge detection ability,which can detect edges more effectively,but its noise-resisting ability is relatively low.Because of the bigger noise of remote sensing image,the authors probe into putting forward other edge detection method based on combination of wavelet directivity checkout technology and small-scale Mathematical Morphology finally.So,position at the edge can be accurately located,the noise can be inhibited to a certain extent and the effect of edge detection is obvious.

  17. Finite Element Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Damage on an Aeronautical Carbon Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemanle Sanga, Roger Pierre; Garnier, Christian; Pantalé, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Low velocity barely visible impact damage (BVID) in laminated carbon composite structures has a major importance for aeronautical industries. This contribution leads with the development of finite element models to simulate the initiation and the propagation of internal damage inside a carbon composite structure due by a low velocity impact. Composite plates made from liquid resin infusion process (LRI) have been subjected to low energy impacts (around 25 J) using a drop weight machine. In the experimental procedure, the internal damage is evaluated using an infrared thermographic camera while the indentation depth of the face is measured by optical measurement technique. In a first time we developed a robust model using homogenised shells based on degenerated tri-dimensional brick elements and in a second time we decided to modelize the whole stacking sequence of homogeneous layers and cohesive interlaminar interfaces in order to compare and validate the obtained results. Both layer and interface damage initiation and propagation models based on the Hashin and the Benzeggagh-Kenane criteria have been used for the numerical simulations. Comparison of numerical results and experiments has shown the accuracy of the proposed models.

  18. Two-Element PIFA Array Structure for Polarization Diversity in UMTS Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hamouz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to strongly modify the radiated fields of a UMTS handset by using a phased two-element PIFA array. The structure is composed of a 100x40 mm2 metallic ground plane acting as the Printed Circuit Board (PCB of the mobile phone. Two UMTS PIFAs are located at the top edge of this PCB. They are fed by a double Quasi-Lumped Coupler able to provide a 360 phase difference between its two outputs. By properly choosing the DC bias of the double QuasiLumped Coupler, we can set a specific phase difference between the two PIFAs. In this way the two-element array is able to radiate different electromagnetic fields. Simulated and measured radiation patterns in the two main planes of the chassis are presented for different phase differences. It is especially revealed that the novel twoantenna structure is able to radiate vertically-polarized electric fields in the azimuthal plane of the phone and horizontally-polarized electric fields in the same plane when changing the phase shift between the antennas from 0 to 180. Potential applications are polarization-diversity techniques and Specific Absorption Rate reduction for handsets.

  19. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A. [and others

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  20. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ∼ 104 at 488 nm and ∼ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  1. Symmetric coupling of finite element shell structures by the 3D-boundary element method; Symmetrische Kopplung von Finite-Elemente-Schalenstrukturen mit der 3D-Randelelementmethode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, M.

    2004-07-01

    The three-dimensional Symmetrical Galerkin Boundary Element Method is presented. The necessary coupling equations for FEM/BEM coupling are established in consideration of the dimensional jump at the coupling surface. The author shows how a commercial FE program system (ABAQUS) can be coupled with the boundary element method in industrial practice. (orig.) [German] Im Leichtbau spielt die beansprechungsgerechte Auslegung von Bauteilen eine immer groessere Rolle. Meist handelt es sich um flaechige Strukturen, fuer deren Simulation sich finite Schalenelemente als effizient erwiesen haben. In Iokalen Bereichen dieser flaechigen Bauteile liegt jedoch oft ein dreidimensionaler Spannungszustand vor. Bei linear-elastischem Materialverhalten stellt fuer solche Bereiche die Randelementmethode eine Alternative zur volumenorientieren Finite-Elemente-Methode dar. In der Arbeit wird die dreidimensionale Symmetrische Galerkin-Randelementmethode vorgestellt. Es werden die notwendigen Kopplungsbeziehungen fuer die FEM/BEM-Kopplung aufgestellt, wobei der an der Kopplungsflaeche auftretende Dimensionssprung Beruecksichtigung findet. In der Arbeit wird ein Weg gezeigt, wie in der industriellen Praxis ein kommerzielles FE-Programmsystem (ABAQUS) mit der Randelementmethode gekoppelt werden kann. (orig.)

  2. Structural analysis of technical-tactical elements in table tennis and their role in different playing zones

    OpenAIRE

    Munivrana Goran; Petrinović Lidija Zekan; Kondrič Miran

    2016-01-01

    For the purpose of determining the overall structure of technical-tactical elements in table tennis and evaluating their role in different playing zones around the table, a new measuring instrument (a questionnaire) was formulated that took advantage of the expert knowledge of top, world class table tennis coaches. The results of the hierarchical taxonomic (cluster) analysis showed that the overall structure of the technical-tactical elements forming the table tennis technique could be divide...

