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Sample records for cell dysfunction role

  1. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  2. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  3. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes. PMID:27350339

  4. High Glucose Causes Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction by Promoting Mitochondrial Fission: Role of a GLUT1 Blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, He Yun; Park, Ji Hye; Jang, Woong Bi; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Kim, Yeon Ju; Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Jae Ho; Baek, Sang Hong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is the primary characteristic of diabetes and is associated with many complications. The role of hyperglycemia in the dysfunction of human cardiac progenitor cells that can regenerate damaged cardiac tissue has been investigated, but the exact mechanism underlying this association is not clear. Thus, we examined whether hyperglycemia could regulate mitochondrial dynamics and lead to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction, and whether blocking glucose uptake could rescue this dysfunction. High glucose in cardiac progenitor cells results in reduced cell viability and decreased expression of cell cycle-related molecules, including CDK2 and cyclin E. A tube formation assay revealed that hyperglycemia led to a significant decrease in the tube-forming ability of cardiac progenitor cells. Fluorescent labeling of cardiac progenitor cell mitochondria revealed that hyperglycemia alters mitochondrial dynamics and increases expression of fission-related proteins, including Fis1 and Drp1. Moreover, we showed that specific blockage of GLUT1 improved cell viability, tube formation, and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that high glucose leads to cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction through an increase in mitochondrial fission, and that a GLUT1 blocker can rescue cardiac progenitor cell dysfunction and downregulation of mitochondrial fission. Combined therapy with cardiac progenitor cells and a GLUT1 blocker may provide a novel strategy for cardiac progenitor cell therapy in cardiovascular disease patients with diabetes. PMID:27350339

  5. Role of chemokine RANTES in the regulation of perivascular inflammation, T-cell accumulation, and vascular dysfunction in hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Mikolajczyk, T.P.; Nosalski, R.; Szczepaniak, P.; Budzyn, K; Osmenda, G.; Skiba, D; A. SAGAN; Wu, J.; Vinh, A.; Marvar, P. J.; Guzik, B.; Podolec, J.; Drummond, G.; Lob, H. E.; Harrison, D.G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the role of perivascular inflammation in cardiovascular disease. We studied mechanisms of perivascular leukocyte infiltration in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and their links to vascular dysfunction. Chronic Ang II infusion in mice increased immune cell content of T cells (255 ± 130 to 1664 ± 349 cells/mg; P < 0.01), M1 and M2 macrophages, and dendritic cells in perivascular adipose tissue. In particular, the content of T lymphocytes bearing C...

  6. Dysfunctional T regulatory cells in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhala, Rao H.; Neri, Paola; Bae, Jooeun E.; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Shammas, Masood A.; Allam, Charles K.; Daley, John F.; Chauhan, Dharminder; Blanchard, Elizabeth; Thatte, Hemant S.; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin and is associated with suppressed uninvolved immunoglobulins and dysfunctional T-cell responses. The biologic basis of this dysfunction remains ill defined. Because T regulatory (Treg) cells play an important role in suppressing normal immune responses, we evaluated the potential role of Treg cells in immune dysfunction in MM. We observed a significant increase in CD4+CD25+ T cells in patients with monoclona...

  7. Role of Kupffer Cells in Thioacetamide-Induced Cell Cycle Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirandeli Bautista

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that gadolinium chloride (GD attenuates drug-induced hepatotoxicity by selectively inactivating Kupffer cells. In the present study the effect of GD in reference to cell cycle and postnecrotic liver regeneration induced by thioacetamide (TA in rats was studied. Two months male rats, intraveously pretreated with a single dose of GD (0.1 mmol/Kg, were intraperitoneally injected with TA (6.6 mmol/Kg. Samples of blood and liver were obtained from rats at 0, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following TA intoxication. Parameters related to liver damage were determined in blood. In order to evaluate the mechanisms involved in the post-necrotic regenerative state, the levels of cyclin D and cyclin E as well as protein p27 and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA were determined in liver extracts because of their roles in the control of cell cycle check-points. The results showed that GD significantly reduced the extent of necrosis. Noticeable changes were detected in the levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, p27 and PCNA when compared to those induced by thioacetamide. Thus GD pre-treatment reduced TA-induced liver injury and accelerated the postnecrotic liver regeneration. These results demonstrate that Kupffer cells are involved in TA-induced liver and also in the postnecrotic proliferative liver states.

  8. Role and mechanism of uncoupling protein 2 on the fatty acid-induced dysfunction of pancreatic alpha cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jie-ying; LI Hong-liang; YANG Wen-ying; XIAO Jian-zhong; DU Rui-qin; SHEN Xiao-xia; CAI Zhe; ZHANG Lan; SHU Jun

    2010-01-01

    Background Uncoupling protein (UCP) 2 is related to the dysfunction of beta cells induced by fatty acids. However,whether UCP2 has similar effects on alpha cell is still not clear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of UCP2 and its possible mechanisms in lipotoxicity-induced dysfunction of pancreatic alpha cells.Methods The alpha TC1-6 cells were used in this study to evaluate the effects of palmitate and/or UCP2 inhibit factors on the glucagon secretory function, glucagon content, the glucagon mRNA level and the nitrotyrosine level in the supernatant. Meantime, the expression levels of UCP2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha) were measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Furthermore, the possible relationship between UCP2 and insulin signal transduction pathway was analyzed.Results Palmitate stimulated alpha cell glucagon secretion and the expression of UCP2 and PGC-1 alpha, which could be partially decreased by the inhibition of UCP2. Palmitate increased nitrotyrosine level and suppressed insulin signal transduction pathway in alpha cells. Inhibition of UCP2 influenced the effects of free fatty acid on alpha cells and may relate to glucagon secretion.Conclusion UCP2 played an important role on alpha cell dysfunction induced by free fatty acid in vitro, which may be related to its effects on oxidative stress and insulin signal transduction pathway.

  9. Male Gender Role Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Daig, Isolde

    2010-01-01

    Background: Men have a higher alcohol and cigarette consumption than women, they use more drugs, they have twice as high a suicide rate and only a minority of men attend on preventive medical checkups. Hypotheses: The central questions of the present study pertained to the identification of dysfunctional aspects of a male self concept and the possible correlations with risk behaviour of men in different age stages. One possible explanation for this high risk behaviour may be higher mascul...

  10. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  11. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  12. Possible role of glial cells in the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami eNoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that there is a close relationship between the endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS. Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs are critical for the development and function of the CNS; not only for neuronal cells but also for glial development and differentiation. Any impairment of TH supply to the developing CNS causes severe and irreversible changes in the overall architecture and function of human brain, leading to various neurological dysfunctions. In adult brain, impairment of THs, such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, can cause psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Though hypothyroidism impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity, its effect on glial cells and cellular mechanisms are unknown. This mini-review article summarizes how THs are transported to the brain, metabolized in astrocytes and affect microglia and oligodendrocytes, showing an example of glioendocrine system. It may help to understand physiological and/or pathophysiological functions of THs in the CNS and how hypo- and hyper-thyroidism may cause mental disorders.

  13. Possible role of glial cells in the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Mami

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that there is a close relationship between the endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS). Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and function of the CNS; not only for neuronal cells but also for glial development and differentiation. Any impairment of TH supply to the developing CNS causes severe and irreversible changes in the overall architecture and function of the human brain, leading to various neurological dysfunctions. In the adult brain, impairment of THs, such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, can cause psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Although impact of hypothyroidism on synaptic transmission and plasticity is known, its effect on glial cells and related cellular mechanisms remain enigmatic. This mini-review article summarizes how THs are transported into the brain, metabolized in astrocytes and affect microglia and oligodendrocytes, demonstrating an example of glioendocrine system. Neuroglial effects may help to understand physiological and/or pathophysiological functions of THs in the CNS and how hypo- and hyper-thyroidism may cause mental disorders. PMID:26089777

  14. Nox2 NADPH Oxidase Has a Critical Role in Insulin Resistance–Related Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, Piruthivi; Viswambharan, Hema; Imrie, Helen; Cubbon, Richard M.; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Gage, Matthew; Galloway, Stacey; Skromna, Anna; Kandavelu, Parkavi; Santos, Celio X.; Gatenby, V. Kate; Smith, Jessica; Beech, David J; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Channon, Keith M.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by excessive endothelial cell generation of potentially cytotoxic concentrations of reactive oxygen species. We examined the role of NADPH oxidase (Nox) and specifically Nox2 isoform in superoxide generation in two complementary in vivo models of human insulin resistance (endothelial specific and whole body). Using three complementary methods to measure superoxide, we demonstrated higher levels of superoxide in insulin-resistant endothelial cells, which cou...

  15. Roles of Pyruvate, NADH, and Mitochondrial Complex I in Redox Balance and Imbalance in β Cell Function and Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells not only use glucose as an energy source, but also sense blood glucose levels for insulin secretion. While pyruvate and NADH metabolic pathways are known to be involved in regulating insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation, the roles of many other components along the metabolic pathways remain poorly understood. Such is the case for mitochondrial complex I (NADH/ubiquinone oxidoreductase. It is known that normal complex I function is absolutely required for episodic insulin secretion after a meal, but the role of complex I in β cells in the diabetic pancreas remains to be investigated. In this paper, we review the roles of pyruvate, NADH, and complex I in insulin secretion and hypothesize that complex I plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction in the diabetic pancreas. This hypothesis is based on the establishment that chronic hyperglycemia overloads complex I with NADH leading to enhanced complex I production of reactive oxygen species. As nearly all metabolic pathways are impaired in diabetes, understanding how complex I in the β cells copes with elevated levels of NADH in the diabetic pancreas may provide potential therapeutic strategies for diabetes.

  16. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: roles for distinctTIN2-containing complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sahn-Ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Campisi, Judith

    2006-11-07

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins, TRF1, TRF2 and POT1, and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. These and two other proteins form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere-maintenance complex. It is not clear whether subcomplexes exist or function in vivo. Here, we provide evidence for two TIN2 subcomplexes with distinct functions in human cells. TIN2 ablation by RNA interference caused telomere uncapping and p53-independent cell death in all cells tested. However, we isolated two TIN2 complexes from cell lysates, each selectively sensitive to a TIN2 mutant (TIN2-13, TIN2-15C). In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN215C more than TIN2-13 caused genomic instability and cell death. Thus, TIN2 subcomplexes likely have distinct functions in telomere maintenance, and may provide selective targets for eliminating cells with mutant p53.

  17. The role of APOE in cerebrovascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Leon M; Thomas, Riya; Marottoli, Felecia M; Koster, Kevin P; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Morris, Alan W J; Bu, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE4) is associated with cognitive decline during aging, is the greatest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and has links to other neurodegenerative conditions that affect cognition. Increasing evidence indicates that APOE genotypes differentially modulate the function of the cerebrovasculature (CV), with apoE and its receptors expressed by different cell types at the CV interface (astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, brain endothelial cells). However, research on the role of apoE in CV dysfunction has not advanced as quickly as other apoE-modulated pathways. This review will assess what aspects of the CV are modulated by APOE genotypes during aging and under disease states, discuss potential mechanisms, and summarize the therapeutic significance of the topic. We propose that APOE4 induces CV dysfunction through direct signaling at the CV, and indirectly via modulation of peripheral and central pathways. Further, that APOE4 predisposes the CV to damage by, and exacerbates the effects of, additional risk factors (such as sex, hypertension, and diabetes). ApoE4-induced detrimental CV changes include reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF), modified neuron-CBF coupling, increased blood-brain barrier leakiness, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, hemorrhages and disrupted transport of nutrients and toxins. The apoE4-induced detrimental changes may be linked to pericyte migration/activation, astrocyte activation, smooth muscle cell damage, basement membrane degradation and alterations in brain endothelial cells. PMID:26884068

  18. Dysfunction of pulmonary immuity in atopic asthma: Possible role of T helper cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bice, D.E.; Schuyler, M.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Atopic asthma is characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE and IgG{sub 4} antibody and airway hyperreactivity caused by interactions between the immune system and inhaled allergens. Recent studies suggest that the production of IgE and IgG{sub 4} antibody important in atopic disease requires help from Th2 lymphocytes, while Th1 lymphocytes support the production of immune responses that would not cause asthma. The evaluation of cells from the lungs of asthmatics indicated that they have elevated Th2 immune responses. However, no study has compared the immune responses that develop in asthmatics and normals (people without asthma) after their lungs are exposed to a neoantigen. The purpose of this study was to determine if Th2 immunity would be produced to a neoantigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), deposited in the lungs of asthmatics, while Th1 immunity would be produced to KLH deposited in the lungs of nonasthmatics. Because the production of IgG{sub 4} requires Th2 immune help, the higher level of anti-KLH IgG{sub 4} in the serum of asthmatics suggests that a Th2 immune response was produced to a neoantigen deposited in their lungs.

  19. T cell dysfunction in the diabetes-prone BB rat. A role for thymic migrants that are not T cell precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes-prone BB (BB-DP) rats express several T cell dysfunctions which include poor proliferative and cytotoxic responses to alloantigen. The goal of this study was to determine the origin of these T cell dysfunctions. When BB-DP rats were thymectomized, T cell depleted, and transplanted with neonatal thymus tissue from diabetes-resistant and otherwise normal DA/BB F1 rats, the early restoration of T cell function proceeded normally on a cell-for-cell basis; i.e., peripheral T cells functioned like those from the thymus donor. Because the thymus in these experiments was subjected to gamma irradiation before transplantation and there was no evidence of F1 chimerism in the transplanted BB-DP rats, it appeared that the BB-DP T cell precursors could mature into normally functioning T cells if the maturation process occurred in a normal thymus. If the F1 thymus tissue was treated with dGua before transplantation, the T cells of these animals functioned poorly like those from untreated BB-DP rats. dGua poisons bone marrow-derived cells, including gamma radiation-resistant cells of the macrophage/dendritic cell lineages, while sparing the thymic epithelium. Therefore, the reversal of the T cell dysfunction depends on the presence in the F1 thymus of gamma radiation-resistant, dGua-sensitive F1 cells. Conversely, thymectomized and T cell-depleted F1 rats expressed T cell dysfunction when transplanted with gamma-irradiated BB thymus grafts. T cell responses were normal in animals transplanted with dGua-treated BB thymus grafts. With increasing time after thymus transplantation, T cells from all animals gradually expressed the functional phenotype of the bone marrow donor. Taken together these results suggest that BB-DP bone marrow-derived cells that are not T cell precursors influence the maturation environment in the thymus of otherwise normal BB-DP T cell precursors

  20. Stem cell-based therapy for erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-hong; XIA Shu-jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of stem cells in erectile dysfunction as well as their application to the therapy of erectile dysfunction.Data sources The data used in the present article were mainly from PubMed with relevant English articles published from 1974 to 2011.The search terms were "stem cells" and "erectile dysfunction".Study selection Articles regarding the role of stem cells in erectile dysfunction and their application to the therapy of erectile dysfunction were selected.Results Stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into various cell types.Meanwhile,in preclinical experiments,therapeutic gene-modified stem cells have been approved to offer a novel strategy for cell therapy and gene therapy of erectile dysfunction.Conclusion The transplantation of stem cells has the potential to provide cell types capable of restoring normal function after injury or degradation inerectile dysfunction.However,a series of problems,such as the safety of stem cells transplantation,their application in cell therapy and gene therapy of erectile dysfunction need further investigation.

  1. Roles of LOX-1 in microvascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2016-05-01

    Studies from human and animal models with metabolic disease and hypertension highlight atrophic remodeling, reduced lumen size and thinner vascular walls of microvessels with profound density reduction. This impaired vascular response limits the perfusion of peripheral tissues inducing organ damage. These conditions are strongly associated with oxidative stress and in particular with the up-regulation of lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1). Several factors such as cytokines, shear stress, and advanced glycation end-products, especially oxLDL, can up-regulate LOX-1. The activation of this receptor induces the production of adhesion molecules, cytokines and the release of reactive oxygen species via NADPH oxidase. LOX-1 is considered a potent mediator of endothelial dysfunction and it is significantly associated with reduced microvascular endothelium NO-dependent vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Microvascular endothelial cells increased the expression of IL-6 in association with the increased concentration of LDL and its degree of oxidation. Moreover, increased IL-6 levels are associated with up-regulation of LOX-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Another consequence of microvascular inflammation is the generation of small amounts of ROS, similar to those induced by low concentration of oxLDL (<5μg/mL) which induces capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, through LOX-1 up-regulation. In light of its central role, LOX-1 represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human atherosclerotic diseases and microvascular disorders. PMID:26907636

  2. Role of the T cell in the genesis of angiotensin II–induced hypertension and vascular dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz J. Guzik; Hoch, Nyssa E.; Brown, Kathryn A.; McCann, Louise A.; Rahman, Ayaz; Dikalov, Sergey; Goronzy, Jorg; Weyand, Cornelia; Harrison, David G

    2007-01-01

    Hypertension promotes atherosclerosis and is a major source of morbidity and mortality. We show that mice lacking T and B cells (RAG-1−/− mice) have blunted hypertension and do not develop abnormalities of vascular function during angiotensin II infusion or desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)–salt. Adoptive transfer of T, but not B, cells restored these abnormalities. Angiotensin II is known to stimulate reactive oxygen species production via the nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate ...

  3. The role of dysfunctional HDL in atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Navab, Mohamad; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Fogelman, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on HDL function in modulating LDL oxidation and LDL-induced inflammation. Dysfunctional HDL has been identified in animal models and humans with chronic inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. The loss of antiinflammatory function correlated with a loss of function in reverse cholesterol transport. In animal models and perhaps in humans, dysfunctional HDL can be improved by apoA-I mimetic peptides that bind oxidized lipids with high affinity.

  4. Role of microparticles in endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas; Helbing; Christoph; Olivier; Christoph; Bode; Martin; Moser; Philipp; Diehl

    2014-01-01

    Microparticles are small cell vesicles that can be released by almost all eukaryotic cells during cellular stress and cell activation. Within the last 1-2 decades it has been shown that microparticles are useful blood surrogate markers for different pathological conditions, such as vascular inflammation, coagulation and tumour diseases. Several studies have investigated the abundance of microparticles of different cellular origins in multiple cardiovascular diseases. It thereby has been shown that microparticles released by platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells can be found in conditions of endothelial dysfunction, acute and chronic vascular inflammation and hypercoagulation. In addition to their function as surrogate markers, several studies indicate that circulating microparticles can fuse with distinct target cells, such as endothelial cells or leukocyte, and thereby deliver cellular components of their parental cells to the target cells. Hence, microparticles are a novel entity of circulating, paracrine, biological vectors which can influence the phenotype, the function and presumably even the transcriptome of their target cells.This review article aims to give a brief overview about the microparticle biology with a focus on endothelial activation and arterial hypertension. More detailed information about the role of microparticles in pathophysiology and disease can be found in already published work.

  5. Roles of Treg/Th17 Cell Imbalance and Neuronal Damage in the Visual Dysfunction Observed in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Chronologically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), is characterized by inflammation, T cell activation, demyelination, and neuronal damage, which might induce permanent vision loss. Elucidating the chronological relationship among the features is critical for treatment of demyelinating optic neuritis. EAON was induced in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein subcutaneously, and visual function was assessed by flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) at days 7, 11, 14, 19, 23, 28 post-immunization. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Demyelination and axonal damage were verified with myelin basic protein (MBP) and β-amyloid precursor protein staining, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantified IL-17, IL-1β, TGF-β, FoxP3, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the optic nerve, as well as FoxP3 and IL-17 staining. Systemic changes of Th17 and Treg cells were tested by flow cytometry in spleen. F-VEP latency was prolonged at 11 days and peaked at 23 days commensurate with demyelination. However, F-VEP amplitude was reduced at 11 days, preceding axon damage, and was exacerbated at 23 days when a peak in RGC apoptosis was detected. Th17 cells up-regulated as early as 7 days and peaked at 11 days, while Treg cells down-regulated inversely compared to Th17 cells change as verified by IL-17 and FoxP3 expression; spleen cell samples were slightly different, demonstrating marked changed at 14 days. Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the optic nerve precedes and may initiate neuronal damage of axons and RGCs. These changes are commensurate with the appearances of visual dysfunction reflected in F-VEP and hence may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for vision preservation. PMID:26318182

  6. Reversibility of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes: role of polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, N; Bhakkiyalakshmi, E; Sarada, D V L; Ramkumar, K M

    2016-07-01

    The endothelium, a thin single sheet of endothelial cells, is a metabolically active layer that coats the inner surface of blood vessels and acts as an interface between the circulating blood and the vessel wall. The endothelium through the secretion of vasodilators and vasoconstrictors serves as a critical mediator of vascular homeostasis. During the development of the vascular system, it regulates cellular adhesion and vessel wall inflammation in addition to maintaining vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. A shift in the functions of the endothelium towards vasoconstriction, proinflammatory and prothrombic states characterise improper functioning of these cells, leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED), implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including diabetes. Major mechanisms of ED include the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels, differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress. ED tends to be the initial event in macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and microvascular complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. Numerous strategies have been developed to protect endothelial cells against various stimuli, of which the role of polyphenolic compounds in modulating the differentially regulated pathways and thus maintaining vascular homeostasis has been proven to be beneficial. This review addresses the factors stimulating ED in diabetes and the molecular mechanisms of natural polyphenol antioxidants in maintaining vascular homeostasis. PMID:27264638

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stem Cell Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regardless of the precise underlying molecular mechanisms, the fundamental defining manifestation of aging is an overall decline in the functional capacity of various organs to maintain baseline tissue homeostasis and to respond adequately to physiological needs under stress. There is an increasingly urgent need for a more complete understanding of the molecular pathways and biological processes underlying aging and age-related disorders. CONTENT: Mitochondria constitute the most prominent source of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and are implicated in multiple anabolic and catabolic circuitries. In addition, mitochondria coordinate cell-wide stress responses and control non-apoptotic cell death routines. The involvement of mitochondria in both vital and lethal processes is crucial for both embryonic and postembryonic development, as well as for the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Age-associated telomere damage, diminution of telomere ‘capping’ function and associated p53 activation have emerged as prime instigators of a functional decline of tissue stem cells and of mitochondrial dysfunction that adversely affect renewal and bioenergetic support in diverse tissues. Constructing a model of how telomeres, stem cells and mitochondria interact with key molecules governing genome integrity, ‘stemness’ and metabolism provides a framework for how diverse factors contribute to aging and age-related disorders. SUMMARY: Cellular senescence defined as an irreversible proliferation arrest promotes age-related decline in mammalian tissue homeostasis. The aging of tissue-specific stem cell and progenitor cell compartments is believed to be central to the decline of tissue and organ integrity and function in the elderly. Taken into consideration that the overwhelming majority of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS are of mitochondrial origin, it is reasonable to posit that the elevated ROS production might be caused by

  8. Vascular Dysfunction following Polymicrobial Sepsis: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrentraut, Stefan Felix; Dörr, Anne; EHRENTRAUT Heidi; Lohner, Ralph; Lee, Sun-Hee; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Knuefermann, Pascal; Boehm, Olaf; Meyer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Aims Aim was to elucidate the specific role of pattern recognition receptors in vascular dysfunction during polymicrobial sepsis (colon ascendens stent peritonitis, CASP). Methods and Results Vascular contractility of C57BL/6 (wildtype) mice and mice deficient for Toll-like receptor 2/4/9 (TLR2-D, TLR4-D, TLR9-D) or CD14 (CD14-D) was measured 18 h following CASP. mRNA expression of pro- (Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα), Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) and of ...

  9. Role of endothelial Nox2 NADPH oxidase in angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vasomotor dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Murdoch, Colin E.; Alom-Ruiz, Sara P.; Wang, Minshu; Zhang, Min; Walker, Simon; Yu, Bin; Brewer, Alison; Shah, Ajay M.

    2011-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Several Nox isoforms are expressed in the vessel wall, among which Nox2 is especially abundant in the endothelium. Endothelial Nox2 levels rise during hypertension but little is known about the cell-specific role of endothelial Nox2 in vivo. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice with endothelial-specific overexpression of Nox2 ...

  10. Vascular dysfunction following polymicrobial sepsis: role of pattern recognition receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Felix Ehrentraut

    Full Text Available AIMS: Aim was to elucidate the specific role of pattern recognition receptors in vascular dysfunction during polymicrobial sepsis (colon ascendens stent peritonitis, CASP. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular contractility of C57BL/6 (wildtype mice and mice deficient for Toll-like receptor 2/4/9 (TLR2-D, TLR4-D, TLR9-D or CD14 (CD14-D was measured 18 h following CASP. mRNA expression of pro- (Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα, Interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and of vascular inducible NO-Synthase (iNOS was determined using RT-qPCR. Wildtype mice exhibited a significant loss of vascular contractility after CASP. This was aggravated in TLR2-D mice, blunted in TLR4-D animals and abolished in TLR9-D and CD14-D animals. TNF-α expression was significantly up-regulated after CASP in wildtype and TLR2-D animals, but not in mice deficient for TLR4, -9 or CD14. iNOS was significantly up-regulated in TLR2-D animals only. TLR2-D animals showed significantly higher levels of TLR4, -9 and CD14. Application of H154-ODN, a TLR9 antagonist, attenuated CASP-induced cytokine release and vascular dysfunction in wildtype mice. CONCLUSIONS: Within our model, CD14 and TLR9 play a decisive role for the development of vascular dysfunction and thus can be effectively antagonized using H154-ODN. TLR2-D animals are more prone to polymicrobial sepsis, presumably due to up-regulation of TLR4, 9 and CD14.

  11. ATRX dysfunction induces replication defects in primary mouse cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clynes

    Full Text Available The chromatin remodeling protein ATRX, which targets tandem repetitive DNA, has been shown to be required for expression of the alpha globin genes, for proliferation of a variety of cellular progenitors, for chromosome congression and for the maintenance of telomeres. Mutations in ATRX have recently been identified in tumours which maintain their telomeres by a telomerase independent pathway involving homologous recombination thought to be triggered by DNA damage. It is as yet unknown whether there is a central underlying mechanism associated with ATRX dysfunction which can explain the numerous cellular phenomena observed. There is, however, growing evidence for its role in the replication of various repetitive DNA templates which are thought to have a propensity to form secondary structures. Using a mouse knockout model we demonstrate that ATRX plays a direct role in facilitating DNA replication. Ablation of ATRX alone, although leading to a DNA damage response at telomeres, is not sufficient to trigger the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

  12. Blimp-1-mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, SuJin; Cobb, Dustin A; Bhadra, Rajarshi; Youngblood, Ben; Khan, Imtiaz A

    2016-08-22

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)-susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  13. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskomani Silambarasan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h. miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis.

  14. Do gender differences in the role of dysfunctional attitudes in depressive symptoms depend on depression history?

    OpenAIRE

    You, Sungeun; Merritt, Rebecca Davis; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Gender differences in the moderating role of dysfunctional attitudes in the relationship between life stress and depressive symptoms were examined with and without controlling for the presence of lifetime history of depression. When lifetime history of depression was controlled, dysfunctional attitudes played a moderating role in the relationship between life stress and depressive symptoms for both men and women. However, when lifetime history of depression was not controlled, dysfunctional a...

  15. NOX, NOX who is there?, The contribution of NADPH Oxidase to beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eTaylor-Fishwick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of diabetes prevalence over the next decades warrant the aggressive discovery of new approaches to stop or reverse loss of functional beta cell mass. Beta cells are recognized to have a relatively high sensitivity to reactive oxygen species (ROS and become dysfunctional under oxidative stress conditions. New discoveries have identified NADPH oxidases in beta cells as contributors to elevated cellular ROS. Reviewed are recent reports that evidence a role for NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1 in beta cell dysfunction. NOX-1 is stimulated by inflammatory cytokines that are elevated in diabetes. First, regulation of cytokine-stimulated NOX-1 expression has been linked to inflammatory lipid mediators derived from 12-lipoxyganase activity. For the first time in beta cells these data integrate distinct pathways associated with beta cell dysfunction. Second, regulation of NOX-1 in beta cells involves feed-forward control linked to elevated ROS and Src-kinase activation. This potentially results in unbridled ROS generation and identifies candidate targets for pharmacologic intervention. Third, consideration is provided of new, first-in-class, selective inhibitors of NOX-1. These compounds could have an important role in assessing a disruption of NOX-1/ROS signaling as a new approach to preserve and protect beta cell mass in diabetes.

  16. Epigenetic Dysfunction in Turner Syndrome Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, Bradly J; Hong, Lee Kyung; Whitmire, Jason K; Su, Maureen A

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition associated with partial or complete absence of the X chromosome that involves characteristic findings in multiple organ systems. In addition to well-known clinical characteristics such as short stature and gonadal failure, TS is also associated with T cell immune alterations and chronic otitis media, suggestive of a possible immune deficiency. Recently, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on the X chromosome (UTX), a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been identified as a downregulated gene in TS immune cells. Importantly, UTX is an X-linked gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation and thus is haploinsufficient in TS. Mice with T cell-specific UTX deficiency have impaired clearance of chronic viral infection due to decreased frequencies of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which are critical for B cell antibody generation. In parallel, TS patients have decreased Tfh frequencies in peripheral blood. Together, these findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of the X-linked UTX gene in TS T cells underlies an immune deficit, which may manifest as increased predisposition to chronic otitis media. PMID:27039394

  17. Five dysfunctional telomeres predict onset of senescence in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, Zeenia; Cesare, Anthony J.; Huschtscha, Lily I.; Neumann, Axel A.; Reddel, Roger R

    2011-01-01

    Replicative senescence is accompanied by a telomere-specific DNA damage response (DDR). We found that DDR+ telomeres occur spontaneously in early-passage normal human cells and increase in number with increasing cumulative cell divisions. DDR+ telomeres at replicative senescence retain TRF2 and RAP1 proteins, are not associated with end-to-end fusions and mostly result from strand-independent, postreplicative dysfunction. On the basis of the calculated number of DDR+ telomeres in G1-phase cel...

  18. PD-L1 blockade improves immune dysfunction of spleen dendritic cells and T-cells in zymosan-induced multiple organs dysfunction syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qian; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Min; Jin, Yiduo; Lu, Jiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This research is to investigate the role of tolerant spleen dendritic cells (DC) in multiple organs dysfunction syndromes (MODS) at late stage. Tolerant DC and MODS were induced by intraperotineal injection of zymosan. The immunity of DC was determined by examining interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-2, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), CD86, programmed death (PD-1), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) or T-cell proliferation in serum, spleen homo...

  19. Sepsis-associated AKI: epithelial cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlet, David R; Shaw, Andrew D; Kellum, John A

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently in critically ill patients with sepsis, in whom it doubles the mortality rate and half of the survivors suffer permanent kidney damage or chronic kidney disease. Failure in the development of viable therapies has prompted studies to better elucidate the cellular and molecular etiologies of AKI, which have generated novel theories and paradigms for the mechanisms of this disease. These studies have shown multifaceted origins and elements of AKI that, in addition to/in lieu of ischemia, include the generation of damage-associated molecular patterns and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, the inflammatory response, humoral and cellular immune activation, perturbation of microvascular flow and oxidative stress, bioenergetic alterations, cell-cycle alterations, and cellular de-differentiation/re-differentiation. It is becoming clear that a major etiologic effector of all these inputs is the renal tubule epithelial cell (RTEC). This review discusses these elements and their effects on RTECs, and reviews the current hypotheses of how these effects may determine the fate of RTECs during sepsis-induced AKI. PMID:25795502

  20. Eating Dysfunctions in College Women: The Roles of Depression and Attachment to Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Joeanne; Oliver, J. M.; Katz, Barry M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors examined the roles of depression and attachment to fathers in college women's eating dysfunctions. Three-hundred six undergraduate women completed (1) a diagnostic measure of eating dysfunctions that categorized them as asymptomatic, symptomatic but not eating disordered, or eating disordered; (2) 3 dimensional measures of attachment…

  1. The role of penile prosthetic surgery in the modern management of erectile dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, S.; Bhojwani, A; Terry, T

    2000-01-01

    The management of erectile dysfunction looks set to be revolutionised with the introduction of effective oral therapies. There will remain, however, some men who do not respond to conservative measures. This article reviews the important role of penile prosthetic surgery as a treatment option in these patients.


Keywords: penile prosthesis; erectile dysfunction

  2. 线粒体功能障碍与心血管疾病%Roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊燕; 张梅; 陈菲; 方伟进

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are important organelles of energy generation in eukaryocytes and play a pivotal role in cell calcium homeostasis, signal transduction and apoptotic regulation. The possible causes leading to mitochondrial dysfunction include oxidative stress, Ca + disorder, reduction of mitochondrial biosynthesis and mitochondrial DNA mutations, all of which are also closely related to the development of cardiovascular diseases. Understanding the mitochondrial dysfunction and its important role in cardiovascular diseases are very significant for elucidating the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. High-density lipoprotein, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell survival mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Roger; Giordano, Samantha; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic injury is associated with acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and open heart surgery. The timely re-establishment of blood flow is critical in order to minimize cardiac complications. Reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic period, however, can induce severe cardiomyocyte dysfunction with mitochondria serving as a major target of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. An increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces damage to mitochondrial respiratory complexes leading to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial membrane perturbations also contribute to calcium overload, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and the release of apoptotic mediators into the cytoplasm. Clinical and experimental studies show that ischemic preconditioning (ICPRE) and postconditioning (ICPOST) attenuate mitochondrial injury and improve cardiac function in the context of I/R injury. This is achieved by the activation of two principal cell survival cascades: 1) the Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway; and 2) the Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Recent data suggest that high density lipoprotein (HDL) mimics the effects of conditioning protocols and attenuates myocardial I/R injury via activation of the RISK and SAFE signaling cascades. In this review, we discuss the roles of apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I), the major protein constituent of HDL, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysosphingolipid associated with small, dense HDL particles as mediators of cardiomyocyte survival. Both apoA-I and S1P exert an infarct-sparing effect by preventing ROS-dependent injury and inhibiting the opening of the mPTP. PMID:27150975

  4. Temporary corneal stem cell dysfunction after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy can cause corneal and conjuctival abnormalities that sometimes require surgical treatment. Corneal stem cell dysfunction is described, which recovered after the cessation of radiation. Methods - A 44-year-old man developed a corneal epithelial abnormality associated with conjuctival and corneal inflammation following radiation therapy for maxillary cancer. Examination of brush cytology samples showed goblet cells in the upper and lower parts of the cornea, which showed increased fluorescein permeability, and intraepithelial lymphocytes. Impression cytology showed goblet cells in the same part of the cornea. Specular microscopy revealed spindle type epithelial cells. Patient follow up included artificial tears and an antibiotic ophthalmic ointment. The corneal abnormalities resolved after 4 months with improved visual acuity without any surgical intervention, but the disappearance of the palisades of Vogt did not recover at 1 year after radiation. Radiation therapy in this patient caused temporary stem cell dysfunction which resulted in conjunctivalisation in a part of the cornea. Although limbal stem cell function did not fully recover, this rare case suggested that medical options should be considered before surgery. (Author)

  5. Role of clinical neurophysiological tests in evaluation of erectile dysfunction in people with spinal cord disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf V; Taly Arun Kumar; Sivaraman Nair K; Rao Shivaji; Sridhar

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While erectile dysfunction is frequent among people with disorders of the spinal cord, the role of various clinical neurophysiological tests in assessment is not clear. AIMS: To study the role of clinical neurophysiological investigations in assessing erectile dysfunction among men with spinal cord disorders. SETTING: National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, India. DESIGN: Survey. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subjects with a score of 21 or less on the International Index ...

  6. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Angelo Claudino

    Full Text Available Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD, include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking.Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS.Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g. Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM, relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM, KCl (1 mM-300mM, CaCl2 (1μM-100mM, α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder.SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo, compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration.Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections

  7. Stem cells: novel players in the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyang Zhang; Maarten Albersen; XunboJin; Guiting Lin

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their capacity for both self-renewal and directed differentiation; thus,they represent great promise for regenerative medicine.Historically,stem cells have been categorized as either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or adult stem cells (ASCs).It was previously believed that only ESCs hold the ability to differentiate into any cell type,whereas ASCs have the capacity to give rise only to cells of a given germ layer.More recently,however,numerous studies demonstrated the ability of ASCs to differentiate into cell types beyond their tissue origin.The aim of this review was to summarize contemporary evidence regarding stem cell availability,differentiation,and more specifically,the potential of these cells in the diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) in both animal models and human research.We performed a search on PubMed for articles related to definition,Iocalisation and circulation of stem cells as well as the application of stem cells in both diagnosis and treatment of ED.Strong evidence supports the concept that stem cell therapy is potentially the next therapeutic approach for ED.To date,a large spectrum of stem cells,including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,adipose tissue-derived stem cells and muscle-derived stem cells,have been investigated for neural,vascular,endothelial or smooth muscle regeneration in animal models for ED.In addition,several subtypes of ASCs are localized in the penis,and circulating endogenous stem cells can be employed to predict the outcome of ED and ED-related cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjeong Jung

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  9. Ultrafine particles cause cytoskeletal dysfunctions in macrophages: role of intracellular calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown David M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution is reported to cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. Since most of these particles are derived form combustion processes, the primary composition product is carbon with a very small diameter (ultrafine, less than 100 nm in diameter. Besides the induction of reactive oxygen species and inflammation, ultrafine particles (UFP can cause intracellular calcium transients and suppression of defense mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, such as impaired migration or phagocytosis. Methods In this study the role of intracellular calcium transients caused by UFP was studied on cytoskeleton related functions in J774A.1 macrophages. Different types of fine and ultrafine carbon black particles (CB and ufCB, respectively, such as elemental carbon (EC90, commercial carbon (Printex 90, diesel particulate matter (DEP and urban dust (UD, were investigated. Phagosome transport mechanisms and mechanical cytoskeletal integrity were studied by cytomagnetometry and cell viability was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Macrophages were exposed in vitro with 100 and 320 μg UFP/ml/million cells for 4 hours in serum free medium. Calcium antagonists Verapamil, BAPTA-AM and W-7 were used to block calcium channels in the membrane, to chelate intracellular calcium or to inhibit the calmodulin signaling pathways, respectively. Results Impaired phagosome transport and increased cytoskeletal stiffness occurred at EC90 and P90 concentrations of 100 μg/ml/million cells and above, but not with DEP or UD. Verapamil and W-7, but not BAPTA-AM inhibited the cytoskeletal dysfunctions caused by EC90 or P90. Additionally the presence of 5% serum or 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA suppressed the cytoskeletal dysfunctions. Cell viability showed similar results, where co-culture of ufCB together with Verapamil, W-7, FCS or BSA produced less cell dead compared to the particles only.

  10. The role of immune dysfunction in the pathophysiology of autism

    OpenAIRE

    Onore, Charity; Careaga, Milo; Ashwood, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a complex group of neurodevelopmental disorders encompassing impairments in communication, social interactions and restricted stereotypical behaviors. Although a link between altered immune responses and ASD was first recognized nearly 40 years ago, only recently has new evidence started to shed light on the complex multifaceted relationship between immune dysfunction and behavior in ASD. Neurobiological research in ASD has highlighted pathways involved in ...

  11. Resveratrol prevents interleukin-1β-induced dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Lin, Yan; JING, CHANGWEN; Yang, Tao; Ji, Yong; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays an important role in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Resveratrol, a polyphenol, is known to have a wide range of pharmacological properties in vitro. In this research, we examined the effects of resveratrol on IL-1β-induced β-cell dysfunction. Methods We first evaluated the effect of resveratrol on nitric oxide (NO) formation in RINm5F cells stimulated with IL-1β using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection a...

  12. Thymic Epithelial Cell Development and Its Dysfunction in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are the key components in thymic microenvironment for T cells development. TECs, composed of cortical and medullary TECs, are derived from a common bipotent progenitor and undergo a stepwise development controlled by multiple levels of signals to be functionally mature for supporting thymocyte development. Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR family members including the receptor activator for NFκB (RANK, CD40, and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR cooperatively control the thymic medullary microenvironment and self-tolerance establishment. In addition, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, Wnt, and Notch signals are essential for establishment of functional thymic microenvironment. Transcription factors Foxn1 and autoimmune regulator (Aire are powerful modulators of TEC development, differentiation, and self-tolerance. Dysfunction in thymic microenvironment including defects of TEC and thymocyte development would cause physiological disorders such as tumor, infectious diseases, and autoimmune diseases. In the present review, we will summarize our current understanding on TEC development and the underlying molecular signals pathways and the involvement of thymus dysfunction in human diseases.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction remodels one-carbon metabolism in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoyan Robert; Ong, Shao-En; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Sharma, Rohit; Thompson, Dawn A; Vafai, Scott B; Cox, Andrew G; Marutani, Eizo; Ichinose, Fumito; Goessling, Wolfram; Regev, Aviv; Carr, Steven A; Clish, Clary B; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, ranging from rare, inborn errors of metabolism to common, age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. How these lesions give rise to diverse pathology is not well understood, partly because their proximal consequences have not been well-studied in mammalian cells. Here we provide two lines of evidence that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leads to alterations in one-carbon metabolism pathways. First, using hypothesis-generating metabolic, proteomic, and transcriptional profiling, followed by confirmatory experiments, we report that mitochondrial DNA depletion leads to an ATF4-mediated increase in serine biosynthesis and transsulfuration. Second, we show that lesioning the respiratory chain impairs mitochondrial production of formate from serine, and that in some cells, respiratory chain inhibition leads to growth defects upon serine withdrawal that are rescuable with purine or formate supplementation. Our work underscores the connection between the respiratory chain and one-carbon metabolism with implications for understanding mitochondrial pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10575.001 PMID:27307216

  14. Foodborne cereulide causes beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Vangoitsenhoven

    Full Text Available To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function.Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6 and rat (INS-1E beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1. Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests.24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05. Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05 and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05 and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05 following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively.Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell.