  3. Active conductivity of plane two-barrier resonance tunnel structure as operating element of quantum cascade laser or detector

    OpenAIRE

    Ju.O. Set; M.V. Tkach; Matijek, V. O.; O.M. Voitsekhivska

    2011-01-01

    Within the model of rectangular potentials and different effective masses of electrons in different elements of plane two-barrier resonance tunnel structure there is developed a theory of spectral parameters of quasi-stationary states and active conductivity for the case of mono-energetic electronic current interacting with electromagnetic field. It is shown that the two-barrier resonance tunnel structure can be utilized as a separate or active element of quantum cascade laser or detector. Fo...

  4. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  5. Antiproliferative effect of a synthetic aptamer mimicking androgen response elements in the LNCaP cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhpayeh, S; Einizadeh, A R; Hejazi, Z; Boshtam, M; Shariati, L; Mirian, M; Darzi, L; Sojoudi, M; Khanahmad, H; Rezaei, A

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer usually develops to a hormone-refractory state that is irresponsive to conventional therapeutic approaches. Therefore, new methods for treating aggressive prostate cancer are under development. Because of the importance of androgen receptors (ARs) in the development of the hormone-refractory state and AR mechanism of action, this study was designed. A single-stranded DNA as an aptamer was designed that could mimic the hormone response element (HRE). The LNCaP cells as an AR-rich model were divided into three sets of triplicate groups: the test group was transfected with Aptamer Mimicking HRE (AMH), Mock received only transfection reagents (mock) and a negative control. All three sets received 0, 10 and 100 nM of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) separately. Data analysis showed hormone dependency of LNCaP cells in the negative control group upon treatment with 10 and 100 nM DHEA (compared with cells left untreated (P=0.001)). Transfection of AMH resulted in significant reduction of proliferation in the test group when compared with the negative control group with 10 (P=0.001) or 100 nM DHEA (P=0.02). AMH can form a hairpin structure at 37 °C and mimic the genomic HRE. Hence, it is capable of effectively competing with genomic HRE and interrupting the androgen signaling pathway in a prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP). PMID:27364573

  6. Cell structure and percent viability by a slide centrifuge technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, M G; Hosking, C S

    1982-01-01

    It was found that a slide centrifuge (Cytospin) preparation of a cell suspension allowed a reliable assessment of not only cell structure but also the percentage of non-viable cells. The non-viable cells appeared as "smear" cells and paralleled in number the cells taking up trypan blue. Direct experiment showed the unstained viable cells in a trypan blue cell suspension remained intact in a Cytospin preparation while the cells taking up trypan blue were the "smear" cells. The non-viability of...

  7. Nuclear Structure of the Heaviest Elements – Investigated at SHIP-GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heßberger Fritz Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations has been started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by α-decay as investigation of two- or fourquasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162.

  8. Nuclear structure of the heaviest elements - investigated at SHIP-GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons) and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt, an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by a-decay as investigation of two- or four-quasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed us to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162. (authors)

  9. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.

    2013-11-11

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and \\'through-DNA\\' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  10. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of light elements in cells: self-absorption correction by integration of compositional and morphological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here a new methodology for quantitative mapping of light elements in cells, based on combination of compositional and morphological information, derived respectively by X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XRFM), Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). Since XRFM of light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium and magnesium), are strongly influenced by self-absorption, we developed an algorithm to correct for this effect, using the morphological and structural information provided by AFM and STXM. Finally, the corrected distributions have been obtained, thus allowing quantitative mapping

  11. Element Decoupling of 7T Dipole Body Arrays by EBG Metasurface Structures: Experimental Verification

    OpenAIRE

    Hurshkainen, Anna A.; Derzhavskaya, Tatyana A.; Glybovski, Stanislav B.; Voogt, Ingmar J.; Melchakova, Irina V.; Berg, Cornelis A. T. van den; Raaijmakers, Alexander J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces are artificial electromagnetic boundaries or interfaces usually implemented as two-dimensional periodic structures with subwavelength periodicity and engineered properties of constituent unit cells. The electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) effect in metasurfaces prevents all surface modes from propagating in a certain frequency band. While metasurfaces provide a number of important applications in microwave antennas and antenna arrays, their features are also highly suitable for MRI app...