  15. Role of amyloid peptides in vascular dysfunction and platelet dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Canobbio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia in the elderly. AD is accompanied by the accumulation of amyloid peptides in the brain parenchyma and in the cerebral vessels. The sporadic form of the AD accounts for about 95% of all cases. It is characterized by a late onset, typically after the age of 65, with a complex and still poorly understood aetiology. Several observations point towards a central role of cerebrovascular dysfunction in the onset of sporadic AD. According to the vascular hypothesis, AD may be initiated by vascular dysfunctions that precede and promote the neurodegenerative process. In accordance to this, AD patients show increased hemorragic or ischemic stroke risks. It is now clear that multiple bidirectional connections exist between AD and cerebrovascular disease, and in this new scenario, the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular cells and blood platelets appear to be central to AD. In this review we analyse the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular function and platelet activation and its contribution to the cerebrovascular pathology associated with AD and the progression of this disease.

  16. Patients with Tuberculosis Have a Dysfunctional Circulating B-Cell Compartment, Which Normalizes following Successful Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Nonno, Franca; Baiocchini, Andrea; Petrone, Linda; Vanini, Valentina; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Goletti, Delia; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    B-cells not only produce immunoglobulins and present antigens to T-cells, but also additional key roles in the immune system. Current knowledge on the role of B-cells in infections caused by intracellular bacteria is fragmentary and contradictory. We therefore analysed the phenotypical and functional properties of B-cells during infection and disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacillus causing tuberculosis (TB), and included individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI), active TB, individuals treated successfully for TB, and healthy controls. Patients with active or treated TB disease had an increased proportion of antibodies reactive with mycobacteria. Patients with active TB had reduced circulating B-cell frequencies, whereas only minor increases in B-cells were detected in the lungs of individuals deceased from TB. Both active TB patients and individuals with LTBI had increased relative fractions of B-cells with an atypical phenotype. Importantly, these B-cells displayed impaired proliferation, immunoglobulin- and cytokine- production. These defects disappeared upon successful treatment. Moreover, T-cell activity was strongest in individuals successfully treated for TB, compared to active TB patients and LTBI subjects, and was dependent on the presence of functionally competent B-cells as shown by cellular depletion experiments. Thus, our results reveal that general B-cell function is impaired during active TB and LTBI, and that this B-cell dysfunction compromises cellular host immunity during Mtb infection. These new insights may provide novel strategies for correcting Mtb infection-induced immune dysfunction towards restored protective immunity. PMID:27304615

  17. Erectile dysfunction and heart failure: the role of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ameri, H; Kloner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are effective in treating erectile dysfunction (ED). ED and heart failure (HF) share similar risk factors, and commonly present together. This association has led to questions ranging from the safety and efficacy of PDE-5 inhibitors in HF patients to a possible role for this class of medication to treat HF patients with or without ED. In addition to endothelial dysfunction, there are causes of ED specific to patients with HF including low exerci...

  18. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION AND ROLE NITRATES AND BETA-BLOCKERS IN ITS CORRECTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Britov

    2016-01-01

    The role of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and some other cardiovascular diseases is considered. The endothelial dysfunction takes place at the earliest stages of diseases. The interaction of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor factors produced by vascular endothelium is discussed. The treating effect of some medicinal products (nitrates, beta-blockers and others) is analyzed from the point of view of their correcting influence on endothelial function.

  19. Role of microtubules in the contractile dysfunction of hypertrophied myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Ishiguro, Y.; Conrad, C. H.; Buckley, J. M.; Morgan, J. P.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether the ameliorative effects of microtubule depolymerization on cellular contractile dysfunction in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy apply at the tissue level. BACKGROUND: A selective and persistent increase in microtubule density causes decreased contractile function of cardiocytes from cats with hypertrophy produced by chronic right ventricular (RV) pressure overloading. Microtubule depolymerization by colchicine normalizes contractility in these isolated cardiocytes. However, whether these changes in cellular function might contribute to changes in function at the more highly integrated and complex cardiac tissue level was unknown. METHODS: Accordingly, RV papillary muscles were isolated from 25 cats with RV pressure overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) for 4 weeks and 25 control cats. Contractile state was measured using physiologically sequenced contractions before and 90 min after treatment with 10(-5) mol/liter colchicine. RESULTS: The PAB significantly increased RV systolic pressure and the RV weight/body weight ratio in PAB; it significantly decreased developed tension from 59+/-3 mN/mm2 in control to 25+/-4 mN/mm2 in PAB, shortening extent from 0.21+/-0.01 muscle lengths (ML) in control to 0.12+/-0.01 ML in PAB, and shortening rate from 1.12+/-0.07 ML/s in control to 0.55+/-0.03 ML/s in PAB. Indirect immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that PAB muscles had a selective increase in microtubule density and that colchicine caused complete microtubule depolymerization in both control and PAB papillary muscles. Microtubule depolymerization normalized myocardial contractility in papillary muscles of PAB cats but did not alter contractility in control muscles. CONCLUSIONS: Excess microtubule density, therefore, is equally important to both cellular and to myocardial contractile dysfunction caused by chronic, severe pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy.

  20. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    % increase in ROS generation; this implies that higher ROS concentrations in sliced tissue indicate extraneous ROS generation not associated with the ROS stimulus of interest. We also investigated the role of ROS in chronic flow overload (CFO). Elevation of shear stress that increases production of vascular ROS has not been well investigated. We hypothesize that CFO increases ROS production mediated in part by NADPH oxidase, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. ROS production increased threefold in response to CFO. The endothelium dependent vasorelaxation was compromised in the CFO group. Treatment with apocynin significantly reduced ROS production in the vessel wall, preserved endothelial function, and inhibited expressions of p22/p47phox and NOX2/NOX4. The present data implicate NADPH oxidase produced ROS and eNOS uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction at 1 wk of CFO. In further work, a swine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) model induced by pulmonary artery (PA) banding was used to study right coronary artery (RCA) endothelial function and ROS level. Endothelial function was compromised in RCA of RVH as attributed to insufficient endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. In conclusion, stretch due to outward remodeling of RCA during RVH (at constant wall shear stress), similar to vessel stretch in hypertension, appears to induce ROS elevation, endothelial dysfunction, and an increase in basal tone. Finally, although hypertension-induced vascular stiffness and dysfunction are well established in patients and animal models, we hypothesize that stretch or distension due to hypertension and outward expansion is the cause of endothelial dysfunction mediated by angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in coronary arteries. The expression and activation of AT1 receptor and the production of ROS were up regulated and endothelial function deteriorated in the RCA. The acute inhibition of AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase partially restored the endothelial

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in cirrhosis: Role of inflammationand oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balasubramaniyan Vairappan

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in thepathobiology of endothelial dysfunction (ED) in thecontext of cirrhosis with portal hypertension and definesnovel strategies and potential targets for therapy. EDhas prognostic implications by predicting unfavourableearly hepatic events and mortality in patients withportal hypertension and advanced liver diseases. EDcharacterised by an impaired bioactivity of nitric oxide(NO) within the hepatic circulation and is mainly dueto decreased bioavailability of NO and accelerateddegradation of NO with reactive oxygen species.Furthermore, elevated inflammatory markers also inhibitNO synthesis and causes ED in cirrhotic liver. Therefore,improvement of NO availability in the hepatic circulationcan be beneficial for the improvement of endothelialdysfunction and associated portal hypertension inpatients with cirrhosis. Furthermore, therapeutic agentsthat are identified in increasing NO bioavailabilitythrough improvement of hepatic endothelial nitricoxide synthase (eNOS) activity and reduction in hepaticasymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous modulatorof eNOS and a key mediator of elevated intrahepaticvascular tone in cirrhosis would be interestingtherapeutic approaches in patients with endothelialdysfunction and portal hypertension in advanced liverdiseases.

  2. The role of tissue renin angiotensin aldosterone system in the development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annayya R Aroor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies support the notion that arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular events contributing significantly to systolic hypertension, impaired ventricular-arterial coupling and diastolic dysfunction, impairment in myocardial oxygen supply and demand, and progression of kidney disease. Although arterial stiffness is associated with aging, it is accelerated in the presence of obesity and diabetes. The prevalence of arterial stiffness parallels the increase of obesity that is occurring in epidemic proportions and is partly driven by a sedentary life style and consumption of a high fructose, high salt and high fat western diet. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of arterial stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. The local tissue renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS in the vascular tissue and immune cells and perivascular adipose tissue is recognized as an important element involved in endothelial dysfunction which contributes significantly to arterial stiffness. Activation of vascular RAAS is seen in humans and animal models of obesity and diabetes, and associated with enhanced oxidative stress and inflammation in the vascular tissue. The cross talk between angiotensin and aldosterone underscores the importance of mineralocorticoid receptors in modulation of insulin resistance, decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide, endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness. In addition, both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this local tissue activation of RAAS. In this review we will attempt to present a unifying mechanism of how environmental and immunological factors are involved in this local tissue RAAS activation, and the role of this process in the development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness and targeting tissue RAAS activation.

  3. Role of angiotensin receptor blockers in patients with left ventricular dysfunction : lessons from CHARM and VALIANT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2004-01-01

    The role of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in patients with left ventricular dysfunction has changed after the VALIANT and CHARM trials. CHARM proved that candesartan is a good alternative for patients with chronic heart failure who cannot tolerate ACE-inhibitors. Moreover, VALIANT demonstrate

  4. Psychology's Role in the Assessment of Erectile Dysfunction: Historical Precedents, Current Knowledge, and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Mark D.; Carey, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the role of the psychologist in the evaluation of erectile dysfunction. Reviews current diagnostic criteria and provides a historical overview of the topic. Summarizes current epidemiologic knowledge, including data on prevalence and research on cognitive, affective, dydactic, and lifestyle etiologic risk factors. Discusses assessment…

  5. Innate lymphoid cells as novel regulators of obesity and its-associated metabolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Yang, W; Tian, Z; van Velkinburgh, J C; Song, J; Wu, Y; Ni, B

    2016-06-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity worldwide has been accompanied by increases in risk and rates of obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions, such as insulin resistance. The chronic, low-grade inflammatory condition of obesity highlights the pathophysiological link between the immune system and the metabolic system, which has yet to be fully understood. Recent studies of obesity have started to uncover potential regulatory roles for the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which under normal conditions serve to regulate development of lymphoid tissue and function of the mucosal immune system. The ILCs are a newly identified immune cell population with complicated composition and subsequently diverse and dynamic functions. Studies to determine the distribution profile of the various ILCs in adipose tissue provide intriguing clues as to their regulatory capacity in obesity and its associated metabolic dysfunctions. Here, we review the recent findings supporting a role for ILCs as regulators of obesity or its associated insulin resistance, and discuss the potential underlying molecular mechanism as well as its promise as a therapeutic target for clinical applications. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:26948388

  6. The DNA methylation inhibitor induces telomere dysfunction and apoptosis of leukemia cells that is attenuated by telomerase over-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Li, Bingnan; de Jonge, Nick; Björkholm, Magnus; Xu, Dawei

    2015-03-10

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTIs) such as 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) have been used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignancies. Although inhibiting global/gene-specific DNA methylation is widely accepted as a key mechanism behind DNMTI anti-tumor activity, other mechanisms are likely involved in DNMTI's action. Because telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) plays key roles in cancer through telomere elongation and telomere lengthening-independent activities, and TERT has been shown to confer chemo- or radio-resistance to cancer cells, we determine whether DNMTIs affect telomere function and whether TERT/telomerase interferes with their anti-cancer efficacy. We showed that 5-AZA induced DNA damage and telomere dysfunction in AML cell lines by demonstrating the presence of 53-BP1 foci and the co-localization of 53-BP1 foci with telomere signals, respectively. Telomere dysfunction was coupled with diminished TERT expression, shorter telomere and apoptosis in 5-AZA-treated cells. However, 5-AZA treatment did not lead to changes in the methylation status of subtelomere regions. Down-regulation of TERT expression similarly occurred in primary leukemic cells derived from AML patients exposed to 5-AZA. TERT over-expression significantly attenuated 5-AZA-mediated DNA damage, telomere dysfunction and apoptosis of AML cells. Collectively, 5-AZA mediates the down-regulation of TERT expression, and induces telomere dysfunction, which consequently exerts an anti-tumor activity. PMID:25682873

  7. Role of oxidative DNA damage in mitochondrial dysfunction and Huntington's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Peña, Sylvette

    2013-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with an autosomal dominant expression pattern and typically a late-onset appearance. HD is a movement disorder with a heterogeneous phenotype characterized by involuntary dance-like gait, bioenergetic deficits, motor impairment, and cognitive and psychiatric deficits. Compelling evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie HD pathogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms underlying mutant huntingtin-induced neurological toxicity remain unclear. The objective of this paper is to review recent literature regarding the role of oxidative DNA damage in mitochondrial dysfunction and HD pathogenesis. PMID:23602907

  8. Ionizing radiation induces PI3K-dependent JNK activation for amplifying mitochondrial dysfunction in human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is one of the most commonly used treatments for a wide variety of tumors. Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation results in the simultaneous activation or down regulation of multiple signaling pathways, which play critical role in controlling cell death and cell survival after irradiation in a cell type specific manner. The molecular mechanism by which apoptotic cell death occurs in response to ionizing radiation has been widely explored but not precisely deciphered. Therefore an improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in radiation-induced apoptosis may ultimately provide novel strategies of intervention in specific signal transduction pathways to favorably alter the therapeutic ratio in the treatment of human malignancies. The aim of our investigation was to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated apoptotic cell death triggered by ionizing radiation in human cervical cancer cells. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation utilizes PI3K-JNK signaling pathway for amplifying mitochondrial dysfunction and susequent apoptotic cell death: We showed that PI3K-dependent JNK activation leads to transcriptional upregulation of Fas and the phosphorylation/inactivation of Bcl-2, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated apoptotic cell death in response to ionizing radiation

  9. Vascular dysfunction in diabetes: The endothelial progenitor cells as new therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Adriana

    2011-06-15

    The vascular endothelium is a critical determinant of diabetes-associated vascular complications, and improving endothelial function is an important target for therapy. Diabetes mellitus contributes to endothelial cell injury and dysfunction. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in maintaining endothelial function and might affect the progression of vascular disease. EPCs are essential to blood vessel formation, can differentiate into mature endothelial cells, and promote the repair of damaged endothelium. In diabetes, the circulating EPC count is low and their functionality is impaired. The mechanisms that underlie this reduced count and impaired functionality are poorly understood. Knowledge of the status of EPCs is critical for assessing the health of the vascular system, and interventions that increase the number of EPCs and restore their angiogenic activity in diabetes may prove to be particularly beneficial. The present review outlines current thinking on EPCs' therapeutic potential in endothelial dysfunction in diabetes, as well as evidence-based perspectives regarding their use for vascular regenerative medicine. PMID:21860692

  10. Cardiac dysfunction in cirrhosis - does adrenal function play a role? A hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theocharidou, Eleni; Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    conditions, such as sepsis, bleeding and surgery. CCM reverses after liver transplantation and potentially has a role in the pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome. In adrenal insufficiency (AI), cardiac dysfunction is a feature with low ejection fraction, decreased left ventricular chamber size and...... to both cardiac conditions. Thus, AI may play a role in CCM. Steroid replacement therapy reverses cardiac changes in AI, and may do so for CCM, with important therapeutic implications; this needs formal evaluation....

  11. Cardiac dysfunction in cirrhosis - does adrenal function play a role? A hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theocharidou, Eleni; Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    conditions, such as sepsis, bleeding and surgery. CCM reverses after liver transplantation and potentially has a role in the pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome. In adrenal insufficiency (AI), cardiac dysfunction is a feature with low ejection fraction, decreased left ventricular chamber size and...... to both cardiac conditions. Thus, AI may play a role in CCM. Steroid replacement therapy reverses cardiac changes in AI, and may do so for CCM, with important therapeutic implications; this needs formal evaluation....

  12. Role of nitric oxide in hemodialysis-related hypotension in an experimental renal dysfunction dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Masaharu; Akimoto, Akira; Fujita, Tsuneo; Aramaki, Tomohei; Aoki, Mika; Shimada, Terumasa; Ohashi, Fumihito

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the role of nitric oxide (NO) in hemodialysis (HD)-related hypotension, the relationship between plasma NO metabolites (NOx) and blood pressure changes, and the effect of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a NO synthase inhibitor, on changes in blood pressure were evaluated in an experimental renal dysfunctional dog model. In order to create a renal dysfunction model, gentamicin was administered to male beagles in which 7 of 8 renal artery branches had been ligated. Normal renal functional and dysfunctional dogs underwent 3 hr of HD per day for 3 days. HD induced a transient decrease in mean blood pressure in the normal renal functional dogs. In renal dysfunctional dogs, a continuous hypotension occurred with a gradual increase in the plasma NOx concentration during HD. Although L-NMMA prevented the fall in blood pressure, it did not significantly change the plasma NOx concentration during HD. These results suggest that NO contributes to HD-related hypotension in renal dysfunctional dogs but the plasma NOx concentration does not reflect the change in blood pressure. PMID:14960811

  13. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  14. Implications of Altered Glutathione Metabolism in Aspirin-Induced Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HepG2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH)-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), prior to ASA tre...

  15. Dual roles of telomere dysfunction in initiation and suppression of tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human carcinomas arise through the acquisition of genetic changes that endow precursor cancer cells with a critical threshold of cancer-relevant genetic lesions. This complex genomic alterations confer upon precursor cancer cells the ability to grow indefinitely and to metastasize to distant sites. One important mechanism underlying a cell's tumorigenic potential is the status of its telomere. Telomeres are G-rich simple repeat sequences that serve to prevent chromosomal ends from being recognized as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Dysfunctional telomeres resemble DSBs, leading to the formation of dicentric chromosomes that fuel high degrees of genomic instability. In the setting of an intact p53 pathway, this instability promotes cellular senescence, a potent tumor suppressor mechanism. However, rare cells that stochastically lose p53 function emerge from this sea of genomic instability and progress towards cancer. In this review, we describe the use of mouse models to probe the impact of dysfunctional telomeres on tumor initiation and suppression

  16. Targeting IκB kinase β in Adipocyte Lineage Cells for Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsley, Robert N; Sui, Yipeng; Park, Se-Hyung; Liu, Zun; Lee, Richard G; Zhu, Beibei; Kern, Philip A; Zhou, Changcheng

    2016-07-01

    IκB kinase β (IKKβ), a central coordinator of inflammation through activation of nuclear factor-κB, has been identified as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions. In this study, we evaluated an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) inhibitor of IKKβ and found that IKKβ ASO ameliorated diet-induced metabolic dysfunctions in mice. Interestingly, IKKβ ASO also inhibited adipocyte differentiation and reduced adiposity in high-fat (HF)-fed mice, indicating an important role of IKKβ signaling in the regulation of adipocyte differentiation. Indeed, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic deletion of IKKβ in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes blocked these cells differentiating into adipocytes. To further elucidate the role of adipose progenitor IKKβ signaling in diet-induced obesity, we generated mice that selectively lack IKKβ in the white adipose lineage and confirmed the essential role of IKKβ in mediating adipocyte differentiation in vivo. Deficiency of IKKβ decreased HF-elicited adipogenesis in addition to reducing inflammation and protected mice from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Further, pharmacological inhibition of IKKβ also blocked human adipose stem cell differentiation. Our findings establish IKKβ as a pivotal regulator of adipogenesis and suggest that overnutrition-mediated IKKβ activation serves as an initial signal that triggers adipose progenitor cell differentiation in response to HF feeding. Inhibition of IKKβ with antisense therapy may represent as a novel therapeutic approach to combat obesity and metabolic dysfunctions. Stem Cells 2016;34:1883-1895. PMID:26991836

  17. Pancreatic α-Cell Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes: Old Kids on the Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sung Moon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D has been known as 'bi-hormonal disorder' since decades ago, the role of glucagon from α-cell has languished whereas β-cell taking center stage. Recently, numerous findings indicate that the defects of glucagon secretion get involve with development and exacerbation of hyperglycemia in T2D. Aberrant α-cell responses exhibit both fasting and postprandial states: hyperglucagonemia contributes to fasting hyperglycemia caused by inappropriate hepatic glucose production, and to postprandial hyperglycemia owing to blunted α-cell suppression. During hypoglycemia, insufficient counter-regulation response is also observed in advanced T2D. Though many debates still remained for exact mechanisms behind the dysregulation of α-cell in T2D, it is clear that the blockade of glucagon receptor or suppression of glucagon secretion from α-cell would be novel therapeutic targets for control of hyperglycemia. Whereas there have not been remarkable advances in developing new class of drugs, currently available glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors could be options for treatment of hyperglucagonemia. In this review, we focus on α-cell dysfunction and therapeutic potentials of targeting α-cell in T2D.

  18. The Role of Hypertriglyceridemia in the Development of Atherosclerosis and Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Matsumoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemic rabbit (PHT rabbit is a new dyslipidemic model showing remarkably high plasma triglycerides with only limited elevation of plasma total cholesterol. In PHT rabbits, plasma triglyceride was markedly elevated postprandially compared with healthy Japanese white (JW rabbits. In physiological experiments, the ring preparation of the thoracic aorta was suspended in an organ bath filled with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, and the developed tension was recorded. Endothelial function was evaluated by acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in each preparation with intact endothelium. The acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was diminished in PHT compared with JW rabbits, suggesting endothelial dysfunction in PHT rabbits. Histological examination was carried out in adipose tissue, liver and aorta. They were fixed in formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. The tissues were sliced (4 μm and stained using hematoxylin-eosin solution. In the adipose tissue, the visceral fat accumulated, and the size of adipose cells was enlarged in PHT rabbits. The liver of the PHT rabbit was fatty and degenerated. In aorta, increased intimal thickness was observed, suggesting the progression of atherosclerosis in the PHT rabbit. This study suggests the important role of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in atherosclerosis. By using PHT rabbits, the effects of hypertriglyceridemia on health and diseases could be evaluated precisely.

  19. Mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunction in renal convoluted tubules of obese mice: protective role of melatonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Stacchiotti

    Full Text Available Obesity is a common and complex health problem, which impacts crucial organs; it is also considered an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Few studies have analyzed the consequence of obesity in the renal proximal convoluted tubules, which are the major tubules involved in reabsorptive processes. For optimal performance of the kidney, energy is primarily provided by mitochondria. Melatonin, an indoleamine and antioxidant, has been identified in mitochondria, and there is considerable evidence regarding its essential role in the prevention of oxidative mitochondrial damage. In this study we evaluated the mechanism(s of mitochondrial alterations in an animal model of obesity (ob/ob mice and describe the beneficial effects of melatonin treatment on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics as influenced by mitofusin-2 and the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Melatonin dissolved in 1% ethanol was added to the drinking water from postnatal week 5-13; the calculated dose of melatonin intake was 100 mg/kg body weight/day. Compared to control mice, obesity-related morphological alterations were apparent in the proximal tubules which contained round mitochondria with irregular, short cristae and cells with elevated apoptotic index. Melatonin supplementation in obese mice changed mitochondria shape and cristae organization of proximal tubules, enhanced mitofusin-2 expression, which in turn modulated the progression of the mitochondria-driven intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These changes possibly aid in reducing renal failure. The melatonin-mediated changes indicate its potential protective use against renal morphological damage and dysfunction associated with obesity and metabolic disease.

  20. The subcellular compartmentalization of arginine metabolizing enzymes and their role in endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eChen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS through the conversion of its substrate, L-arginine to L-citrulline. Reduced access to L-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2 metabolize L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of L-arginine. Indeed, supplemental L-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, L-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis suggesting additional mechanisms. The compartmentalization of intracellular L-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of L-arginine. Indeed the subcellular location of L-arginine metabolizing enzymes plays important functional roles. In endothelial cells, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localtion. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, ASL, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. This review highlights the importance of the subcellular location of eNOS and arginine transporting and metabolizing enzymes to NO release and cardiovascular disease.

  1. Aldolase B knockdown prevents high glucose-induced methylglyoxal overproduction and cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Liu

    Full Text Available We used cultured endothelial cells as a model to examine whether up-regulation of aldolase B and enhanced methylglyoxal (MG formation play an important role in high glucose-induced overproduction of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs, oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction. High glucose (25 mM incubation up-regulated mRNA levels of aldose reductase (an enzyme converting glucose to fructose and aldolase B (a key enzyme that catalyzes MG formation from fructose and enhanced MG formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and HUVEC-derived EA. hy926 cells. High glucose-increased MG production in EA. hy926 cells was completely prevented by siRNA knockdown of aldolase B, but unaffected by siRNA knockdown of aldolase A, an enzyme responsible for MG formation during glycolysis. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 or semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase which produces MG during the metabolism of lipid and proteins, respectively, did not alter MG production. Both high glucose (25 mM and MG (30, 100 µM increased the formation of N(ε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL, a MG-induced AGE, oxidative stress (determined by the generation of oxidized DCF, H(2O(2, protein carbonyls and 8-oxo-dG, O-GlcNAc modification (product of the hexosamine pathway, membrane protein kinase C activity and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in EA. hy926 cells. However, the above metabolic and signaling alterations induced by high glucose were completely prevented by knockdown of aldolase B and partially by application of aminoguanidine (a MG scavenger or alagebrium (an AGEs breaker. In conclusion, efficient inhibition of aldolase B can prevent high glucose-induced overproduction of MG and related cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  2. IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS: A DISORDER OF EPITHELIAL CELL DYSFUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Zoz, Donald F.; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive dyspnea, interstitial infiltrates in lung parenchyma, and restriction on pulmonary function testing. IPF is the most common and severe of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), with most individuals progressing to respiratory failure. Multiple lines of evidence reveal prominent roles for alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in disease. Our current disease paradigm is that ongoing or repetitive injurious stimuli in the pre...

  3. The Role of Big Five Personality Factors and Defense Mechanisms in Predicting Quality of Life in Sexually Dysfunctional Female Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Salary, S; Roshan, R.; M. moghaddathin

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction can lead to behavioral problems and reduction in a person's quality of life. In 50 % of patients with personality disorders, there is also sexual dysfunction. Psychoanalysis approach attributes the cause of sexual dysfunction to a kind of fundamental anxiety as well as the use of immature mechanisms in these patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of big five personality traits and defensive mechanisms in predicting these patients' quality of life. S...

  4. The role of the mitochondrial dysfunction in two neurodegenerative diseases, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases and is correlated with augmented levels of intracellular oxydant stress. The mitochondrial defects observed in tissues from patients, as well as in animal and cellular models of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases, suggest the implication of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The two projects discussed in this manuscript focus on the role of particular aspects of mitochondrial physiology in ...

  5. Energy metabolic dysfunction as a carcinogenic factor in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongyan; Shi, Zhenhua; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Cancer, as a leading cause of death, has attracted enormous public attention. Reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is deemed to be one of the principal hallmarks of cancer. In this article, we reviewed the mutual relationships among environmental pollution factors, energy metabolic dysfunction, and various cancers. We found that most environmental pollution factors could induce cancers mainly by disturbing the energy metabolism. By triggering microenvironment alteration, energy metabolic dysfunction can be treated as a factor in carcinogenesis. Thus, we put forward that energy metabolism might be as a key point for studying carcinogenesis and tumor development to propose new methods for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27053249

  6. Role of Nox isoforms in angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Banfi, Botond; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes vascular disease through several mechanisms including by producing oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Although multiple potential sources of reactive oxygen species exist, the relative importance of each is unclear, particularly in individual vascular beds. In these experiments, we examined the role of NADPH oxidase (Nox1 and Nox2) in Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction in the cerebral circulation. Treatment with Ang II (1.4 mg·kg−1·day−1 for 7 days), but not vehicle, increased blood pressure in all groups. In wild-type (WT; C57Bl/6) mice, Ang II reduced dilation of the basilar artery to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine compared with vehicle but had no effect on responses in Nox2-deficient (Nox2−/y) mice. Ang II impaired responses to acetylcholine in Nox1 WT (Nox1+/y) and caused a small reduction in responses to acetylcholine in Nox1-deficient (Nox1−/y) mice. Ang II did not impair responses to the endothelium-independent agonists nitroprusside or papaverine in either group. In WT mice, Ang II increased basal and phorbol-dibutyrate-stimulated superoxide production in the cerebrovasculature, and these increases were abolished in Nox2−/y mice. Overall, these data suggest that Nox2 plays a relatively prominent role in mediating Ang II-induced oxidative stress and cerebral endothelial dysfunction, with a minor role for Nox1. PMID:22628375

  7. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  8. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  9. In vivo role of checkpoint kinase 2 in signaling telomere dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Flores, Juana M.; Blasco, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) is a downstream effector of the DNA damage response (DDR). Dysfunctional telomeres, either owing to critical shortening or disruption of the shelterin complex, activate a DDR, which eventually results in cell cycle arrest, senescence and/or apoptosis. Successive generations of telomerase-deficient (Terc) mice show accelerated aging and shorter lifespan due to tissue atrophy and impaired organ regeneration associated to progressive telomere shortening. In contrast, m...

  10. Chronic high-fat diet in fathers programs ß-cell dysfunction in female rat offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Sheau-Fang; Lin, Ruby C Y; Laybutt, D Ross;

    2010-01-01

    The global prevalence of obesity is increasing across most ages in both sexes. This is contributing to the early emergence of type 2 diabetes and its related epidemic. Having either parent obese is an independent risk factor for childhood obesity. Although the detrimental impacts of diet-induced ......The global prevalence of obesity is increasing across most ages in both sexes. This is contributing to the early emergence of type 2 diabetes and its related epidemic. Having either parent obese is an independent risk factor for childhood obesity. Although the detrimental impacts of diet......-induced maternal obesity on adiposity and metabolism in offspring are well established, the extent of any contribution of obese fathers is unclear, particularly the role of non-genetic factors in the causal pathway. Here we show that paternal high-fat-diet (HFD) exposure programs ß-cell 'dysfunction' in rat F(1...

  11. Paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability in cells with dysfunctional telomeres: Implication in multinucleation and chemosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Eun [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Seon Rang [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun Ran; Park, In-chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Kee [Department of Life Science and Genetic Engineering, Paichai University, Daejeon 302-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Kwon [Department of Biotechnology, Seoul Woman' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-74-2 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Paclitaxel serves as a stimulator of chromosomal fusion in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. {yields} Typical fusions involve p-arms, but paclitaxel-induced fusions occur between both q- and p-arms. {yields} Paclitaxel-stimulated fusions in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional evoke prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest and delay multinucleation. {yields} Upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel promotes chromosomal instability and subsequent apoptosis. {yields} Chromosomal fusion enhances paclitaxel chemosensitivity under telomere dysfunction. -- Abstract: The anticancer effect of paclitaxel is attributable principally to irreversible promotion of microtubule stabilization and is hampered upon development of chemoresistance by tumor cells. Telomere shortening, and eventual telomere erosion, evoke chromosomal instability, resulting in particular cellular responses. Using telomerase-deficient cells derived from mTREC-/-p53-/- mice, here we show that, upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel propagates chromosomal instability by stimulating chromosomal end-to-end fusions and delaying the development of multinucleation. The end-to-end fusions involve both the p- and q-arms in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. Paclitaxel-induced chromosomal fusions were accompanied by prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest, delayed multinucleation, and apoptosis. Telomere dysfunctional cells with mutlinucleation eventually underwent apoptosis. Thus, as telomere erosion proceeds, paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability, and both apoptosis and chemosensitization eventually develop.

  12. Role of Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Predicting Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence after Successful Electrical Cardioversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlens M. Melduni, M.D., M.P.H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of left ventricular (LV diastolic dysfunction in predicting atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence after successful electrical cardioversion is largely unknown. Studies suggest that there may be a link between abnormal LV compliance and the initial development, and recurrence of AF after electrical cardioversion. Although direct-current cardioversion (DCCV is a well-established and highly effective method to convert AF to sinus rhythm, it offers little else beyond immediate rate control because it does not address the underlying cause of AF. Preservation of sinus rhythm after successful cardioversion still remains a challenge for clinicians. Despite the use of antiarrhythmic drugs and serial cardioversions, the rate of AF recurrence remains high in the first year. Current evidence suggests that diastolic dysfunction, which is associated with atrial volume and pressure overload, may be a mechanism underlying the perpetuating cycle of AF recurrence following successful electrical cardioversion. Diastolic dysfunction is considered to be a defect in the ability of the myofibrils, which have shortened against a load in systole to eject blood into the high-pressure aorta, to rapidly or completely return to their resting length. Consequently, LV filling is impaired and the non-compliant left ventricle is unable to fill at low pressures. As a result, left atrial and pulmonary vein pressure rises, and electrical and structural remodeling of the atrial myocardium ensues, creating a vulnerable substrate for AF. In this article, we review the current evidence highlighting the association of LV diastolic dysfunction with AF recurrence after successful electrical cardioversion and provide an approach to the management of LV diastolic dysfunction to prevent AF recurrence.

  13. Circulating angiogenic cell dysfunction in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Zucco

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs play an important role in vascular repair and regeneration. This study was designed to examine the function of CACs derived from patients with HHT. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs isolated from patients with HHT and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were assessed for expression of CD34, CD133 and VEGF receptor 2 by flow cytometry. PBMNCs were cultured to procure early outgrowth CACs. Development of endothelial cell (EC phenotype in CACs was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. CAC apoptosis was assayed with Annexin V staining, and CAC migration assessed by a modified Boyden chamber assay. mRNA expression of endoglin (ENG, activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ACVLR1 or ALK1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in CACs was measured by real time RT-PCR. The percentage of CD34+ cells in PBMNCs from HHT patients was significantly higher than in PBMNCs of healthy controls. CACs derived from patients with HHT not only showed a significant reduction in EC-selective surface markers following 7-day culture, but also a significant increase in the rate of basal apoptosis and blunted migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1. CACs from HHT patients expressed significantly lower levels of ENG, ALK1 and eNOS mRNAs. In conclusion, CACs from patients with HHT exhibited various functional impairments, suggesting a reduced regenerative capacity of CACs to repair the vascular lesions seen in HHT patients.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: At the Intersection of Treatment Toxicity and Immune Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Lucie M; Yingst, Ashley; Verneris, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors face a multitude of short- and long-term health complications in the years after treatment. One important health complication that is associated with significant morbidity is metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). This constellation of findings, which includes obesity, glucose and lipid dysmetabolism, and hypertension, places affected individuals at increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular complications, and stroke. Previous studies have linked MetSyn in HCT survivors to prior treatment; however, few studies have addressed the potential roles of systemic inflammation and immune system dysfunction after HCT. Within this review, we address the recent advances in the understanding of adipose tissue biology, immune, and inflammatory mechanisms involved in MetSyn in non-HCT patients, and lastly, we discuss potential novel mechanisms that may play a role in MetSyn development after HCT, such as hematopoietic stem cell source, inflammatory status of the stem cell donor, and microbiome composition, all of which represent potential new directions for post-HCT MetSyn research. PMID:27013015

  15. Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor: Enbrel (Etanercept) for Subacute Pulmonary Dysfunction Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Yanik, Gregory A.; Mineishi, Shin; Levine, John E.; Kitko, Carrie L.; White, Eric S.; Vander Lugt, Mark T.; Harris, Andrew C.; Braun, Thomas; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Subacute lung disease, manifested as either obstructive (OLD) or restrictive (RLD) lung dysfunction, is a common complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each case, therapeutic options are limited, morbidity remains high, and long-term survival is poor. Between 2001 and 2008, 34 patients with noninfectious, obstructive (25) or RLD restrictive lung dysfunction (nine) received etanercept (Enbrel®, Amgen Inc.) 0.4 mg/kg/dose, subcutaneously, twice weekly, for 4 (group A) o...

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia: a systematic review of preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Oliveri, Roberto Stefan; Trojahn-Kølle, Stig-Frederik;

    2014-01-01

    was to assess, through systematic review, the potential benefit of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in radiation-induced and SS-related salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the World Health Organization...... gland dysfunction and xerostomia. Nonetheless, the preliminary studies identified in the present review were encouraging for further research....

  17. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Immune Dysfunction Associated with Abnormal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stroma Cells in Senescence Accelerated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mice (SAM) are a group of mice that show aging-related diseases, and SAM prone 10 (SAMP10) show spontaneous brain atrophy and defects in learning and memory. Our previous report showed that the thymus and the percentage of T lymphocytes are abnormal in the SAMP10, but it was unclear whether the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (BMMSCs) were abnormal, and whether they played an important role in regenerative medicine. We thus compared BMMSCs from SAMP10 and their control, SAM-resistant (SAMR1), in terms of cell cycle, oxidative stress, and the expression of PI3K and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Our cell cycle analysis showed that cell cycle arrest occurred in the G0/G1 phase in the SAMP10. We also found increased reactive oxygen stress and decreased PI3K and MAPK on the BMMSCs. These results suggested the BMMSCs were abnormal in SAMP10, and that this might be related to the immune system dysfunction in these mice. PMID:26840301

  19. p21WAF1/CIP1 deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► p21−/− HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. ► The expression levels of PGC-1α and AMPK were upregulated in p21−/− HCT116 cells. ► The proliferation of p21−/− HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. ► p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21WAF1/CIP1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21−/− HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53−/− cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1α and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21−/− cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1α axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21−/− cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21−/− cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  20. Dysfunctional telomeres in human BRCA2 mutated breast tumors and cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K., E-mail: skb@hi.is [Cancer Research Laboratory, BioMedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Steinarsdottir, Margret [Chromosome Laboratory, Department of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik (Iceland); Bjarnason, Hordur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E. [Cancer Research Laboratory, BioMedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2012-01-03

    In the present study the possible involvement of telomeres in chromosomal instability of breast tumors and cell lines from BRCA2 mutation carriers was examined. Breast tumors from BRCA2 mutation carriers showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome end-to-end fusions (CEFs) than tumors from non-carriers despite normal telomere DNA content. Frequent CEFs were also found in four different BRCA2 heterozygous breast epithelial cell lines, occasionally with telomere signal at the fusion point, indicating telomere capping defects. Extrachromosomal telomeric repeat (ECTR) DNA was frequently found scattered around metaphase chromosomes and interstitial telomere sequences (ITSs) were also common. Telomere sister chromatid exchanges (T-SCEs), characteristic of cells using alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), were frequently detected in all heterozygous BRCA2 cell lines as well as the two ALT positive cell lines tested. Even though T-SCE frequency was similar in BRCA2 heterozygous and ALT positive cell lines they differed in single telomere signal loss and ITSs. Chromatid type alterations were more prominent in the BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines that may have propensity for telomere based chromosome healing. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs) formation, identified by co-localization of telomeres and {gamma}-H2AX, supported telomere associated DNA damage response in BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines. TIFs were found in interphase nuclei, at chromosome ends, ITSs and ECTR DNA. In conclusion, our results suggest that BRCA2 has an important role in telomere stabilization by repressing CEFs through telomere capping and the prevention of telomere loss by replication stabilization.

  1. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania; Flores, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc(-/-)) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc(-/-) newborns but rescued in G3 Terc(-/-)/p21(-/-) mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  2. Internal carotid artery aneurysms, cranial nerve dysfunction and headache: the role of deformation and pulsation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Catarino, M.; Wikholm, G.; Svendsen, P. [Interventional Neuroradiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Frisen, L. [Ophthalmology Dept., Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Elfverson, J. [Neurosurgery Dept., Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Quiding, L. [Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering Dept., Sahlgrenska Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    Cranial nerve dysfunction and headache may occur with unruptured aneurysms of the cavernous and supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid artery. Nerve deformation (mass effect) and transmitted pulsations have been suggested as pathogenetic mechanisms. Differentiation may be possible by studying effects of endovascular treatment with Guglielmi detachable coils. Symptoms and signs of cranial neuropathy were retrospectively contrasted with angiographic aneurysm volumes before and after treatment in 10 patients. Mean follow-up was 36 months. Symptoms improved in three of four patients with cranial nerve dysfunction and in all patients with headache: None of the other patients, one with cranial nerve dysfunction, and three who were asymptomatic, developed any new symptoms after treatment. Aneurysm volume ranged from 0.1 to 2.7 cm{sup 3} before and 0.2 to 5.7 cm{sup 3} after treatment; the size thus increased by 15 to 110%, a change which was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The consistent increase in aneurysm volume with treatment is not associated with clinical deterioration, suggesting that deformation and displacement play a minor role in cranial neuropathy and that transmitted pulsations may be more important. (orig.)

  3. Internal carotid artery aneurysms, cranial nerve dysfunction and headache: the role of deformation and pulsation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial nerve dysfunction and headache may occur with unruptured aneurysms of the cavernous and supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid artery. Nerve deformation (mass effect) and transmitted pulsations have been suggested as pathogenetic mechanisms. Differentiation may be possible by studying effects of endovascular treatment with Guglielmi detachable coils. Symptoms and signs of cranial neuropathy were retrospectively contrasted with angiographic aneurysm volumes before and after treatment in 10 patients. Mean follow-up was 36 months. Symptoms improved in three of four patients with cranial nerve dysfunction and in all patients with headache: None of the other patients, one with cranial nerve dysfunction, and three who were asymptomatic, developed any new symptoms after treatment. Aneurysm volume ranged from 0.1 to 2.7 cm3 before and 0.2 to 5.7 cm3 after treatment; the size thus increased by 15 to 110%, a change which was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The consistent increase in aneurysm volume with treatment is not associated with clinical deterioration, suggesting that deformation and displacement play a minor role in cranial neuropathy and that transmitted pulsations may be more important. (orig.)