  12. Material characterization of open-cell foams by finite element based micromechanics methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagasundaram, Prasanna

    Finite element based micromechanics methods have been used for predicting elastic properties, failure strengths, mode-I, mode-II and mixed mode fracture toughness of open-cell foams. In predicting the orthotropic elastic properties, foams with both equisided and Kelvin-elongated tetrakaidecahedron unit cells are studied. Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBCs) exploiting the special repeating microstructural geometry for these materials have been derived and have been applied on the micromechanical model to calculate the elastic properties. It is shown that the results for the elastic constants from these finite element based models agree well with the available analytical models. Further studies such as effect of a varying strut cross-section over a uniform strut cross-section on the elastic properties are also done in the same context. Next, the procedures used for predicting the above elastic properties are extended to predict multi-axial failure strengths of these low density open cell foams with a microstructure made out of tetrakaidecahedral unit cells. Again, foams with both equisided tetrakaidecahedron and Kelvin-elongated tetrakaidecahedron as unit cells are studied. Failure strengths in different material directions are computed using direct Micromechanics based Methods (DMM). Further, the effect of a varying strut cross section over a uniform strut cross section on failure strengths is also presented. Bi-axial failure envelopes for foams with equisided tetrakaidecahedron unit cells are shown to take the shape of a regular hexagon in the hydrostatic plane. The tri-axial failure envelope for foams made out of equisided tetrakaidecahedron unit cells is shown to have a shape of a double hexagonal pyramid. The bi-axial and tri-axial failure envelopes of foams with elongated tetrakaidecahedron unit cells are also plotted and the effect of anisotropy in foams with these unit cells on the failure envelopes is also discussed. Next, global-local models are developed

  13. Discrete Element Modeling Results of Proppant Rearrangement in the Cooke Conductivity Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl Mattson; Hai Huang; Michael Conway; Lisa O' Connell

    2014-02-01

    The study of propped fracture conductivity began in earnest with the development of the Cooke cell which later became part of the initial API standard. Subsequent developments included a patented multicell design to conduct 4 tests in a press at the same time. Other modifications have been used by various investigators. Recent studies by the Stim-Lab proppant consortium have indicated that the flow field across a Cooke proppant conductivity testing cell may not be uniform as initially believed which resulted is significantly different conductivity results. Post test analysis of low temperature metal alloy injections at the termination of proppant testing prior to the release of the applied stress suggest that higher flow is to be expected along the sides and top of the proppant pack than compared to the middle of the pack. To evaluate these experimental findings, a physics-based two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element model (DEM) was developed and applied to simulate proppant rearrangement during stress loading in the Cooke conductivity cell and the resulting porosity field. Analysis of these simulations are critical to understanding the impact of modification to the testing cell as well as understanding key proppant conductivity issues such as how these effects are manifested in proppant concentration testing results. The 2-D DEM model was constructed to represent a realistic cross section of the Cooke cell with a distribution of four material properties, three that represented the Cooke cell (steel, sandstone,square rings), and one representing the proppant. In principle, Cooke cell materials can be approximated as assemblies of independent discrete elements (particles) of various sizes and material properties that interact via cohesive interactions, repulsive forces, and frictional forces. The macroscopic behavior can then be modeled as the collective behavior of many interacting discrete elements. This DEM model is particularly suitable for modeling proppant

  14. Variation of fine structure constant and nuclear size from isotope shift of Group III elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interpretation of precise isotope-shift (IS) theory is formalism dependent, and care must be exercised in interpreting these results and those obtained from relativistic many-electron ab-initio calculations. Here nuclear size or specifically, nuclear charge radii have been estimated with high accuracy. Important consequence of IS is shifting of spectral lines which is observed in quasar medium. Accurate calculation of IS will provide light on the variation of fine structure constant α as shifting depends on both. Now interestingly both of the phenomena have same magnitude of effects. So without highly accurate study of IS, nobody can comment on α variation. The study of particle physics beyond standard model demands precise calculation of Parity non-conservation (PNC) effect. PNC effect depends on the charge distribution of the nucleus. The shifting of the energy levels due to the change of the model of the nucleus from point type to Fermi distribution type is a great tool to calculate the most realistic rms radius of the nucleus. This shifting is called the Volume Shift or Field Shift (FS). So calculations with higher accuracy of volume shift take important role in these studies. A large number of researchers involved in this field since last two decades. They used different theories but none of them are all order method, which is extremely necessary for Specific Mass Shift (SMS) Calculations. We are applying here the relativistic coupled cluster (RCC) theory in self-consistent way. RCC is well known as highly correlated all order method. Here we present the IS- study on a few Group III elements. The group III elements are single valence elements. P1/2 state is their ground state and P3/2 state is their first excited state which is a metastable state. We study how the lifetime of this metastable state is effected by all three parts of the IS which are SMS, NMS and FS. The most abundant isotopes of the elements of this group such as 11B, 27AI, 69Ga etc. possess a