  4. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system. PMID:25976368

  5. Air Pollution-Induced Vascular Dysfunction: Potential Role of Endothelin-1 (ET-1) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Jordan; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to air pollution negatively impacts cardiovascular health. Studies show that increased exposure to a number of airborne pollutants increases the risk for cardiovascular disease progression, myocardial events, and cardiovascular mortality. A hypothesized mechanism linking air pollution and cardiovascular disease is the development of systemic inflammation and endothelium dysfunction, the latter of which can result from an imbalance of vasoactive factors within the vasculature. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent peptide vasoconstrictor that plays a significant role in regulating vascular homeostasis. It has been reported that the production and function of ET-1 and its receptors are upregulated in a number of disease states associated with endothelium dysfunction including hypertension and atherosclerosis. This mini-review surveys epidemiological and experimental air pollution studies focused on ET-1 dysregulation as a plausible mechanism underlying the development of cardiovascular disease. Although alterations in ET-1 system components are observed in some studies, there remains a need for future research to clarify whether these specific changes are compensatory or causally related to vascular injury and dysfunction. Moreover, further research may test the efficacy of selective ET-1 pharmacological interventions (e.g., ETA receptor inhibitors) to determine whether these treatments could impede the deleterious impact of air pollution exposure on cardiovascular health. PMID:26148452

  6. The Role of Natriuretic Peptides for the Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palazzuoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natriuretic peptides (NPs are entered in current guidelines for heart failure (HF diagnosis and management because of their high specificity and sensibility in screening patients with acute dyspnea. Due to their availability and relatively low cost, they became the first step examinations in HF patients evaluation at hospital admission together with clinical and chest radiography examination. NPs are released following any cardiac haemodynamic stress due to volume or pressure overload and should be considered as a mirror of cardiac condition helping in recognizing patients with poor outcome. Moreover, the exact role of NPs in early HF stages, in isolated diastolic dysfunction, and in general population is questioned. Several promising reports described their potential role; however, the wide cut-off definition, inclusion criteria, and intrinsic measurement biases do not actually consent to their clinical application in these settings. A multimodality strategy including both NPs and imaging studies appears to be the best strategy to define the cardiac dysfunction etiology and its severity as well as to identify patients with higher risk. In this review, we describe the current and potential role of NPs in patients with asymptomatic cardiac insufficiency, evaluating the requirement to obtain a better standardization for imaging as for laboratory criteria.

  7. Dysfunction of Murine Dendritic Cells Induced by Incubation with Tumor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengguang Gao; Xin Hui; Xianghuo He; Dafang Wan; Jianren Gu

    2008-01-01

    In vivo studies showed that dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction occurred in tumor microcnvironment. As tumors were composed of many kinds of cells, the direct effects of tumor cells on immature DCs (imDCs) are needed for further studies in vitro. In the present study, bone marrow-derived imDCs were incubated with lymphoma, hepatoma and menaloma cells in vitro and surface molecules in imDCs were determined by flow cytometry. Then, imDCs incubated with tumor cells or control imDCs were further pulsed with tumor lysates and then incubated with splenocytes to perform mixed lymphocyte reaction. The DC-dependent tumor antigen-specific T cell proliferation,and IL-12 secretion were determined by flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively.Finally, the DC-dependent tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL was determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The results showed that tumor cell-DC incubation down-regulated the surface molecules in imDCs, such as CD80, CD54, CDllb, CD11a and MHC class Ⅱ molecules. The abilities of DC-dependent antigen-specific T cell proliferation and IL-12 secretion were also decreased by tumor cell incubation in vitro. Most importantly, the ability for antigenic-specific CTL priming of DCs was also decreased by incubation with tumor cells. In the present in vitro study demonstrated that the defective abilities of DCs induced by tumor cell co-incubation and the co-incubation system might be useful for future study of tumor-immune cells direct interaction and for drug screen of immune-modulation.

  8. Microbial Translocation and B Cell Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosal barrier disrupted in HIV disease, resulting in increased systemic exposure to microbial products such as Lipo Polys Accharide (LPS. The association of enhanced microbial translocation and B cell dysfunction in HIV disease is not fully understood. High dose and short term exposure of microbial Toll-Like Receptor (TLR agonists were used as vaccine adjuvants, however, low dose and long term exposure of TLR agonists could be harmful. The characteristics of B cell dysfunction in HIV disease included B cell, especially memory B cell depletion, enhanced levels of autoimmune antibodies and impaired vaccine or antigen responsiveness. This review discusses and explores the possibility of the effect of microbial translocation on memory B cell depletion and impaired vaccine responses in HIV infection. By determining the mechanisms of B cell depletion and perturbations in HIV disease, it may be possible to design interventions that can improve immune responses to vaccines, reduce selected opportunistic infections and perhaps slow disease progression.

  9. Recruiting endogenous stem cells: a novel therapeutic approach for erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplanted stem cells (SCs, owing to their regenerative capacity, represent one of the most promising methods to restore erectile dysfunction (ED. However, insufficient source, invasive procedures, ethical and regulatory issues hamper their use in clinical applications. The endogenous SCs/progenitor cells resident in organ and tissues play critical roles for organogenesis during development and for tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Even without any therapeutic intervention, human body has a robust self-healing capability to repair the damaged tissues or organs. Therefore, SCs-for-ED therapy should not be limited to a supply-side approach. The resident endogenous SCs existing in patients could also be a potential target for ED therapy. The aim of this review was to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1 SC niche and SC biological features in vitro; (2 localization and mobilization of endogenous SCs; (3 existing evidence of penile endogenous SCs and their possible mode of mobilization. We performed a search on PubMed for articles related to these aspects in a wide range of basic studies. Together, numerous evidences hold the promise that endogenous SCs would be a novel therapeutic approach for the therapy of ED.

  10. Arsenic induces diabetic effects through beta-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Guo, Xuechao; Wu, Bing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Mei

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic as a potential risk factor for type 2 diabetes has been received attention recently. However, the roles of arsenic on development of diabetes are unclear. In this study, we compared the influences of inorganic arsenic (iAs) on normal and diabetic mice by systems toxicology approaches. Although iAs exposure did not change glucose tolerance in normal mice, it caused the pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis and oxidative damages in liver. However, iAs exposure worsened the glucose tolerance in diabetic mice, which might be due to increased gluconeogenesis and impairment of pancreatic β-cell function. It is interesting that iAs exposure could improve the insulin sensitivity based on the insulin tolerance testing by the activation of glucose uptake-related genes and enzymes in normal and diabetic individuals. Our data suggested that iAs exposure could cause pre-diabetic effects by altering the lipid metabolism, gluconeogenesis and insulin secretion in normal individual, and worsen diabetic effects in diabetes individual by these processes. Insulin resistance might be not the reason of diabetic effects caused by iAs, indicating that mechanism of the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure is different from the mechanism associated with traditional risk factors (such as obesity)-reduced type 2 diabetes.

  11. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sánchez-Calvo

    Full Text Available Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells. Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-, nitric oxide (●NO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2 expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO- and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH and ATP synthase (ATPase were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease.

  12. Common and cell type-specific responses of human cells to mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In yeast, mitochondrial dysfunction activates a specific pathway, termed retrograde regulation, which alters the expression of specific nuclear genes and results in increased replicative life span. In mammalian cells, the specific nuclear genes induced in response to loss of mitochondrial function are less well defined. This study characterizes responses in nuclear gene expression to loss of mitochondrial DNA sequences in three different human cell types: T143B, an osteosarcoma-derived cell line; ARPE19, a retinal pigment epithelium cell line; and GMO6225, a fibroblast cell population from an individual with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure gene expression of a selection of glycolysis, TCA cycle, mitochondrial, peroxisomal, extracellular matrix, stress response, and regulatory genes. Gene expression changes that were common to all three cell types included up-regulation of GCK (glucokinase), CS (citrate synthase), HOX1 (heme oxygenase 1), CKMT2 (mitochondrial creatine kinase 2), MYC (v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog), and WRN (Werner syndrome helicase), and down-regulation of FBP1 (fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase 1) and COL4A1 (collagen, type IV, alpha 1). RNA interference experiments show that induction of MYC is important in ρ0 cells for the up-regulation of glycolysis. In addition, a variety of cell type-specific gene changes was detected and most likely depended upon the differentiated functions of the individual cell types. These expression changes may help explain the response of different tissues to the loss of mitochondrial function due to aging or disease

  13. Characteristics of dysfunction of islet β-cell in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延兵

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of the dysfunction of isletβ-cell in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was carried out on 352 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and 48 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and then blood samples were collected 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 minutes later to measure the

  14. Role of mineralocorticoid receptor and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in adipocyte dysfunction and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Alessandra; Armani, Andrea; Mammi, Caterina; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Caprio, Massimiliano

    2013-09-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) classically mediates aldosterone effects on salt homeostasis and blood pressure regulation in epithelial target tissues. In recent years, functional MRs have been identified in non classical targets of aldosterone actions, in particular in adipose tissue, where they mediate the effects of aldosterone and glucocorticoids in the control of adipogenesis, adipose expansion and its pro-inflammatory capacity. In this context, inappropriate MR activation has been demonstrated to be a causal factor in several pathologic conditions such as vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and obesity. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest developments in this rapidly developing field, and will focus on the role of MR and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) as potential leading characters in the early steps of adipocyte dysfunction and obesity. Indeed modulation of MR activity in adipose tissue has promise as a novel therapeutic approach to treat obesity and its related metabolic complications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'. PMID:23454117

  15. Renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction: Potential protective role of Angiotensin (1-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurta', Anna; Zambelli, Vanessa; Bellani, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction is a feared complication of mechanical ventilation that adversely affects the outcome of intensive care patients. Human and animal studies demonstrate atrophy and ultrastructural alteration of diaphragmatic muscular fibers attributable to increased oxidative stress, depression of the anabolic pathway regulated by Insulin-like growing factor 1 and increased proteolysis. The renin-angiotensin system, through its main peptide Angiotensin II, plays a major role in skeletal muscle diseases, mainly increasing oxidative stress and inducing insulin resistance, atrophy and fibrosis. Conversely, its counter-regulatory peptide Angiotensin (1-7) has a protective role in these processes. Recent data on rodent models show that renin-angiotensin system is activated after mechanical ventilation and that infusion of Angiotensin II induces diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy. Given: (A) common pathways shared by ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction and skeletal muscle pathology induced by renin-angiotensin system, (B) evidences of an involvement of renin-angiotensin system in diaphragm atrophy and dysfunction, we hypothesize that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, while Angiotensin (1-7) can have a protective effect on this pathological process. The activation of renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be demonstrated by quantification of its main components in the diaphragm of ventilated humans or animals. The infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) in an established rodent model of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be used to test its potential protective role, that can be further confirmed with the infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) antagonists like A-779. Verifying this hypothesis can help in understanding the processes involved in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction pathophysiology and open new possibilities for its

  16. Balsamic Vinegar Improves High Fat-Induced Beta Cell Dysfunction via Beta Cell ABCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Seok

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate the effects of balsamic vinegar on β-cell dysfunction.MethodsIn this study, 28-week-old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF rats were fed a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet (HFD and were provided with tap water or dilute balsamic vinegar for 4 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests and histopathological analyses were performed thereafter.ResultsIn rats fed both the both chow diet and the HFD, the rats given balsamic vinegar showed increased insulin staining in islets compared with tap water administered rats. Balsamic vinegar administration also increased β-cell ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1 expression in islets and decreased cholesterol levels.ConclusionThese findings provide the first evidence for an anti-diabetic effect of balsamic vinegar through improvement of β-cell function via increasing β-cell ABCA1 expression.

  17. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Dysfunction and Senescence: Contribution to Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Imanishi, Toshio; Tsujioka, Hiroto; Akasaka, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The identification of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) has led to a significant paradigm in the field of vascular biology and opened a door to the development of new therapeutic approaches. Based on the current evidence, it appears that EPCs may make both direct contribution to neovascularization and indirectly promote the angiogenic function of local endothelial cells via secretion of angiogenic factors. This concept of arterial wall repair mediated by bone marrow (BM)-derived EPCs provid...

  18. Casiopeina IIgly-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in human lung cancer A549 and H157 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casiopeinas are a series of mixed chelate copper complexes that are being evaluated as anticancer agents. Their effects in the cell include oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, yet the molecular mechanisms leading to such effects remain unclear. We tested whether [Cu(4,7-dimethyl-phenanthroline)(glycinate)]NO3 (Casiopeina IIgly or Cas IIgly) could alter cellular glutathione (GSH) levels by redox cycling with GSH to generate ROS and cellular oxidative stress. Cas IIgly induced a dramatic drop in intracellular levels of GSH in human lung cancer H157 and A549 cells, and is able to use GSH as source of electrons to catalyze the Fenton reaction. In both cell lines, the toxicity of Cas IIgly (2.5-5 μM) was potentiated by the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and diminished by the catalytic antioxidant manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N,N'-diethylimidazolium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTDE-1,3-IP5+), thus supporting an important role for oxidative stress. Cas IIgly also caused an over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mitochondria and a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. Moreover, Cas IIgly produced mitochondrial DNA damage that resulted in an imbalance of the expression of the apoproteins of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which also can contribute to increased ROS production. These results suggest that Cas IIgly initiates multiple possible sources of ROS over-production leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death.

  19. GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE-1 PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE IN PROTECTING AGAINST ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Didion, Sean P.; Kinzenbaw, Dale A.; Schrader, Laura I.; Dayal, Sanjana; Lentz, Steven R.; Faraci, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), increase in blood vessels during hypertension and in response to angiotensin II (Ang II). Although glutathione peroxidases (GPx) are known to metabolize H2O2, the role of GPx during hypertension is poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that GPx-1 protects against Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. Responses of carotid arteries from Gpx1-deficient (Gpx1 +/− and Gpx1 −/−) and Gpx1 transgenic (Tg) mice, and their respective littermate controls, were examined in vitro following overnight incubation with either vehicle or Ang II. Under control conditions, relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent agonist) was similar in control, Gpx1 +/−, and Gpx1 Tg mice, whereas in Gpx1 −/− mice, responses to ACh were impaired. In control mice, ACh-induced vasorelaxation was not affected by 1 nmol/L Ang II. In contrast, relaxation to ACh in arteries from Gpx1 +/− mice was inhibited by ~60% following treatment with 1 nmol/L Ang II, indicating Gpx1 haploinsufficiency markedly enhances Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. A higher concentration of Ang II (10 nmol/L) selectively impaired relaxation to ACh in arteries from control mice, and this effect was prevented in arteries from Gpx1 Tg mice, or arteries from control mice treated with PEG-catalase (which degrades H2O2). Thus, genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests a major role for GPx-1 and H2O2 in Ang II-induced effects on vascular function. PMID:18299484

  20. [Role of nitric oxide in diaphragmatic dysfunction genesis during sepsis in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samb, A; Boczkowski, J; Danialou, G; Lanone, S; Cisse, F; Aubier, M

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator agent that is cytotoxic and negatively inotropic in the heart. More recently, it has been shown that during sepsis there is a high amount of NO production by a NO synthase (NOS) that is inducible by cytokines. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of NO in the genesis of diaphragmatic dysfunction during sepsis. Rats were inoculated i.p. injection with 10 mg/kg of Escherichia coil endotoxin (E animals) or saline (C animals). Six hours after endotoxin or saline inoculation, diaphragmatic force and muscularc GMP (Cyclic guanosine monophosphate) were assessed by in vitro force frequency curves and ELISA method, respectively. As compared to C animals, E animals showed a significant decrease in diaphragmatic force for all the frequencies of stimulation (p < 0.01). This reduction was associated with a significant increase in muscular cGMP. Inhibition of NO synthesis in E animals with either dexamethasone (4 mg/kg IV, 45 min before endotoxin or saline) or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 8 mg/kg IV, 90 min after endotoxin or saline) prevented the effects of endotoxin. However, no modification was seen with NG-monomethyl-D-arginine (D-NMMA), a molecule which does not inhibit NO synthesis. Administration of dexamethasone or L-NMMA in C animals did not induce any significant change in diaphragmatic force, and cGMP ratio. We conclude that NO has a contributive role in diaphragmatic dysfunction during Escherichia coli induced sepsis in rats. PMID:15779166

  1. Immediate dysfunction of vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells primed in the absence of CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N.; Yates, Kathleen B.; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng’ang’a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W. Nicholas; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help is critical for optimal CD8+ T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. Additionally, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8+ T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help, which often coincides with reduced antigen or pathogen clearance. Here we demonstrate that absence of CD4+ T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8+ T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 days of immunization. Unhelped CD8+ T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4+ T cell-deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4+ T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8+ T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  2. Altered Plasma Profile of Antioxidant Proteins as an Early Correlate of Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Taiyi; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2016-04-29

    Insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Unlike insulin resistance, β cell dysfunction remains difficult to predict and monitor, because of the inaccessibility of the endocrine pancreas, the integrated relationship with insulin sensitivity, and the paracrine effects of incretins. The goal of our study was to survey the plasma response to a metabolic challenge in order to identify factors predictive of β cell dysfunction. To this end, we combined (i) the power of unbiased iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification) mass spectrometry with (ii) direct sampling of the portal vein following an intravenous glucose/arginine challenge (IVGATT) in (iii) mice with a genetic β cell defect. By so doing, we excluded the effects of peripheral insulin sensitivity as well as those of incretins on β cells, and focused on the first phase of insulin secretion to capture the early pathophysiology of β cell dysfunction. We compared plasma protein profiles with ex vivo islet secretome and transcriptome analyses. We detected changes to 418 plasma proteins in vivo, and detected changes to 262 proteins ex vivo The impairment of insulin secretion was associated with greater overall changes in the plasma response to IVGATT, possibly reflecting metabolic instability. Reduced levels of proteins regulating redox state and neuronal stress markers, as well as increased levels of coagulation factors, antedated the loss of insulin secretion in diabetic mice. These results suggest that a reduced complement of antioxidants in response to a mixed secretagogue challenge is an early correlate of future β cell failure. PMID:26917725

  3. Does microglial dysfunction play a role in autism and Rett syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAEZAWA, IZUMI; CALAFIORE, MARCO; WULFF, HEIKE; JIN, LEE-WAY

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) including classic autism is a group of complex developmental disabilities with core deficits of impaired social interactions, communication difficulties and repetitive behaviors. Although the neurobiology of ASDs has attracted much attention in the last two decades, the role of microglia has been ignored. Existing data are focused on their recognized role in neuroinflammation, which only covers a small part of the pathological repertoire of microglia. This review highlights recent findings on the broader roles of microglia, including their active surveillance of brain microenvironments and regulation of synaptic connectivity, maturation of brain circuitry and neurogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests that microglia respond to pre- and postnatal environmental stimuli through epigenetic interface to change gene expression, thus acting as effectors of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. Impairments of these microglial functions could substantially contribute to several major etiological factors of autism, such as environmental toxins and cortical underconnectivity. Our recent study on Rett syndrome, a syndromic autistic disorder, provides an example that intrinsic microglial dysfunction due to genetic and epigenetic aberrations could detrimentally affect the developmental trajectory without evoking neuroinflammation. We propose that ASDs provide excellent opportunities to study the influence of microglia on neurodevelopment, and this knowledge could lead to novel therapies. PMID:22717189

  4. Mechanisms of Beta Cell Dysfunction Associated With Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, Antje; Solimena, Michele; Knoch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from genetic predisposition and environmental factors leading to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Recently, a rapid increase in the incidence of childhood T1D has been observed worldwide; this is too fast to be explained by genetic factors alone, pointing to the spreading of environmental factors linked to the disease. Enteroviruses (EVs) are perhaps the most investigated environmental agents in relationship to the pathogenesis of T1D. While s...

  5. PD-1 marks dysfunctional regulatory T cells in malignant gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lowther, Daniel E.; Goods, Brittany A.; Lucca, Liliana E.; Lerner, Benjamin A.; Raddassi, Khadir; van Dijk, David; Hernandez, Amanda L.; Duan, Xiangguo; Gunel, Murat; Coric, Vlad; Krishnaswamy, Smita; Love, J. Christopher; Hafler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies targeting the immune checkpoint receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) have shown remarkable efficacy in treating cancer. CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ Tregs are critical regulators of immune responses in autoimmunity and malignancies, but the functional status of human Tregs expressing PD-1 remains unclear. We examined functional and molecular features of PD-1hi Tregs in healthy subjects and patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), combining functional assays, RNA sequencing,...

  6. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seon-Young [Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Genetics, Ajou University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jeanho, E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  7. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuren Zhou

    Full Text Available Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Executive Dysfunctions: The Role in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Post-traumatic Stress Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Lía; Prada, Edward; Satler, Corina; Tavares, Maria C H; Tomaz, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) is an umbrella term for various cognitive processes controlled by a complex neural activity, which allow the production of different types of behaviors seeking to achieve specific objectives, one of them being inhibitory control. There is a wide consensus that clinical and behavioral alterations associated with EF, such as inhibitory control, are present in various neuropsychiatric disorders. This paper reviews the research literature on the relationship between executive dysfunction, frontal-subcortical neural circuit changes, and the psychopathological processes associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A revision on the role of frontal-subcortical neural circuits and their presumable abnormal functioning and the high frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms could explain the difficulties with putting effector mechanisms into action, giving individuals the necessary tools to act efficiently in their environment. Although, neuronal substrate data about ADHD and PTSD has been reported in the literature, it is isolated. Therefore, this review highlights the overlapping of neural substrates in the symptomatology of ADHD and PTSD disorders concerning EFs, especially in the inhibitory component. Thus, the changes related to impaired EF that accompany disorders like ADHD and PTSD could be explained by disturbances that have a direct or indirect impact on the functioning of these loops. Initially, the theoretical model of EF according to current neuropsychology will be presented, focusing on the inhibitory component. In a second stage, this component will be analyzed for each of the disorders of interest, considering the clinical aspects, the etiology and the neurobiological basis. Additionally, commonalities between the two neuropsychiatric conditions will be taken into consideration from the perspectives of cognitive and emotional inhibition. Finally, the implications and future

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts triggers an adaptive cell survival program that requires AMPK-α

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Distelmaier (Felix); F. Valsecchi (Federica); D.C. Liemburg-Apers (Dania C.); M. Lebiedzinska (Magdalena); R.J.T. Rodenburg (Richard); S.G. Heil (Sandra); J. Keijer (Jaap); J.A.M. Fransen (Jack); H. Imamura (Hiromi); K. Danhauser (Katharina); A. Seibt (Annette); B. Viollet (Benoit); F.N. Gellerich (Frank); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); M.R. Wieckowski (Mariusz R.); P.H.G.M. Willems (Peter H.G.M.); W.J.H. Koopman (W. J H)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDysfunction of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) features prominently in human pathology. Cell models of ETC dysfunction display adaptive survival responses that still are poorly understood but of relevance for therapy development. Here we comprehensively

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts triggers an adaptive cell survival program that requires AMPK-alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Liemburg-Apers, D.; Lebiedzinska, M.; Rodenburg, R.; Heil, S.; Keijer, J.; Fransen, J.; Imamura, H.; Danhauser, K.; Seibt, A.; Viollet, B.; Gellerich, F.; Smeitink, J.; Wieckowski, M.; Willems, P.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) features prominently in human pathology. Cell models of ETC dysfunction display adaptive survival responses that still are poorly understood but of relevance for therapy development. Here we comprehensively examined ho

  11. The Role of Sexual Assault and Sexual Dysfunction in Alcohol and Other Drug Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjuan, Pilar M.; Langenbucher, James W.; Labouvie, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Many women with sexual assault histories receive care in alcohol and other drug treatment programs. Affected women frequently suffer from sexual dysfunction, leading investigators to suggest self-medication may be one path to alcohol and other drug use disorders and relapse. This preliminary study examined sexual dysfunction and sexual assault in 71 women receiving treatment for addiction. Women with prior sexual assault scored higher than non-assaulted women on sexual dysfunction overall, a ...

  12. Role of Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessment of Female Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa S Sheha, MSc*, Ola M Nouh, MD*, Inas M Azab, MD*,

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pelvic floor weakening is a major health problem in older women, with an 11.1% lifetime risk of women over 50 years old to undergo surgery for pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence. Clinical examination is the main method of diagnosis, yet imaging is essential especially in patients with multicompartment defects. Pelvic Magnetic Resonance (MR Imaging is expected to play a role in the preoperative planning for complex cases due to its high soft tissue resolution, which will help perform site-specific repair and so avoid recurrence.Aim of the work: The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a non invasive method in the assessment of female pelvic floor dysfunction.Methods: The studied group included 40 female patients complaining of pelvic organ prolapse and / or stress urinary incontinence or fecal incontinence. All patients were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination and Dynamic Magnetic resonance Imaging using 1.5 Tesla Philips MR Scanner.Results: Good concordance was found between Dynamic MRI and clinical examination in all three compartments. The concordance was 82.5% in the anterior compartment, 80% in the posterior compartment, 85% in enteroceles and 65.0% in the middle compartment.Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a promising method that can be used as an imaging tool in the preoperative planning of pelvic organ prolapse.

  13. Study on the mechanism of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) possible role of microvascular damage and dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To test the possible role of microvascular lesions in the development of DPN through investigation of changes of plasma ET, TXB2, PGF1α levels and treatment effect with use of cilostazol and mecobalamin in these patients. Methods: Plasma ET, TXB2, PGF1α levels were measured in: 1) 36 DPN patient before and after treatment with mecobalamin only for 12 weeks 2) 36 patients before and after treatment with mecobalamin plus cilostazol for 12 weeks and 3) 30 controls. Clinical symptoms and nerve conduction velocity were evaluated. Results: In DPN patients, the plasma ET, TXB2 levels were significantly higher and plasma PGF1α levels were significantly lower than those in the controls (P0.05). Improvement of clinical symptom and nerve conduction velocity were also much better with combined treatment (P<0.05). Conclusion: There are microvascular damage and dysfunction in patients with DPN, which may be ameliorated with drugs. Microvascular lesions play important role in the development of DPN

  14. Sexual dysfunction and chronic illness: the role of flexibility in coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Jennifer L; Friedman, Michael A; Rosen, Raymond C

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common among individuals with chronic illnesses and is associated with distress and reduced quality of life. Because of the long-term, often irreversible nature of sexual dysfunction in chronic illness and limitations of pharmacological treatments, there is a need to understand cognitive and behavioral coping processes in this population. We present a model of coping with sexual dysfunction that focuses on the construct of flexibility, including the definition of sexual functioning and its centrality to overall self-concept. We describe how this model can be applied in a comprehensive approach to treating sexual dysfunction in individuals with chronic illnesses. PMID:16809251

  15. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to a...

  16. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase dysfunction causes cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration in rat prefrontal cortex slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Cerebrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in imbalance of cerebral blood flow contributes to the onset of psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Although decrease in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity has been reported in the patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the contribution of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase to endothelial cell dysfunction remains poorly understood. Here, by using rat neonatal prefrontal cortex slice cultures, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase by ouabain induced endothelial cell injury. Treatment with ouabain significantly decreased immunoreactive area of rat endothelial cell antigen-1 (RECA-1), a marker of endothelial cells, in a time-dependent manner. Ouabain also decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and phosphorylation level of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) (Ser9), which were prevented by lithium carbonate. On the other hand, ouabain-induced endothelial cell injury was exacerbated by concomitant treatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3- (PI3-) kinase. We also found that xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor, but not SEA0400, an inhibitor of Na(+), Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), protected endothelial cells from cytotoxicity of ouabain. These results suggest that cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration induced by Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition resulting in Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and activation of GSK3β signaling underlies pathogenesis of these psychiatric disorders. PMID:27208492

  17. Platycodin D induced apoptosis and autophagy in PC-12 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Zhang, Cheng; Yao, Jun-Hua; Lai, Shang-Hai; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Tang, Bing; Wan, Dan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the in vitro cytotoxicity of platycodin D was evaluated in human PC-12, SGC-7901, BEL-7402, HeLa and A549 cancer cell lines. PC-12 cells were sensitive to platycodin D treatment, with an IC50 value of 13.5±1.2μM. Morphological and comet assays showed that platycodin D effectively induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells. Platycodin D increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Platycodin D induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the PC-12 cell line. Platycodin D can induce autophagy. In addition, platycodin D can down-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x, and up-regulate the levels of Bid protein in the PC-12 cells. The results demonstrated that platycodin D induced PC-12 cell apoptosis through a ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway. PMID:27294548

  18. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  19. Higher psychic dysfunctions in adult patients with epilepsy: role of antiepileptic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Vladimirovna Voronkova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the data available in the literature on higher psychic dysfunctions in adult patients with epilepsy. It considers the factors influencing the development of higher psychic dysfunctions, including the use of antiepileptic drugs. Possible correction options are given for higher psychic sphere impairments in patients with epilepsy.

  20. Suppression of Cpn10 increases mitochondrial fission and dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jung Park

    Full Text Available To date, several regulatory proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics have been identified. However, the precise mechanism coordinating these complex processes remains unclear. Mitochondrial chaperones regulate mitochondrial function and structure. Chaperonin 10 (Cpn10 interacts with heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and functions as a co-chaperone. In this study, we found that down-regulation of Cpn10 highly promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in SK-N-MC and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of Drp1 suppressed the mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Cpn10 reduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in 3-NP-treated cells was markedly enhanced by Cpn10 knock down. Depletion of Cpn10 synergistically increased cell death in response to 3-NP treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of Drp1 recovered Cpn10-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in 3-NP-treated cells. Moreover, an ROS scavenger suppressed cell death mediated by Cpn10 knockdown in 3-NP-treated cells. Taken together, these results showed that down-regulation of Cpn10 increased mitochondrial fragmentation and potentiated 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

  1. The Role of Rho Kinase in Sex-Dependent Vascular Dysfunction in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Nuno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that rho/rho kinase plays a role in sex differences in vascular dysfunction of diabetics. Contractions to serotonin were greater in isolated aortic rings from nondiabetic males versus females and increased further in streptozotocin-induced diabetic males but not females. The increased contractions to serotonin in males were reduced by inhibitors of rho kinase (fasudil, Y27632 and H1152 despite no change in expression of rhoA or rho kinase. Contractions to U46619 were not altered by fasudil or Y27632 or the presence of diabetes. In contrast to acute effects of fasudil, chronic treatment with fasudil increased contractions to serotonin in aorta from both non-diabetic and diabetic males. In summary, serotonin-induced contractions were increased in aorta from diabetic males but not females. Although administration of rho kinase inhibitors acutely decreased contractions to serotonin, long-term treatment with fasudil increased contractions. Long-term fasudil treatment may increase compensatory mechanisms to enhance vasoconstrictions.

  2. NOTCH4 signaling controls EFNB2-induced endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Luo, Qingqing; Zheng, Yanfang; Liu, Xiaoping; Hu, Ying; Liu, Weifang; Luo, Minglian; Zhao, Yin; Zou, Li

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious complication of pregnancy and is closely related to endothelial dysfunction, which can be repaired by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 (ephrinB2) cascade may be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia by inhibiting the biological activity of EPCs. In addition, both NOTCH1 and NOTCH4, which are specific receptors for DLL4/NOTCH, play critical roles in the various steps of angiogenesis. However, it has not been determined which receptor (NOTCH1, NOTCH4, or both) is specific for the DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 cascade. Accordingly, we performed a series of investigations to evaluate it. EFNB2 expression was examined when NOTCH4 or NOTCH1 was downregulated, with or without DLL4 treatment. Then, the effects of NOTCH4 on EPC function were detected. Additionally, we analyzed NOTCH4 and EFNB2 expression in the EPCs from preeclampsia and normal pregnancies. Results showed that NOTCH4 downregulation led to decreased expression of EFNB2, which maintained the same level in the presence of DLL4/NOTCH activation. By contrast, NOTCH1 silencing resulted in a moderate increase in EFNB2 expression, which further increased in the presence of DLL4/NOTCH activation. The downregulation of NOTCH4 resulted in an increase of EPC biological activity, which was similar to EFNB2 silencing. NOTCH4 expression, consistent with the EFNB2 level, increased notably in preeclampsia EPCs compared with the controls. These findings suggest that NOTCH4, not NOTCH1, is the specific receptor for the DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 cascade. Blockade of this cascade may enhance the angiogenic property of EPCs, and act as a potential target to promote angiogenesis in patients with preeclampsia. PMID:27069008

  3. Uric Acid-Induced Adipocyte Dysfunction Is Attenuated by HO-1 Upregulation: Potential Role of Antioxidant Therapy to Target Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Komal; Hilgefort, Jordan; Banks, George; Gilliam, Chelsea; Stevens, Sarah; Ansinelli, Hayden A; Getty, Morghan; Abraham, Nader G; Shapiro, Joseph I; Khitan, Zeid

    2016-01-01

    Increased uric acid levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To examine the mechanisms by which this occurs, we hypothesized that an increase in heme oxygenase 1, a potent antioxidant gene, will decrease uric acid levels and adipocyte dysfunction via suppression of ROS and xanthine oxidase (XO) levels. We examined the effect of uric acid on adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the presence and absence of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO activity inhibitor. Uric acid increased adipogenesis by increasing NADPH oxidase expression and elevation in the adipogenesis markers C/EBPα, PPARγ, and Mest, while decreasing small lipid droplets and Wnt10b levels. We treated MSCs with fructose, a fuel source that increases uric acid levels. Our results showed that fructose increased XO expression as compared to the control and concomitant treatment with CoPP significantly decreased XO expression and uric acid levels. These beneficial effects of CoPP were reversed by SnMP, supporting a role for HO activity in mediating these effects. These findings demonstrate that increased levels of HO-1 appear crucial in modulating the phenotype of adipocytes exposed to uric acid and in downregulating XO and NADPH oxidase levels. PMID:26681956

  4. Cinnamon polyphenols attenuate cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction following oxygen-glucose deprivation in glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrocyte swelling is an integral component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemic injury. While mechanisms underlying astrocyte swelling are likely multifactorial, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are hypothesized to contribute to such swelling. We investigated the protective effects of...

  5. Endothelial cell markers reflecting endothelial cell dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soltész Pál (1961-) (belgyógyász, kardiológus); Bereczki Dániel (1960-) (neurológus); Szodoray Péter (1973-) (belgyógyász, orvos); Magyar Mária Tünde (1970-) (neurológus); Dér Henrietta (1977-) (orvos); Csípő István (1953-) (vegyész); Hajas Ágota Helga (1985-) (orvos); Paragh György (1953-) (belgyógyász, kardiológus, endokrinológus, lipidológus, sürgősségi orvostani szakorvos, belgyógyászati angiológiai minősített orvos); Szegedi Gyula (1936-2013) (belgyógyász, immunológus); Bodolay Edit (1950-) (belgyógyász, allergológus és klinikai immunológus)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and endothelial dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and to determine which biomarkers are associated with atherosclerotic complications, such as cardiovascular disease. Methods Fifty MCTD patients and 38 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this study. In order to describe endothelial dysfunction, we assessed flow-mediated di...

  6. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  7. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  8. Proteomics analysis of cytokine-induced dysfunction and death in insulin-producing INS-1E cells: new insights into the pathways involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Hertog, Wannes; Overbergh, Lut; Hansen, Kasper Lage;

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines released by islet-infiltrating immune cells play a crucial role in beta-cell dysfunction and apoptotic cell death in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and after islet transplantation. RNA studies revealed complex pathways of genes being activated or suppressed during this beta...... points (1, 4, and 24 h of cytokine exposure) revealed that the major changes were taking place only after 24 h. At this time point 158 proteins were altered in expression (4.1%, n = 4, p

  9. Diabetes-induced upregulation of urotensin II and its receptor plays an important role in TGF-beta1-mediated renal fibrosis and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Li, Cai; Qi, Jiping; Fu, Peng; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaokun; Cai, Lu

    2008-11-01

    Urotensin II (UII) was identified as the ligand for a novel G protein-coupled receptor, GPR14. UII was found not only to have a potent vasoconstrictive action but also to have profibrotic effects in the heart. The present study was to define whether UII and GPR14 also play important roles in diabetes-induced renal fibrosis and dysfunction. Diabetic rats were induced using streptozotocin, and the rat proximal tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E) were used for the in vitro mechanism study. Results showed that expression of UII and GPR14 was significantly upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in the diabetic kidneys compared with controls. The upregulated expressions of UII and GPR14 in the kidney were accompanied by significant increases in the renal profibrotic factor transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 expression, the renal extracellular matrix (fibronectin and collagen IV) accumulation, and the renal dysfunction (increases in urinal N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase content, 24-h urinary retinol-binding protein excretion rate, and decrease in creatinine clearance rate). Exposure of NRK-52E cells to 10(-8) mol/l UII for 48 h caused a significant increase of TGF-beta1, but not ANG II, production that was GPR14- and calcium-dependent, since GPR14 small-interfering RNA and calcium channel blocker nimodipine or calcium chelator EDTA all could abolish the induction of TGF- beta1 by UII. Furthermore, exposure of NRK-52E cells to TGF-beta1 or ANG II also increased UII and GPR14 mRNA expressions. These results suggested that diabetes-induced upregulation of UII and GPR14, most likely through autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms, plays an important role in TGF-beta1-mediated renal fibrosis and dysfunction. PMID:18796544

  10. Dysfunctional miRNA-Mediated Regulation in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohan; Zhang, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Past research on pathogenesis of a complex disease suggests that differentially expressed message RNAs (mRNAs) can be noted as biomarkers of a disease. However, significant miRNA-mediated regulation change might also be more deep underlying cause of a disease. In this study, a miRNA-mediated regulation module is defined based on GO terms (Gene Ontology terms) from which dysfunctional modules are identified as the suspected cause of a disease. A miRNA-mediated regulation module contains mRNAs annotated to a GO term and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate the mRNAs. Based on the miRNA-mediated regulation coefficients estimated from the expression profiles of the mRNA and the miRNAs, a SW (single regulation-weight) value is then designed to evaluate the miRNA-mediated regulation change of an mRNA, and the modules with significantly differential SW values are thus identified as dysfunctional modules. The approach is applied to Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and it identifies 70 dysfunctional miRNA-mediated regulation modules from initial 4381 modules. The identified dysfunctional modules are detected to be comprehensive reflection of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. The proposed approach suggests that accumulated alteration in miRNA-mediated regulation might cause functional alterations, which further cause a disease. Moreover, this approach can also be used to identify diffentially miRNA-mediated regulated mRNAs showing more comprehensive underlying association with a disease than differentially expressed mRNAs. PMID:27258182

  11. C-Phycocyanin Confers Protection against Oxalate-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in MDCK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur M.; Boppana, Nithin B.; Asokan, Devarajan; Sekaran, Shamala D.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Li, Chunying; Gopal, Kaliappan; Bakar, Sazaly A.; Karthik, Harve S.; Ebrahim, Abdul S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP) could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL), an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2). Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis. PMID:24691130

  12. C-phycocyanin confers protection against oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in MDCK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukkur M Farooq

    Full Text Available Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO. The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2. Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis.

  13. Delayed behavioral dysfunctions following exposure to ionising radiation: role of neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being a terminally differentiated organ, the brain has been considered to be a radioresistant one. Traditionally, delayed radiation-induced CNS damage was hypothesized as chiefly attributable to impaired vascular endothelial system and neuroinflammatory glial cell populations. In the recent decades, preclinical studies have focused on the hippocampal dentate gyrus, one of two discrete sites of the brain where adult neurogenesis takes place. Neurogenesis, in such area of the brain takes place throughout the adulthood and makes the brain highly vulnerable to the radiation. Recent investigations, including our own reports indicated that radiation ablates hippocampal neurogenesis, alters neuronal function, and induces neuroinflammation. Since the hippocampus is involved in learning and memory, behavioral adaptation and HPA axis regulation, damage by radiation leads to severe behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study aimed at evaluating the delayed effects of gamma-irradiation on the cognitive and affective functions, which were further corroborated to changes in neurogenesis. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to whole body irradiation as well as cranial irradiation by gamma-rays at different sub-lethal doses. The behavioral tests, consisting spontaneous motor activity, open field test, novel object recognition test, forced swim test and Morris water maze were performed at 1 month and 5 months post-exposure. Neurogenic potential was evaluated using flow-cytometry (FC) and immuno-histo-chemistry (IHC). The results indicated the significant changes in the affective and cognitive functions at delayed time points of radiation exposure. Profound alteration in the anxiety and depressive phenotype was observed following irradiation. Additionally, both long term and short term memory functions were disrupted, which were attributable to changes in the neurogenic potential as reported in the terms of BrdU positive cells using FC and IHC. Present investigation clearly

  14. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Eva L Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved ...

  15. The role of pouch compliance measurement in the management of pouch dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Molina, Maria E; Norton, Christine;

    2010-01-01

    pouch compliance tests over 11 years to assess whether measuring pouch compliance is a useful diagnostic tool to guide management of pouch dysfunction. METHODS: The results of pouch compliance tests performed between 1996 and 2007 together with the details of symptoms, treatments and outcome were...... (p=0.07). CONCLUSIONS: Measuring pouch compliance does not offer new information accounting for idiopathic pouch dysfunction and has little influence on the clinical management. Udgivelsesdato: 2010...

  16. Burn injury triggered dysfunction in dendritic cell response to TLR9 activation and resulted in skewed T cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Shen

    Full Text Available Severe trauma such as burn injury is often associated with a systemic inflammatory syndrome characterized by a hyperactive innate immune response and suppressed adaptive immune function. Dendritic cells (DCs, which sense pathogens via their Toll-like receptors (TLRs, play a pivotal role in protecting the host against infections. The effect of burn injury on TLR-mediated DC function is a debated topic and the mechanism controlling the purported immunosuppressive response remains to be elucidated. Here we examined the effects of burn injury on splenic conventional DC (cDC and plasmacytoid DC (pDC responses to TLR9 activation. We demonstrate that, following burn trauma, splenic cDCs' cytokine production profile in response to TLR9 activation became anti-inflammatory dominant, with high production of IL-10 (>50% increase and low production of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-12p70 (∼25-60% reduction. CD4+ T cells activated by these cDCs were defective in producing Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Furthermore, burn injury had a more accentuated effect on pDCs than on cDCs. Following TLR9 activation, pDCs displayed an immature phenotype with an impaired ability to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-α, IL-6 and TNF-α and to activate T cell proliferation. Moreover, cDCs and pDCs from burn-injured mice had low transcript levels of TLR9 and several key molecules of the TLR signaling pathway. Although hyperactive innate immune response has been associated with severe injury, our data show to the contrary that DCs, as a key player in the innate immune system, had impaired TLR9 reactivity, an anti-inflammatory phenotype, and a dysfunctional T cell-priming ability. We conclude that burn injury induced impairments in DC immunobiology resulting in suppression of adaptive immune response. Targeted DC immunotherapies to promote their ability in triggering T cell immunity may represent a strategy to improve immune defenses against infection following burn injury.

  17. Chronic alcohol consumption potentiates the development of diabetes through pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji; Yeon; Kim; Dae; Yeon; Lee; Yoo; Jeong; Lee; Keon; Jae; Park; Kyu; Hee; Kim; Jae; Woo; Kim; Won-Ho; Kim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is well established as a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes(T2D), which is evidenced by impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. However, the relationships between alcoholconsumption and the development of T2 D remain controversial. In particular, the direct effects of ethanol consumption on proliferation of pancreatic β-cell and the exact mechanisms associated with ethanolmediated β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis remain elusive. Although alcoholism and alcohol consumption are prevalent and represent crucial public health problems worldwide, many people believe that low-tomoderate ethanol consumption may protect against T2 D and cardiovascular diseases. However, the J- or U-shaped curves obtained from cross-sectional and large prospective studies have not fully explained the relationship between alcohol consumption and T2 D. This review provides evidence for the harmful effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the progressive development of T2 D, particularly with respect to pancreatic β-cell mass and function in association with insulin synthesis and secretion. This review also discusses a conceptual framework for how ethanolproduced peroxynitrite contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Role of common sarcomeric gene polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to left ventricular dysfunction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SURENDRA KUMAR; AVSHESH MISHRA; ANSHIKA SRIVASTAVA; MANSI BHATT; N. GARG; S. K. AGARWAL; SHANTANU PANDE; BALRAJ MITTAL

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in sarcomeric genes are common genetic cause of cardiomyopathies. An intronic 25-bp deletion in cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) at 3' region is associated with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies in Southeast Asia. However, the frequency of sarcomeric gene polymorphisms and associated clinical presentation have not been established with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the association of MYBPC3 25-bp deletion, titin (TTN) 18 bp I/D, troponin T type 2 (TNNT2) 5 bp I/D and myospryn K2906N polymorphisms with LVD. This study includes 988 consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD) and 300 healthy controls. Among the 988 CAD patients, 253 with reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF≤45%) were categorized as LVD. MYBPC3 25-bp deletion,TTN 18 bp I/D and TNNT25 bp I/D polymorphisms were determined by direct polymerase chain reaction method, while myospryn K2906N polymorphism by TaqMan assay. Our results showed that MYBPC3 25-bpdeletion polymorphism was significantly associated with elevated risk of LVD (LVEF <45) (healthy controls versus LVD: OR= 3.85,P<0.001; and nonLVD versus LVD: OR=1.65,P=0.035), while TTN 18 bp I/D, TNNT25bpI/Dand myospryn K2906N polymorphisms did not show any significant association with LVD. The results also showed that MYBPC3 25-bp deletion polymorphism was significantly associated with other parameters of LV remodelling, i.e. LV dimensions (LV end diastole dimension, LVEDD: P= 0.037 and LV end systolic dimension, LVESD: P= 0.032).Our data suggests that MYBPC3 25-bp deletion may play significant role in conferring LVD as well as CAD risk in north Indian population

  19. Role of Caffeine Intake on Erectile Dysfunction in US Men: Results from NHANES 2001-2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Lopez

    Full Text Available Caffeine is consumed by more than 85% of adults and little is known about its role on erectile dysfunction (ED in population-based studies. We investigated the association of caffeine intake and caffeinated beverages with ED, and whether these associations vary among comorbidities for ED.Data were analyzed for 3724 men (≥20 years old who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES. ED was assessed by a single question during a self-paced, computer-assisted self-interview. We analyzed 24-h dietary recall data to estimate caffeine intake (mg/day. Multivariable logistic regression analyses using appropriate sampling weights were conducted.We found that men in the 3rd (85-170 mg/day and 4th (171-303 mg/day quintiles of caffeine intake were less likely to report ED compared to men in the lowest 1st quintile (0-7 mg/day [OR: 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.89; and OR: 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.97, respectively], but no evidence for a trend. Similarly, among overweight/obese and hypertensive men, there was an inverse association between higher quintiles of caffeine intake and ED compared to men in the lowest 1st quintile, P≤0.05 for each quintile. However, only among men without diabetes we found a similar inverse association (Ptrend = 0.01.Caffeine intake reduced the odds of prevalent ED, especially an intake equivalent to approximately 2-3 daily cups of coffee (170-375 mg/day. This reduction was also observed among overweight/obese and hypertensive, but not among diabetic men. Yet, these associations are warranted to be investigated in prospective studies.

  20. Senescence marker protein 30 has a cardio-protective role in doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Miyata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30, which was originally identified as an aging marker protein, is assumed to act as a novel anti-aging factor in the liver, lungs and brain. We hypothesized that SMP30 has cardio-protective function due to its anti-aging and anti-oxidant effects on doxorubicin (DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: SMP30 knockout (SMP30 KO mice, SMP30 transgenic (SMP30 TG mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of SMP30 gene and wild-type (WT littermate mice at 12-14 weeks of age were given intra-peritoneal injection of DOX (20 mg/kg or saline. Five days after DOX injection, echocardiography revealed that left ventricular ejection fraction was more severely reduced in the DOX-treated SMP30 KO mice than in the DOX-treated WT mice, but was preserved in the DOX-treated SMP30 TG mice. Generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage in the myocardium were greater in the DOX-treated SMP30 KO mice than in the DOX-treated WT mice, but much less in the SMP30 TG mice. The numbers of deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling positive nuclei in the myocardium, apoptotic signaling pathways such as caspase-3 activity, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and phosphorylation activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase were increased in SMP30 KO mice and decreased in SMP30 TG mice compared with WT mice after DOX injection. CONCLUSIONS: SMP30 has a cardio-protective role by anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and can be a new therapeutic target to prevent DOX-induced heart failure.

  1. Amblyomin-X induces ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and caspase activation in human melanoma and pancreatic tumor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Katia L P; Pacheco, Mario Thiego Fernandes; Berra, Carolina Maria; Bosch, Rosemary V; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Chammas, Roger; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Iqbal, Asif; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, new insights into proteasome function and its role in several human diseases made it a potential therapeutic target. In this context, Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type FXa inhibitor similar to endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and is a novel proteasome inhibitor. Herein, we have demonstrated Amblyomin-X cytotoxicity to different tumor cells lines such as pancreatic (Panc1, AsPC1BxPC3) and melanoma (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). Of note, Amblyomin-X was not cytotoxic to normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, Amblyomin-X promoted accumulation of ER stress markers (GRP78 and GADD153) in sensitive (SK-MEL-28) and bortezomib-resistant (Mia-PaCa-2) tumor cells. The intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i was slightly modulated in human tumor cells (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) after 24 h of Amblyomin-X treatment. Furthermore, Amblyomin-X induced mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, PARP cleavage, and activation of caspase cascade in both human tumor (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) cells. These investigations might help in further understanding of the antitumor properties of Amblyomin-X. PMID:27015684

  2. Factors associated with beta-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes: the BETADECLINE study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina T Russo

    Full Text Available AIMS: Beta-cell dysfunction is an early event in the natural history of type 2 diabetes. However, its progression is variable and potentially influenced by several clinical factors. We report the baseline data of the BetaDecline study, an Italian prospective multicenter study on clinical predictors of beta-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical, lifestyle, and laboratory data, including circulating levels of inflammatory markers and non-esterified fatty acids, were collected in 507 type 2 diabetic outpatients on stable treatment with oral hypoglycemic drugs or diet for more than 1 year. Beta-cell dysfunction was evaluated by calculating the proinsulin/insulin ratio (P/I. RESULTS: At baseline, the subjects in the upper PI/I ratio quartile were more likely to be men and receiving secretagogue drugs; they also showed a borderline longer diabetes duration (P = 0.06 and higher serum levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides. An inverse trend across all PI/I quartiles was noted for BMI and serum levels of total cholesterol (T-C, LDL-C, HDL-C and C reactive protein (CRP, and with homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-B and HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR values (P<0.05 for all. At multivariate analysis, the risk of having a P/I ratio in the upper quartile was higher in the subjects on secretagogue drugs (odds ratio [OR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6-6.9 and in the males (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9. CONCLUSIONS: In the BetaDecline study population, baseline higher PI/I values, a marker of beta-cell dysfunction, were more frequent in men and in patients on secretagogues drugs. Follow-up of this cohort will allow the identification of clinical predictors of beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetic outpatients.

  3. Quantification of topological features in cell meshes to explore E-cadherin dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tânia; Figueiredo, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Sanches, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, defective E-cadherin leads to cell detachment, migration and metastization. Further, alterations mediated by E-cadherin dysfunction affect cell topology and tissue organization. Herein, we propose a novel quantitative approach, based on microscopy images, to analyse abnormal cellular distribution patterns. We generated undirected graphs composed by sets of triangles which accurately reproduce cell positioning and structural organization within each image. Network analysis was developed by exploring triangle geometric features, namely area, edges length and formed angles, as well as their variance, when compared with the respective equilateral triangles. We generated synthetic networks, mimicking the diversity of cell-cell interaction patterns, and evaluated the applicability of the selected metrics to study topological features. Cells expressing wild-type E-cadherin and cancer-related mutants were used to validate our strategy. Specifically, A634V, R749W and P799R cancer-causing mutants present more disorganized spatial distribution when compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, P799R exhibited higher length and angle distortions and abnormal cytoskeletal organization, suggesting the formation of very dynamic and plastic cellular interactions. Hence, topological analysis of cell network diagrams is an effective tool to quantify changes in cell-cell interactions and, importantly, it can be applied to a myriad of processes, namely tissue morphogenesis and cancer. PMID:27151223

  4. Downregulation of Syndecan-1 induce glomerular endothelial cell dysfunction through modulating internalization of VEGFR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zhou; Wei-Jie, Yuan; Yi-Feng, Zhu-Ge; Jing, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains to have high morbidity and mortality rates. The mechanism of glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) dysfunction in the development of ischemic AKI is still unclear. Syndecan-1, one kind of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), is extensively studied in tumor for its effects in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we found that, Syndecan-1 was reduced in GEnC both in vivo and in vitro after hypoxia treatment. Besides, down-regulation of Syndecan-1 could lead to dysfunction and apoptosis of GEnC, as indicated by increased cell permeability, decreased cell viability and inhibited tube formation. VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling is essential in maintaining biology of GEnC, and activation of its downstream effectors, ERK1/2, AKT, and Rac1, were inhibited in GEnC transfected with Syndecan-1 siRNA compared with control siRNA. Moreover, membrane VEGFR-2 expression was reduced significantly in GEnC transfected with Syndecan-1 siRNA. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of VEGFR-2 is essential in the activation of VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling. Our further study demonstrated that down-regulation of Syndecan-1 in GEnC inhibit VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling by recruiting VEGFR-2 to the Caveolin-dependent endocytosis route, there by sequestering it from Clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Moreover, as shown by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis, VEGFR-2 co-localizes and interacts with Syndecan-1, indicating Syndecan-1 may act as a co-receptor of VEGFR-2, thus to mediate internalization of VEGFR-2. We speculated that down-regulation of Syndecan-1 could inhibit VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling through regulating internalization of VEGFR-2, thus leading to dysfunction and apoptosis of GEnC. This indicates a potential target for the therapy of ischemic AKI. PMID:27075925

  5. Iptakalim rescues human pulmonary artery endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced nitric oxide system dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Feng; Zuo, Xiang-Rong; Wang, Qiang; ZHANG, SHI-JIANG; Xie, Wei-Ping; Wang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether hypoxia inhibits endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production, and whether iptakalim may rescue human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) from hypoxia-induced NO system dysfunction. HPAECs were cultured under hypoxic conditions in the absence or presence of 0.1, 10 and 1,000 μM iptakalim or the combination of 10 μM iptakalim and 1, 10 and 100 μM glibenclamide for 24 h, and the eNOS activity and NO levels...

  6. Implications of altered glutathione metabolism in aspirin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment.

  7. Rho kinase inhibitor enables cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Sakamoto, Yuji; Fujii, Keita; Kitano, Junji; Nakano, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shin-Ichiro; Ueno, Morio; Hagiya, Michio; Hamuro, Junji; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Shiina, Takashi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency; consequently, its dysfunction causes severe vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy, as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation, is anticipated to provide a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We conducted a preclinical study for cell-based therapy in a primate model and demonstrated regeneration of the corneal endothelium following injection of cultured monkey corneal endothelial cells (MCECs) or human CECs (HCECs), in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, into the anterior chamber. We also evaluated the safety and efficacy of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade HCECs, similar to those planned for use as transplant material for human patients in a clinical trial, and we showed that the corneal endothelium was regenerated without adverse effect. We also showed that CEC engraftment is impaired by limited substrate adhesion, which is due to actomyosin contraction induced by dissociation-induced activation of ROCK/MLC signaling. Inclusion of a ROCK inhibitor improves efficiency of engraftment of CECs and enables cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction as a clinically relevant therapy. PMID:27189516

  8. Denbinobin induces apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells via Akt inactivation, Bad activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chen-Tzu; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Bing-Chang; Chen, Chien-Chih; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lin, Chien-Huang

    2008-02-28

    Increasing evidence demonstrated that denbinobin, isolated from Ephemerantha lonchophylla, exert cytotoxic effects in cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether denbinobin induces apoptosis and the apoptotic mechanism of denbinobin in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Denbinobin (1-20microM) caused cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis and annexin V labeling demonstrated that denbinobin increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. A549 cells treated with denbinobin showed typical characteristics of apoptosis including morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. Denbinobin induced caspase 3 activation, and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk), a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, prevented denbinobin-induced cell death. Denbinobin induced the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins including cytochrome c, second mitochondria derived activator of caspase (Smac), and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). In addition, denbinobin-induced Bad activation was accompanied by the dissociation of Bad with 14-3-3 and the association of Bad with Bcl-xL. Furthermore, denbinobin induced Akt inactivation in a time-dependent manner. Transfection of A549 cells with both wild-type and constitutively active Akt significantly suppressed denbinobin-induced Bad activation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Akt inactivation, followed by Bad activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase 3 activation, and AIF release, contributes to denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:18262737

  9. Knockdown of IRF6 Attenuates Hydrogen Dioxide-Induced Oxidative Stress via Inhibiting Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HT22 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Min; Chen, Bo; Lv, Jian-Meng; Lei, Qi; Pan, Ya-Juan; Yang, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is involved in many neurological diseases. Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6), a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, is required for the differentiation of skin, breast epithelium, and oral epithelium. However, the regulation and function of IRF6 in central nervous system remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate the role of IRF6 in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative neuronal injury in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. Treatment with H2O2 significantly increased the expression of IRF6 at both mRNA and protein levels, and knockdown of IRF6 using specific small interfering RNA reduced H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, as evidenced by increased cell viability and decreased apoptosis. Knockdown of IRF6 attenuated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation, and also preserved endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities. The inhibitory effect of IRF6 knockdown on mitochondrial dysfunction was demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial oxidative level, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP generation, as well as attenuated mitochondrial swelling. In addition, down-regulation of IRF6 inhibited the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic factors, whereas IRF6 knockdown together with caspase inhibitors had no extra effect on cell viability and LDH release. These results suggest that knockdown of IRF6 has protective effects against H2O2-induced oxidative stress by reducing ROS accumulation and apoptosis, and these protective effects are dependent on preservation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26620051

  10. The mediating role of parenting in the associations between household chaos and children's representations of family dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvara, B J; Mills-Koonce, W R; Garrett-Peters, P; Wagner, N J; Vernon-Feagans, L; Cox, M

    2014-01-01

    Children's drawings are thought to reflect their mental representations of self and their interpersonal relations within families. Household chaos is believed to disrupt key proximal processes related to optimal development. The present study examines the mediating role of parenting behaviors in the relations between two measures of household chaos, instability and disorganization, and how they may be evidenced in children's representations of family dysfunction as derived from their drawings. The sample (N = 962) is from a longitudinal study of rural poverty exploring the ways in which child, family, and contextual factors shape development over time. Findings reveal that, after controlling for numerous factors including child and primary caregiver covariates, there were significant indirect effects from cumulative family disorganization, but not cumulative family instability, on children's representation of family dysfunction through parenting behaviors. Results suggest that the proximal effects of daily disorganization outweigh the effects of periodic instability overtime. PMID:25329862

  11. Roles of calcium and IP3 in impaired colon contractility of rats following multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zheyu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to explore changes in rat colon motility, and determine the roles of calcium and inositol (1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 in colon dysmotility induced by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS caused by bacteria peritonitis. The number of stools, the contractility of the muscle strips and the length of smooth muscle cells (SMC in the colon, the concentration of calcium and IP3 in SMC, and serum nitric oxide were measured. Number of stools, fecal weight, IP3 concentration in SMC and serum nitric oxide concentration were 0.77 ± 0.52 pellets, 2.51 ± 0.39 g, 4.14 ± 2.07 pmol/tube, and 113.95 ± 37.89 µmol/L, respectively, for the MODS group (N = 11 vs 1.54 ± 0.64 pellets, 4.32 ± 0.57 g, 8.19 ± 3.11 pmol/tube, and 37.42 ± 19.56 µmol/L for the control group (N = 20; P < 0.05. After treatment with 0.1 mM acetylcholine and 0.1 M potassium chloride, the maximum contraction stress of smooth muscle strips, the length of SMC and the changes of calcium concentration were 593 ± 81 and 458 ± 69 g/cm³, 48.1 ± 11.8 and 69.2 ± 15.7 µM, 250 ± 70 and 167 ± 48%, respectively, for the control group vs 321 ± 53 and 284 ± 56 g/cm³, 65.1 ± 18.5 and 87.2 ± 23.7 µM, 127 ± 35 and 112 ± 35% for the MODS group (P < 0.05. Thus, colon contractility was decreased in MODS, a result possibly related to reduced calcium concentration and IP3 in SMC.

  12. Role of nucleolar dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders: a game of genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Parlato

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the cell nucleus the nucleolus is the site of rRNA transcription and ribosome biogenesis and its activity is clearly essential for a correct cell function, however its specific role in neuronal homeostasis remains mainly unknown. Here we review recent evidence that impaired nucleolar activity is a common mechanism in different neurodegenerative disorders. We focus on the specific causes and consequences of impaired nucleolar activity to better understand the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD. In particular, we discuss the genetic and epigenetic factors that might regulate nucleolar function in these diseases. In addition, we describe novel animal models enabling the dissection of the context-specific series of events triggered by nucleolar disruption, also known as nucleolar stress. Finally, we suggest how this novel mechanism could help to identify strategies to treat these still incurable disorders.

  13. Nitrosative stress and redox-cycling agents synergize to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne R. Diers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide production by the endothelium is required for normal vascular homeostasis; however, in conditions of oxidative stress, interactions of nitric oxide with reactive oxygen species (ROS are thought to underlie endothelial dysfunction. Beyond canonical nitric oxide signaling pathways, nitric oxide production results in the post-translational modification of protein thiols, termed S-nitrosation. The potential interplay between S-nitrosation and ROS remains poorly understood and is the focus of the current study. The effects of the S-nitrosating agent S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO in combination with redox-cycling agents was examined in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC. CysNO significantly impairs mitochondrial function and depletes the NADH/NAD+ pool; however, these changes do not result in cell death. When faced with the additional stressor of a redox-cycling agent used to generate ROS, further loss of NAD+ occurs, and cellular ATP pools are depleted. Cellular S-nitrosothiols also accumulate, and cell death is triggered. These data demonstrate that CysNO sensitizes endothelial cells to redox-cycling agent-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death and identify attenuated degradation of S-nitrosothiols as one potential mechanism for the enhanced cytotoxicity.

  14. Fullerenol cytotoxicity in kidney cells is associated with cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water soluble fullerenes, such as the hydroxylated fullerene, fullerenol (C60OHx), are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications in the field of nanotechnology. These molecules have been shown to undergo urinary clearance, yet there is limited data available on their renal biocompatibility. Here we examine the biological responses of renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) exposed to fullerenol. Fullerenol was found to be cytotoxic in the millimolar range, with viability assessed by the sulforhodamine B and trypan blue assays. Fullerenol-induced cell death was associated with cytoskeleton disruption and autophagic vacuole accumulation. Interaction with the autophagy pathway was evaluated in vitro by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, LC3-II marker expression and TEM. Fullerenol treatment also resulted in coincident loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP depletion, as measured by the Mitotracker Red dye and the luciferin-luciferase assays, respectively. Fullerenol-induced ATP depletion and loss of mitochondrial potential were partially ameliorated by co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine. In vitro fullerenol treatment did not result in appreciable oxidative stress, as measured by lipid peroxide and glutathione content. Based on these data, it is hypothesized that cytoskeleton disruption may be an initiating event in fullerenol cytotoxicity, leading to subsequent autophagy dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial capacity. As nanoparticle-induced cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly reported in the literature, the proposed mechanism may be relevant for a variety of nanomaterials.

  15. Managing Perceived Stress among College Students: The Roles of Social Support and Dysfunctional Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2012-01-01

    The author examined the conditions (i.e., social support and dysfunctional coping) under which perceived stress predicted psychological well-being in 459 college students. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated a significant 2-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social Support) and a significant 3-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social…

  16. Shikonin Directly Targets Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer Cells

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    Benjamin Wiench

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is a mainstay of cancer treatment. Due to increased drug resistance and the severe side effects of currently used therapeutics, new candidate compounds are required for improvement of therapy success. Shikonin, a natural naphthoquinone, was used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of different inflammatory diseases and recent studies revealed the anticancer activities of shikonin. We found that shikonin has strong cytotoxic effects on 15 cancer cell lines, including multidrug-resistant cell lines. Transcriptome-wide mRNA expression studies showed that shikonin induced genetic pathways regulating cell cycle, mitochondrial function, levels of reactive oxygen species, and cytoskeletal formation. Taking advantage of the inherent fluorescence of shikonin, we analyzed its uptake and distribution in live cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Shikonin was specifically accumulated in the mitochondria, and this accumulation was associated with a shikonin-dependent deregulation of cellular Ca2+ and ROS levels. This deregulation led to a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, dysfunction of microtubules, cell-cycle arrest, and ultimately induction of apoptosis. Seeing as both the metabolism and the structure of mitochondria show marked differences between cancer cells and normal cells, shikonin is a promising candidate for the next generation of chemotherapy.

  17. Natural Killer Cell Function and Dysfunction in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Kayla A. Holder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continually adapt against dynamic innate and adaptive responses of the host immune system to establish chronic infection. Only a small minority (~20% of those exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV spontaneously clear infection, leaving approximately 200 million people worldwide chronically infected with HCV. A number of recent research studies suggest that establishment and maintenance of chronic HCV infection involve natural killer (NK cell dysfunction. This relationship is illustrated in vitro by disruption of typical NK cell responses including both cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of a number of activating NK cell receptors in vivo is also affected in chronic HCV infection. Thus, direct in vivo and in vitro evidence of compromised NK function in chronic HCV infection in conjunction with significant epidemiological associations between the outcome of HCV infection and certain combinations of NK cell regulatory receptor and class I human histocompatibility linked antigen (HLA genotypes indicate that NK cells are important in the immune response against HCV infection. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that selective impairment of NK cell activity is related to establishment of chronic HCV infection.

  18. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and β-Cell Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Zhongmin Alex Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the most common human endocrine disease and is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance and pancreatic islet β-cell failure. Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is a central contributor to β-cell failure in the evolution of T2DM. As reviewed elsewhere, reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by β-cell mitochondria as a result of metabolic stress activate several stress-response pathways. This paper focuses on mechanisms whereby ROS affect mitochondrial structure and function and lead to β-cell failure. ROS activate UCP2, which results in proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and this leads to reduced β-cell ATP synthesis and content, which is a critical parameter in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, ROS oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondrial cardiolipin and other phospholipids, and this impairs membrane integrity and leads to cytochrome c release into cytosol and apoptosis. Group VIA phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β appears to be a component of a mechanism for repairing mitochondrial phospholipids that contain oxidized fatty acid substituents, and genetic or acquired iPLA2β-deficiency increases β-cell mitochondrial susceptibility to injury from ROS and predisposes to developing T2DM. Interventions that attenuate ROS effects on β-cell mitochondrial phospholipids might prevent or retard development of T2DM.

  19. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

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    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  20. Pro-inflammatory endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with intersectin-1s down-regulation

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    Zhang Jian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs to lipopolysaccharide (LPS is central to the pathogenesis of lung injury. It is dual in nature, with one facet that is pro-inflammatory and another that is cyto-protective. In previous work, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL rescued ECs from apoptosis triggered by siRNA knockdown of intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s, a pro-survival protein crucial for ECs function. Here we further characterized the cyto-protective EC response to LPS and pro-inflammatory dysfunction. Methods and Results Electron microscopy (EM analyses of LPS-exposed ECs revealed an activated/dysfunctional phenotype, while a biotin assay for caveolae internalization followed by biochemical quantification indicated that LPS causes a 40% inhibition in biotin uptake compared to controls. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression, respectively, for several regulatory proteins of intrinsic apoptosis, including ITSN-1s. The decrease in ITSN-1s mRNA and protein expression were countered by Bcl-XL and survivin upregulation, as well as Bim downregulation, events thought to protect ECs from impending apoptosis. Absence of apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL and lack of cytochrome c (cyt c efflux from mitochondria. Moreover, LPS exposure caused induction and activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and a mitochondrial variant (mtNOS, as well as augmented mitochondrial NO production as measured by an oxidation oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb assay applied on mitochondrial-enriched fractions prepared from LPS-exposed ECs. Interestingly, expression of myc-ITSN-1s rescued caveolae endocytosis and reversed induction of iNOS expression. Conclusion Our results suggest that ITSN-1s deficiency is relevant for the pro-inflammatory ECs dysfunction induced by LPS.

  1. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Possible Contribution of a Defective Vascular Niche to Myelodysplasia

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    Luciana Teofili

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We set a model to replicate the vascular bone marrow niche by using endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs, and we used it to explore the vascular niche function in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Overall, we investigated 56 patients and we observed higher levels of ECFCs in MDS than in healthy controls; moreover, MDS ECFCs were found variably hypermethylated for p15INK4b DAPK1, CDH1, or SOCS1. MDS ECFCs exhibited a marked adhesive capacity to normal mononuclear cells. When normal CD34+ cells were co-cultured with MDS ECFCs, they generated significant lower amounts of CD11b+ and CD41+ cells than in co-culture with normal ECFCs. At gene expression profile, several genes involved in cell adhesion were upregulated in MDS ECFCs, while several members of the Wingless and int (Wnt pathways were underexpressed. Furthermore, at miRNA expression profile, MDS ECFCs hypo-expressed various miRNAs involved in Wnt pathway regulation. The addition of Wnt3A reduced the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on MDS ECFCs and restored the defective expression of markers of differentiation. Overall, our data demonstrate that in low-risk MDS, ECFCs exhibit various primary abnormalities, including putative MDS signatures, and suggest the possible contribution of the vascular niche dysfunction to myelodysplasia.

  2. Endothelin and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Tomoh; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) produced in endothelial cells are leading molecules which regulate vascular function. Failure of the physiological balance between these two molecules is usually referred to as endothelial dysfunction. ET was initially identified as a potent vasoconstrictive peptide. Three ET isoforms and two ET receptors have been identified. One of the isoforms, ET-1, plays a significant role in many cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial receptor for oxLDL was cloned, and named lectin-like oxidized receptor-1 (LOX-1). Activation of LOX-1 generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), and acivates a transcriptional factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), resulting in down-regulation of NO and up-regulation of ET-1. LOX-1 might be a key molecule in the generation of endothelial dysfunction. In endothelial dysfunction, ET-1 is an aggravating factor of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25792766

  3. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine.

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    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC. Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins.

  4. Antidiabetic effect of α-mangostin and its protective role in sexual dysfunction of streptozotocin induced diabetic male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelli, Giri Babu; K, Anand Solomon; Kilari, Eswar Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction is one of the diabetic complications in males. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of α-mangostin and its protective role in sexual dysfunction of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic male rats. Male Wistar rats were divided as control, diabetic control, diabetic rats administered with 25, 50 mg/kg body weight (bw) of α-mangostin and 1 mg/kg bw of gliclazide. The α-mangostin was administered once daily for a period of 55 days. On day 55 animals were sacrificed, serum was analyzed for testosterone levels, and sperm was collected from the epididymis and sperm parameters analyzed. Testis and epididymis were examined for antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, lipidperoxidation products, and histopathological alterations. In diabetic rats, sperm count, motile sperms, viable sperms, and hypo-osmotic swelling tail coiled sperms were significantly decreased while sperm malformations increased when compared with normal rats. Serum testosterone levels and testicular 3β and 17 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase levels were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. Significant reduction in testicular and epididymal SOD, catalase, GPx levels, and elevation in lipid peroxidation products were observed. However, α-mangostin treatment showed noteworthy recovery in all parameters towards the control levels. It may therefore be suggested that α-mangostin showed a protective effect against sexual dysfunction in STZ induced diabetic rats. PMID:23886300

  5. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak: basis and roles in cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized SR calcium (Ca) release is critical to normal cardiac myocyte excitation-contraction coupling, and ideally this release shuts off completely between heartbeats. However, other SR Ca release events are referred to collectively as SR Ca leak (which includes Ca sparks and waves as well as smaller events not detectable as Ca sparks). Much, but not all, of the SR Ca leak occurs via ryanodine receptors and can be exacerbated in pathological states such as heart failure. The extent of SR Ca leak is important because it can (a) reduce SR Ca available for release, causing systolic dysfunction; (b) elevate diastolic [Ca]i, contributing to diastolic dysfunction; (c) cause triggered arrhythmias; and (d) be energetically costly because of extra ATP used to repump Ca. This review addresses quantitative aspects and manifestations of SR Ca leak and its measurement, and how leak is modulated by Ca, associated proteins, and posttranslational modifications in health and disease. PMID:24245942

  6. Analysis of the Role of Neurospecific Proteins in the Diagnosis of Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Yuliya Gennad'evna Samoylova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundImpairment of the central nervous system manifested as cognitive dysfunction caused by metabolic or structural changes is a severe progressive vascular complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Significant difficulties in the diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction are associated with subjective diagnostic techniques.ObjectiveTo identify the role of neurospecific markers in the diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with T1DM.Materials and MethodsA total of 58 patients with T1DM aged 16–30 years were included in this study. The control group included 29 healthy young adults matched by gender and age. The survey included clinical and laboratory examinations, psychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA was used to screen for cognitive impairment. The levels of neurospecific proteins (S100, glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein were determined to identify early markers of cognitive impairment. MRI of the brain was performed using a Siemens Magnetom 1.0 T system to assess structural changes in the central nervous system.ResultsThe study revealed increased levels of all neurospecific proteins, which correlated with parameters of hyperglycaemia and cognitive deficit (MoCA scores of <26 points. MRI of the brain revealed signs of grey matter atrophy and involvement of white matter, which correlated with the presence of chronic hyperglycaemia, cognitive impairment and microvascular complications.ConclusionChronic hyperglycemia can be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction in T1DM patients. More studies (prospective controlled and observational trials are needed to clarify the relationship of diabetes and central nervous system impairment.

  7. Role of serum copper and ceruloplasmin level in patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Ketki P. Khandhadiya; Yousef Rezaei Chianeh; Pragna Rao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Objective of current study was to study serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in abnormal endometrial angiogenesis observed in dysfunctional uterine bleeding patients. Methods: Design: The present cross sectional study was undertaken in the departments of biochemistry and department of OBG, Kasturba medical college, Manipal University, Manipal, India. Population: This study was done in 40 females age between 18-45 years with history of, bleeding excessively for more than 3 mont...

  8. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction in propionic aciduria: a pathogenic role for endogenous mitochondrial toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, M.A.; Sauer, S.W.; Okun, J.G.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Drose, S.; Brandt, U; Hoffmann, G F; Laak, H.J. ter; S. Kolker; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction during acute metabolic crises is considered an important pathomechanism in inherited disorders of propionate metabolism, i.e. propionic and methylmalonic acidurias. Biochemically, these disorders are characterized by accumulation of propionyl-CoA and metabolites of alternative propionate oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrate uncompetitive inhibition of PDHc (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) by propionyl-CoA in purified porcine enzyme and in submitochondrial ...

  9. Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a role for exercise training?

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotou, Marios; Peacock, Andrew J.; Johnson, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction is emerging as an important pathophysiological abnormality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Muscle abnormalities appear to occur frequently and promote dyspnea, fatigue, and exercise limitation in patients with PAH. Preliminary data suggest that targeted muscle training may be of benefit, although further evidence is required to consolidate these findings into specific recommendations for exercise training in patients with PAH. This article rev...

  10. Role of intrinsic aerobic capacity and ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Sollanek, Kurt J.; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P; Morton, Aaron B.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Powers, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) leads to rapid diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, which is collectively termed “ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction” (VIDD). Interestingly, endurance exercise training prior to MV has been shown to protect against VIDD. Further, recent evidence reveals that sedentary animals selectively bred to possess a high aerobic capacity possess a similar skeletal muscle phenotype to muscles from endurance trained animals. Therefore, we tested th...

  11. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction and altered autophagy in cardiovascular aging and disease: from mechanisms to therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Csiszar, Anna; Dutta, Debapriya; Balagopal, Gauthami; Calvani, Riccardo; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with a disproportionate prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Intrinsic alterations in the heart and the vasculature occurring over the life course render the cardiovascular system more vulnerable to various stressors in late life, ultimately favoring the development of CVD. Several lines of evidence indicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a major contributor to cardiovascular senescence. Besides being less bioenergetically efficient, damaged mitochondria also p...

  12. Oxyphenisatin acetate (NSC 59687) triggers a cell starvation response leading to autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, and autocrine TNFα-mediated apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxyphenisatin (3,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-indol-2-one) and several structurally related molecules have been shown to have in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity. This study aims to confirm and extend mechanistic studies by focusing on oxyphenisatin acetate (OXY, NSC 59687), the pro-drug of oxyphenisatin. Results confirm that OXY inhibits the growth of the breast cancer cell lines MCF7, T47D, HS578T, and MDA-MB-468. This effect is associated with selective inhibition of translation accompanied by rapid phosphorylation of the nutrient sensing eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) kinases, GCN2 and PERK. This effect was paralleled by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) combined with reduced phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) substrates p70S6K and 4E-BP1. Microarray analysis highlighted activation of pathways involved in apoptosis induction, autophagy, RNA/protein metabolism, starvation responses, and solute transport. Pathway inhibitor combination studies suggested a role for AMPK/mTOR signaling, de novo transcription and translation, reactive oxygen species (ROS)/glutathione metabolism, calcium homeostasis and plasma membrane Na+/K+/Ca2+ transport in activity. Further examination confirmed that OXY treatment was associated with autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ROS generation. Additionally, treatment was associated with activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. In the estrogen receptor (ER) positive MCF7 and T47D cells, OXY induced TNFα expression and TNFR1 degradation, indicating autocrine receptor-mediated apoptosis in these lines. Lastly, in an MCF7 xenograft model, OXY delivered intraperitoneally inhibited tumor growth, accompanied by phosphorylation of eIF2α and degradation of TNFR1. These data suggest that OXY induces a multifaceted cell starvation response, which ultimately induces programmed cell death. The mechanistic basis for oxyphenisatin acetate anti

  13. Kidney dysfunction and beta S-haplotypes in patients with sickle cell disease

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    Lilianne Brito da Silva Rocha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between kidney dysfunction and haplotypes in sickle cell disease. Methods: A cohort of 84 sickle cell disease patients, treated in a public health service in Fortaleza, Brazil, was studied. Hemoglobin S haplotypes were obtained from 57 patients as they had recently received blood transfusions with 18 of them agreeing to undertake urinary concentrating ability and acidification tests. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation. Urinary concentration was evaluated utilizing the urinary and serum osmolality ratio (U/Posm after 12 hours of water deprivation. Urinary acidification was evaluated by measuring the urinary pH before and after the administration of oral CaCl2. The analysis of the haplotypes of the beta S gene cluster was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The analysis of variance (ANOVA test was used for multiple comparisons of means and the Newman-Keuls test was used to identify which groups were significantly different. Results: The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 13 years with 64.2% being females. The glomerular filtration rate was normal in 25 cases (30% and a rate > 120 mL/min was seen in 52 cases (62%. Urinary concentration deficit was found in all patients who underwent the test and urinary acidification in 22%. There was no significant difference when comparing patients with the Bantu/Bantu and Benin/Benin haplotypes. On comparing patients with the Central African Republic-haplotype however, a higher number had glomerular filtration rates between 60 and 120 mL/min. Conclusion: There was no significant difference among sickle cell disease patients regarding the haplotypes and kidney dysfunction.

  14. Acute ablation of PERK results in ER dysfunctions followed by reduced insulin secretion and cell proliferation

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    McGrath Barbara C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A deficiency in Perk (EIF2AK3 causes multiple neonatal defects in humans known as the Wolcott Rallison syndrome. Perk KO mice exhibit the same array of defects including permanent neonatal diabetes (PND. PND in mice was previously shown by us to be due to a decrease in beta cell proliferation and insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine if acute ablation of PERK in the 832/13 beta cells recapitulates these defects and to identify the primary molecular basis for beta cell dysfunction. Results The INS1 832/13 transformed rat beta cell line was transduced with a dominant-negative Perk transgene via an adenoviral vector. AdDNPerk-832/13 beta cells exhibited reduced expression of insulin and MafA mRNAs, reduced insulin secretion, and reduced cell proliferation. Although proinsulin content was reduced in AdDNPerk-832/13 beta cells, proinsulin was abnormally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. A temporal study of the acute ablation of Perk revealed that the earliest defect seen was induced expression of two ER chaperone proteins, GRP78/BiP and ERp72. The oxidized states of ERp72 and ERp57 were also increased suggesting an imbalance in the redox state of the ER. Conclusion Acute ablation of Perk in INS 832/13 beta cells exhibited all of the major defects seen in Perk KO mice and revealed abnormal expression and redox state of key ER chaperone proteins. Dysregulation of ER chaperone/folding enzymes ERp72 and GRP78/BiP occurred early after ablation of PERK function suggesting that changes in ER secretory functions may give rise to the other defects including reduced insulin gene expression, secretion, and cell proliferation.

  15. Norcantharidin induced DU145 cell apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo; He, Pei-Jie; Shao, Chun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD), a demethylated analog of cantharidin derived from blister beetles, has attracted considerable attentions in recent years due to their definitely toxic properties and the noteworthy advantages in stimulating bone marrow and increasing the peripheral leukocytes. Hence, it is worth studying the anti-tumor effect of NCTD on human prostate cancer cells DU145. It was found that after the treatment of NCTD with different concentrations (25-100 μM), the cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, which led to the appearance of micronucleus (MN). Moreover, the cells could be killed in a dose-/time-dependent manner along with the reduction of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression, destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), down-regulation of MnSOD, induction of ROS, depletion of ATP, and activation of AMPK (Adenosine 5'-monophosphate -activated protein kinase) . In addition, a remarkable release of cytochrome c was found in the cells exposed to 100 μM NCTD and exogenous SOD-PEG could eliminate the generation of NCTD-induced MN. In conclusion, our studies indicated that NCTD could induce the collapse of MMP and mitochondria dysfunction. Accumulation of intercellular ROS could eventually switch on the apoptotic pathway by causing DNA damage and depleting ATP. PMID:24367681

  16. Norcantharidin induced DU145 cell apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Shen

    Full Text Available Norcantharidin (NCTD, a demethylated analog of cantharidin derived from blister beetles, has attracted considerable attentions in recent years due to their definitely toxic properties and the noteworthy advantages in stimulating bone marrow and increasing the peripheral leukocytes. Hence, it is worth studying the anti-tumor effect of NCTD on human prostate cancer cells DU145. It was found that after the treatment of NCTD with different concentrations (25-100 μM, the cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, which led to the appearance of micronucleus (MN. Moreover, the cells could be killed in a dose-/time-dependent manner along with the reduction of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression, destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, down-regulation of MnSOD, induction of ROS, depletion of ATP, and activation of AMPK (Adenosine 5'-monophosphate -activated protein kinase . In addition, a remarkable release of cytochrome c was found in the cells exposed to 100 μM NCTD and exogenous SOD-PEG could eliminate the generation of NCTD-induced MN. In conclusion, our studies indicated that NCTD could induce the collapse of MMP and mitochondria dysfunction. Accumulation of intercellular ROS could eventually switch on the apoptotic pathway by causing DNA damage and depleting ATP.