  15. Coupled agent-based and finite-element models for predicting scar structure following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-08-01

    Following myocardial infarction, damaged muscle is gradually replaced by collagenous scar tissue. The structural and mechanical properties of the scar are critical determinants of heart function, as well as the risk of serious post-infarction complications such as infarct rupture, infarct expansion, and progression to dilated heart failure. A number of therapeutic approaches currently under development aim to alter infarct mechanics in order to reduce complications, such as implantation of mechanical restraint devices, polymer injection, and peri-infarct pacing. Because mechanical stimuli regulate scar remodeling, the long-term consequences of therapies that alter infarct mechanics must be carefully considered. Computational models have the potential to greatly improve our ability to understand and predict how such therapies alter heart structure, mechanics, and function over time. Toward this end, we developed a straightforward method for coupling an agent-based model of scar formation to a finite-element model of tissue mechanics, creating a multi-scale model that captures the dynamic interplay between mechanical loading, scar deformation, and scar material properties. The agent-based component of the coupled model predicts how fibroblasts integrate local chemical, structural, and mechanical cues as they deposit and remodel collagen, while the finite-element component predicts local mechanics at any time point given the current collagen fiber structure and applied loads. We used the coupled model to explore the balance between increasing stiffness due to collagen deposition and increasing wall stress due to infarct thinning and left ventricular dilation during the normal time course of healing in myocardial infarcts, as well as the negative feedback between strain anisotropy and the structural anisotropy it promotes in healing scar. The coupled model reproduced the observed evolution of both collagen fiber structure and regional deformation following coronary

  16. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  17. The Cell Cycle Independence of HIV Infections Is Not Determined by Known Karyophilic Viral Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus and other lentiviruses infect cells independent of cell cycle progression, but gammaretroviruses, such as the murine leukemia virus (MLV require passage of cells through mitosis. This property is thought to be important for the ability of HIV to infect resting CD4+ T cells and terminally differentiated macrophages. Multiple and independent redundant nuclear localization signals encoded by HIV have been hypothesized to facilitate migration of viral genomes into the nucleus. The integrase (IN protein of HIV is one of the HIV elements that targets to the nucleus; however, its role in nuclear entry of virus genomes has been difficult to describe because mutations in IN are pleiotropic. To investigate the importance of the HIV IN protein for infection of non-dividing cells, and to investigate whether or not IN was redundant with other viral signals for cell cycle-independent nuclear entry, we constructed an HIV-based chimeric virus in which the entire IN protein of HIV was replaced by that of MLV. This chimeric virus with a heterologous IN was infectious at a low level, and was able to integrate in an IN-dependent manner. Furthermore, this virus infected non-dividing cells as well as it infected dividing cells. Moreover, we used the chimeric HIV with MLV IN to further eliminate all of the other described nuclear localization signals from an HIV genome-matrix, IN, Viral Protein R, and the central polypurine tract-and show that no combination of the virally encoded NLS is essential for the ability of HIV to infect non-dividing cells.

  18. Cell structures for purifying ionized solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cell structure is described for separating an ionized solution into streams of concentrated acid, concentrated alkali and deionized fluid, the structure comprising a bed of mixed anion and cation resin, a first anion membrane forming a partition for a side of the mixed resin bed, a first cation membrane forming a partition for another side of the mixed resin bed, an anion resin bed adjacent to the first anion membrane, a second cation membrane forming a partition for a side of the anion resin bed remote from the first anion membrane, an anode spaced from the anion resin bed and the second cation membrane, a cation resin bed adjacent to the first cation membrane, a second anion membrane forming a partition for a side of the cation resin bed remote from the first cation membrane, and a cathode spaced from the cation resin bed and the second anion membrane. As an example, reference is made to the continuous extraction of tritium from the water in the primary coolant loop of a nuclear power plant. (author)

  19. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence reveals polarized distribution of atomic elements during differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone C Cardoso

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying pluripotency and differentiation in embryonic and reprogrammed stem cells are unclear. In this work, we characterized the pluripotent state towards neural differentiated state through analysis of trace elements distribution using the Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Naive and neural-stimulated embryoid bodies (EB derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem (ES and iPS cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 µm to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. Results show that these embryo-like aggregates exhibit self-organization at the atomic level. Metallic elements content rises and consistent elemental polarization pattern of P and S in both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells were observed, indicating that neural differentiation and elemental polarization are strongly correlated.

  20. Optical, Structural and Elemental Analysis of New Nonlinear Organic Single Crystal of Urea L-Asparagine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Jayaprakash ,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Single crystal of urea L-asparagine was synthesized and crystallized by slow evaporation solution growth method at room temperature. The bright, transparent and colourless crystal was obtained with average dimension of 11 × 0.7 × 0.3 cm3 . The elemental analysis of the compound confirms the stoichiometric ratio of the compound. The sharp and well defined Bragg peaks obtained in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern confirm the crystalline nature of the compound. The optical property of the compound was ascertained through UV-visible spectral analysis. The various characteristics absorption bands in the compound were assigned through fourier transform infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy. The single crystal unit cell parameters of the compound show that the grown crystal belongs to orthorhombic system with space group P. The nonlinear optical property study indicates that the compound has SHG efficiency 0.5 times greater than that of standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP.

  1. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-cell Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgashev, Valery A; Higo, Toshiyasu; Nantista, Christopher D; Tantawi, Sami G

    2005-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials an...

  2. Photosynthetic efficiency, cell volume, and elemental stoichiometric ratios in Thalassirosira weissflogii under phosphorus limitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sheng; GUO Zhiling; LI Tao; HUANGHui; LIN Senjie

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient limitation is known to inhibit growth and metabolism and to alter elemental stoichiometric ratios in phytoplankton.In this study,physiological changes in Thalassirosira weissflogii were measured under different dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) regimes in semi-continuous cultures to revisit the utility of the Redfield ratio for assessing nutrient limitation.The results showed that cell size increased with decreasing DIP availability.In the P-depleted treatment (f/2-P) the cell size was 1.48 times larger than that in the P-limited (f/100) treatment and 2.67 times larger than that in the P-saturated treatment (f/2 and f/10).The fucoxanthin to chlorophyll a ratio (Fuco/chl a) was relatively stable (about 0.3) in P-saturated cultures and was 10 times higher than that in P-limited and P-depleted cultures.During the experimental period,the photosynthetic efficiency index,△F/Fm',was relatively stable at ~0.50 in the P-saturated cultures,but quickly declined with decreasing DIP availability.Although cellular P content showed a significant difference between the P-saturated culture (1.6 pg/cell) and the P-limited culture (0.7 pg/cell),the N/P ratio in T.weissflogii did not show a trend with DIP availability and fluctuated slightly around 25.Our results suggest that cell division in T.weissflogii is not strictly size-gated but is probably regulated by a biochemical,and hence,an elemental stoichiometric ratio threshold,and that deviation of the cellular N/P ratio from the Redfield ratio is not a reliable indicator of algal nutrient stress.

  3. Common and unique elements of the ABA-regulated transcriptome of Arabidopsis guard cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhixin

    2011-05-01

    their downstream targets, the type 2C protein phosphatases. Our data also provide evidence for cross-talk at the transcriptional level between ABA and another hormonal inhibitor of stomatal opening, methyl jasmonate. Conclusions Our results engender new insights into the basic cell biology of guard cells, reveal common and unique elements of ABA-regulation of gene expression in guard cells, and set the stage for targeted biotechnological manipulations to improve plant water use efficiency.

  4. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  5. Multi-cell thermionic fuel element for nuclear electric power and propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Yuri V.; Gontar, Alexander S.; Eremin, Stanislav A.; Lapochkin, Nikolai V.; Andreev, Pavel V.; Zhabotinsky, Evgeny E.

    1999-01-01

    Conceptual problems of development of two-mode multi-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) for nuclear electric power and propulsion system are considered. The results of analysis of the design and TFE output parameters are presented. It is shown that application of advanced high effective materials and technologies provides operating of the TFE in two modes: a) in nominal mode of power generation for power supply of spacecraft payload at operational orbit and b) in forced mode of power generation for power supply of electric thrusters under spacecraft orbit transfer from intermediate to operational one.

  6. Studies in the compartmentalization of trace elements in the blood of patients with sickle cell anaemia using PIXE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, J.O. (Dept. of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)); Oluwole, A.F. (Dept. of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)); Durosinmi, M.A. (Dept. of Haematology and Immunology, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)); Arsed, W. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Akanle, O.A. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Spyrou, N.M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    Concentrations of trace elements in the whole blood, plasma and erythrocytes of 77 individuals (20 carrying the HbSS genotype, 21 with HbAS and 36 with HbAA) were determined using a PIXE facility employing a 2 MeV proton beam. Up to 16 elements were detected in some or all of the samples. The skewness of elemental distribution was measured for each element in the three bloodflow compartments. Most of the essential elements, apart from selenium were distinctly packed in either the erythrocytes or the plasma. Results of the t-test employed to compare elemental values between sickle cell subjects and matched controls show similar patterns in the three compartments for some of the elements. The results are compared with previous work using INAA. (orig.)