  17. Role of interleukin-6 levels in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. However, the relationship between IL-6 levels and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum IL-6 levels are associated with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients. Eighty type 2 diabetic patients who did not have organic heart disease were categorized into a high IL-6 group (>2.5 pg/ml, n= 0, age 59±12 years) or a non-high IL-6 group (123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The body mass index values (BMI), fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment index values were higher in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group (p123I-MIBG myocardial uptake values were lower (p123I-MIBG was higher (p123I-MIBG during the delayed phase. The results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels are associated with depressed cardiovascular autonomic function and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. (orig.)

  18. Multinucleation and cell dysfunction induced by amorphous silica nanoparticles in an L-02 human hepatic cell line

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    Wang W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wen Wang,1–3,* Yang Li,1–3,* Xiaomei Liu,3 Minghua Jin,3 Haiying Du,3 Ying Liu,3 Peili Huang,1,2 Xianqing Zhou,1,2 Lan Yuan,4 Zhiwei Sun1–3 1School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 3School of Public Health, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, 4Medical and Healthy Analysis Centre, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Silica nanoparticles (SNPs are one of the most important nanomaterials, and have been widely used in a variety of fields. Therefore, their effects on human health and the environment have been addressed in a number of studies. In this work, the effects of amorphous SNPs were investigated with regard to multinucleation in L-02 human hepatic cells. Our results show that L-02 cells had an abnormally high incidence of multinucleation upon exposure to silica, that increased in a dose-dependent manner. Propidium iodide staining showed that multinucleated cells were arrested in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Increased multinucleation in L-02 cells was associated with increased generation of cellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage on flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, which might have led to failure of cytokinesis in these cells. Further, SNPs inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in exposed cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that multinucleation in L-02 human hepatic cells might be a failure to undergo cytokinesis or cell fusion in response to SNPs, and the increase in cellular reactive oxygen species could be responsible for the apoptosis seen in both mononuclear cells and multinucleated cells. Keywords: silica nanoparticles, human hepatic cell L-02, multinucleation, cell cycle, cell dysfunction, apoptosis

  19. Combined Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction in 46,XX males lacking the sex determining region Y gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, B.; Vordermark, J.S. [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX (United States); Fechner, P.Y. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    We have evaluated 3 individuals with a rare form of 46,XX sex reversal. All of them had ambiguous external genitalia and mixed wolffian and muellerian structures, indicating both Leydig cell and Sertoli cell dysfunction, similar to that of patients with true hermaphroditism. However, gonadal tissue was not ovotesticular but testicular with varying degrees of dysgenesis. SRY sequences were absent in genomic DNA from peripheral leukocytes in all 3 subjects. Y centromere sequences were also absent, indicating that testis development did not occur because of a low level mosaicism of Y-bearing cells. The subjects in this report demonstrate that there is a continuum in the extent of the testis determination in SRY-negative 46,XX sex reversal, ranging from nearly normal to minimal testicular development. 20 refs.

  20. Analysis of radiation dysfunction of gastrointestinal epithelial cell regeneration system and its nutritional modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dysfunction of the regeneration system of small intensive cell and other kinds of digestive function by the total body irradiation of rat were studied. The enzyme activity between the small intestinal villus and crypt and the short chain aliphatic fatty acid in caecum were measured. Rat was irradiated with 3 Gy or 10 Gy dose. The irradiation effects were not observed by 3 Gy dose but by 10 Gy dose. The effects on each digestive enzyme were not constant. In the upper part of intestine, sucrase and lactose activity were not changed after one day, but decreased after 2 days. However, trehalase was not changed until 2 days and decreased after 3 days. ALP increased until 2 days and then decreased. LAP was constant until 1 day but decreased rapidly after 2 days. Total amount of acetic acid and butyric acid decreased after one day, but propionic acid decreased after 2 days. (S.Y.)

  1. Analysis of radiation dysfunction of gastrointestinal epithelial cell regeneration system and its nutritional modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Narita, Mayumi; Ikegami, Sachie [National Inst. of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    The dysfunction of the regeneration system of small intensive cell and other kinds of digestive function by the total body irradiation of rat were studied. The enzyme activity between the small intestinal villus and crypt and the short chain aliphatic fatty acid in caecum were measured. Rat was irradiated with 3 Gy or 10 Gy dose. The irradiation effects were not observed by 3 Gy dose but by 10 Gy dose. The effects on each digestive enzyme were not constant. In the upper part of intestine, sucrase and lactose activity were not changed after one day, but decreased after 2 days. However, trehalase was not changed until 2 days and decreased after 3 days. ALP increased until 2 days and then decreased. LAP was constant until 1 day but decreased rapidly after 2 days. Total amount of acetic acid and butyric acid decreased after one day, but propionic acid decreased after 2 days. (S.Y.)

  2. MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION AND APOPTOSIS IN TROPHOBLAST CELLS DURING PREECLAMPSIA: AN ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castejón O

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructure of the mitochondria in trophoblast cells of pregnant women with preeclampsia and to relate it with apoptotic events.Material and methods: Placentas at term were obtained immediately after cesarean delivery. Three biopsies per placenta were taken from the maternal basal surface in the delivery room. Specimens from peripheral ramifications of the villous tree (especially immature intermediate and terminal villi were processed through conventional procedures of transmission electron microscopy and opportunely compared with controls obtained from normal placentas.Results: Ultrastructural degenerative changes in mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix of trophoblast cells (lysis of cristae and matrix vacuolization were visualized. Swollen mitochondria in diverse degenerative grades were found. Two types of degenerated mitochondria in accordance with the mitochondrial matrix were detected in apoptotic trophoblast cells.Conclusion: Mitochondrial ultrastructural changes appear to be the origin of trophoblast cell death by apoptosis. Subsequently, trophoblast debris would fall from placental villi into the intervillous space and could become not only corpuscles damaging the endothelium of the fetal-placental maternal unit but one of the stimuli for endothelial dysfunction and the maintenance of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  3. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  4. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K+ channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca2+, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca2+-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  5. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  6. Pathogenesis of endothelial cell dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: a retrospective and what the future may hold

    OpenAIRE

    Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications dominate the landscape of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) is a well-known culprit of cardiovascular morbidity and it develops in CKD with remarkable frequency. This brief overview of ECD in CKD scans two decades of studies performed in my laboratory, from genetic analyses to proteomic and metabolomics screens. I provide a detailed description of findings related to the premature senescence of endothelial cells, cell transition fro...

  7. Barth Syndrome: From Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Associated with Aberrant Production of Reactive Oxygen Species to Pluripotent Stem Cell Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie; Møller, Ian M; Petit, Patrice X

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated with TAZ mutations. Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipidlysophospholipid transacylase that shuttles acyl groups between phospholipids and regulates the remodeling of cardiolipin (CL), a unique inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid dimer consisting of two phosphatidyl residues linked by a glycerol bridge. After their biosynthesis, the acyl chains of CLs may be modified in remodeling processes involving up to three different enzymes. Their characteristic acyl chain composition depends on the function of tafazzin, although the enzyme itself surprisingly lacks acyl specificity. CLs are crucial for correct mitochondrial structure and function. In addition to their function in the basic mitochondrial function of ATP production, CLs play essential roles in cardiac function, apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Recent developments in tafazzin research have provided strong insights into the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important tool has been the generation of BTHS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BTHS patients. In a complementary approach, disease-specific mutations have been introduced into wild-type iPSC lines enabling direct comparison with isogenic controls. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were then characterized using biochemical and classical bioenergetic

  8. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma. PMID:24665390

  9. Endothelial dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis associated with reduced endothelial progenitor cell population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Krishan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality have been documented in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have reparative potential in overcoming the endothelial dysfunction and reducing cardiovascular risk. Aim: To investigate the relationship between endothelial function and EPCs in patients with AS in a cross-sectional study. Methods: Circulating EPCs (CD34+/CD133+ were isolated and quantified from peripheral blood samples of AS (n23 and healthy controls (n=20 matched for age and sex. Endothelium-depended vascular function, i.e. flow-mediated dilation (FMD, was assessed for all subjects. Disease activity was evaluated using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI. Functional ability was monitored using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI. All subjects were free of any other known traditional CV risk factors. Results: AS patients had depleted level of circulating %EPCs (0.028 ± 0.001% versus 0.045 ± 0.011%, P <0.001 and reduced FMD% (6.77 ± 2.15 versus 10.06 ± 0.55, P <0.001 than healthy controls. Circulating EPC population significantly positively correlated with FMD% (r 0.538, P = 0.008. Levels of CD34+/CD133+ putative cells showed a significant inverse correlation with disease duration (P = 0.01, BASDAI (P = 0.04, ESR (P = 0.002 and CRP (P = 0.007. Conclusion: AS patients, free of any other known CV risk factors, demonstrated depleted levels of EPCs and reduced endothelial function. These alterations may cause further deterioration of endothelial function in AS patients. EPC would possibly serve as a novel therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular risk in AS.

  10. Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetic Erectile Dysfunction in Rats: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchao Li

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is a novel method for the treatment of diabetic erectile dysfunction (ED. Many relative animal studies have been done to evaluate the efficacy of this therapy in rats.This meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy of different stem cell therapies, to evaluate the influential factors and to determine the optimal stem cell therapeutic strategy for diabetic ED.We searched the studies analyzing the efficacy of stem cell therapy for diabetic ED in rats published before September 30, 2015 in PubMed, Web of Science and EBSCO. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted to assess the outcomes of stem cell therapy. Subgroup analysis was also performed by separating these studies based on their different characteristics. Changes in the ratio of intracavernous pressure (ICP to mean arterial pressure (MAP and in the structure of the cavernous body were compared.10 studies with 302 rats were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Pooled analysis of these studies showed a beneficial effect of stem cell therapy in improving erectile function of diabetic rats (SMD 4.03, 95% CI = 3.22 to 4.84, P< 0.001. In the stem cell therapy group, both the smooth muscle and endothelium content were much more than those in control group. There was also significant increase in the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, the ratio of smooth muscle to collagen, as well as the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Besides, apoptotic cells were reduced by stem cell treatment. The subgroup analysis indicated that modified stem cells were more effective than those without modification.Our results confirmed that stem cell therapy could apparently improve the erectile function of diabetic rats. Some specific modification, especially the gene modification with growth factors, could improve the efficacy of stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has potential to be an effective therapeutic

  11. Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetic Erectile Dysfunction in Rats: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchao; Li, Hao; Ruan, Yajun; Wang, Tao; Liu, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stem cell therapy is a novel method for the treatment of diabetic erectile dysfunction (ED). Many relative animal studies have been done to evaluate the efficacy of this therapy in rats. Aims This meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy of different stem cell therapies, to evaluate the influential factors and to determine the optimal stem cell therapeutic strategy for diabetic ED. Methods We searched the studies analyzing the efficacy of stem cell therapy for diabetic ED in rats published before September 30, 2015 in PubMed, Web of Science and EBSCO. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted to assess the outcomes of stem cell therapy. Subgroup analysis was also performed by separating these studies based on their different characteristics. Changes in the ratio of intracavernous pressure (ICP) to mean arterial pressure (MAP) and in the structure of the cavernous body were compared. Results 10 studies with 302 rats were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Pooled analysis of these studies showed a beneficial effect of stem cell therapy in improving erectile function of diabetic rats (SMD 4.03, 95% CI = 3.22 to 4.84, P< 0.001). In the stem cell therapy group, both the smooth muscle and endothelium content were much more than those in control group. There was also significant increase in the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the ratio of smooth muscle to collagen, as well as the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, apoptotic cells were reduced by stem cell treatment. The subgroup analysis indicated that modified stem cells were more effective than those without modification. Conclusions Our results confirmed that stem cell therapy could apparently improve the erectile function of diabetic rats. Some specific modification, especially the gene modification with growth factors, could improve the efficacy of stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has potential

  12. Probiotics (VSL#3 prevent endothelial dysfunction in rats with portal hypertension: role of the angiotensin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherzad K Rashid

    Full Text Available AIMS: Portal hypertension characterized by generalized vasodilatation with endothelial dysfunction affecting nitric oxide (NO and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH has been suggested to involve bacterial translocation and/or the angiotensin system. The possibility that ingestion of probiotics prevents endothelial dysfunction in rats following common bile duct ligation (CBDL was evaluated. METHODS: Rats received either control drinking water or the probiotic VSL#3 solution (50 billion bacteria.kg body wt⁻¹.day⁻¹ for 7 weeks. After 3 weeks, rats underwent surgery with either resection of the common bile duct or sham surgery. The reactivity of mesenteric artery rings was assessed in organ chambers, expression of proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, oxidative stress using dihydroethidium, and plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Both NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations to acetylcholine were reduced in the CBDL group compared to the sham group, and associated with a reduced expression of Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, IKCa and SKCa and an increased expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. In aortic sections, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, angiotensin converting enzyme, AT1 receptors and angiotensin II, and formation of ROS and peroxynitrite were observed. VSL#3 prevented the deleterious effect of CBDL on EDH-mediated relaxations, vascular expression of connexins, IKCa, SKCa and eNOS, oxidative stress, and the angiotensin system. VSL#3 prevented the CBDL-induced increased plasma TNF-α, IL-1α and MCP-1 levels. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that VSL#3 ingestion prevents endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric artery of CBDL rats, and this effect is associated with an improved vascular oxidative stress most likely by reducing bacterial translocation and the local angiotensin system.

  13. Role of interleukin-6 levels in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Takahashi, Naohiko; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu [Oita University, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Faculty of Medicine, Yuhu, Oita (Japan); Yufu, Kunio; Anan, Futoshi; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Saikawa, Tetsunori [Oita University, Department of Cardiovascular Science, Oita (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    Increased serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. However, the relationship between IL-6 levels and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum IL-6 levels are associated with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients. Eighty type 2 diabetic patients who did not have organic heart disease were categorized into a high IL-6 group (>2.5 pg/ml, n= 0, age 59{+-}12 years) or a non-high IL-6 group (<2.5 pg/ml, n=40, 61{+-}12 years). Cardiac autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentrations and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The body mass index values (BMI), fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment index values were higher in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group (p<0.01). Early and delayed {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial uptake values were lower (p<0.01), and the percent washout rate of {sup 123}I-MIBG was higher (p<0.05) in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis revealed that the IL-6 level was independently predicted by the BMI and the myocardial uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG during the delayed phase. The results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels are associated with depressed cardiovascular autonomic function and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. (orig.)

  14. The role of vegetative and vascular disturbances in development of sexual dysfunctions. Chapter 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that in clinics of late consequences of low radiation doses action the principle place takes vegetative and vascular dysfunctions. For estimation of vegetative-vascular system tone the Danini-Ashner of eye-heard reflex is studied. Status of the reflex for 120 examined patients was studied. Results of investigation of Danini-Ashner reflex in relation of received dose of radiation, as well as results of skin temperature of sicks with different levels of low radiation doses late consequences are presented. For study of vegetative-vascular system the electro-skin resistance method was used as well

  15. Transplanted Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Testicular Dysfunction In A D-Galactose-Induced Aging Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Du, Yi-Kuan; Wang, Jun; Luan, Ping; Yang, Qin-Lao; Huang, Wen-Hua; Yuan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Glycation product accumulation during aging of slowly renewing tissues may be an important mechanism underlying aging of the testis. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have shown promise in a novel tissue regenerative technique and may have utility in treating sexual dysfunction. ADSCs have also been found to be effective in antiaging therapy, although the mechanism underlying their effects remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the anti-aging effect of ADSCs in a D-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging animal model and to clarify the underlying mechanism. Randomly selected 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were subcutaneously injected with D-gal daily for 8 weeks. Two weeks after completion of treatment, D-gal-induced aging rats were randomized to receive caudal vein injections of 3 × 10(6) 5-bromo 2'deoxy-uridine-labeled ADSCs or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline. Serum testosterone level, steroidogenic enzymes (3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased significantly in aging rats compared with the control group; serum lipid peroxidation, spermatogenic cell apoptosis, and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) expression increased significantly. ADSCs increased the SOD level and reduced the MDA level in the aging animal model and restored levels of serum testosterone, steroidogenic enzymes, and spermatogenic cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate that ADSCs can contribute to testicular regeneration during aging. ADSCs also provide functional benefits through glycation suppression and antioxidant effects in a rat model of aging. Although some ADSCs differentiated into Leydig cells, the paracrine pathway seems to play a main role in this process, resulting in the reduction of apoptosis. PMID:25728126

  16. Immunoregulatory Role of Myeloid-derived Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Marcelo Cerf; Däbritz, Jan

    2015-12-01

    As the frontiers of immunological research expand, new insights into the pathogenesis of long poorly understood diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are opening up new possible avenues for treatment. Myeloid-derived cells (i.e., monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells), long believed to be effector cells driving the initiation of inflammation, have been increasingly shown to have immunoregulatory effects previously underappreciated. Dysfunction in the immunoregulatory roles of these cells may play a part in the pathogenesis of a subset of patients with IBD. The role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, initially described in cancer, have been shown to play an important role in the balancing of effector and regulatory T cells in inflammation as well, and their role in IBD is also explored. The potential for future cell-based therapies for IBD is enhanced by the advances being made in the understanding of the innate immune system in the intestine. PMID:26244650

  17. Beta Cell Pancreas Dysfunction and Hyperglycemia in Patient Schizophrenia that Uses Haloperidol at Region Special Dadi Hospital Province South Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmawati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenic patients at high risk for development of type 2 diabetes as a side effect of the antipsychotic medication This research is aimed to find out (1 the level of HbA1c and the description of hyperglycemia incidence, (2 the value of HOMA-β and the description of beta cell dysfunction incidence, (3 the correlation between HOMA-β value with HbA1c level, (4 the duration correlation between the use of haloperidol with the HOMA-β value and the HbA1c level, (5 the duration correlation the use of haloperidol and the HbA1c level through HOMA-β value. This study was conducted at the inpatient ward of Dadi Hospital, South Sulawesi Province using quantitative method with cross sectional study. By using total sampling way, 64 were chosen. The data were then analyzed by using frequency distribution test and Spearman correlation. The result of the study indicates that sufferer schizophrenia at Dadi Hospital who use haloperidol have problems of hyperglycemia (HbA1c >5,5%. The longer the use of haloperidol the more the excelsior level of HbA1c found. About 4,3% hyperglycemia in use of haloperidol 1 year. The mechanism the hyperglycemia incidence mentioned above suffered through dysfunction of beta cell. The longer the use of haloperidol the lower the HOMA-β value. It reaches 28,3% dysfunction of beta cell in use of haloperidol 1 year. The dysfunction of beta cell has relation with the duration in the use of haloperidol. The lower HOMA-β value level the more the excelsior level of HbA1c. The incidence of Hyperglycemia is correlated with the dysfunction of beta cell.

  18. Role of executive dysfunction in predicting frequency and severity of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Megan; Tapscott, Jennifer L; Hoaken, Peter N S

    2010-01-01

    The adverse consequences of violence on society are tremendous. The proportion of offenders incarcerated for violent offenses is large, and the cost of keeping these offenders incarcerated is startling. Understanding and treating the causal underpinnings of violent crime is of utmost importance for individuals and society as a whole. Several factors have been identified as potential contributors to violent crime, including cognitive deficits in executive functioning [Hoaken et al., 2007]. To investigate this further, 77 offenders from Fenbrook Institution, a federal facility, were tested on a battery of executive functioning measures. Offenders were found to have broad and pervasive dysfunction in their executive abilities. In addition, specific scores from the battery were found using regression techniques, to predict the frequency and severity of past violent offending but not nonviolent offending. This speaks of the possibility of a new type of correctional rehabilitation program, one that focuses on the rehabilitation of basic executive functions. PMID:20593426

  19. Role of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vorobyeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The reason for the progressive vision reduction at diabetes mellitus (DM is diabetic retinopathy (DR. When type 2 diabetes combined with hypertension (Ht, it increases the risk of vision loss by 25 times. In the pathogenesis of DR is important to endothelial dysfunction and a variety of biochemical processes (an excess of intracellular sorbitol, non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, oxidative stress. there is a decrease in generation vasodilating factors, nitric oxide, with a simultaneous increase of endothelin, which causes vasoconstriction. Key processes underlying the development of DR, such as increased vascular permeability, edema, neovasculariza- tion, inflammation and associated with the effects of kallikrein-kinin system. In the pathogenesis of DR can be involved independent intraocular renin-angiotensin system, which is an important mediator of angiogenesis and increased vascular permeability. Damage to the endothelium of retinal vessels leads to ischemia of the retina. there is growth and development of newly formed blood vessels, which may provoke recurrent bleeding.

  20. Isosteviol has beneficial effects on palmitate-induced α-cell dysfunction and gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to high levels of fatty acids impairs insulin secretion and exaggerates glucagon secretion. The aim of this study was to explore if the antihyperglycemic agent, Isosteviol (ISV, is able to counteract palmitate-induced α-cell dysfunction and to influence α-cell gene expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Long-term incubation studies with clonal α-TC1-6 cells were performed in the presence of 0.5 mM palmitate with or without ISV. We investigated effects on glucagon secretion, glucagon content, cellular triglyceride (TG content, cell proliferation, and expression of genes involved in controlling glucagon synthesis, fatty acid metabolism, and insulin signal transduction. Furthermore, we studied effects of ISV on palmitate-induced glucagon secretion from isolated mouse islets. Culturing α-cells for 72-h with 0.5 mM palmitate in the presence of 18 mM glucose resulted in a 56% (p<0.01 increase in glucagon secretion. Concomitantly, the TG content of α-cells increased by 78% (p<0.01 and cell proliferation decreased by 19% (p<0.05. At 18 mM glucose, ISV (10(-8 and 10(-6 M reduced palmitate-stimulated glucagon release by 27% (p<0.05 and 27% (p<0.05, respectively. ISV (10(-6 M also counteracted the palmitate-induced hypersecretion of glucagon in mouse islets. ISV (10(-6 M reduced α-TC1-6 cell proliferation rate by 25% (p<0.05, but ISV (10(-8 and 10(-6 M had no effect on TG content in the presence of palmitate. Palmitate (0.5 mM increased Pcsk2 (p<0.001, Irs2 (p<0.001, Fasn (p<0.001, Srebf2 (p<0.001, Acaca (p<0.01, Pax6 (p<0.05 and Gcg mRNA expression (p<0.05. ISV significantly (p<0.05 up-regulated Insr, Irs1, Irs2, Pik3r1 and Akt1 gene expression in the presence of palmitate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ISV counteracts α-cell hypersecretion and apparently contributes to changes in expression of key genes resulting from long-term exposure to palmitate. ISV apparently acts as a glucagonostatic drug with potential as a

  1. T-cell dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients with impaired recovery of CD4 cells despite suppression of viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kronborg, Gitte; Lohse, Nicolai;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CD4 T-cell recovery is impeded in some HIVinfected patients despite successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with suppressed HIV RNA. We hypothesized that T-cell dysfunction would be increased in these patients. METHODS: In the Danish HIV Cohort Study, we identified HIV-...

  2. The role of salivary gland scintigraphy in detection of salivary gland dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the salivary gland dysfunction in a patient with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes using salivary gland scintigraphy. patients included in the study were 32 uncontrolled type 2 diabetic and 30 normal healthy individuals. Patients having any other systemic(or) nervous illness(or) taking medications that could affect the normal functioning of the salivary gland were excluded from the study. The salivary gland scintigraphy was performed, with radioactivity measured at 1st, 20th, and 40th minutes. Twenty minutes after the injection, vitamin C chewable tablet was given to stimulate the secretion and continued until the end of the study period (40min). The data were replayed and regions of interest were chosen over four salivary glands to obtain the uptake ratio (UR) and excretory ratio(ER) of the salivary glands. Result: The scintigraphic total URand ER in diabetic and control groups was compared. The values in these two categories showed decrease in both UR and ER in diabetic patients, when compared to control patients. The result of this study suggests that salivary gland scintigraphy plays a significant role in the evaluation of salivary gland dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

  3. Preferential killing of human lung cancer cell lines with mitochondrial dysfunction by nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Panngom, K; Baik, K Y; Nam, M K; Han, J. H.; Rhim, H; Choi, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive cellular and mitochondrial dysfunctions of two human lung cancer cell lines (H460 and HCC1588) from two human lung normal cell lines (MRC5 and L132) have been studied by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treatment. This cytotoxicity is exposure time-dependent, which is strongly mediated by the large amount of H2O2 and NOx in culture media generated by DBD nonthermal plasma. It is found that the cell number of lung cancer cells has been reduced more than that of the lun...

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Leukemic Stem/Progenitor Cells upon Loss of RAC2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capala, Marta E.; Maat, Henny; Bonardi, Francesco; van den Boom, Vincent; Kuipers, Jeroen; Vellenga, Edo; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) reside within bone marrow niches that maintain their relatively quiescent state and convey resistance to conventional treatment. Many of the microenvironmental signals converge on RAC GTPases. Although it has become clear that RAC proteins fulfill important roles in the he

  5. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad T. Elnakish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models.

  6. Inflammatory cytokines regulate secretion of VEGF and chemokines by human conjunctival fibroblasts: Role in dysfunctional tear syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; William, Abitha; Cherukuri, Aswini; Samuel, William; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Ocular surface inflammation is one of the primary mechanisms associated with dysfunctional tear syndrome (DTS), also known as dry eye disease. DTS, more prevalent in older populations, causes ocular discomfort and visual disturbance due to dryness on the surface layer in the eye. We used human conjunctival fibroblast cultures (HCJVF) to investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β (ITI) on the secretions of VEGF and chemokines. Our results demonstrate the elevated secretion of angiogenic VEGF molecules by ITI without affecting anti-angiogenic molecules, PEDF, endostatin, thrombospondin and sVEGF-R1. The secretion of interferon-γ inducible chemokines, CXCL9, -10, -11 by HCJVF were significantly enhanced by ITI. Our in vitro study supports previously reported observations of elevated VEGF and chemokines in tear fluids of DTS patients, reiterating the role of inflammatory reactions in DTS. PMID:26615568

  7. Comparative neuroscience of stimulant-induced memory dysfunction: role for neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan J

    2010-09-01

    The discovery that the addictive drugs impair neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has prompted the elaboration of new biological hypotheses to explain addiction and drug-induced cognitive dysfunction. Considerable evidence now implicates the process of adult neurogenesis in at least some critical components of hippocampal-dependent memory function. In experimental models, psychomotor stimulant drugs produce alterations in the rate of birth, survival, maturation and functional integration of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Thus some of the deleterious consequences of drug abuse on memory could result from the neurotoxic actions of drugs on adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In this review, we will first summarize preclinical and clinical literature on the disruptive effects of drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy in the areas of learning, memory and attention. We will also summarize data that document the widespread effects of stimulant drugs on progenitor activity and precursor incorporation in the adult dentate gyrus. Finally, we will examine evidence that supports the involvement of hippocampal neurogenesis in specific aspects of learning and memory function and we will consider critically the hypothesis that some of the negative consequences of drug abuse on cognition might be ascribed to deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Evidence suggests that stimulant abuse impacts negatively on at least four areas of memory/cognitive function that may be influenced by adult hippocampal neurogenesis: contextual memory, spatial memory, working memory and cognitive flexibility. PMID:20700045

  8. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer and erectile (dys)function: The role of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incrocci, Luca [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2005-10-01

    Incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) after radiotherapy reported in the literature varies from 7 to 72% after external-beam radiotherapy to 5-51% after brachytherapy. Most of these studies are retrospective, the definition of ED is variable and sexual functioning is frequently assessed by asking only one question. Already in the 1980's it was suggested that post-radiation ED was attributable to vascular damage. The most reliable method to assess vasculogenic ED is the use of the Doppler ultrasound. More recently, many studies have assessed the relationship between radiation dose and volume of the penile bulb and post-radiation ED, though the outcome is controversial. The penile structures and the neurovascular bundles are best seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore the use of a computer tomography scan/MRI image fusion can result in reducing the planning target volume and consequently the radiation dose to the penile bulb and bodies. If radiation induces vascular damage that causes ED, any means of reducing the dose to the pelvic vascular structures would likely decrease ED, therefore new radiation techniques such as the intensity modulated radiation therapy or the implant of fiducial markers can help decrease the margins and therefore ED.

  9. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer and erectile (dys)function: The role of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) after radiotherapy reported in the literature varies from 7 to 72% after external-beam radiotherapy to 5-51% after brachytherapy. Most of these studies are retrospective, the definition of ED is variable and sexual functioning is frequently assessed by asking only one question. Already in the 1980's it was suggested that post-radiation ED was attributable to vascular damage. The most reliable method to assess vasculogenic ED is the use of the Doppler ultrasound. More recently, many studies have assessed the relationship between radiation dose and volume of the penile bulb and post-radiation ED, though the outcome is controversial. The penile structures and the neurovascular bundles are best seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore the use of a computer tomography scan/MRI image fusion can result in reducing the planning target volume and consequently the radiation dose to the penile bulb and bodies. If radiation induces vascular damage that causes ED, any means of reducing the dose to the pelvic vascular structures would likely decrease ED, therefore new radiation techniques such as the intensity modulated radiation therapy or the implant of fiducial markers can help decrease the margins and therefore ED

  10. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease: The Role of Posturography in Developing a Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ferrazzoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance dysfunction (BD in Parkinson’s disease (PD is a disabling symptom, difficult to treat and predisposing to falls. The dopaminergic drugs or deep brain stimulation does not always provide significant improvements of BD and rehabilitative approaches have also failed to restore this condition. In this study, we investigated the suitability of quantitative posturographic indicators to early identify patients that could develop disabling BD. Parkinsonian patients not complaining of a subjective BD and controls were tested using a posturographic platform (PP with open eyes (OE and performing a simple cognitive task [counting (OEC]. We found that patients show higher values of total standard deviation (SD of body sway and along the medio-lateral (ML axis during OE condition. Furthermore, total and ML SD of body sway during OE condition and total SD of body sway with OEC were higher than controls also in a subgroup of patients with normal Berg Balance Scale. We conclude that BD in Parkinsonian patients can be discovered before its appearance using a PP and that these data may allow developing specific rehabilitative treatment to prevent or delay their onset.

  11. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: The Role of Posturography in Developing a Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Fasano, Alfonso; Maestri, Roberto; Bera, Rossana; Palamara, Grazia; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Pezzoli, Gianni; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Balance dysfunction (BD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a disabling symptom, difficult to treat and predisposing to falls. The dopaminergic drugs or deep brain stimulation does not always provide significant improvements of BD and rehabilitative approaches have also failed to restore this condition. In this study, we investigated the suitability of quantitative posturographic indicators to early identify patients that could develop disabling BD. Parkinsonian patients not complaining of a subjective BD and controls were tested using a posturographic platform (PP) with open eyes (OE) and performing a simple cognitive task [counting (OEC)]. We found that patients show higher values of total standard deviation (SD) of body sway and along the medio-lateral (ML) axis during OE condition. Furthermore, total and ML SD of body sway during OE condition and total SD of body sway with OEC were higher than controls also in a subgroup of patients with normal Berg Balance Scale. We conclude that BD in Parkinsonian patients can be discovered before its appearance using a PP and that these data may allow developing specific rehabilitative treatment to prevent or delay their onset. PMID:26504611

  12. In colorectal cancer mast cells contribute to systemic regulatory T-cell dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Blatner, Nichole R.; Bonertz, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Cheon, Eric C.; Krantz, Seth B.; Strouch, Matthew; Weitz, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Halverson, Amy L.; Bentrem, David J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2010-01-01

    T-regulatory cells (Treg) and mast cells (MC) are abundant in colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors. Interaction between the two is known to promote immune suppression or loss of Treg functions and autoimmunity. Here, we demonstrate that in both human CRC and murine polyposis the outcome of this interaction is the generation of potently immune suppressive but proinflammatory Treg (ΔTreg). These Treg shut down IL10, gain potential to express IL17, and switch from suppressing to promoting MC expansion...

  13. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 2 Dysfunction Contributes to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine Depletion in Gastric Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Nan-Hua; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Tu, Ya-Ting; Wang, Kuo-Chiang; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Po-Min; Li, Guan-Cheng; Lam, Hing-Chung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Kuo-Wang

    2016-08-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) family of enzymes comprises of the key functional metabolic enzymes in the Krebs cycle that catalyze the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). α-KG acts as a cofactor in the conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). However, the relationship between 5hmC and IDH in gastric cancer remains unclear. Our study revealed that the 5hmC level was substantially lower and 5mC level was slightly higher in gastric cancer tissues; however, 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) levels did not change significantly in these tissues. We further examined the expression levels of IDH1 and IDH2 in gastric cancer tissues and observed that IDH2 levels were significantly lower in gastric cancer tissues than in the adjacent normal tissues. The ectopic expression of IDH2 can increase 5hmC levels in gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that IDH2 dysfunction is involved in 5hmC depletion during gastric cancer progression. PMID:27466503

  14. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in autism spectrum disorder: the role of the mitochondria and the enteric microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Frye

    2015-05-01

    helpful for GI symptoms in ASD and mitochondrial disorders. To this end, this review aims to help better understand the underlying pathophysiology associated with ASD that may be related to concurrent mitochondrial and GI dysfunction.

  15. Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) induces vascular endothelial dysfunction: Role of oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects induced by phylloquinone (Vitamin K1; VK1). Vascular reactivity experiments, using standard muscle bath procedures, showed that VK1 (5 and 50 μM) enhances the contractile response of endothelium-intact, but not denuded, rat carotid rings to phenylephrine. Similarly, maximal contraction induced by phenylephrine was enhanced in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The combination of L-NAME and VK1 did not produce any further additional effect. Pre-incubation of intact-rings with VK1 reduced both acetylcholine- and bradykinin-induced relaxation. VK1 induced an increment in tension on carotid rings submaximally pre-contracted with phenylephrine. VK1-induced increment in tension was completely abolished by endothelial removal or incubation of intact rings with L-NAME and L-NNA. Conversely, 7-nitroindazole, 1400 W, or indomethacin did not affect VK1-induced contraction. Moreover, VK1 reduced L-arginine-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact rings. Lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence assays showed that VK1 induced an increase in the level of superoxide anions in endothelium-intact but not denuded rings. Measurement of nitrite and nitrate generation showed that VK1 did not alter nitrate formation but strongly inhibited the generation of nitrite. Finally, the superoxide anions scavenger tiron prevented the endothelial vasomotor dysfunction caused by VK1 on phenyleprine-induced contraction and acetylcholine or bradykinin-induced relaxation. In conclusion, our data show that VK1 disrupts the vasomotor function of rat carotid. Our results suggest that VK1-induced oxidative stress through production of superoxide anion is interfering with the NO pathway, which in turn is responsible for the altered vascular reactivity induced by VK1

  16. Role of peripheral inflammatory markers in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linying Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD is common following cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, but the pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. Many studies suggest that an inflammatory response is a key contributor to POCD. The current meta-analysis shows that the levels of peripheral inflammatory markers are associated with POCD. METHODS: An online search was performed to identify peer-reviewed studies without language restriction that measured peripheral inflammatory markers of patients with and without POCD, using PubMed, ScienceDirect, SinoMed and the National Knowledge Infrastructure database. Extracted data were analyzed with STATA (version 12.The standardized mean difference (SMD and the 95% confidence interval (95%CI were calculated for each outcome using a random effect model. Tests of heterogeneity assessment of bias, and meta-regression were performed in the meta-analysis. RESULTS: A total of 13 studies that measured the concentrations of peripheral inflammatory markers were included. The current meta-analysis found significantly higher concentrations of S-100β(SMD[95%CI] (1.377 [0.423, 2.331], p-value < 0.001, N [POCD/non-POCD] =178/391, 7 studies, and interleukin(IL-6 (SMD[95%CI] (1.614 [0.603,2.624], p-value < 0.001, N[POCD/non-POCD] = 91/99, 5 studies, but not of neuron specific enolase, interleukin-1β, or tumor necrosis factor-α , in POCD compared with patients without POCD. In meta-regression analyses, a significant positive association was found between the SMD and the preoperative interleukin-6 peripheral blood concentration in patients with POCD (Coef.= 0.0587, p-value=0.038, 5 studies. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that POCD is indeed correlated with the concentrations of peripheral inflammatory markers, particularly interleukin-6 and S-100β.

  17. ROLE OF NEUROSPECIFIC PROTEINS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Novosyolova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 (type 1 DM diabetes mellitus is one of the common chronic metabolic diseases, which currently is a significant problem due to disability at a young age and reduce life expectancy. Despite the fact that type 1 diabetes accounts for only 10% of all patients with diabetes, it occurs particularly hard, with a tendency to progression. One of the targets of type 1 diabetes is the central nervous system with the further formation of cognitive dysfunction in young age leads to diminished quality of life. Cognitive deficits may be the result not only of structural lesions of the brain, but it may be due to the development of metabolic disorders. In the case of timely diagnosis and treatment of cognitive impairment associated with metabolic changes that can partially or completely regress. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of the brain damage in young patients with type 1 diabetes. The study involved 58 patients with  type  1  diabetes,  the  control  group  comprised  29  healthy  controls.  The  complex  included a neuropsychological examination which was used for testing the Montreal scale (MoCA test rapid screening of cognitive impairment, assessment of quality of life using a common questionnaire Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS SF-36 and the specific audit – dependent quality of life (ADDQoL. To evaluateearly markersin the developmentof cognitive dysfunctionwere identifiedneurospecific proteins – S100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, myelin basic protein (MBP. Found an increased level of neurospecific protein that was correlated with parameters of carbohydrate metabolism, poor quality of life and severe cognitive deficiency (MoCA test lower than 26 points.

  18. High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Obesity-Mediated Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Dysfunction in Mexican Americans123

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Mary Helen; Watanabe, Richard M; Trigo, Enrique; Takayanagi, Miwa; Lawrence, Jean M.; Thomas A Buchanan; Xiang, Anny H.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods has contributed to the rising incidence of obesity and may underlie insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. Macronutrient intake patterns were examined in relation to anthropometric and metabolic traits in participants of BetaGene, a family-based study of obesity, insulin resistance, and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans. Dietary intake, body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI), and β-cell function [Disposition Index (DI)] were asses...

  19. Role of mitochondria on muscle cell death and meat tenderization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Verónica; Oliván, Mamen

    2013-05-01

    The possibility that mitochondria are involved in cellular dysfunction is particularly high in situations associated with increases in free radical activity, like hypoxia or ischemia; therefore its potential role in the muscle post-mortem metabolism is reviewed. In the dying muscle, different routes of cell death catabolism (apoptosis, autophagy) may occur having great influence on the process of conversion of muscle into meat. Mitochondria are the first and also one of the main organelles affected by post-mortem changes; therefore they are decisive in the subsequent cellular responses influencing the pathway to cell demise and thus, the final meat quality. Depending on the cell death programme followed by muscle cells after exsanguination, diverse proteases would be activated to a different extent, which is also reviewed in order to understand how they affect meat tenderization. This review also summarizes recent patents relating cell death processes and meat tenderness. Further research is encouraged as there is still a need of knowledge on cell death post-mortem processes to increase our understanding of the conversion of muscle into meat. PMID:23432120

  20. Role of cancer stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bo; Jacob, Samson T.

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in cancer stem cells (CSCs) among cancer biologists and clinicians, most likely because of their role in the heterogeneity of cancer and their potential application in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies suggest that CSCs play a key role in liver carcinogenesis. A small subpopulation of cancer cells with CSC properties has been identified and characterized from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, animal models and human primary HCCs. Considering the...

  1. In colorectal cancer mast cells contribute to systemic regulatory T-cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatner, Nichole R; Bonertz, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Cheon, Eric C; Krantz, Seth B; Strouch, Matthew; Weitz, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Halverson, Amy L; Bentrem, David J; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2010-04-01

    T-regulatory cells (Treg) and mast cells (MC) are abundant in colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors. Interaction between the two is known to promote immune suppression or loss of Treg functions and autoimmunity. Here, we demonstrate that in both human CRC and murine polyposis the outcome of this interaction is the generation of potently immune suppressive but proinflammatory Treg (DeltaTreg). These Treg shut down IL10, gain potential to express IL17, and switch from suppressing to promoting MC expansion and degranulation. This change is also brought about by direct coculture of MC and Treg, or culture of Treg in medium containing IL6 and IL2. IL6 deficiency in the bone marrow of mice susceptible to polyposis eliminated IL17 production by the polyp infiltrating Treg, but did not significantly affect the growth of polyps or the generation of proinflammatory Treg. IL6-deficient MC could generate proinflammatory Treg. Thus, MC induce Treg to switch function and escalate inflammation in CRC without losing T-cell-suppressive properties. IL6 and IL17 are not needed in this process. PMID:20308560

  2. Is There a Role for Exercise in the Management of Bulbar Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The role of exercise in the management of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (PALS) is controversial and currently unclear. The purpose of this review article is to review literature examining the impact of limb, respiratory, and oral motor exercise on function, disease progression, and survival in PALS and the transgenic ALS…

  3. Primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia : role of FSH dysfunction and timing of the lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, Cynthia S.; Land, Jolande A.; Evers, Johannes L. H.; Bierau, Jorgen; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; Robben, Simon G. F.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. Estela

    2013-01-01

    FSH inactivity due to secondary hypoglycosylation has been suggested as a potential mechanism for primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia. To investigate the role of FSH and to gain insight in the timing of the damage, ovarian stimulation tests were performed and data on ovarian imagin

  4. Starvation induced cell death in autophagy-defective yeast mutants is caused by mitochondria dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho W Suzuki

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA. We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants.