  7. Studies in the compartmentalization of trace elements in the blood of patients with sickle cell anaemia using PIXE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of trace elements in the whole blood, plasma and erythrocytes of 77 individuals (20 carrying the HbSS genotype, 21 with HbAS and 36 with HbAA) were determined using a PIXE facility employing a 2 MeV proton beam. Up to 16 elements were detected in some or all of the samples. The skewness of elemental distribution was measured for each element in the three bloodflow compartments. Most of the essential elements, apart from selenium were distinctly packed in either the erythrocytes or the plasma. Results of the t-test employed to compare elemental values between sickle cell subjects and matched controls show similar patterns in the three compartments for some of the elements. The results are compared with previous work using INAA. (orig.)

  8. Determination of the elemental composition of cyanobacteria cells and cell fractions by atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to studying the elemental composition of cyanobacteria Spirulina platensis and Nostoc commune using a set of complementary analytical methods (ICP-AES, PAAS, and ETAAS) was proposed . The procedures were adapted for the determination of macro- and microelements (Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Mo, Zn, B, and Se) in the biomass of cyanobacteria and separated cell fractions (chloroform and water-methanol extracts and precipitates). The conditions for the mineralization of biological materials were optimized for autoclave and microwave sample preparation procedures. The evaporation and atomization of Se and Mo in a graphite furnace in the presence of chloroform and methanol were studied

  9. [Structure and evolutionary role of the Penelope mobile element in Drosophila species of the virilis group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezin, G T; Makarova, K V; Velikodvorskaia, V V; Zelentsova, E S; Kechumian, R R; Kidwell, M G; Kunin, E V; Evgen'ev, M B

    2001-01-01

    The mobile element Penelope is activated and mobilizes several other transposons in dysgenic crosses in Drosophila virilis. Its structure proved to be complex and to vary greatly in all examined species of the virilis group. Phylogenetic analysis of the reverse transcriptase (RT) domain assigned Penelope to a new branch, rather than to any known family, of LTR-lacking retroelements. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that the C-terminal domain of the Penelope polyprotein is an active endonuclease, which is related to intron-encoded endonucleases and to bacterial repair endonuclease UrvC, and may act as an integras. Retroelements coding for a putative endonuclease that differs from typical integrase have thus far not been known. The N-terminal domain of the Penelope polyprotein was shown to contain a protease with significant homology to HIV-1 protease. Phylogenetic analysis divided the Penelope copies from several virilis species into two subfamilies, one including virtually identical full-length copies, and the other comprising highly divergent defective copies. The results suggest both vertical and horizontal transfer of the element. Possibly, Penelope invasion recurred during evolution and contributed to genome rearrangement in the virilis species. Chromosome aberrations detected in D. virilis, which is now being invaded by Penelope, is direct evidence for this assumption. PMID:11605533

  10. Simulations of Underground Structures Subjected to Dynamic Loading using the Distinct Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J P; Glenn, L A; Heuze, F E; Bonner, M P

    2003-07-14

    We present preliminary results from a parameter study investigating the stability of underground structures in response to explosion-induced strong ground motions. In practice, even the most sophisticated site characterization may lack key details regarding precise joint properties and orientations within the rock mass. Thus, in order to place bounds upon the predicted behavior of a given facility, an extensive series of simulations representing different realizations may be required. The influence of both construction parameters (reinforcement, rock bolts,liners) and geological parameters (joint stiffness, joint spacing and orientation, and tunnel diameter to block size ratio) must be considered. We will discuss the distinct element method (DEM) with particular emphasis on techniques for achieving improved computational efficiency, including the handling of contact detection and approaches to parallelization. We also outline the continuum approaches we employ to obtain boundary conditions for the distinct element simulations. Finally, our DEM code is used to simulate dynamic loading of a generic subterranean facility in hardrock, demonstrating the suitability of the DEM for this application.