  5. Immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-09-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP (or ERAP1), is essential for trimming peptides that are presented by MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 is inhibited by human cytomegalovirus, and ERAP1 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases. How the immune system detects ERAAP dysfunction, however, is unknown. We have shown previously that ERAAP-deficient cells present an immunogenic pMHC I repertoire, that elicits CD8+ T cell response in WT mice. Additionally, we discovered that the WT CD8+ T cells recognized novel peptides presented by non-classical, or MHC class Ib, molecules on ERAAP-deficient cells. The MHC Ib restricted WT CD8 T cells eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified the FL9 peptide, presented by Qa-1(b), a MHC class Ib molecule exclusively on ERAAP-deficient cells. Remarkably, T cells specific for the FL9-Qa-1(b) complex were frequent in naïve WT mice, and had an antigen-experienced phenotype. Thus, novel non-classical pQa-1(b) complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to target cells with defective peptide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings, and the possible roles of pMHC Ib-specific T cells in immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction. PMID:23433779

  6. Five stages of progressive β-cell dysfunction in the laboratory Nile rat model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaiyuan; Gotzmann, Jonathan; Kuny, Sharee; Huang, Hui; Sauvé, Yves; Chan, Catherine B

    2016-06-01

    We compared the evolution of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in the Nile rat (Arvicanthis niloticus), a diurnal rodent model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes (T2D), when maintained on regular laboratory chow versus a high-fiber diet. Chow-fed Nile rats already displayed symptoms characteristic of insulin resistance at 2 months (increased fat/lean mass ratio and hyperinsulinemia). Hyperglycemia was first detected at 6 months, with increased incidence at 12 months. By this age, pancreatic islet structure was disrupted (increased α-cell area), insulin secretion was impaired (reduced insulin secretion and content) in isolated islets, insulin processing was compromised (accumulation of proinsulin and C-peptide inside islets), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein ERp44 was upregulated in insulin-producing β-cells. By contrast, high-fiber-fed Nile rats had normoglycemia with compensatory increase in β-cell mass resulting in maintained pancreatic function. Fasting glucose levels were predicted by the α/β-cell ratios. Our results show that Nile rats fed chow recapitulate the five stages of progression of T2D as occurs in human disease, including insulin-resistant hyperglycemia and pancreatic islet β-cell dysfunction associated with ER stress. Modification of diet alone permits long-term β-cell compensation and prevents T2D. PMID:27068697

  7. Aconitum carmichaelii protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity via B-cell lymphoma-2 protein-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ki Mo; Choi, Songie; Oh, Dal-Seok

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported the clinical profile of processed Aconitum carmichaelii (AC, Aconibal(®)), which included inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activity in healthy male adults. CYP2E1 is recognized as the enzyme that initiates the cascade of events leading to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. However, no studies have characterized its role in APAP-induced hepatic injury. Here, we investigated the protective effects of AC on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction. AC (5-500μg/mL) significantly inhibited APAP-induced reduction of glutathione. In addition, AC decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein levels (% change 46.63) in mitochondria. Moreover, it increased Bcl-2 (% change 55.39) and cytochrome C levels (% change 38.33) in mitochondria, measured using immunofluorescence or a commercial kit. Furthermore, cell membrane integrity was preserved and nuclear fragmentation inhibited by AC. These results demonstrate that AC protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced toxicity by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26895385

  8. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  9. Generation and Feasibility Assessment of a New Vehicle for Cell-Based Therapy for Treating Corneal Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Kakutani, Kazuya; Inoue, Ryota; Matsumoto, Daiki; Shimada, Tomoki; Nakahara, Makiko; Kiyanagi, Yumiko; Itoh, Takehiro; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency by its pump and barrier functions; consequently, its decompensation due to any pathological reason causes severe vision loss due to corneal haziness. Corneal transplantation is the only therapeutic choice for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction, but associated problems, such as a shortages of donor corneas, the difficulty of the surgical procedure, and graft failure, still need to be resolved. Regenerative medicine is attractive to researchers as a means of providing innovative therapies for corneal endothelial dysfunction, as it now does for other diseases. We previously demonstrated the successful regeneration of corneal endothelium in animal models by injecting cultured corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. The purpose of the present study was to optimize the vehicle for clinical use in cell-based therapy. Our screening of cell culture media revealed that RELAR medium promoted CEC adhesion. We then modified RELAR medium by removing hormones, growth factors, and potentially toxic materials to generate a cell therapy vehicle (CTV) composed of amino acid, salts, glucose, and vitamins. Injection of CECs in CTV enabled efficient engraftment and regeneration of the corneal endothelium in the rabbit corneal endothelial dysfunction model, with restoration of a transparent cornea. The CECs retained >85% viability after a 24 hour preservation as a cell suspension in CTV at 4°C and maintained their potency to regenerate the corneal endothelium in vivo. The vehicle developed here is clinically applicable for cell-based therapy aimed at treating the corneal endothelium. Our strategy involves the generation of vehicle from a culture medium appropriate for a given cell type by removing materials that are not favorable for clinical use. PMID:27355373

  10. Generation and Feasibility Assessment of a New Vehicle for Cell-Based Therapy for Treating Corneal Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Okumura

    Full Text Available The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency by its pump and barrier functions; consequently, its decompensation due to any pathological reason causes severe vision loss due to corneal haziness. Corneal transplantation is the only therapeutic choice for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction, but associated problems, such as a shortages of donor corneas, the difficulty of the surgical procedure, and graft failure, still need to be resolved. Regenerative medicine is attractive to researchers as a means of providing innovative therapies for corneal endothelial dysfunction, as it now does for other diseases. We previously demonstrated the successful regeneration of corneal endothelium in animal models by injecting cultured corneal endothelial cells (CECs in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK inhibitor. The purpose of the present study was to optimize the vehicle for clinical use in cell-based therapy. Our screening of cell culture media revealed that RELAR medium promoted CEC adhesion. We then modified RELAR medium by removing hormones, growth factors, and potentially toxic materials to generate a cell therapy vehicle (CTV composed of amino acid, salts, glucose, and vitamins. Injection of CECs in CTV enabled efficient engraftment and regeneration of the corneal endothelium in the rabbit corneal endothelial dysfunction model, with restoration of a transparent cornea. The CECs retained >85% viability after a 24 hour preservation as a cell suspension in CTV at 4°C and maintained their potency to regenerate the corneal endothelium in vivo. The vehicle developed here is clinically applicable for cell-based therapy aimed at treating the corneal endothelium. Our strategy involves the generation of vehicle from a culture medium appropriate for a given cell type by removing materials that are not favorable for clinical use.

  11. THE PSYCHO-SOCIAL ROLE OF THE FAMILY IN THE EMERGENCE OF THE CHILDREN SOCIAL DYSFUNCTIONALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina ACRIS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Family has a significant contribution to the individual process of social inclusion and to theprocess of internalization several social roles which are to be assumed in several situations. That iswhy we can state that family, as a complete institution, being able to make use of its all functions, isan important part of our contemporary society. Disorganized families cannot carry out the role theyhave in the educational process of the children. Educational and social defaults can be observed inthe children school conduct and, later, in their adult behavior. Considering the idea that somefamily default elements can be seen noticed during school education, this paper tries to argue that,by specific prevention programs or by psychological therapy, these elements can be redressed oreven discarded.

  12. The Role of Anti-Müllerian Hormone in Ovarian Function, Dysfunction and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Kevenaar, Maria Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe ovary is of major importance for both reproduction and the endocrine status of women. Follicle development in the ovary is regulated by gonadotropins but also by intra-ovarian factors, such as anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH). In mice, AMH inhibits primordial follicle recruitment, thereby influencing ovarian aging, and suppresses FSH sensitivity of growing follicles. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of the AMH signaling pathway in the mouse and human ovary. Our s...

  13. Primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia: role of FSH dysfunction and timing of the lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Gubbels, Cynthia S.; Land, Jolande A.; Evers, Johannes L. H.; Bierau, Jörgen; Paul P C A Menheere; Robben, Simon G. F.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. Estela

    2012-01-01

    FSH inactivity due to secondary hypoglycosylation has been suggested as a potential mechanism for primary ovarian insufficiency in classic galactosemia. To investigate the role of FSH and to gain insight in the timing of the damage, ovarian stimulation tests were performed and data on ovarian imaging collected. Fifteen patients with primary ovarian insufficiency underwent ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins. Only one patient showed a normal increase in estradiol level, all the others had a...

  14. Pathophysiological consequences of hemolysis. Role of cell-free hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Misztal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abundant hemolysis is associated with a number of inherent and acquired diseases including sickle-cell disease (SCD, polycythemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH and drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Despite different etiopathology of hemolytic diseases, many concomitant symptoms are comparable and include e.g. hypertension, hemoglobinuria and hypercoagulation state. Studies in the last years have shown a growing list of mechanisms lying at the basis of those symptoms, in particular irreversible reaction between cell-free hemoglobin (Hb and nitric oxide (NO – endogenous vasorelaxant and anti-thrombotic agent. Saturation of protective physiological cell-free Hb-scavenging mechanisms results in accumulation of Hb in plasma and hemoglobinemia. Extensive hemoglobinemia subsequently leads to hemoglobinuria, which may cause kidney damage and development of Fanconi syndrome. A severe problem in patients with SCD and PNH is pulmonary and systemic hypertension. It may lead to circulation failure, including stroke, and it is related to abolition of NO bioavailability for vascular smooth muscle cells. Thrombotic events are the major cause of death in SCD and PNH. It ensues from lack of platelet inhibition evoked by Hb-mediated NO scavenging. A serious complication that affects patients with excessive hemolysis is erectile dysfunction. Also direct cytotoxic, prooxidant and proinflammatory effects of cell-free hemoglobin and heme compose the clinical picture of hemolytic diseases. The pathophysiological role of plasma Hb, mechanisms of its elimination, and direct and indirect (via NO scavenging deleterious effects of cell-free Hb are presented in detail in this review. Understanding the critical role of hemolysis and cell-free Hb is important in the perspective of treating patients with hemolytic diseases and to design new effective therapies in future.

  15. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells improve cognitive dysfunction due to aging hypoperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jing; YIN Shao-jun; CHEN Yu-juan; BIAN Wei-hong; YU Jing; ZHAO Yu-wu; LIU Xue-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Aging is an important risk factor for vascular dementia, and D-galactose (D-gal) injection can simulate the pathology of aging. Two-vessel occlusion of common carotid arteries (2VO) is the most popular model for vascular dementia. This study was aimed to investigate the possibility of D-gal injection plus 2VO simulating cognitive impairment of aging vascular dementia; and whether transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can improve the cognitive function induced by D-gal injection plus 2VO.Methods Totally 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups equivalently: control group, D-gal group,D-gal+2VO group, D-gal+2VO+saline water group, and D-gal+2VO+BMSCs group. Aging hypoperfusion rats were created by subcutaneous injection of D-gal and occlusion of two common carotid arteries. BMSCs or saline water was stereotactically transplanted into the subventricular zone as treatment vehicles at 24 hours post operation. Two-way repeat analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for significance analysis of 5 groups at 6 weeks post transplantation;moreover, Tamhane's test (equal variance not assumed) and least significant difference (LSD) test (equal variance assumed) were used for pairwise comparison in Morris water maze (MWM).Results Transplanted BMSCs distributed around the lateral ventricles and acquired the phenotypes of neurons and astrocytes. In terms of swimming path distance and escape latency in MWM, D-gal+2VO+BMSC group showed significant improvement than the D-gal+2VO group but was still obviously worse than the control group (both P <0.05).There was no significant difference in swimming speed for all 5 groups.Conclusions D-gal plus 2VO induces cognitive dysfunction. The engrafted BMSCs exhibit the beneficial effect on cognitive function via promotion interactively with host brain.

  16. Moessbauer studies of frataxin role in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and dysfunction-related disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serres, Ricardo [Universite Joseph Fourier (France); Clemancey, Martin [CNRS, UMR5249 (France); Oddou, Jean-Louis [Universite Joseph Fourier (France); Pastore, Annalisa [Medical Research Council National Institute for Medical Research (United Kingdom); Lesuisse, Emmanuel [Laboratoire Mitochondries, Metaux et Stress oxydant, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris (France); Latour, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.latour@cea.fr [CEA, iRTSV, LCBM (France)

    2012-03-15

    Friedreich ataxia is a disease that is associated with defects in the gene coding for a small protein frataxin. Several different roles have been proposed for the protein, including iron chaperoning and iron storage. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to probe these hypotheses. Iron accumulation in mutant mitochondria unable to assemble iron sulfur clusters proved to be insensitive to overexpression of frataxin, ruling out its potential involvement as an iron storage protein similar to ferritin. Rather, it was found that frataxin negatively regulates iron sulfur cluster assembly.

  17. Motor dysfunction in cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific vesicular GABA transporter knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko eKayakabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system and plays modulatory roles in neural development. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT is an essential molecule for GABAergic neurotransmission due to its role in vesicular GABA release. Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs are GABAergic projection neurons that are indispensable for cerebellar function. To elucidate the significance of VGAT in cerebellar PCs, we generated and characterized PC-specific VGAT knockout (L7-VGAT mice. VGAT mRNAs and proteins were specifically absent in the 40-week-old L7-VGAT PCs. The morphological charactereistics, such as lamination and foliation of the cerebellar cortex, of the L7-VGAT mice were similar to those of the control littermate mice. Moreover, the protein expression levels and patterns of pre- (calbindin and parvalbumin and postsynaptic (GABA-A receptor α1 subunit (GABAARα1 and gephyrin molecules between the L7-VGAT and control mice were similar in the deep cerebellar nuclei that receive PC projections. However, the L7-VGAT mice performed poorly in the accelerating rotarod test and displayed ataxic gait in the footprint test. The L7-VGAT mice also exhibited severer ataxia as VGAT deficits progressed. These results suggest that VGAT in cerebellar Purkinje cells is not essential for the rough maintenance of cerebellar structure, but does play an important role in motor coordination. The L7-VGAT mice are a novel model of ataxia without PC degeneration, and would also be useful for studying the role of Purkinje cells in cognition and emotion.

  18. Chronic cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullienne, Amandine; Obenaus, Andre; Ichkova, Aleksandra; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Pearce, William J; Badaut, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often involve vascular dysfunction that leads to long-term alterations in physiological and cognitive functions of the brain. Indeed, all the cells that form blood vessels and that are involved in maintaining their proper function can be altered by TBI. This Review focuses on the different types of cerebrovascular dysfunction that occur after TBI, including cerebral blood flow alterations, autoregulation impairments, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasms, blood-brain barrier disruption, and edema formation. We also discuss the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions, focusing on the cellular components of cerebral blood vessels (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular nerves) and their known and potential roles in the secondary injury cascade. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117494

  19. Role of microRNAs in gastrointestinal smooth muscle fibrosis and dysfunction: novel molecular perspectives on the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Rattan, Satish

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a group of short noncoding RNA molecules with important roles in cellular biology. miRNAs regulate gene expression by repressing translation or degrading the target mRNA. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggests that miRNAs are implicated in many diseases and could be potential biomarkers. Fibrosis and/smooth muscle (SM) dysfunction contributes to the morbidity and mortality associated with several diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Currently available therapeutic modalities are unsuccessful in efficiently blocking or reversing fibrosis and/or SM dysfunction. Recent understanding of the role of miRNAs in signaling pathway of fibrogenesis and SM phenotype switch has provided a new insight into translational research. However, much is still unknown about the molecular targets and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the GIT. This review discusses miRNA biology, pathophysiology of fibrosis, and aging- associated SM dysfunction in relation to the deregulation of miRNAs in the GIT. We also highlight the role of selected miRNAs associated with fibrosis and SM dysfunction-related diseases of the GIT. PMID:26822916

  20. Anticipatory Role of High Density Lipoprotein and Endothelial Dysfunction: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Esin; Yılmaz, Necat; Aydin, Ozgur; Ellidağ, Hamit Y

    2014-01-01

    High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) has been witnessed to possess a range of different functions that contribute to its atheroprotective effects. These functions are: the promotion of macrophage cholesterol efflux, reverse cholesterol transport, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, anti-apoptotic, pro-fibrinolytic and anti-oxidative functions. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an HDL associated enzyme esterase/homocysteinethiolactonase that contributes to the anti-oxidant and anti-atherosclerotic capabilities of HDL. PON1 is directly involved in the etiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis through the modulation of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The aim of this review is to summarize the role of HDL on endothelial homeostasis, and also to describe the recently characterized molecular pathways involved. PMID:25598849

  1. YKL-40, a new inflammatory marker with relation to insulin resistance and with a role in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, C N; Vestergaard, H

    2006-01-01

    atherosclerotic plaques. YKL-40 promotes chemotaxis, cell attachment and migration of VSMCs and the formation of branching tubules suggesting that YKL-40 plays a role in angiogenesis. Latest studies reveal that YKL-40 is elevated in patients with T2D and is related to insulin resistance. This article reviews the...

  2. Possible Protective Role of Carnosine against gamma-Radiation-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative Stress with subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been postulated as one of the mechanisms of cardiac toxicity. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) a biological antioxidant, is a relatively non-toxic dipeptide which possesses many functions (antiglycator, scavenger of ions of zinc and copper, toxic aldehydes and protein carbonyls) that are likely to suppress oxidative stress. The aim of the present work is to investigate the possible protective effects of carnosine on gamma-radiation-induced cardiac damage in mice. Carnosine was supplemented daily to mice (50 mg/ Kg body wt), by gavage, 10 days before whole body gamma-irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy (applied as a shot dose). The results obtained showed that whole body gamma-irradiation of mice produced biochemical alteration in levels of serum glucose and lipid profile fractions. Furthermore, some markers of cardiac injury enzymes as serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatin phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate transaminase (AST) activities showed significant increases associated with alteration in the antioxidant status of cardiac tissues. Significant increases of lipid peroxidation end product malonaldehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl levels, xanthine oxidase (XO) activity along with reduction in the activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes; glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were observed. Carnosine-treatment prior irradiation has attenuated the cardiotoxic effects of radiation obvious by reduction in the levels of MDA and protein carbonyl and XO activity, rescued the depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and diminished the increases of cardiac injury markers. It could be postulated that carnosine as a multi-functional dietary supplement could exert a modulator role in the radiation-induced cardiac damage and serum biochemical changes through its antioxidant properties

  3. The role of depression chronicity and recurrence on neurocognitive dysfunctions in HIV-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysique, Lucette A; Dermody, Nadene; Carr, Andrew; Brew, Bruce J; Teesson, Maree

    2016-02-01

    Research assessing whether major depressive disorders (MDD) impacts neurocognitive functions in HIV+ persons has yielded inconsistent results. However, none have considered the role of MDD remission, chronicity, and stability on treatment. Ninety-five HIV+ adults clinically stable on combined antiretroviral treatment completed a psychiatric interview, a depression scale, a neuropsychological, daily living, and cognitive complaints assessments at baseline and 18 months. Participants were screened for current (within 12 months of study entry) alcohol and/or substance use disorder. History of alcohol and/or substance abuse disorder prior to the 12 months entry screen and MDD treatments were recorded. Participants were grouped into two psychiatric nomenclatures: (1) lifetime: no MD episode (MDE), single MDE life-event treated and fully remitted, chronic MDD treated and stable, chronic MDD treated and unstable, and baseline untreated MDE; (2) recent: last 2 years MDE (yes or no). We found that lifetime and recent psychiatric history were more strongly associated with decreased in independence in daily living and cognitive complaints than with baseline neuropsychological performance. However, lack of full remission, instability on treatment in chronic MDD, and severity of symptoms in current MDE were factors in whether MDD impacted baseline neuropsychological performance. Depressive symptoms improved at follow-up in those with baseline moderate-severe symptoms, and MDD was not associated with neurocognitive change at 18 months. A history of alcohol and/or substance abuse disorder was significantly more frequent in those with treated and unstable chronic MDD but it was not associated with neuropsychological performance. MDD recurrence, chronicity profiles, and associated comorbidities are keys factors to understand any potential impact on neurocognitive abilities in HIV infection. More comprehensive consideration of these complex effects could serve at constructively

  4. The effect of uric acid on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, Ivana; Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín; Kubala, Lukáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2009), s. 112-115. ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : uric acid * homocysteine * endothelial dysfunction Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.047, year: 2009

  5. Effect of uric acid on homocysteine - induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, Ivana; Kubala, Lukáš; Lojek, Antonín

    Brno, 2008. s. 1. [III. European Workshop on the Analysis of Phagocyte Functions. 22.05.2008-24.05.2008, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/07/P539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : uric acid * endothelial dysfunction * homocysteine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letitia D Jones

    Full Text Available The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1. As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND.

  7. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance.

  8. Autistic-Like Traits and Cerebellar Dysfunction in Purkinje Cell PTEN Knock-Out Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupolillo, Dario; Hoxha, Eriola; Faralli, Alessio; De Luca, Annarita; Rossi, Ferdinando; Tempia, Filippo; Carulli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impaired social interaction, isolated areas of interest, and insistence on sameness. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog missing on chromosome 10 (PTEN) have been reported in individuals with ASDs. Recent evidence highlights a crucial role of the cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of ASDs. In the present study we analyzed the specific contribution of cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) PTEN loss to these disorders. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we generated conditional knockout mice in which PTEN inactivation was induced specifically in PCs. We investigated PC morphology and physiology as well as sociability, repetitive behavior, motor learning, and cognitive inflexibility of adult PC PTEN-mutant mice. Loss of PTEN in PCs results in autistic-like traits, including impaired sociability, repetitive behavior and deficits in motor learning. Mutant PCs appear hypertrophic and show structural abnormalities in dendrites and axons, decreased excitability, disrupted parallel fiber and climbing fiber synapses and late-onset cell death. Our results unveil new roles of PTEN in PC function and provide the first evidence of a link between the loss of PTEN in PCs and the genesis of ASD-like traits. PMID:26538449

  9. Soluble and cell-associated insulin receptor dysfunction correlates with severity of HAND in HIV-infected women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamil Gerena

    Full Text Available Blood sugar metabolism abnormalities have been identified in HIV-infected individuals and associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. These abnormalities may occur as a result of chronic HIV infection, long-term use of combined antiretroviral treatment (CART, aging, genetic predisposition, or a combination of these factors, and may increase morbidity and mortality in this population.To determine if changes in soluble and cell-associated insulin receptor (IR levels, IR substrate-1 (IRS-1 levels, and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with the presence and severity of HAND in a cohort of HIV-seropositive women.This is a retrospective cross-sectional study using patient database information and stored samples from 34 HIV-seropositive women and 10 controls without history of diabetes from the Hispanic-Latino Longitudinal Cohort of Women. Soluble IR subunits [sIR, ectodomain (α and full-length or intact (αβ] were assayed in plasma and CSF samples by ELISA. Membrane IR levels, IRS-1 levels, and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation were analyzed in CSF white cell pellets (WCP using flow cytometry. HIV-seropositive women had significantly increased levels of intact or full-length sIR in plasma (p<0.001 and CSF (p<0.005 relative to controls. Stratified by HAND, increased levels of full-length sIR in plasma were associated with the presence (p<0.001 and severity (p<0.005 of HAND. A significant decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine-phosphorylation in the WCP was also associated with the presence (p<0.02 and severity (p<0.02 of HAND.This study provides evidence that IR secretion is increased in HIV-seropositive women, and increased IR secretion is associated with cognitive impairment in these women. Thus, IR dysfunction may have a role in the progression of HAND and could represent a biomarker for the presence and severity of HAND.

  10. The role of mast cells in functional GI disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Mira M; Vicario, Maria; Santos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are characterized by chronic complaints arising from disorganized brain-gut interactions leading to dysmotility and hypersensitivity. The two most prevalent FGIDs, affecting up to 16-26% of worldwide population, are functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. Their etiopathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, however, recent observations reveal low-grade mucosal inflammation and immune activation, in association with impaired epithelial barrier function and aberrant neuronal sensitivity. These findings come to challenge the traditional view of FGIDs as pure functional disorders, and relate the origin to a tangible organic substrate. The mucosal inflammatory infiltrate is dominated by mast cells, eosinophils and intraepithelial lymphocytes in the intestine of FGIDs. It is well established that mast cell activation can generate epithelial and neuro-muscular dysfunction and promote visceral hypersensitivity and altered motility patterns in FGIDs, postoperative ileus, food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. This review will discuss the role of mucosal mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract with a specific focus on recent advances in disease mechanisms and clinical management in irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia. PMID:26194403

  11. Role of Pterocarpus santalinus against mitochondrial dysfunction and membrane lipid changes induced by ulcerogens in rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Shoba; Devi, R S; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-11-20

    Free radicals produced by ulcerogenic agents affect the TCA cycle enzymes located in the outer membrane of the mitochondria. Upon induction with ulcerogens, peroxidation of membrane lipids bring about alterations in the mitochondrial enzyme activity. This indicates an increase in the permeability levels of the mitochondrial membrane. The ability of PSE to scavenge the reactive oxygen species results in restoration of activities of TCA cycle enzymes. NSAIDs interfere with the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process. This usually results in diminished cellular ATP production. The recovery of gastric mucosal barrier function through maintenance of energy metabolism results in maintenance of ATP levels, as observed in this study upon treatment with PSE. Membrane integrity altered by peroxidation is known to have a modified fatty acid composition, a disruption of permeability, a decrease in electrical resistance, and increase in flip-flopping between monolayers and inactivated cross-linked proteins. The severe depletion of arachidonic acid in ulcer induced groups was prevented upon treatment with PSE. The acid inhibitory property of the herbal extract enables the maintenance of GL activity upon treatment with PSE. The ability to prevent membrane peroxidation has been traced to the presence of active constituents in the PSE. In essence, PSE has been found to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, provide mitochondrial cell integrity, through the maintenance of lipid bilayer by its ability to provide a hydrophobic character to the gastric mucosa, further indicating its ability to reverse the action of NSAIDs and mast cell degranulators in gastric mucosa. PMID:17719569

  12. A mutation in the insulin 2 gene induces diabetes with severe pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in the Mody mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Jie WANG; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Kubo, Suely-Kunimi; Kayo, Tsuyoshi; Lu, Danhong; Takata, Kuniaki; Koizumi, Akio; Izumi, Tetsuro

    1999-01-01

    The mouse autosomal dominant mutation Mody develops hyperglycemia with notable pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. This study demonstrates that one of the alleles of the gene for insulin 2 in Mody mice encodes a protein product that substitutes tyrosine for cysteine at the seventh amino acid of the A chain in its mature form. This mutation disrupts a disulfide bond between the A and B chains and can induce a drastic conformational change of this molecule. Although there was no gross defect in the ...

  13. Vascular hypercontractility and endothelial dysfunction before development of atherosclerosis in moderate dyslipidemia: role for nitric oxide and interleukin-6

    OpenAIRE

    Cavieres, Vanessa; Valdes, Karla; Moreno, Brayan; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease that affects peripheral arteries and the aorta. Several inflammatory processes are required until the production of an atheroma. Before the atheroma appears, endothelial dysfunction is a key event. We hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction occurs in a mouse model of mild dyslipidemia, the mouse deficient in apolipoprotein E (apoE+/-). Using aortic rings preparation, we found that apoE+/- mice showed increased developed tension in response to KCl 60 mM w...

  14. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome. PMID:26856307

  15. Potential primary roles of glial cells in the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko eYamamuro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While neurons have long been considered the major player in multiple brain functions such as perception, emotion and memory, glial cells have been relegated to a far lesser position, acting as merely a glue to support neurons. Multiple lines of recent evidence however, have revealed that glial cells such as oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia, substantially impact on neuronal function and activities and are significantly involved in the underlying pathobiology of psychiatric disorders. Indeed, a growing body of evidence indicates that glial cells interact extensively with neurons both chemically (e.g. through neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors and cytokines and physically (e.g. through gap junctions, supporting a role for these cells as likely significant modifiers not only of neural function in brain development but also disease pathobiology. Since questions have lingered as to whether glial dysfunction plays a primary role in the biology of neuropsychiatric disorders or a role related solely to their support of neuronal physiology in these diseases, informative and predictive animal models have been developed over the last decade. In this article, we review recent findings uncovered using glia-specific genetically modified mice with which we can evaluate both the causation of glia dysfunction and its potential role in neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

  16. Potential primary roles of glial cells in the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Rosen, Kenneth M; Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Makinodan, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    While neurons have long been considered the major player in multiple brain functions such as perception, emotion, and memory, glial cells have been relegated to a far lesser position, acting as merely a "glue" to support neurons. Multiple lines of recent evidence, however, have revealed that glial cells such as oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia, substantially impact on neuronal function and activities and are significantly involved in the underlying pathobiology of psychiatric disorders. Indeed, a growing body of evidence indicates that glial cells interact extensively with neurons both chemically (e.g., through neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors, and cytokines) and physically (e.g., through gap junctions), supporting a role for these cells as likely significant modifiers not only of neural function in brain development but also disease pathobiology. Since questions have lingered as to whether glial dysfunction plays a primary role in the biology of neuropsychiatric disorders or a role related solely to their support of neuronal physiology in these diseases, informative and predictive animal models have been developed over the last decade. In this article, we review recent findings uncovered using glia-specific genetically modified mice with which we can evaluate both the causation of glia dysfunction and its potential role in neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. PMID:26029044

  17. Effect of uric acid on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, Ivana; Kubala, Lukáš; Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín

    Elsevier. Roč. 45, č. 1 (2008), s. 310. ISSN 0891-5849. [SFRBM's Annual Meeting /15./. 19.11.2008-23.11.2008, Indianapolis] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : uric acid * endothelial dysfunction * homocysteine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  18. EFFECT OF FUROSTANOL GLYCOSIDES FROM CULTURED DIOSCOREA DELTOIDEA CELLS ON REGULATORY FUNCTION OF ENDOTHELIUM IN A RAT MODEL OF HYPOESTROGEN-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    E. B. Artyushkova; N. G. Gumanova; V. A. Metelskaya; T. G. Pokrovskaya; V. I. Kochkarov; M. V. Korokin; M. V. Pokrovsky; L. V. Korokina; A. M. Nosov; M. M. Korneev

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the effects of furostanol glycosides from cultured Dioscorea Deltoidea cells (DM-05, Institute of Plant Physiology, RAS) on physiological and biochemical markers of endothelial function in rats with hypoestrogen-induced endothelial dysfunction.Material and methods. 10 female rats of Wistar line, with body mass 200-300 g have been included in the experiment. The bilateral ovariectomy was performed in rats to produce the model of hypoestrogen-induced endothelial dysfunction. Rats ...

  19. Protection from Palmitate-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Damage Prevents from Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Apoptosis, and Impaired Insulin Signaling in Rat L6 Skeletal Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V.; Solodushko, Viktoriya A.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Rachek, Lyudmila I.

    2011-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme ...

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in neurodegenerative diseases through nitroxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammed; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Daradkeh, Ghazi; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Choi, Youngshim; Mahmood, Lubna; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondria are important for providing cellular energy ATP through the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. They are also critical in regulating many cellular functions including the fatty acid oxidation, the metabolism of glutamate and urea, the anti-oxidant defense, and the apoptosis pathway. Mitochondria are an important source of reactive oxygen species leaked from the electron transport chain while they are susceptible to oxidative damage, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury. In fact, impaired mitochondrial function is commonly observed in many types of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease, alcoholic dementia, brain ischemia-reperfusion related injury, and others, although many of these neurological disorders have unique etiological factors. Mitochondrial dysfunction under many pathological conditions is likely to be promoted by increased nitroxidative stress, which can stimulate post-translational modifications (PTMs) of mitochondrial proteins and/or oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA and lipids. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that various antioxidants, including naturally occurring flavonoids and polyphenols as well as synthetic compounds, can block the formation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species, and thus ultimately prevent the PTMs of many proteins with improved disease conditions. Therefore, the present review is aimed to describe the recent research developments in the molecular mechanisms for mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury in neurodegenerative diseases and discuss translational research opportunities. PMID:26883165

  1. Dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation makes malignant melanoma cells addicted to glycolysis driven by the (V600E)BRAF oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Meyle, Kathrine Damm; Lange, Marina Krarup; Klima, Martin; Sanderhoff, May; Dahl, Christina; Abildgaard, Cecilie; Thorup, Katrine; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Jensen, Per Bo; Bartek, Jiri; Guldberg, Per; Christensen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene addiction describes how cancer cells exhibit dependence on single oncogenes to escape apoptosis and senescence. While oncogene addiction constitutes the basis for new cancer treatment strategies targeting individual kinases and pathways activated by oncogenic mutations, the biochemical...... basis for this addiction is largely unknown. Here we provide evidence for a metabolic rationale behind the addiction to (V600E)BRAF in two malignant melanoma cell lines. Both cell lines display a striking addiction to glycolysis due to underlying dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS......). Notably, even minor reductions in glycolytic activity lead to increased OXPHOS activity (reversed Warburg effect), however the mitochondria are unable to sustain ATP production. We show that (V600E)BRAF upholds the activity of glycolysis and therefore the addiction to glycolysis de facto becomes an...

  2. Pathogenesis of endothelial cell dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: a retrospective and what the future may hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications dominate the landscape of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) is a well-known culprit of cardiovascular morbidity and it develops in CKD with remarkable frequency. This brief overview of ECD in CKD scans two decades of studies performed in my laboratory, from genetic analyses to proteomic and metabolomics screens. I provide a detailed description of findings related to the premature senescence of endothelial cells, cell transition from the endothelial to mesenchymal phenotype, and stages of development of ECD. Clinical utility of some of these findings is illustrated with data on laser-Doppler flowmetry and imaging in patients with CKD. Some currently available and emerging therapeutic options for the management of ECD are briefly presented. PMID:26484026

  3. Folic Acid Reverses Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction in Insulin Resistance: Role of Ca2+/Calmodulin-Activated Protein Kinase II

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, Nathan D.; He, Emily Y.; Wu, Zhenbiao; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) may be uncoupled to produce superoxide rather than nitric oxide (NO) under pathological conditions such as diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance, leading to cardiac contractile anomalies. Nonetheless, the role of NOS uncoupling in insulin resistance-induced cardiac dysfunction remains elusive. Given that folic acid may produce beneficial effect for cardiac insufficiency partially through its NOS recoupling capacity, this study was designed to evaluate the effect...

  4. Immune dysfunction in cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sipeki Nóra; Antal-Szalmás Péter (1968-) (laboratóriumi szakorvos, laboratóriumi hematológus és immunológus, klinikai farmakológus szakorvos); Lakatos Péter László; Papp Mária (1975-) (belgyógyász, gasztroenterológus)

    2014-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune dysfunction, also referred to as cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, is a major component of cirrhosis, and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both the acute and chronic worsening of liver function. During the evolution of the disease, acute decompensation events associated with organ failure(s), so-called acute-on chronic liver failure, and chronic decompensation with progression of liver fibrosis and also development of disease specific comp...

  5. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin; Bo; Su

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smo-king, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide(NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease.

  6. Twisted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition promotes progression of surviving bladder cancer T24 cells with hTERT-dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cancer cells maintain telomeres to protect cells from senescence through telomerase activity (TA or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT in different cell types. Moreover, cellular senescence can be bypassed by Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT during cancer progression in diverse solid tumors. However, it has not been elucidated the characteristics of telomere maintenance and progression ability after long-term culture in bladder cancer T24 cells with hTERT dysfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, by using a dominant negative mutant human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT vector to inhibit TA in bladder cancer T24 cells, we observed the appearance of long phenotype of telomere length and the ALT-associated PML body (APB complex after the 27(th passage, indicating the occurrence of ALT-like pathway in surviving T24/DN868A cells with telomerase inhibition. Meanwhile, telomerase inhibition resulted in significant EMT as shown by change in cellular morphology concomitant with variation of EMT markers. Consistently, the surviving T24/DN868A cells showed increased progression ability in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found Twist was activated to mediate EMT in surviving T24/DN868A samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings indicate that bladder cancer T24 cells may undergo the telomerase-to-ALT-like conversion and promote cancer progression at advanced stages through promoting EMT, thus providing novel possible insight into the mechanism of resistance to telomerase inhibitors in cancer treatment.

  7. Understanding the function and dysfunction of the immune system in lung cancer: the role of immune checkpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival rates for metastatic lung cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), are poor with 5-year survivals of less than 5%. The immune system has an intricate and complex relationship with tumorigenesis; a groundswell of research on the immune system is leading to greater understanding of how cancer progresses and presenting new ways to halt disease progress. Due to the extraordinary power of the immune system—with its capacity for memory, exquisite specificity and central and universal role in human biology—immunotherapy has the potential to achieve complete, long-lasting remissions and cures, with few side effects for any cancer patient, regardless of cancer type. As a result, a range of cancer therapies are under development that work by turning our own immune cells against tumors. However deeper understanding of the complexity of immunomodulation by tumors is key to the development of effective immunotherapies, especially in lung cancer

  8. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; SHI, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect ...

  9. Relationship Between Beta Cell Dysfunction and Severity of Disease Among Critically Ill Children: A STROBE-Compliant Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Lan; Xiao, Zheng-Hui; Qiu, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2016-05-01

    Although beta cell dysfunction has been proved to predict prognosis among humans and animals, its prediction on severity of disease remains unclear among children. The present study was aimed to examine the relationship between beta cell dysfunction and severity of disease among critically ill children.This prospective study included 1146 critically ill children, who were admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Hunan Children's Hospital from November 2011 to August 2013. Information on characteristics, laboratory tests, and prognostic outcomes was collected. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β, evaluating beta cell function, was used to divide all participants into 4 groups: HOMA-β = 100% (group I, n = 339), 80% ≤ HOMA-β ventilation (MV) and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of developing poor outcomes among patients in different HOMA-β groups, with group I as the reference group.Among 1146 children, incidence of HOMA-β < 100% was 70.41%. C-peptide and insulin declined with the decrement of HOMA-β (P < 0.01). C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels, rather than white blood cell, were significantly different among 4 groups (P < 0.01). In addition, the worst SOFA score and the worst PRISMIII score increased with declined HOMA-β. For example, the worst SOFA score in group I, II, III, and IV was 1.55 ± 1.85, 1.71 ± 1.93, 1.92 ± 1.63, and 2.18 ± 1.77, respectively. Furthermore, patients with declined HOMA-β had higher risk of developing septic shock, MODS, MV, and mortality, even after adjusting age, gender, myocardial injury, and lung injury. For instance, compared with group I, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for developing septic shock was 2.17 (0.59, 8.02), 2.94 (2.18, 6.46), and 2.76 (1.18, 6.46) among patients in group II, III, and IV, respectively.Beta cell dysfunction reflected the severity of disease among critically ill children

  10. Role of endothelial cells in bovine mammary gland health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryman, Valerie E; Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Sordillo, Lorraine M

    2015-12-01

    The bovine mammary gland is a dynamic and complex organ composed of various cell types that work together for the purpose of milk synthesis and secretion. A layer of endothelial cells establishes the blood-milk barrier, which exists to facilitate the exchange of solutes and macromolecules necessary for optimal milk production. During bacterial challenge, however, endothelial cells divert some of their lactation function to protect the underlying tissue from damage by initiating inflammation. At the onset of inflammation, endothelial cells tightly regulate the movement of plasma components and leukocytes into affected tissue. Unfortunately, endothelial dysfunction as a result of exacerbated or sustained inflammation can negatively affect both barrier integrity and the health of surrounding extravascular tissue. The objective of this review is to highlight the role of endothelial cells in supporting milk production and regulating optimal inflammatory responses. The consequences of endothelial dysfunction and sustained inflammation on milk synthesis and secretion are discussed. Given the important role of endothelial cells in orchestrating the inflammatory response, a better understanding of endothelial function during mastitis may support development of targeted therapies to protect bovine mammary tissue and mammary endothelium. PMID:26303748

  11. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  12. Changes in microRNA expression contribute to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in prediabetic NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggli, Elodie; Gattesco, Sonia; Caille, Dorothée; Briet, Claire; Boitard, Christian; Meda, Paolo; Regazzi, Romano

    2012-07-01

    During the initial phases of type 1 diabetes, pancreatic islets are invaded by immune cells, exposing β-cells to proinflammatory cytokines. This unfavorable environment results in gene expression modifications leading to loss of β-cell functions. To study the contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs) in this process, we used microarray analysis to search for changes in miRNA expression in prediabetic NOD mice islets. We found that the levels of miR-29a/b/c increased in islets of NOD mice during the phases preceding diabetes manifestation and in isolated mouse and human islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of miR-29a/b/c in MIN6 and dissociated islet cells led to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion. Defective insulin release was associated with diminished expression of the transcription factor Onecut2, and a consequent rise of granuphilin, an inhibitor of β-cell exocytosis. Overexpression of miR-29a/b/c also promoted apoptosis by decreasing the level of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl1. Indeed, a decoy molecule selectively masking the miR-29 binding site on Mcl1 mRNA protected insulin-secreting cells from apoptosis triggered by miR-29 or cytokines. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in the level of miR-29 family members contribute to cytokine-mediated β-cell dysfunction occurring during the initial phases of type 1 diabetes. PMID:22537941

  13. TRPV1 Activation Exacerbates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Apoptosis in H9C2 Cells via Calcium Overload and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewei Sun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 channels, which are expressed on sensory neurons, elicit cardioprotective effects during ischemia reperfusion injury by stimulating the release of neuropeptides, namely calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and substance P (SP. Recent studies show that TRPV1 channels are also expressed on cardiomyocytes and can exacerbate air pollutant-induced apoptosis. However, whether these channels present on cardiomyocytes directly modulate cell death and survival pathways during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R injury remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 in H/R induced apoptosis of H9C2 cardiomyocytes. We demonstrated that TRPV1 was indeed expressed in H9C2 cells, and activated by H/R injury. Although neuropeptide release caused by TRPV1 activation on sensory neurons elicits a cardioprotective effect, we found that capsaicin (CAP; a TRPV1 agonist treatment of H9C2 cells paradoxically enhanced the level of apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium and mitochondrial superoxide levels, attenuating mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibiting mitochondrial biogenesis (measured by the expression of ATP synthase β. In contrast, treatment of cells with capsazepine (CPZ; a TRPV1 antagonist or TRPV1 siRNA attenuated H/R induced-apoptosis. Furthermore, CAP and CPZ treatment revealed a similar effect on cell viability and mitochondrial superoxide production in primary cardiomyocytes. Finally, using both CGRP8–37 (a CGRP receptor antagonist and RP67580 (a SP receptor antagonist to exclude the confounding effects of neuropeptides, we confirmed aforementioned detrimental effects as TRPV1−/− mouse hearts exhibited improved cardiac function during ischemia/reperfusion. In summary, direct activation of TRPV1 in myocytes exacerbates H/R-induced apoptosis, likely through calcium overload and associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Our study provides a novel understanding of the role of

  14. Intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-yi; WANG Fang; FENG Jie-xiong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on the observation that coagulation necrosis occurs in the majority of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) patients,it is clear that intestinal ischemia is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of NEC.However,the published studies regarding the role of intestinal ischemia in NEC are controversial.The aim of this paper is to review the current studies regarding intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and NEC,and try to elucidate the exact role of intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction in NEC.Data sources The studies cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms used were "intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction" and "neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis".Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators in the field were selected.Results Immature regulatory control of mesentery circulation makes the neonatal intestinal microvasculature vulnerable.When neonates are subjected to stress,endothelial cell dysfunction occurs and results in vasoconstriction of arterioles,inflammatory cell infiltration and activation in venules,and endothelial barrier disruption in capillaries.The compromised vasculature increases circulation resistance and therefore decreases intestinal perfusion,and may eventually progress to intestinal necrosis.Conclusion Intestinal ischemia plays an important role through the whole course of NEC.New therapeutic agents targeting intestinal ischemia,like HB-EGF,are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of NEC.