  11. Active transposable elements recover species boundaries and geographic structure in Madagascan coffee species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal, Julissa; Guyot, Romain; Hamon, Perla; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Konan, Olivier N'Guessan; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Nowak, Michael D; Davis, Aaron P; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    The completion of the genome assembly for the economically important coffee plant Coffea canephora (Rubiaceae) has allowed the use of bioinformatic tools to identify and characterize a diverse array of transposable elements (TEs), which can be used in evolutionary studies of the genus. An overview of the copy number and location within the C. canephora genome of four TEs is presented. These are tested for their use as molecular markers to unravel the evolutionary history of the Millotii Complex, a group of six wild coffee (Coffea) species native to Madagascar. Two TEs from the Gypsy superfamily successfully recovered some species boundaries and geographic structure among samples, whereas a TE from the Copia superfamily did not. Notably, species occurring in evergreen moist forests of eastern and southeastern Madagascar were divergent with respect to species in other habitats and regions. Our results suggest that the peak of transpositional activity of the Gypsy and Copia TEs occurred, respectively, before and after the speciation events of the tested Madagascan species. We conclude that the utilization of active TEs has considerable potential to unravel the evolutionary history and delimitation of closely related Coffea species. However, the selection of TE needs to be experimentally tested, since each element has its own evolutionary history. Different TEs with similar copy number in a given species can render different dendrograms; thus copy number is not a good selection criterion to attain phylogenetic resolution. PMID:26231981

  12. Surface geometric analysis of anatomic structures using biquintic finite element interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D B; Sacks, M S; Vorp, D A; Thornton, M

    2000-06-01

    The surface geometry of anatomic structures can have a direct impact upon their mechanical behavior in health and disease. Thus, mechanical analysis requires the accurate quantification of three-dimensional in vivo surface geometry. We present a fully generalized surface fitting method for surface geometric analysis that uses finite element based hermite biquintic polynomial interpolation functions. The method generates a contiguous surface of C2 continuity, allowing computation of the finite strain and curvature tensors over the entire surface with respect to a single in-surface coordinate system. The Sobolev norm, which restricts element length and curvature, was utilized to stabilize the interpolating polynomial at boundaries and in regions of sparse data. A major advantage of the current method is its ability to fully quantify surface deformation from an unstructured grid of data points using a single interpolation scheme. The method was validated by computing both the principal curvature distributions for phantoms of known curvatures and the principal stretch and principal change of curvature distributions for a synthetic spherical patch warping into an ellipsoidal shape. To demonstrate the applicability to biomedical problems, the method was applied to quantify surface curvatures of an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the principal strains and change of curvatures of a deforming bioprosthetic heart valve leaflet. The method proved accurate for the computation of surface curvatures, as well as for strains and curvature change for a surface undergoing large deformations. PMID:10983706

  13. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Pressurized Aircraft Fuselage Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aims to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration are not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One of the airframe concepts that might dramatically improve aircraft performance is a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presents inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a nonlinear finite element analysis of a large-scale test article being developed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. There are specific reasons why geometrically nonlinear analysis may be warranted for the hybrid wing body flat panel structure. In general, for sufficiently high internal pressure and/or mechanical loading, energy related to the in-plane strain may become significant relative to the bending strain energy, particularly in thin-walled areas such as the minimum gage skin extensively used in the structure under analysis. To account for this effect, a geometrically nonlinear strain-displacement relationship is needed to properly couple large out-of-plane and in-plane deformations. Depending on the loading, this nonlinear coupling mechanism manifests itself in a distinct manner in compression- and tension-dominated sections of the structure. Under significant compression, nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately predict loss of stability and postbuckled deformation. Under significant tension, the nonlinear effects account for suppression of the out-of-plane deformation due to in-plane stretching. By comparing the present results with the previously

  14. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, Frank [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  15. Determination of structural elements on the folding reaction of mnemiopsin by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakiminia, Forough; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Sajedi, Reza H.; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    Mnemiopsin 1 is a member of photoprotein family, made up of 206 amino acid residues. These Ca2 +-regulated photoproteins are responsible for light emission in a variety of marine cnidarians and ctenophores. They composed of an apoprotein, a single polypeptide chain of 25 kDa, molecular oxygen and the non-covalently bound chromophore. In this study, we examined whether three mutations, namely R39K, S128G and V183T affect the thermodynamic stability as well as refolding and unfolding kinetics of mnemiopsin 1. Conformational stability measurements using fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopies revealed that all variants unfold in multi-step manner in which the secondary and tertiary structures are lost in different steps. However kinetic studies showed that point mutation S128G destabilizes both kinetic intermediate and native conformation; while, these structural elements are stabilized in V183T. We also found that the stability of folded and intermediate states increases in R39K. We concluded that the initial packing of helical segments within the protein structure is more facilitated when Lys with smaller side chain is present in the protein chain.