  15. Role of Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger-1 (NHE-1) in the Effect of Exercise on Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen M, Yu-Chih; Yang, Kun-Ta; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Tu, Wei-Chia; Chen, Tsung-I

    2015-08-31

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and can cause ventricular dysfunction. However, whether myocardial inflammation and sodium-hydrogen exchanger-1 (NHE-1) expression play an important role in IH-induced ventricular dysfunction remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether short-term exercise provides a protective effect on IH-induced left ventricular (LV) function impairment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control (CON), IH, exercise (EXE) or IH interspersed with EXE (IHEXE). IH rats were exposed to repetitive hypoxia/reoxygenation cycles (2%-6% O₂ for 2-5 s per 75 s, followed by 21% O₂ for 6 h/day) during the light phase for 12 consecutive days. EXE rats were habituated to treadmill running for 5 days, permitted 2 days of rest, and followed by 5 exercise bouts (30 m/min for 60 min on a 2% grade) on consecutive days during the dark phase. IHEXE rats were exposed to IH during the light phase interspersed with exercise programs during the dark phase on the same day. Cardiac function was quantified by echocardiographic evaluation. Myocardial levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and NHE-1 were determined. IH rats showed LV dysfunction characterized by lower LV fractional shortening (LVFS%) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF%). LV dysfunction was associated with higher myocardial levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and NHE-1 mRNA and protein. These changes were not observed in IHEXE rats (P > 0.05 for all). EXE rats showed lower levels of NHE-1 protein than CON rats (P 0.05 for all). These data indicated that exercise may provide a protective effect on IH-induced LV dysfunction by attenuating IH-induced myocardial NHE-1 hyperactivity. PMID:26211649

  16. Multidimensional Clusters of CD4+T Cell Dysfunction Are Primarily Associated with the CD4/CD8 Ratio in Chronic HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Juliet Wairimu; Buggert, Marcus; Noyan, Kajsa;

    2015-01-01

    correlation analyses between laboratory parameters and pathological CD4+ clusters revealed that the CD4/CD8 ratio was the preeminent surrogate marker of CD4+ T cells dysfunction using all three methods. Increased frequencies of an early-differentiated CD4+ T cell cluster with high CD38, HLA-DR and PD-1...

  17. Dysfunctional Neurotransmitter Systems in Fibromyalgia, Their Role in Central Stress Circuitry and Pharmacological Actions on These Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Becker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is considered a stress-related disorder, and hypo- as well as hyperactive stress systems (sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have been found. Some observations raise doubts on the view that alterations in these stress systems are solely responsible for fibromyalgia symptoms. Cumulative evidence points at dysfunctional transmitter systems that may underlie the major symptoms of the condition. In addition, all transmitter systems found to be altered in fibromyalgia influence the body's stress systems. Since both transmitter and stress systems change during chronic stress, it is conceivable that both systems change in parallel, interact, and contribute to the phenotype of fibromyalgia. As we outline in this paper, subgroups of patients might exhibit varying degrees and types of transmitter dysfunction, explaining differences in symptomatoloy and contributing to the heterogeneity of fibromyalgia. The finding that not all fibromyalgia patients respond to the same medications, targeting dysfunctional transmitter systems, further supports this hypothesis.

  18. THE ROLE OF LACTATE CLEARANCE AS A PREDICTOR OF ORGAN DYSFUNCTION AND MORTALITY IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE SEPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolvardi, Ehsan; Malmir, Jafar; Reihani, Hamidreza; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Bahramian, Mehran; Khademhosseini, Peyman; Ahmadi, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about biomarkers which are used to classification of patients in order to diagnosis severity of sepsis among clients of emergency units. It seems that Lactate’s clearance can be used in this regard. This study aimed to determine the relationship between Lactate’s clearance, mortality and organ’s dysfunction with severe sepsis. Materials and methods: In this study 90 patients with severe sepsis, were visited and examined exactly. Para clinical tests, serum venous lactate, organ’s dysfunction scores, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) were applied upon admission and 6 hours after it. According to clinical and laboratory criteria, dysfunction in main organs were examined and Lactate’s Clearance was accounted. All the patients were cured according to early goal-directed therapy protocol. Results: Among the participants 49 and 41 were male and female respectively. The mean age of the group was 49.37±1.41. The patients were classified to groups, less or more than 10% lactate’s clearance. Mortality rate of the patients was 18.9% (17 people). Mean age of the dead group was 49.71±13.33. The mean of dysfunctional organs which is assessed in terms of clinical, laboratory and SOFA criteria was significantly higher among the dead group than other. The Lactate’s clearance in the dead group was significantly lower than the other group (p<.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that patients with severe sepsis is a marker which is related to tissue hypoxia, also lactate’s clearance increasing is related to drastic reduction in biomarkers, mortality, and incidence of organ’s dysfunction. Overall, patients with lower lactate’s clearance are counted a high risk group for mortality and organs’ dysfunction. PMID:27047270

  19. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  20. Syntrophin proteins as Santa Claus: role(s) in cell signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Hina F; Adams, Marvin E; Khanday, Firdous A

    2013-07-01

    Syntrophins are a family of cytoplasmic membrane-associated adaptor proteins, characterized by the presence of a unique domain organization comprised of a C-terminal syntrophin unique (SU) domain and an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that is split by insertion of a PDZ domain. Syntrophins have been recognized as an important component of many signaling events, and they seem to function more like the cell's own personal 'Santa Claus' that serves to 'gift' various signaling complexes with precise proteins that they 'wish for', and at the same time care enough for the spatial, temporal control of these signaling events, maintaining overall smooth functioning and general happiness of the cell. Syntrophins not only associate various ion channels and signaling proteins to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), via a direct interaction with dystrophin protein but also serve as a link between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular downstream targets and cell cytoskeleton by interacting with F-actin. They play an important role in regulating the postsynaptic signal transduction, sarcolemmal localization of nNOS, EphA4 signaling at the neuromuscular junction, and G-protein mediated signaling. In our previous work, we reported a differential expression pattern of alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) protein in esophageal and breast carcinomas. Implicated in several other pathologies, like cardiac dys-functioning, muscular dystrophies, diabetes, etc., these proteins provide a lot of scope for further studies. The present review focuses on the role of syntrophins in membrane targeting and regulation of cellular proteins, while highlighting their relevance in possible development and/or progression of pathologies including cancer which we have recently demonstrated. PMID:23263165

  1. Colistin-Induced Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma-2a Cells Involves the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Velkov, Tony; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-09-01

    Neurotoxicity remains a poorly characterized adverse effect associated with colistin therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of colistin-induced neurotoxicity using the mouse neuroblastoma2a (N2a) cell line. Colistin treatment (0-200 μM) of N2a neuronal cells induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity was associated with a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with a concomitant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the glutathione (GSH) levels. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evident from the dissipation of membrane potential and the increase of Bax/Bcl-2, followed by the release of cytochrome c (CytC). Caspase-3/7, -8, and -9 activations were also detected. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity significantly increased the gene expression of p53 (1.6-fold), Bax (3.3-fold), and caspase-8 (2.2-fold) (all p colistin treatment (50-200 μM). Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy by pretreatment with chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) enhanced colistin-induced apoptosis via caspase activation, which could be attenuated by co-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. In summary, our study reveals that colistin-induced neuronal cell death involves ROS-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. A knowledge base of the neuronal signaling pathways involved in colistin-induced neurotoxicity will greatly facilitate the discovery of neuroprotective agents for use in combination with colistin to prevent this undesirable side effect. PMID:26316077

  2. The Potential Role of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Link between Mitochondrial Complex I Dysfunction and Inflammation in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kyunghee Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of the inflammatory system are two of the most consistently reported findings in bipolar disorder (BD. More specifically, altered levels of inflammatory cytokines and decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I subunits have been found in the brain and periphery of patients with BD, which could lead to increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial production of ROS and inflammation may be closely linked through a redox sensor known as nod-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3. Upon sensing mitochondrial release of ROS, NLRP3 assembles the NLRP3 inflammasome, which releases caspase 1 to begin the inflammatory cascade. In this review, we discuss the potential role of the NLRP3 inflammasome as a link between complex I dysfunction and inflammation in BD and its therapeutic implications.

  3. Neuroendocrine mechanisms of left ventricular dysfunction stimulated by anger stress in rats with atherosclerosis-a putative role of natriuretic peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Chen; Xian-Zhi He; Qi-Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of natriuretic peptide in the process of left ventricular dysfunction caused by emotional stress. Methods: Adult male SD rats (n=30) and Wistar rats (n=60) were selected in this study. Atherosclerosis models were induced with high-fat diet and excess VD3 injection (eight consecutive weeks), and anger stress models were prepared by resident-intruder stress experiment (two consecutive weeks). Furthermore, left ventricular functions were examined by high-resolution echocardiograph, after which left ventricular myocardium and coronary arteries were prepared for pathological section and observed with electron microscope. At the same time, the hypothalamus, medulla oblongata and left ventricular myocardium were also prepared for pathological sections to detect the localization and expression of ANP, BNP and NPR-A with immunofluorescence and western blot. Results: We found that left ventricular functions of atherosclerosis or emotional stress modeled rats were both inferior to the healthy ones and superior to the combined (atherosclerosis and emotional stress) modeled ones (P<0.05). We also found that atherosclerosis and emotional stress could both cause morphological changes of left ventricular cells and capillary which contribute to apoptosis and hyperblastosis. Further more, there was NPR-A distributed in hypothalamus, medulla oblongata, as well as left ventricular tissues with the same express trend between groups, with atherosclerosis modeled rats the highest and the healthy rats the lowest. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that anger stress could cause an excess consumption of ANP, BNP and NPR-A in nervous and cardiovascular system which inhibit the compensatory self-repair function of atherosclerosis rats, leading to a promotion of fibrosis and lipid peroxidation, offering insight into the neuroendocrine mechanisms of left heart function obstacle.

  4. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H2O2 production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly activated

  5. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chunhua [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Jiang, Shengyang [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Jiang, Junkang, E-mail: Jiang_junkang@163.com [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 Jiangsu (China)

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is

  6. Obesity and Cognitive Dysfunction in Heart Failure: The Role of Hypertension, Type 2 Diabetes, and Physical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure (HF). Obesity is a known risk factor for cognitive dysfunction in HF, though the mechanisms remain unclear. Obesity increases risk for conditions like hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as well as poor fitness levels and this may serve as one possible pathway accounting for association between obesity and cognitive dysfunction. Aims We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to test whether the combination of hypertension, T2DM, and reduced fitness mediate the association between obesity and cognitive dysfunction. Methods 200 HF patients completed neuropsychological testing and a physical fitness assessment. Hypertension and T2DM were ascertained via self-report and medical records. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Results 43% of the sample was obese. Hypertension (70%) and T2DM (36%) were common, and fitness levels were reduced. The SEM model with these factors as mediators between BMI and cognitive function demonstrated excellent fit (CFI = 0.98; RMSEA = .03). Higher BMI correlated with hypertension, T2DM, and poorer fitness. Each of these factors predicted worse cognition. Models that isolated medical comorbidities and physical fitness as the mediator were weaker than the full model. Conclusions Increased risk for medical comorbidities and reduced fitness levels helped to explain the negative effects of obesity on cognitive dysfunction in HF. Prospective studies should confirm this pattern and examine weight loss benefits cognitive function in HF. Keywords: Physical fitness; cognitive function; heart failure; obesity; hypertension; type 2 diabetes mellitus PMID:24829294

  7. Motor dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome : the role of sensory processing and sensory-motor integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, Paulina Johanna Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), motor disturbances are common and cause significant disability. The motor dysfunction of CRPS is a poorly understood phenomenon that is characterized predominantly by a decrease or loss of voluntary muscle control. This thesis aims to ob

  8. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Tae-Boo [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seok-Il [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jae-Youn [Laboratory of Modulation of Radiobiological Responses, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Gyu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Han, E-mail: yhlee87@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  9. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells

  10. Licochalcone A-Induced Human Bladder Cancer T24 Cells Apoptosis Triggered by Mitochondria Dysfunction and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Licochalcone A (LCA, a licorice chalconoid, is considered to be a bioactive agent with chemopreventive potential. This study investigated the mechanisms involved in LCA-induced apoptosis in human bladder cancer T24 cells. LCA significantly inhibited cells proliferation, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, and caused T24 cells apoptosis. Moreover, LCA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase-3 activation, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, which displayed features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals. Besides, exposure of T24 cells to LCA triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress; as indicated by the enhancement in 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153/C/EBP homology protein (GADD153/CHOP expression, ER stress-dependent apoptosis is caused by the activation of ER-specific caspase-12. All the findings from our study suggest that LCA initiates mitochondrial ROS generation and induces oxidative stress that consequently causes T24 cell apoptosis via the mitochondria-dependent and the ER stress-triggered signaling pathways.

  11. Impact of diabetic serum on endothelial cells: An in-vitro-analysis of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by altered levels of adhesion molecules and cytokines. Aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of diabetic serum on cell-growth and proinflammatory markers in human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) from diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic serum showed (1) complementary proliferative activity for non-diabetic and diabetic HSVEC, (2) unchanged surface expression of adhesion molecules, and (3) elevated levels of sICAM-1 in HSVEC of all donors. The concentration of sVCAM-1 was increased only in diabetic cells. The proinflammatory state of diabetic HSVEC characterized by increased levels of cytokines was compensated. We concluded that even under normoglycemic conditions the serum itself contains critical factors leading to abnormal regulation of inflammation in diabetics. We introduced an in vitro model of diabetes representing the endothelial situation at the beginning of diabetes (non-diabetic cells/diabetic serum) as well as the diabetic chronic state (diabetic cells/diabetic serum)

  12. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R.; Birx, Deborah L.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Hu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  13. Orgasmic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhibited sexual excitement; Sex - orgasmic dysfunction; Anorgasmia ... GM. Emotional aspects of gynecology: depression, anxiety PTSD, eating disorders, substance abuse, "difficult" patients, sexual function, rape intimate partner violence, and grief. In: ...

  14. Understanding the function and dysfunction of the immune system in lung cancer:the role of immune checkpoints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niki Karachaliou; Maria Gonzalez Cao; Cristina Teixid; Santiago Viteri; Daniela Morales-Espinosa; Mariacarmela Santarpia; Rafael Rosell

    2015-01-01

    AbstrAct Survival rates for metastatic lung cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), are poor with 5-year survivals of less than 5%. The immune system has an intricate and complex relationship with tumorigenesis;a groundswell of research on the immune system is leading to greater understanding of how cancer progresses and presenting new ways to halt disease progress. Due to the extraordinary power of the immune system—with its capacity for memory, exquisite speciifcity and central and universal role in human biology—immunotherapy has the potential to achieve complete, long-lasting remissions and cures, with few side effects for any cancer patient, regardless of cancer type. As a result, a range of cancer therapies are under development that work by turning our own immune cells against tumors. However deeper understanding of the complexity of immunomodulation by tumors is key to the development of effective immunotherapies, especially in lung cancer.

  15. [Mediating role of emotional regulation between impulsive behavior in gambling, Internet and videogame abuse, and dysfunctional symptomatology in young adults and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez Gutiérrez, Ana; Herrero Fernández, David; Sarabia Gonzalvo, Izaskun; Jáuregui Bilbao, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The way emotions are regulated might affect the engagement on risk behaviors in adolescents and young adults. Therefore, studying the relationship between these variables could be of great importance. Some of the less studied risky behaviors are pathological gambling, and Internet and videogame abuse. This research aims to analyze the existing relationship between such risky behaviors, emotion regulation, and dysfunctional psychological symptomatology (depression, anxiety, phobic anxiety, somatization, obsessive-–compulsive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism). In addition, it also looks to assess whether emotional regulation plays a mediating role between pathological gambling, and Internet and videogame abuse, and psychological symptomatology. The sample was composed of 1312 young adults and adolescents, aged between 12 and 30, recruited from scholar centers, universities and free time groups, and from associations and centers associated with FEJAR (Spanish Federation of Rehabilitated Gamblers). Participants completed measurements of impulsive behavior, emotion regulation, and dysfunctional symptomatology. Results showed that there is generally a positive and significant relation between these variables. Moreover, it has been pointed out that emotion regulation mediates the association between impulsive behavior and dysfunctional symptomatology among those young adults and adolescents who engage in these impulsive behaviors, except for the relation between videogame abuse and depressive symptomatology. Training in emotional regulation skills could be useful in dealing with and treating this type of behaviors in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25577999

  16. Carnosic acid induces apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and Akt inactivation in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qisen; Ma, Yunfang; Dong, Jilin; Shen, Ruiling

    2015-02-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary, shows potential benefits in health promotion and disease prevention. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic-inducing effects of CA on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells were investigated. The MTT assay results indicated that CA decreased cell viability in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with CA caused a rapid Caspase-3 activation and subsequently proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), both of which were markers of cells undergoing apoptosis. CA also dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein, which mediated cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, CA reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, which was partially inhibited by insulin, an activator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling pathway. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction and deactivation of Akt may contribute to the apoptosis-inducing effects of CA. PMID:25265205

  17. [The role of the basal forebrain cholinergic dysfunction in pathogenesis of declarative memory disorder in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, V N

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of the declarative memory disorder: 30-40% cases of dementia among all of age groups, and 50-60% among the people older 65 years. In addition, disorder of declarative memory is the genuine symptom of the disease, which certainly appears on early stage of the disease and it is an obligate diagnostic symptom. Proponents of the "cholinergic theory" of pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease suggest that the basis disorder of declarative memory is cholinergic dysfunction. Several neurodynamic mechanisms associated with declarative memory depend on the level of acetylcholine in hippocampus and neocortex. It is believed that dysfunction of the basal cholinergic system in Alzheimer's disease leads to the impairment of these mechanisms. In this review, we summarize available literature data concerning the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24459876

  18. Dysfunctional Neurotransmitter Systems in Fibromyalgia, Their Role in Central Stress Circuitry and Pharmacological Actions on These Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Schweinhardt; Susanne Becker

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is considered a stress-related disorder, and hypo- as well as hyperactive stress systems (sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) have been found. Some observations raise doubts on the view that alterations in these stress systems are solely responsible for fibromyalgia symptoms. Cumulative evidence points at dysfunctional transmitter systems that may underlie the major symptoms of the condition. In addition, all transmitter systems found to be altered...

  19. Alcohol Dehydrogenase Accentuates Ethanol-Induced Myocardial Dysfunction and Mitochondrial Damage in Mice: Role of Mitochondrial Death Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Rui; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Binge drinking and alcohol toxicity are often associated with myocardial dysfunction possibly due to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde although the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study was designed to examine the impact of accelerated ethanol metabolism on myocardial contractility, mitochondrial function and apoptosis using a murine model of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Methods ADH and wild-type FVB mice were acutely chall...

  20. Significance of upper airway influence among patients of vocal cord dysfunction for its diagnosis: Role of impulse oscillometry

    OpenAIRE

    Hira H; Singh Anshu

    2009-01-01

    Background: To identify the patients of bronchial asthma (suspected or proven), not responding to optimal therapy, for the presence of vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and to compare the diagnostic ability of flow volume (FV) loop and impulse oscillometry (IOS). Materials and Methods: Fifty one patients of suspected/proven bronchial asthma not responding to optimal therapy were included for the study. Each patient was subjected to both FV loop and IOS studies. Direct visualization of the vocal...

  1. Role of adrenocortical dysfunction in the pathogenesis of poisoning syndromes due to some industrial toxins (aromatic nitro compounds, lead)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makotcenko, V.M.

    1974-10-01

    Comparative study is presented of adrenocortical dysfunction in workers chronically exposed to aromatic nitro compounds and to lead. The chronic intoxications produced by aromatic nitro compounds and by lead are characterized by a slight reduction in adrenocortical activity, which plays an important part in the pathogenesis of certain syndromes such as asthenia, gastric secretion disorders, lead anemia and lead polyneuritis. It is desirable to take measures to normalize corticosteroid formation when chronic occupational poisoning is being treated. (CIS Abstr. Vol. 2)

  2. Electro-mechanical dysfunction in long QT syndrome: Role for arrhythmogenic risk prediction and modulation by sex and sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C N; Menza, M; Jochem, S; Franke, G; Perez Feliz, S; Brunner, M; Koren, G; Zehender, M; Bugger, H; Jung, B A; Foell, D; Bode, C; Odening, K E

    2016-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a congenital arrhythmogenic channelopathy characterized by impaired cardiac repolarization. Increasing evidence supports the notion that LQTS is not purely an "electrical" disease but rather an "electro-mechanical" disease with regionally heterogeneously impaired electrical and mechanical cardiac function. In the first part, this article reviews current knowledge on electro-mechanical (dys)function in LQTS, clinical consequences of the observed electro-mechanical dysfunction, and potential underlying mechanisms. Since several novel imaging techniques - Strain Echocardiography (SE) and Magnetic Resonance Tissue Phase Mapping (TPM) - are applied in clinical and experimental settings to assess the (regional) mechanical function, advantages of these non-invasive techniques and their feasibility in the clinical routine are particularly highlighted. The second part provides novel insights into sex differences and sex hormone effects on electro-mechanical cardiac function in a transgenic LQT2 rabbit model. Here we demonstrate that female LQT2 rabbits exhibit a prolonged time to diastolic peak - as marker for contraction duration and early relaxation - compared to males. Chronic estradiol-treatment enhances these differences in time to diastolic peak even more and additionally increases the risk for ventricular arrhythmia. Importantly, time to diastolic peak is particularly prolonged in rabbits exhibiting ventricular arrhythmia - regardless of hormone treatment - contrasting with a lack of differences in QT duration between symptomatic and asymptomatic LQT2 rabbits. This indicates the potential added value of the assessment of mechanical dysfunction in future risk stratification of LQTS patients. PMID:26718598

  3. IL-12 triggers a programmatic change in dysfunctional myeloid-derived cells within mouse tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkar, Sid P.; Goldszmid, Romina S.; Muranski, Pawel; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Reger, Robert N.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Morgan, Richard A.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    Solid tumors are complex masses with a local microenvironment, or stroma, that supports tumor growth and progression. Among the diverse tumor-supporting stromal cells is a heterogeneous population of myeloid-derived cells. These cells are alternatively activated and contribute to the immunosuppressive environment of the tumor; overcoming their immunosuppressive effects may improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We recently found that engineering tumor-specific CD8+ T cells to secrete the inflammatory cytokine IL-12 improved their therapeutic efficacy in the B16 mouse model of established melanoma. Here, we report the mechanism underlying this finding. Surprisingly, direct binding of IL-12 to receptors on lymphocytes or NK cells was not required. Instead, IL-12 sensitized bone marrow–derived tumor stromal cells, including CD11b+F4/80hi macrophages, CD11b+MHCIIhiCD11chi dendritic cells, and CD11b+Gr-1hi myeloid–derived suppressor cells, causing them to enhance the effects of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells. This reprogramming of myeloid-derived cells occurred partly through IFN-γ. Surprisingly, direct presentation of antigen to the transferred CD8+ T cells by tumor was not necessary; however, MHCI expression on host cells was essential for IL-12–mediated antitumor enhancements. These results are consistent with a model in which IL-12 enhances the ability of CD8+ T cells to collapse large vascularized tumors by triggering programmatic changes in otherwise suppressive antigen-presenting cells within tumors and support the use of IL-12 as part of immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:22056381

  4. Conditional PDK1 ablation promotes epidermal and T cell-mediated dysfunctions leading to inflammatory skin disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Minjun; Owens, David M.; Ghosh, Sankar; Farber, Donna L.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositide dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) is a key signaling molecule downstream of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3 kinase) pathway and is a master regulator of multiple kinases in cells of epithelial and hematopoietic lineages. The physiological role of PDK1 in regulating skin and immune homeostasis is not known. Here we developed a mouse model in which PDK1 is conditionally ablated in activated CD4 T cells, regulatory T cells and mature keratinocytes, through OX40-Cre recombinase e...

  5. Role of ammonia, inflammation, and cerebral oxygenation in brain dysfunction of acute-on-chronic liver failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Rohit; Holland-Fischer, Peter; Rosselli, Matteo; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Agarwal, Banwari; Jalan, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common feature of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). Although ammonia, inflammation, and cerebral oxygenation are associated with HE in acute liver failure, their roles in ACLF are unknown. The aim of this prospective, longitudinal study was to determine the role of these pathophysiological variables in ACLF patients with and without HE. We studied 101 patients with ACLF admitted to the intensive care unit. Severity of ACLF and HE, arterial ammonia, jugular venous oxygen saturation (JVO2 ), white blood cell count (WCC), and C-reactive protein were measured at days 0, 1, 3, and 7. Patients were followed until death or hospital discharge. Mortality was high (51 patients, 50.5%), especially in patients with HE of whom 35 of 53 (66.0%) died regardless of ACLF severity. At baseline, increased WCC and abnormal JVO2 (high or low) were independent predictors of death. Further deterioration in inflammation, JVO2 , and ammonia were also predictive of mortality. JVO2 deviation and hyperammonemia were associated with the presence and severity of HE; improvement in these parameters was associated with a reduction in HE grade. No direct interaction was observed between these variables in regards to mortality or HE. In conclusion, this study describes potential mechanisms of HE in ACLF indicating that ammonia and abnormal cerebral oxygenation are important. The results suggest that ammonia, JVO2 , and WCC are important prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The relative roles of these pathophysiological factors in the pathogenesis of HE in ACLF or guiding therapy to improve survival requires future study. Liver Transplantation 22 732-742 2016 AASLD. PMID:27028317

  6. Streptozotocin-Induced Cytotoxicity, Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptozotocin (STZ is an antibiotic often used in the treatment of different types of cancers. It is also highly cytotoxic to the pancreatic beta-cells and therefore is commonly used to induce experimental type 1 diabetes in rodents. Resistance towards STZ-induced cytotoxicity in cancer cells has also been reported. Our previous studies have reported organ-specific toxicity and metabolic alterations in STZ-induced diabetic rats. STZ induces oxidative stress and metabolic complications. The precise molecular mechanism of STZ-induced toxicity in different tissues and carcinomas is, however, unclear. We have, therefore, investigated the mechanism of cytotoxicity of STZ in HepG2 hepatoma cells in culture. Cells were treated with different doses of STZ for various time intervals and the cytotoxicity was studied by observing the alterations in oxidative stress, mitochondrial redox and metabolic functions. STZ induced ROS and RNS formation and oxidative stress as measured by an increase in the lipid peroxidation as well as alterations in the GSH-dependent antioxidant metabolism. The mitochondria appear to be a highly sensitive target for STZ toxicity. The mitochondrial membrane potential and enzyme activities were altered in STZ treated cells resulting in the inhibition of ATP synthesis. ROS-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase activity was markedly inhibited suggesting increased oxidative stress in STZ-induced mitochondrial toxicity. These results suggest that STZ-induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells is mediated, at least in part, by the increase in ROS/RNS production, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our study may be significant for better understanding the mechanisms of STZ action in chemotherapy and drug induced toxicity.

  7. Cytosolic triglycerides and oxidative stress in central obesity : the missing link between excessive atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and beta-cell failure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SJL; IJzerman, RG; Teerlink, T; Westerhoff, HV; Gans, ROB; Heine, RJ

    2000-01-01

    Central obesity is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we present a hypothesis that may explain the excess atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and progressive beta-cell failure. Central obesity is associated with increased cytosolic tr

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KayFMacleod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability and other more conventional aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the sigificance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis and spatial dynamics and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knockon effects for cell proliferation and growth. Scientifically, there is also scope for defining what mitochondria dysfunction is and here we address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Across-frequency behavioral estimates of the contribution of inner and outer hair cell dysfunction to individualized audiometric loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Johannesen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the multiple contributors to the audiometric loss of a hearing impaired listener at a particular frequency is becoming gradually more useful as new treatments are developed. Here, we infer the contribution of inner (IHC and outer hair cell (OHC dysfunction to the total audiometric loss in a sample of 68 hearing aid candidates with mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss, and for test frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 kHz. It was assumed that the audiometric loss (HL_TOTAL at each test frequency was due to a combination of cochlear gain loss, or OHC dysfunction (HL_OHC, and inefficient IHC processes (HL_IHC, all of them in decibels. HL_OHC and HL_IHC were estimated from cochlear I/O curves inferred psychoacoustically using the temporal masking curve method. 325 I/O curves were measured and 59% of them showed a compression threshold. The analysis of these I/O curves suggests that (1 HL_OHC and HL_IHC account on average for 60-70% and 40-30% of HL_TOTAL, respectively; (2 these percentages are roughly constant across frequencies; (3 across-listener variability is large; (4 residual cochlear gain is negatively correlated with hearing loss while residual compression is not correlated with hearing loss. Altogether, the present results support the conclusions from earlier studies and extend them to a wider range of test frequencies and hearing loss ranges. 24% of I/O curves were linear and suggested total cochlear gain loss. The number of linear I/O curves increased gradually with increasing frequency. The remaining 17% I/O curves suggested audiometric losses due mostly to IHC dysfunction and were more frequent at low (≤ 1 kHz than at high frequencies. It is argued that in a majority of listeners, hearing loss is due to a common mechanism that concomitantly alters IHC and OHC function and that IHC processes may be more labile in the apex than in the base.

  10. Dysfunctional p53 deletion mutants in cell lines derived from Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerborn, Alexander; Moritz, Constanze; von Bonin, Frederike;

    2006-01-01

    transcriptional activity of p53. Transcriptional inactivity was also found for p53 in L428 cells. This study characterizes mutations in TP53 transcripts within cHL cell lines with associated functional defects in the resulting p53 proteins and therefore reintroduces the concept that mutations of TP53 might be...

  11. Reversible neural stem cell niche dysfunction in a model of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine; Imitola, Jaime; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain constitutes a niche for neural stem and progenitor cells that can initiate repair after central nervous system (CNS) injury. In a relapsing-remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the neural stem cells (NSCs) become...

  12. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. RESULTS In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. CONCLUSIONS The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  13. Troglitazone, but not rosiglitazone, damages mitochondrial DNA and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone (TRO) and rosiglitazone (ROSI), improve insulin resistance by acting as ligands for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). TRO was withdrawn from the market because of reports of serious hepatotoxicity. A growing body of evidence suggests that TRO caused mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of apoptosis in human hepatocytes but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. We hypothesized that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an initiating event involved in TRO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes were exposed to TRO and ROSI. The results obtained revealed that TRO, but not ROSI at equimolar concentrations, caused a substantial increase in mtDNA damage and decreased ATP production and cellular viability. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetyl cystein (NAC), significantly diminished the TRO-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting involvement of ROS in TRO-induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity. The PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) did not block the TRO-induced decrease in cell viability, indicating that the TRO-induced hepatotoxicity is PPARγ-independent. Furthermore, TRO induced hepatocyte apoptosis, caspase-3 cleavage and cytochrome c release. Targeting of a DNA repair protein to mitochondria by protein transduction using a fusion protein containing the DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease III (EndoIII) from Escherichia coli, a mitochondrial translocation sequence (MTS) and the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV-1 TAT protein protected hepatocytes against TRO-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that significant mtDNA damage caused by TRO is a prime initiator of the hepatoxicity caused by this drug.

  14. A Syntenic Cross Species Aneuploidy Genetic Screen Links RCAN1 Expression to β-Cell Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshan Peiris

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a complex metabolic disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance and hypoinsulinemia due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Reduced mitochondrial function is thought to be central to β-cell dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced insulin secretion are also observed in β-cells of humans with the most common human genetic disorder, Down syndrome (DS, Trisomy 21. To identify regions of chromosome 21 that may be associated with perturbed glucose homeostasis we profiled the glycaemic status of different DS mouse models. The Ts65Dn and Dp16 DS mouse lines were hyperglycemic, while Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mice were not, providing us with a region of chromosome 21 containing genes that cause hyperglycemia. We then examined whether any of these genes were upregulated in a set of ~5,000 gene expression changes we had identified in a large gene expression analysis of human T2D β-cells. This approach produced a single gene, RCAN1, as a candidate gene linking hyperglycemia and functional changes in T2D β-cells. Further investigations demonstrated that RCAN1 methylation is reduced in human T2D islets at multiple sites, correlating with increased expression. RCAN1 protein expression was also increased in db/db mouse islets and in human and mouse islets exposed to high glucose. Mice overexpressing RCAN1 had reduced in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and their β-cells displayed mitochondrial dysfunction including hyperpolarised membrane potential, reduced oxidative phosphorylation and low ATP production. This lack of β-cell ATP had functional consequences by negatively affecting both glucose-stimulated membrane depolarisation and ATP-dependent insulin granule exocytosis. Thus, from amongst the myriad of gene expression changes occurring in T2D β-cells where we had little knowledge of which changes cause β-cell dysfunction, we applied a trisomy 21 screening approach which linked RCAN1 to β-cell mitochondrial

  15. A Syntenic Cross Species Aneuploidy Genetic Screen Links RCAN1 Expression to β-Cell Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Heshan; Duffield, Michael D.; Fadista, Joao; Kashmir, Vinder; Genders, Amanda J.; McGee, Sean L.; Martin, Alyce M.; Saiedi, Madiha; Morton, Nicholas; Carter, Roderick; Cousin, Michael A.; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Volkov, Petr; Hough, Tertius A.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Busciglio, Jorge; Coskun, Pinar E.; Becker, Ann; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Mobley, William C.; Ryan, Michael T.; Chan, Jeng Yie; Laybutt, D. Ross; Coates, P. Toby; Yang, Sijun; Ling, Charlotte; Groop, Leif; Pritchard, Melanie A.; Keating, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance and hypoinsulinemia due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Reduced mitochondrial function is thought to be central to β-cell dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced insulin secretion are also observed in β-cells of humans with the most common human genetic disorder, Down syndrome (DS, Trisomy 21). To identify regions of chromosome 21 that may be associated with perturbed glucose homeostasis we profiled the glycaemic status of different DS mouse models. The Ts65Dn and Dp16 DS mouse lines were hyperglycemic, while Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mice were not, providing us with a region of chromosome 21 containing genes that cause hyperglycemia. We then examined whether any of these genes were upregulated in a set of ~5,000 gene expression changes we had identified in a large gene expression analysis of human T2D β-cells. This approach produced a single gene, RCAN1, as a candidate gene linking hyperglycemia and functional changes in T2D β-cells. Further investigations demonstrated that RCAN1 methylation is reduced in human T2D islets at multiple sites, correlating with increased expression. RCAN1 protein expression was also increased in db/db mouse islets and in human and mouse islets exposed to high glucose. Mice overexpressing RCAN1 had reduced in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and their β-cells displayed mitochondrial dysfunction including hyperpolarised membrane potential, reduced oxidative phosphorylation and low ATP production. This lack of β-cell ATP had functional consequences by negatively affecting both glucose-stimulated membrane depolarisation and ATP-dependent insulin granule exocytosis. Thus, from amongst the myriad of gene expression changes occurring in T2D β-cells where we had little knowledge of which changes cause β-cell dysfunction, we applied a trisomy 21 screening approach which linked RCAN1 to β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction in T2D

  16. A Syntenic Cross Species Aneuploidy Genetic Screen Links RCAN1 Expression to β-Cell Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Heshan; Duffield, Michael D; Fadista, Joao; Jessup, Claire F; Kashmir, Vinder; Genders, Amanda J; McGee, Sean L; Martin, Alyce M; Saiedi, Madiha; Morton, Nicholas; Carter, Roderick; Cousin, Michael A; Kokotos, Alexandros C; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Volkov, Petr; Hough, Tertius A; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Busciglio, Jorge; Coskun, Pinar E; Becker, Ann; Belichenko, Pavel V; Mobley, William C; Ryan, Michael T; Chan, Jeng Yie; Laybutt, D Ross; Coates, P Toby; Yang, Sijun; Ling, Charlotte; Groop, Leif; Pritchard, Melanie A; Keating, Damien J

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance and hypoinsulinemia due to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Reduced mitochondrial function is thought to be central to β-cell dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced insulin secretion are also observed in β-cells of humans with the most common human genetic disorder, Down syndrome (DS, Trisomy 21). To identify regions of chromosome 21 that may be associated with perturbed glucose homeostasis we profiled the glycaemic status of different DS mouse models. The Ts65Dn and Dp16 DS mouse lines were hyperglycemic, while Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mice were not, providing us with a region of chromosome 21 containing genes that cause hyperglycemia. We then examined whether any of these genes were upregulated in a set of ~5,000 gene expression changes we had identified in a large gene expression analysis of human T2D β-cells. This approach produced a single gene, RCAN1, as a candidate gene linking hyperglycemia and functional changes in T2D β-cells. Further investigations demonstrated that RCAN1 methylation is reduced in human T2D islets at multiple sites, correlating with increased expression. RCAN1 protein expression was also increased in db/db mouse islets and in human and mouse islets exposed to high glucose. Mice overexpressing RCAN1 had reduced in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and their β-cells displayed mitochondrial dysfunction including hyperpolarised membrane potential, reduced oxidative phosphorylation and low ATP production. This lack of β-cell ATP had functional consequences by negatively affecting both glucose-stimulated membrane depolarisation and ATP-dependent insulin granule exocytosis. Thus, from amongst the myriad of gene expression changes occurring in T2D β-cells where we had little knowledge of which changes cause β-cell dysfunction, we applied a trisomy 21 screening approach which linked RCAN1 to β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction in T2D

  17. N-acetylcysteine impairs survival of luteal cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhrke, Berthold; Xu, Jinxian; Weitzel, Joachim M; Krüger, Burkhard; Goldammer, Tom; Viergutz, Torsten

    2010-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is known as an antioxidant and used for mucus viscosity reduction. However, this drug prevents or induces cell death depending on the cell type. The response of steroidogenic luteal cells to NAC is unknown. Our data shows that NAC can behave as an antioxidant or prooxidant in dependency on the concentration and mitochondrial energization. NAC elevated the flowcytometric-measured portion of hypodiploid (dying) cells. This rise was completely abolished by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. NAC increased the secretion of nitric oxide and cellular nitrotyrosine. An image analysis indicated that cells pretreated with NAC and loaded with DHR showed a fluorescent structure probably elicited by the oxidative product of DHR, rhodamine 123 that sequesters mitochondrially. Pretreating luteal cells with NAC or adding NAC directly to mitochondrial fractions followed by assessing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential difference (Deltapsi) by the JC-1 technique demonstrated a marked decrease in Deltapsi. A protonophore restored Deltapsi and rotenone (an inhibitor of respiratory chain complex I) inhibited mitochondrial recovering. Thus, in steroidogenic luteal cells from healthy mature corpus luteum, NAC impairs cellular survival by interfering with mitochondrial metabolism. The protonophore-induced recovering of NAC-provoked decrease in Deltapsi indicates that an ATP synthase-favored route of H(+) re-entry to the matrix is essentially switched off by NAC while other respiratory chain complexes remain intact. These data may be important for therapeutic timing of treatments with NAC. (c) 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:20151456

  18. MicroRNAs as regulators of beta-cell function and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmai, Mirwais; Osmai, Yama; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus H; Pallesen, Emil M H; Vestergaard, Anna L; Novotny, Guy W; Pociot, Flemming; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, there has been an explosion in both the number of and knowledge about miRNAs associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Even though we are presently in the initial stages of understanding how this novel class of posttranscriptional regulators are involved in diabetes, recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are important regulators of the islet transcriptome, controlling apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation, as well as regulating unique islet and beta-cell functions and pathways such as insulin expression, processing and secretion. Furthermore, a large number of miRNAs have been linked to diabetogenic processes induced by elevated levels of glucose, free fatty acids and inflammatory cytokines. Thus, miRNAs are novel therapeutic targets with the potential of protecting the beta-cell, and there is proof of principle that miRNA antagonists, so-called antagomirs, are effective in vivo for other disorders. miRNAs are exported out of cells in exosomes, raising the intriguing possibility of cell-to-cell communication between distant tissues via miRNAs and that miRNAs can be used as biomarkers of beta-cell function, mass and survival. The purpose of this review is to provide a status on how miRNAs control beta-cell function and viability in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26418758

  19. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:26976926

  20. The enigmatic role of mast cells in dominant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Elgueta, Raul; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral tolerance has been studied extensively in transplantation research. Recently, mast cells have been shown to play an indispensable role in allograft tolerance. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader on the current standings of the role of mast cells in dominant tolerance with an emphasis on the interaction of mast cells with Treg.RECENT FINDINGS: Mast cells are required to sustain peripheral tolerance via Treg. ...