  16. Asynchronous Communication: Investigating the Influences of Relational Elements and Background on the Framing Structure of Emails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Awad AlAfnan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the influences of relational elements and the background of communicators on the framing structure of email messages that were exchanged in an educational Institute in Malaysia. The investigation revealed that social distance played a more significant role than power relations as Malaysian respondents are, generally, more polite to distant colleagues than they are to close colleagues regardless of their organizational position. It was also revealed that the ethnic background of email writers prompted the framing structure of the emails as the use of the pre-closing move and ‘thank you’ as a closing marker was generally a Malaysian practice. This study also revealed that the framing structure of the emails depended on the direction of the message as the majority of the emails that were sent to external contacts included an auto signature, whereas the internally exchanged email were mainly signed off using the first name of the sender alone.  In addition, it was revealed that email writers in the educational Institute had a very high tendency to name their messages as almost 100 percent of the emails included the identifying topic move, which was generally clearly or broadly informative move.Keywords: Email communication, Relational factors, Framing moves, Social distance, Power relations

  17. 2D finite element analysis of thermal balance for drained aluminum reduction cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the principle of energy conservation, the applicable technique for drained cell retrofitted from conventional one was analyzed with 2D finite element model. The model employed a 1D heat transfer scheme to compute iteratively the freeze profile until the thickness variable reached the terminating requirement. The calculated 2D heat dissipation from the cell surfaces was converted into the overall 3D heat loss. The potential drop of the system, freeze profile and heat balance were analyzed to evaluate their variation with technical parameters when designing the 150 kA conventional cell based drained cell. The simulation results show that the retrofitted drained cell is able to keep thermal balance under the conditions that the current is 190 kA, the anodic current density is 0.96 A/cm2, the anode-cathode distance is 2.5 em, the alumina cover is 16 cm thick with a thermal conductivity of 0.20 W/(m ℃C) and the electrolysis temperature is 946 ℃.

  18. Dynamic properties of high structural integrity auxetic open cell foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, F.; Ciffo, L. G.; Yates, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    This paper illustrates various dynamic characteristics of open cell compliant polyurethane foam with auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) behaviour. The foam is obtained from off-the-shelf open cell polyurethane grey foam with a manufacturing process based on mechanical deformation on a mould in a temperature-controlled oven. The Poisson's ratio is measured with an image processing technique based on edge detection with wavelet methods. Foam samples have been tested in a viscoelastic analyser tensile test machine to determine the Young's modulus and loss factor for small dynamic strains. The same samples have also been tested in an acoustic impedance tube to measure acoustic absorption and specific acoustic resistance and reactance with a transmissibility technique. Another set of tests has been set up on a cam plastometer machine for constant strain rate dynamic crushing analysis. All the tests have been carried out on auxetic and normal foam samples to provide a comparison between the two types of cellular solids. The results from the experimental tests are discussed and interpreted using microstructure models for cellular materials existing in the literature. The negative Poisson's ratio foam presented in this paper shows an overall superiority regarding damping and acoustic properties compared to the original conventional foam. Its dynamic crushing performance is also significantly superior to the normal foam, suggesting a possible use in structural integrity compliant elements.

  19. Dynamics of High-speed Machining of Aerospace Structures using Finite-element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kanchana

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available "The study is aimed to investigate certain aspects of high-speed machining for improving the accuracy of thin-walled aerospace components. The approach used involved the development of finite-element model of the workpiece to be machined and its subsequent frequency response analysis. The response of the workpiece subjected to dynamic cutting force gives an indication of the best possible speeds from the point of view of accuracy. Based on the results of the analysis, it is possible to predict the range of spindle speeds at which the workpiece demonstrates very high dynamic rigidity. In addition, this study has established the superiority of high-speed machining to produce aerospace structures with high stiffness-to-weight ratio and also throws some light on the capability of high speed in machining of low rigidity sculptured-surface components. "

  20. MATTER-ELEMENT MODELING OF PARALLEL STRUCTURE AND APPLICATION ABOUT EXTENSION PID CONTROL SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongde LU; Zonghai CHEN

    2006-01-01

    This article describes in detail a new method via the extension predictable algorithm of the matter-element model of parallel structure tuning the parameters of the extension PID controller. In comparison with fuzzy and extension PID controllers, the proposed extension PID predictable controller shows higher control gains when system states are away from equilibrium, and retains a lower profile of control signals at the same time. Consequently, better control performance is achieved. Through the proposed tuning formula, the weighting factors of an extension-logic predictable controller can be systematically selected according to the control plant. An experimental example through industrial field data and site engineers' experience demonstrates the superior performance of the proposed controller over the fuzzy controller.