  1. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols. PMID:22584012

  2. Role of progenitor cells in transplant arteriosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrands, JL; Onuta, G; Rozing, J

    2005-01-01

    To date, chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD) is recognized as the major cause of transplant loss long term after transplantation. CTD has the remarkable histologic feature that the luminal areas of the intragraft arteries become obliterated as a result of occlusive neointima formation. Neointimal l

  3. Hyperuricemia Causes Pancreatic β-Cell Death and Dysfunction through NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Lu; Xing, Jing; Ding, Ying; Shen, Yachen; Shi, Xuhui; Ren, Wei; Wan, Meng; Guo, Jianjin; Zheng, Shujing; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Su, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that hyperuricemia is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, it is still unclear whether elevated levels of uric acid can cause direct injury of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of uric acid on β-cell viability and function. Uric acid solution or normal saline was administered intraperitoneally to mice daily for 4 weeks. Uric acid-treated mice exhibited significantly impaired glucose tolerance and lower ...

  4. Early-onset Purkinje cell dysfunction underlies cerebellar ataxia in peroxisomal multifunctional protein-2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munter, Stephanie; Verheijden, Simon; Vanderstuyft, Esther; Malheiro, Ana Rita; Brites, Pedro; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N; Baes, Myriam

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellar pathologies in peroxisomal diseases underscore that these organelles are required for the normal development and maintenance of the cerebellum, but the mechanisms have not been resolved. Here we investigated the origins of the early-onset coordination impairment in a mouse model with neural selective deficiency of multifunctional protein-2, the central enzyme of peroxisomal β-oxidation. At the age of 4weeks, Nestin-Mfp2(-/-) mice showed impaired motor learning on the accelerating rotarod and underperformed on the balance beam test. The gross morphology of the cerebellum and Purkinje cell arborization were normal. However, electrophysiology revealed a reduced Purkinje cell firing rate, a decreased excitability and an increased membrane capacitance. The distribution of climbing and parallel fiber synapses on Purkinje cells was immature and was accompanied by an increased spine length. Despite normal myelination, Purkinje cell axon degeneration was evident from the occurrence of axonal swellings containing accumulated organelles. In conclusion, the electrical activity, axonal integrity and wiring of Purkinje cells are exquisitely dependent on intact peroxisomal β-oxidation in neural cells. PMID:27353294

  5. The effects of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil against post-resuscitation myocardial and intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction by attenuating apoptosis and regulating microRNAs expression: essential role of nitric oxide syntheses signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Qian ZHANG; Wang, Guoxing; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Wang, Miaomiao; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent experimental and clinical studies have indicated the cardioprotective role of sildenafil during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Sildenafil has been shown to attenuate postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction in piget models of ventricular fibrillation. This study was designed to investigate if administration of sildenafil will attenuate post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction by attenuating apoptosis and regulating miRNA expressions, furthermore, ameliorating the severi...

  6. SIV infection of rhesus macaques results in dysfunctional T- and B-cell responses to neo and recall Leishmania major vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Klatt, Nichole R.; Vinton, Carol L.; Lynch, Rebecca M.; Canary, Lauren A.; Ho, Jason; Darrah, Patricia A.; Estes, Jacob D.; Seder, Robert A.; Moir, Susan L.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection is characterized by immune system dysregulation, including depletion of CD4+ T cells, immune activation, and abnormal B- and T-cell responses. However, the immunologic mechanisms underlying lymphocytic dysfunctionality and whether it is restricted to immune responses against neo antigens, recall antigens, or both is unclear. Here, we immunized SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques to induce immune responses against neo and recall antigens using a Leishmania major polyprote...

  7. Role Of Adhesion Molecules Vcam-1 And Ve-Cadherin In Endothelium Dysfunction Development At Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Baygildina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the changes in concentration of both sVCAM-1 and VE-cadherin in blood serum of patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. 87 patients aged 15-65 were examined. Concentrations of both sVCAM-1 and VE- cadherin in blood serum by means of "Bender MedSystems" (Austria ELISA test were determined. It was shown that in both medium severe and severe forms of HFRS statistically the significant rise of sVCAM-1 concentration in blood with high indices in oliguric period took place. Complicated form was characterized by high indices of sVCAM-1 level in fever period, extremely decreasing in concentration in oliguric period and tendency to normalizing in clinical convalescence period. VE-cadherin level in blood was predominantly lower than control in all the observed groups with the exception of fever period in group with medium severe disease form. Negative correlation of normal intensity between adhesion molecules levels in blood was revealed. In conclusion it is necessary to point out that high VCAM-1 expression by endotheliocytes evidences the development of an adhesion form of endothelial dysfunction, low VE-cadherin production in a base for development of angiogenic form of endothelial dysfunction and changes in expression of these adhesion molecules that have adaptive metabolic response to macroorganism of HFRS pathogenic action

  8. Predictive Role of Intraoperative Serum Brain Natriuretic Peptide for Early Allograft Dysfunction in Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Min Suk; Koo, Jung Min; Park, Chul Soo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) is considered an important complication in liver transplantation. Serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker of cardiac dysfunction related to end-stage liver disease. We investigated the intraoperative change in the serum BNP level and its contribution to EAD after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). MATERIAL AND METHODS The perioperative data of 104 patients who underwent LDLT were retrospectively reviewed and compared between patients with and without EAD. Serum BNPs were obtained at each phase, and potentially significant factors (Pdeveloped EAD after LDLT. In all phases, the EAD group showed higher serum BNP levels than the non-EAD group. The serum BNP level at each phase was less accurate than the mean serum BNP level for EAD. The intraoperative mean serum BNP level showed higher predictive accuracy than the Child-Pugh-Turcotte, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), and D-MELD (donor age × recipient MELD) scores (p<0.05 for all). After multivariate adjustment, intraoperative mean serum BNP level ≥100 pg/mL was identified as an independent risk factor for EAD, along with kidney disease and graft ischemic time. CONCLUSIONS During LDLT, the EAD group showed higher serum BNP levels than the non-EAD group. An intraoperative mean serum BNP level ≥100 pg/mL is independently associated with EAD after LDLT. PMID:27572618

  9. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Plaisance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes.

  10. NADPH oxidase mediates glucolipotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction--clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2010-03-01

    An impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion--reflecting decreased glucokinase expression--and a moderate decrease in beta cell mass attributable to increased apoptosis, constitute the key features of beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Oxidative stress, provoked by prolonged exposure to excessive levels of glucose and/or fatty acids (glucolipotoxicity), appears to be a key mediator of these defects. Oxidant-provoked JNK activation induces nuclear export of the PDX-1 transcription factor, required for expression of glucokinase and other beta cell proteins. Conversely, increases in cAMP induced by incretin hormones promote the nuclear importation of PDX-1, counteracting the diabetogenic impact of oxidant stress; this may explain the utility of measures that slow dietary carbohydrate absorption for diabetes prevention. The ability of oxidative stress to boost apoptosis in beta cells is poorly understood, but may also entail JNK activation. Recent work establishes a phagocyte-type NADPH oxidase as the chief source of glucotoxicity-mediated oxidative stress in beta cells. Since bilirubin is now known to function physiologically as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and phycocyanobilin (PCB) derived from spirulina likewise can inhibit this enzyme complex, supplemental PCB may have utility in the prevention and control of diabetes, and Gilbert syndrome, associated with chronically elevated free bilirubin, may be associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:19576699

  11. Mild endothelial dysfunction in Sirt3 knockout mice fed a high-cholesterol diet: protective role of a novel C/EBP-β-dependent feedback regulation of SOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnik, Stephan; Gaul, Daniel S; Siciliani, Giovanni; Lohmann, Christine; Pasterk, Lisa; Calatayud, Natacha; Weber, Julien; Eriksson, Urs; Auwerx, Johan; van Tits, Lambertus J; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) is an NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial deacetylase associated with superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)-mediated protection from oxidative stress. We have reported accelerated weight gain and impaired metabolic flexibility in atherosclerotic Sirt3 (-/-) mice. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. Yet, the role of Sirt3 in this context remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to unravel the effects of endogenous Sirt3 on endothelial function and oxidative stress. Knockdown of Sirt3 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) increased intracellular mitochondrial superoxide accumulation, as assessed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of aortic rings from Sirt3 (-/-) mice exposed to a normal diet did not differ from wild-type controls. However, following 12 weeks of high-cholesterol diet and increasing oxidative stress, endothelial function of Sirt3 (-/-) mice was mildly impaired compared with wild-type controls. Relaxation was restored upon enhanced superoxide scavenging using pegylated superoxide dismutase. Knockdown of Sirt3 in cultured HAEC diminished SOD2 specific activity, which was compensated for by a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP-β)-dependent transcriptional induction of SOD2. Abrogation of this feedback regulation by simultaneous knockdown of C/EBP-β and Sirt3 exacerbated mitochondrial superoxide accumulation and culminated into endothelial cell death upon prolonged culture. Taken together, Sirt3 deficiency induces a mild, superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction in mice fed a high-cholesterol diet. In cultured endothelial cells, a novel C/EBP-β-dependent rescue mechanism maintains net SOD2 activity upon transient knockdown of Sirt3. PMID:27071400

  12. Intravenous Cardiac Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Ameliorate Cardiac Dysfunction in Doxorubicin Induced Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Vandergriff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the efficacy of cardiac stem cells (CSCs for treatment of cardiomyopathies, there are many limitations to stem cell therapies. CSC-derived exosomes (CSC-XOs have been shown to be responsible for a large portion of the regenerative effects of CSCs. Using a mouse model of doxorubicin induced dilated cardiomyopathy, we study the effects of systemic delivery of human CSC-XOs in mice. Mice receiving CSC-XOs showed improved heart function via echocardiography, as well as decreased apoptosis and fibrosis. In spite of using immunocompetent mice and human CSC-XOs, mice showed no adverse immune reaction. The use of CSC-XOs holds promise for overcoming the limitations of stem cells and improving cardiac therapies.

  13. Retinal signal transmission in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: evidence for dysfunction in the photoreceptor/depolarizing bipolar cell pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, K M; Cibis, G W; Giambrone, S A; Harris, D J

    1994-01-01

    There have been reports of abnormal retinal neurotransmission determined by electroretinography in boys with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin may play a role in transmitting signals between photoreceptors and the excitatory synapse of the ON-bipolar cell. These electroretinographic changes appeared to be limited to the rod ON-pathway but we felt there was also similar abnormality in the cone ON-pathway. We used long-duration stimuli to separate ON-(depolarizing bipolar cell)...

  14. Hyperuricemia causes pancreatic β-cell death and dysfunction through NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jia

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that hyperuricemia is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, it is still unclear whether elevated levels of uric acid can cause direct injury of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of uric acid on β-cell viability and function. Uric acid solution or normal saline was administered intraperitoneally to mice daily for 4 weeks. Uric acid-treated mice exhibited significantly impaired glucose tolerance and lower insulin levels in response to glucose challenge than did control mice. However, there were no significant differences in insulin sensitivity between the two groups. In comparison to the islets in control mice, the islets in the uric acid-treated mice were markedly smaller in size and contained less insulin. Treatment of β-cells in vitro with uric acid activated the NF-κB signaling pathway through IκBα phosphorylation, resulting in upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and excessive nitric oxide (NO production. Uric acid treatment also increased apoptosis and downregulated Bcl-2 expression in Min6 cells. In addition, a reduction in insulin secretion under glucose challenge was observed in the uric acid-treated mouse islets. These deleterious effects of uric acid on pancreatic β-cells were attenuated by benzbromarone, an inhibitor of uric acid transporters, NOS inhibitor L-NMMA, and Bay 11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor. Further investigation indicated that uric acid suppressed levels of MafA protein through enhancing its degradation. Collectively, our data suggested that an elevated level of uric acid causes β-cell injury via the NF-κB-iNOS-NO signaling axis.

  15. Hyperuricemia Causes Pancreatic β-Cell Death and Dysfunction through NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lu; Xing, Jing; Ding, Ying; Shen, Yachen; Shi, Xuhui; Ren, Wei; Wan, Meng; Guo, Jianjin; Zheng, Shujing; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Su, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that hyperuricemia is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, it is still unclear whether elevated levels of uric acid can cause direct injury of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of uric acid on β-cell viability and function. Uric acid solution or normal saline was administered intraperitoneally to mice daily for 4 weeks. Uric acid-treated mice exhibited significantly impaired glucose tolerance and lower insulin levels in response to glucose challenge than did control mice. However, there were no significant differences in insulin sensitivity between the two groups. In comparison to the islets in control mice, the islets in the uric acid–treated mice were markedly smaller in size and contained less insulin. Treatment of β-cells in vitro with uric acid activated the NF-κB signaling pathway through IκBα phosphorylation, resulting in upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and excessive nitric oxide (NO) production. Uric acid treatment also increased apoptosis and downregulated Bcl-2 expression in Min6 cells. In addition, a reduction in insulin secretion under glucose challenge was observed in the uric acid–treated mouse islets. These deleterious effects of uric acid on pancreatic β-cells were attenuated by benzbromarone, an inhibitor of uric acid transporters, NOS inhibitor L-NMMA, and Bay 11–7082, an NF-κB inhibitor. Further investigation indicated that uric acid suppressed levels of MafA protein through enhancing its degradation. Collectively, our data suggested that an elevated level of uric acid causes β-cell injury via the NF-κB-iNOS-NO signaling axis. PMID:24205181

  16. Memory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Memory is the cognitive ability that allows to acquire, store and recall information; its dysfunction is called amnesia and can be a presentation of unilateral ischemic stroke in the territory of the posterior cerebral and anterior choroidal artery as well as subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22377863

  17. TRAIL promotes membrane blebbing, detachment and migration of cells displaying a dysfunctional intrinsic pathway of apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Somasekharan, S.P.; Koc, Michal; Morizot, A.; Micheau, O.; Sorensen, P.H.B.; Gaide, O.; Anděra, Ladislav; Martinou, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2013), s. 324-336. ISSN 1360-8185 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : TRAIL * membrane blebbing * ROCK1 * HCT116 Bax−/− * cancer cell migration * drug resistance * bortezomib * proteasome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.614, year: 2013

  18. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction are attenuated by dietary polyphenols in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenols possess anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cytotoxic brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, OS and pro-inflammatory cytokines also damage the endothelial cells and the neurovascular uni...

  19. Carbon black nanoparticles and vascular dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells and artery segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Mikkelsen, Lone; Folkmann, Janne K; Sheykhzade, Majid; Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to small size particulates is regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated effects of exposure to nanosized carbon black (CB) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and segments of arteries from rodents. The CB exposure was associated with increased...

  20. Vascular hypercontractility and endothelial dysfunction before development of atherosclerosis in moderate dyslipidemia: role for nitric oxide and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Vanessa; Valdes, Karla; Moreno, Brayan; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease that affects peripheral arteries and the aorta. Several inflammatory processes are required until the production of an atheroma. Before the atheroma appears, endothelial dysfunction is a key event. We hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction occurs in a mouse model of mild dyslipidemia, the mouse deficient in apolipoprotein E (apoE(+/-)). Using aortic rings preparation, we found that apoE(+/-) mice showed increased developed tension in response to KCl 60 mM when using a range a pre-loads from 0.5 to 2.0 grams (p = 0.038). Next, we tested the vasorelaxant capacity of apoE(+/-) aortas (pre-contracted with phenylephrine) in response to acetylcholine, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator. ApoE(+/-) aortas showed diminished vasorelaxation in a range of Ach concentrations (p = 0.0032). Next we assessed the levels of plasma NO metabolites, nitrite plus nitrate. These were significantly reduced, along with a significant decrease of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase in ApoE(+/-) mice. When we analyzed the morphology of the aortas in apoE(+/-) mice, these showed no signs of atheroma. In addition, we analyzed the levels of inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, MCP-1 and interleukin 6 (Il-6). While TNF-alpha was similar in both groups, (18.3 ± 2 pg/mL in wild type vs. 17.5 ± 2 pg/mL in apoE(+/-)), MCP-1 was increased in ApoE deficient mice (71.5 ± 0.8 pg/mL in wild type vs. 85.1 ± 7.4 pg/mL in ApoE(+/-) mice, p = 0.006), along with IL-6 (24.7 ± 1.7 pg/ml in wild type vs. 47.1 ± 12.5 in ApoE mice, p = 0.0055). These results suggest that mild dyslipidemia produces a pro-inflammatory state, associated with diminished NOS and NO production, which produces endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25360389

  1. Client attributions for sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, C S; Spector, I; Libman, E

    1988-01-01

    This investigation examined attributions for sexual dysfunctions made by 63 individuals and 21 of their partners who presented at a sex therapy service for the following problems: erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female orgasmic dysfunctions. All participants completed measures of marital adjustment, locus of control, depression and a questionnaire which assessed: attributions of responsibility for the sexual problem, perceived control over sexual functioning, distress, effort made to improve the sexual relationship, and expectations about the efficacy of sex therapy for the problem. Results indicate that both identified patients and their partners, regardless of the dysfunction, blamed the sexual problem on the "dysfunctional individual" rather than on the circumstances or the partner. With respect to the partners, husbands of women with orgasmic dysfunction were more likely to blame themselves than the circumstances, while the opposite was true for wives of males with erectile difficulties. Individuals experiencing the dysfunction perceived themselves and their partners as having little, but equal control over the identified patient's sexuality. Correlational analyses indicate that in identified patients, the better the quality of the marital relationship, the greater the self-blame and the lower the partner blame. Those with happy marriages also made greater efforts to improve their sexual relationship and had higher expectations of success with therapy. The implications of the results for research on the role of attributions in sexual dysfunction and for assessment of cognitive factors in sexually dysfunctional individuals and their partners is discussed. PMID:3172253

  2. Dysfunction of peripheral blood dendritic cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Sheng Wang1; Li-He Xing; Ming-Xu Liu; Cnuan-Lin Zhu; Hui-Gang Liu; Hui- Fen Wang; Zhou-Yun Lei

    2001-01-01

    AIM To identify the property of dendritic cella (DCs) of peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) in patlents with chronic HBV infection. METHODS Twenty patients with persistent HBV infectlon were included in this study, 10 healthy subjects being used as a control group. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of T cell-depleted populations were incubated and induced into mature dendritic cells in the RPMI-1640 medium in the presence of cytokines GMCSF, IL-4, FLt-3, TNF-α and 100 mL@ L-1 of fetal calf serum for a total of 10 - 12 days. The expressions of surface markers on DCs were evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. ELISA method was used to determine the cytokine levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 in the supernatant produced by DCs. For detection of the stimulatory capacity of DCs to T cell proliferation,mytomycin C-treated DC were incubated with allogenic T cells. RESULTS A typical morphology of mature DCs from healthy subjects and HBV-infected patients was induced in in vitro incubation, but the proliferation ability and cellular number of DCs from HBV-infected patients significantly decreased compared with healthy individuals. In particular, the expression levels of HLADR, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on DC surface from patients were also lower than that from healthy individuals (0.46 vs 0.92 for HLA-DR, 0.44 vs 0.88 for CD80 and 0.44 vs 0. 84 for CD86, P< 0.05). The stimulatory capacity and production of IL-12 of DCs from patients in allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) significantly decreased, but the production level of nitric oxide (NO) by DCa simultaneously increased compared with healthy subjects (86± 15 vs 170±22 μmoI@L 1, P<0.05). CONCLUSION The patients with chronic HBV infection have the defective function and immature phenotype of dendritic cells, which may be associated with the inability of efficient presentation of HBV antigens to host immune system for the clearance of HBV.

  3. Agmatine Improves Cognitive Dysfunction and Prevents Cell Death in a Streptozotocin-Induced Alzheimer Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Juhyun; Hur, Bo Eun; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Yang, Wonsuk; Cho, Hyun Jin; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Alzheimer's disease (AD) results in memory impairment and neuronal cell death in the brain. Previous studies demonstrated that intracerebroventricular administration of streptozotocin (STZ) induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in AD. Agmatine (Agm) has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects in central nervous system disorders. In this study, we investigated whether Agm treatment could attenuate apoptosis and improve cognitive decline in a STZ-...

  4. Stem Cell Transplantation Strategies for the Restoration of Cognitive Dysfunction Caused by Cranial Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Roa, Dante E.; Bosch, Omar; Lan, Mary L.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy often provides the only clinical recourse for those afflicted with primary or metastatic brain tumors. While beneficial, cranial irradiation can induce a progressive and debilitating decline in cognition that may, in part, be caused by the depletion of neural stem cells. Given the increased survival of patients diagnosed with brain cancer, quality of life in terms of cognitive health has become an increasing concern, especially in the absence of any satisfactory long-term treatme...

  5. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Steve N. Georas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epi...

  6. MicroRNAs as regulators of beta-cell function and dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmai, Mirwais; Osmai, Yama; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner;

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been an explosion in both the number of and knowledge about miRNAs associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Even though we are presently in the initial stages of understanding how this novel class of posttranscriptional regulators are involved in diabetes, re...... review is to provide a status on how miRNAs control beta-cell function and viability in health and disease....

  7. Cardiac-specific catalase overexpression rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction: role of oxidative stress and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandadi Machender R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal and edema toxins secreted by Bacillus anthracis during anthrax infection were found to incite serious cardiovascular complications. However, the underlying mechanisms in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac anomalies remain unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of antioxidant enzyme catalase in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Methods Wild type (WT and cardiac-specific catalase overexpression mice were challenged with lethal toxin (2 μg/g, intraperotineally (i.p.. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed 18 h later using an IonOptix edge-detection system. Proteasome function was assessed using chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. GFP-LC3 puncta and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate autophagy and protein ubiquitination. Results Lethal toxin exposure suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function (suppressed peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/re-lengthening, prolonged duration of shortening/re-lengthening, and impaired intracellular Ca2+ handling, the effects of which were alleviated by catalase. In addition, lethal toxin triggered autophagy, mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome defects, the effects of which were mitigated by catalase. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes from catalase mice with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly attenuated or ablated catalase-offered protection against lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. On the other hand, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA ablated or significantly attenuated lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Conclusions Our results suggest that catalase is protective against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies, possibly through regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial function.

  8. HZE ⁵⁶Fe-ion irradiation induces endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta: role of xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Kim, Jae Hyung; Oh, Young; Attarzadeh, David O; Sevinc, Baris; Kuo, Maggie M; Shoukas, Artin A; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2011-10-01

    Ionizing radiation has been implicated in the development of significant cardiovascular complications. Since radiation exposure is associated with space exploration, astronauts are potentially at increased risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) iron-ion radiation on vascular and endothelial function as a model of space radiation. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body dose of iron-ion radiation at doses of 0, 0.5 or 1 Gy. In vivo aortic stiffness and ex vivo aortic tension responses were measured 6 and 8 months after exposure as indicators of chronic vascular injury. Rats exposed to 1 Gy iron ions demonstrated significantly increased aortic stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity. Aortic rings from irradiated rats exhibited impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation consistent with endothelial dysfunction. Acute xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging restored endothelial-dependent responses to normal. In addition, XO activity was significantly elevated in rat aorta 4 months after whole-body irradiation. Furthermore, XO inhibition, initiated immediately after radiation exposure and continued until euthanasia, completely inhibited radiation-dependent XO activation. ROS production was elevated after 1 Gy irradiation while production of nitric oxide (NO) was significantly impaired. XO inhibition restored NO and ROS production. Finally, dietary XO inhibition preserved normal endothelial function and vascular stiffness after radiation exposure. These results demonstrate that radiation induced XO-dependent ROS production and nitroso-redox imbalance, leading to chronic vascular dysfunction. As a result, XO is a potential target for radioprotection. Enhancing the understanding of vascular radiation injury could lead to the development of effective methods to ameliorate radiation-induced vascular damage. PMID:21787183

  9. Dissecting the role of the myofilament in diaphragm dysfunction during the development of heart failure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Todd E; Klaiman, Jordan M; Foster, Andrew; Platt, Mathew J; Huber, Jason S; Corso, Melissa Y; Simpson, Jeremy A

    2016-03-01

    Dyspnea and reduced exercise capacity, caused, in part, by respiratory muscle dysfunction, are common symptoms in patients with heart failure (HF). However, the etiology of diaphragmatic dysfunction has not been identified. To investigate the effects of HF on diaphragmatic function, models of HF were surgically induced in CD-1 mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), respectively. Assessment of myocardial function, isolated diaphragmatic strip function, myofilament force-pCa relationship, and phosphorylation status of myofilament proteins was performed at either 2 or 18 wk postsurgery. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamics revealed development of HF by 18 wk postsurgery in both models. In vitro diaphragmatic force production was preserved in all groups while morphometric analysis revealed diaphragmatic atrophy and fibrosis in 18 wk TAC and AMI groups. Isometric force-pCa measurements of myofilament preparations revealed reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation and force generation at half-maximum and maximum Ca(2+) activation in 18 wk TAC. The rate of force redevelopment (ktr) was reduced in all HF groups at high levels of Ca(2+) activation. Finally, there were significant changes in the myofilament phosphorylation status of the 18 wk TAC group. This includes a decrease in the phosphorylation of troponin T, desmin, myosin light chain (MLC) 1, and MLC 2 as well as a shift in myosin isoforms. These results indicate that there are multiple changes in diaphragmatic myofilament function, which are specific to the type and stage of HF and occur before overt impairment of in vitro force production. PMID:26702144

  10. Tag1 deficiency results in olfactory dysfunction through impaired migration of mitral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastakis, George G; Savvaki, Maria; Stamatakis, Antonis; Vidaki, Marina; Karagogeos, Domna

    2015-12-15

    The olfactory system provides mammals with the abilities to investigate, communicate and interact with their environment. These functions are achieved through a finely organized circuit starting from the nasal cavity, passing through the olfactory bulb and ending in various cortical areas. We show that the absence of transient axonal glycoprotein-1 (Tag1)/contactin-2 (Cntn2) in mice results in a significant and selective defect in the number of the main projection neurons in the olfactory bulb, namely the mitral cells. A subpopulation of these projection neurons is reduced in Tag1-deficient mice as a result of impaired migration. We demonstrate that the detected alterations in the number of mitral cells are well correlated with diminished odor discrimination ability and social long-term memory formation. Reduced neuronal activation in the olfactory bulb and the corresponding olfactory cortex suggest that Tag1 is crucial for the olfactory circuit formation in mice. Our results underpin the significance of a numerical defect in the mitral cell layer in the processing and integration of odorant information and subsequently in animal behavior. PMID:26525675

  11. Prominent Lymphatic Vessel Hyperplasia with Progressive Dysfunction and Distinct Immune Cell Infiltration in Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T; Scholl, Jeannette; Uecker, Maja; Detmar, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Lymphedema is a common complication that occurs after breast cancer treatment in up to 30% of the patients undergoing surgical lymph node excision. It is associated with tissue swelling, fibrosis, increased risk of infection, and impaired wound healing. Despite the pronounced clinical manifestations of the disease, little is known about the morphological and functional characteristics of the lymphatic vasculature during the course of lymphedema progression. We used an experimental murine tail lymphedema model where sustained fluid stasis was generated on disruption of lymphatic flow, resulting in chronic edema formation with fibrosis and adipose tissue deposition. Morphological analysis of the lymphatic vessels revealed a dramatic expansion during the course of the disease, with active proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells at the early stages of lymphedema. The lymphatic capillaries exhibited progressively impaired tracer filling and retrograde flow near the surgery site, whereas the collecting lymphatic vessels showed a gradually decreasing contraction amplitude with unchanged contraction frequency, leading to lymphatic contraction arrest at the later stages of the disease. Lymphedema onset was associated with pronounced infiltration by immune cells, predominantly Ly6G(+) and CD4(+) cells, which have been linked to impaired lymphatic vessel function. PMID:27315777

  12. Triterpenoid dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide protects against maladaptive cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in mice: a critical role of Nrf2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Xing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 appears to be an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiac disease. We investigated whether a synthetic triterpenoid derivative of dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethylamide (dh404, a novel Nrf2 activator, protects against pathological cardiac responses to hemodynamic stress in mice. METHODS: Cardiac maladaptive remodeling and dysfunction were established by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in mice. Hypertrophic growth of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes was induced by angiotensin II (Ang II. Cell death of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes was induced with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂. Cellular proliferation of rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts was induced by Ang II, norepinephrine (NE and phenylephrine (PE. Protein expression was assessed by immunochemical staining and Western blots. Gene expression was determined by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. RESULTS: TAC suppressed myocardial Nrf2 expression, increased myocardial 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels, and induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and apoptosis, and overt heart failure and death in mice. Administration of dh404 inhibited the pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, and reduced the mortality. Moreover, dhd404 elevated myocardial levels of Nrf2 and Nrf2 nuclear translocation with a dramatic suppression of the oxidative stress in the heart. Dh404 inhibited hypertrophic growth and death in primary culture of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes and suppressed proliferation in primary culture of rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts. However, these effects of dh404 were blunted by knocking down of Nrf2. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that dh404 prevents pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by activating Nrf2, indicating a therapeutic potential of dh404 for cardiac disease.

  13. Small airways dysfunction in long-term survivors of pediatric stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Mathiesen, Sidsel; Buchvald, Frederik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) in the lungs is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Pulmonary cGvHD is initiated in the peripheral airways, and diagnosis may be delayed by low sensitivity of standard pulmonary function...... performed spirometry, whole-body plethysmography and MBWN2 . From MBWN2 the lung clearance index (LCI) and indices reflecting ventilation inhomogeneity arising close to the acinar lung zone (Sacin ) and in the conductive airway zone (Scond ) were derived. Subjective respiratory morbidity was assessed using...

  14. Polychlorinated Biphenyls Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Cocco

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, ubiquitous environmental contaminants, can adversely affect the development and function of the nervous system. Here we evaluated the effect of PCB exposure on mitochondrial function using the PCB mixture Aroclor-1254 (A1254 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. A 6-hour exposure to A1254 (5 μg/ml reduced cellular ATP production by 45%±7, and mitochondrial membrane potential, detected by TMRE, by 49%±7. Consistently, A1254 significantly decreased oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis measured by extracellular flux analyzer. Furthermore, the activity of mitochondrial protein complexes I, II, and IV, but not V (ATPase, measured by BN-PAGE technique, was significantly reduced after 6-hour exposure to A1254. The addition of pyruvic acid during exposure to A1254 significantly prevent A1254-induced cell injury, restoring resting mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP levels, oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, pyruvic acid significantly preserved the activity of mitochondrial complexes I, II and IV and increased basal activity of complex V. Collectively, the present results indicate that the neurotoxicity of A1254 depends on the impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, aerobic glycolysis, and mitochondrial complexes I, II, and IV activity and it was counteracted by pyruvic acid.

  15. HYDROGEN-RICH MEDIUM AMELIORATES LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BARRIER DYSFUNCTION VIA RHOA-MDIA1 SIGNALING IN CACO-2 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Lu; Sun, Ruiqiang; Chen, Hongguang; Zhang, Hongtao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao; Xie, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastrointestinal barrier dysfunction is associated with the severity and prognosis of sepsis. Hydrogen gas (H2) can ameliorate multiple organ damage in septic animals. Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1) are important to regulate tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ), both of which determine the integrity of the intestinal barrier. This study was aimed to investigate whether H2 could modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated dysfunction of the intestinal barrier and whether RhoA-mDia1 signaling is involved. Caco-2 cells were exposed to different concentrations of LPS (1 μg/mL–1 mg/mL). The permeability of the intestinal barrier was evaluated by transepithelial resistance (TER) and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux. Expression and distribution of occludin and E-cadherin were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. RhoA activity was measured by G-Lisa assay, and mDia1 expression was assessed by Western blot. LPS (100 μg/mL) decreased TER and increased fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux, which were alleviated by H2-rich medium. Also, H2 down-regulated LPS-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, H2 improved the down-regulated expression and redistribution of occludin and E-cadherin caused by LPS. Additionally, H2 alleviated LPS-caused RhoA activation, and the beneficial effects of H2 on barrier were counteracted by RhoA agonist CN03. Rho inhibitor C3 exoenzyme mitigated LPS-induced barrier breakdown. Furthermore, H2-rich medium increased mDia1 expression, and mDia1 knockdown abolished protections of H2 on barrier permeability. mDia1 knockdown eliminated H2-induced benefits for occludin and E-cadherin. These findings suggest that H2 improves LPS-induced hyperpermeability of the intestinal barrier and disruptions of TJ and AJ by moderating RhoA-mDia1 signaling. PMID:26529665

  16. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  17. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  18. Myocardial perfusion imaging - A possible role in revealing endothelial dysfunction in patients with angina and normal coronary angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim/Background: A lot of recent studies have shown that patients with normal or nonobstructive coronary angiography have myocardial ischemia; the pathogenesis in this particular case is related with endothelial dysfunction which contributes to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic disease and could be considered an independent vascular risk factor. Endothelial status is not determined solely by the individual risk factor burden but rather, may be regarded as an integrated index of all atherogenic and atheroprotective factors present in an individual, including known as yet unknown variables and genetic predisposition. The aim of our study was to evaluate perfusion defects on stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with chest pain and normal angiograms and their prognostic values. Materials and Methods: We studied 32 patients who underwent stress (treadmill exercise test)/rest SPECT and coronary angiography; all the patients had at least two risk factors for atherosclerosis; they were followed up during 36 months for the occurrence of myocardial infarction, revascularization or cardiac death. A semiquantitative scoring method was used to evaluate technetium-99m tetrofosmin uptake in 20 myocardial segments in each patients. Each segment was assessed by consensus of two nuclear medicine physicians who were blinded to the clinical and angiographic information. For each segment a 5-point scoring system was used to describe radiotracer uptake (0=normal, 1=equivocal, 2=moderate, 3=severe reduction, 4=absence of detectable radiotracer in a segment). SPECT results were categorized as normal or abnormal if /=3 segments, respectively were affected. Results: 9 patients showed myocardial perfusion defects (SPECT positive group); the others 23 did not show myocardial perfusion defects (SPECT negative group). During the follow-up in the SPECT-positive group 1 patients developed acute myocardial infarction

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction underlies the progressive lymphocytopenia in XLF/Cernunnos deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Serine; Churchill, Michael; Yamamoto, Kenta; Crowe, Jennifer L; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J; Zheng, Tian; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Zha, Shan

    2014-09-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF/Cernunnos) is a component of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of double-strand DNA break repair. XLF-deficient patients develop a severe progressive lymphocytopenia. Although NHEJ is required for V(D)J recombination and lymphocyte development, XLF-deficient mice have normal V(D)J recombination, highlighting the need for an alternative mechanism for the lymphocytopenia. Here, we report that XLF-deficient mice recapitulate the age-dependent lymphocytopenia of patients. We show that XLF deficiency leads to premature aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), measured by decreased functional capacity in transplantation assays, preferential myeloid reconstitution, and reduced self-renewal at a young age. We propose that premature aging of HSCs, together with previously reported defects in class-switch recombination and memory immune response, underlies the progressive and severe lymphocytopenia in XLF-deficient patients in the absence of measurable V(D)J recombination defects. PMID:25075129

  20. A Review of the Potential for Cardiometabolic Dysfunction in Youth with Spina Bifida and the Role for Physical Activity and Structured Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Short

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents who have decreased mobility due to spina bifida may be at increased risk for the components of metabolic syndrome, including abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia due to low physical activity. Like their nondisabled peers, adolescents with spina bifida that develop metabolic risk factors early in life have set the stage for adult disease. Exercise interventions can improve metabolic dysfunction in nondisabled youth, but the types of exercise programs that are most effective and the mechanisms involved are not known. This is especially true in adolescents with spina bifida, who have impaired mobility and physical function and with whom there have been few well-controlled studies. This paper highlights the current lack of knowledge about the role of physical activity and the need to develop exercise strategies targeting the reduction of cardiometabolic risk and improving quality of life in youth with spina bifida.

  1. Microalbuminuria, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    provided evidence of endothelial dysfunction in patients with microalbuminuria, which may be the common link accounting for the associations mentioned above. In this context, a number of markers of endothelial cell dysfunction have been found to be increased in patients with microalbuminuria. In addition......, a number of functional in vivo tests of endothelial dysfunction have been performed in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients as well as in normal controls. Overall, these studies indicate the existence of a functional vascular dysfunction in Type 1 diabetic patients and normal controls with...... microalbuminuria, which may be related to dysfunction of endothelial cells....

  2. Asymmetric dimethylarginine inhibits HSP90 activity in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Sud, Neetu; Wells, Sandra M.; Wiseman, Dean A.; Wilham, Jason; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Increased ADMA levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of conditions affecting the cardiovascular system. However, the mechanism(s) by which ADMA exerts its effect has not been adequately elucidated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increased ADMA on nitric oxide (NO) signaling and to begin to elucidate the mechanism by which ADMA acts. Our initial data demonstrated that that ADMA increased NOS uncoupling both in recombinant human endothelial ...

  3. Impaired enzymatic defensive activity, mitochondrial dysfunction and proteasome activation are involved in RTT cell oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellati, Carlo; Sticozzi, Claudia; Romani, Arianna; Belmonte, Giuseppe; De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Cervellati, Franco; Milanese, Chiara; Mastroberardino, Pier Giorgio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Savelli, Vinno; Forman, Henry J; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    A strong correlation between oxidative stress (OS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting females in the 95% of the cases, has been well documented although the source of OS and the effect of a redox imbalance in this pathology has not been yet investigated. Using freshly isolated skin fibroblasts from RTT patients and healthy subjects, we have demonstrated in RTT cells high levels of H2O2 and HNE protein adducts. These findings correlated with the constitutive activation of NADPH-oxidase (NOX) and that was prevented by a NOX inhibitor and iron chelator pre-treatment, showing its direct involvement. In parallel, we demonstrated an increase in mitochondrial oxidant production, altered mitochondrial biogenesis and impaired proteasome activity in RTT samples. Further, we found that the key cellular defensive enzymes: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductases activities were also significantly lower in RTT. Taken all together, our findings suggest that the systemic OS levels in RTT can be a consequence of both: increased endogenous oxidants as well as altered mitochondrial biogenesis with a decreased activity of defensive enzymes that leads to posttranslational oxidant protein modification and a proteasome activity impairment. PMID:26189585

  4. Curcumin induces apoptotic cell death of activated human CD4+ T cells via increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Lee, Bong Hee; Ryu, Do Gon; Kwon, Kang Beom; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, exerts well-known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, the latter which can influence the activation of immune cells including T cells. Furthermore, curcumin can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, through suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The beneficial effects of curcumin in diseases such as arthritis, allergy, asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer may be due to its immunomodulatory properties. We studied the potential of curcumin to modulate CD4+ T cells-mediated autoimmune disease, by examining the effects of this compound on human CD4+ lymphocyte activation. Stimulation of human T cells with PHA or CD3/CD28 induced IL-2 mRNA expression and activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The treatment of T cells with curcumin induced the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway, initiated by the phosphorylation of PERK and IRE1. Furthermore, curcumin increased the expression of the ER stress associated transcriptional factors XBP-1, cleaved p50ATF6α and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in human CD4+ and Jurkat T cells. In PHA-activated T cells, curcumin further enhanced PHA-induced CHOP expression and reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, curcumin treatment induced apoptotic cell death in activated T cells via eliciting an excessive ER stress response, which was reversed by the ER-stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid or transfection with CHOP-specific siRNA. These results suggest that curcumin can impact both ER stress and mitochondria functional pathways, and thereby could be used as a promising therapy in the context of Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:23415873

  5. Implication of Nerve Growth Factor in intestinal mucosal mast cell activity and colonic motor alterations in a model of ovalbumin-induced gut dysfunction in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jardí Pujol, Ferran

    2011-01-01

    We determined NGF involvement in MMCs and colonic motor alterations in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced gut dysfunction model in rats. Animals received OVA (6 weeks), with/without simultaneous K252a (TrkA antagonist) treatment. MMCs, rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) levels and colonic contractility in vitro were assessed. OVA increased MMC density and RMCPII concentration. Spontaneous contractility was similar in both groups and inhibited by K252a. Carbachol responses were increased by OVA in a K...

  6. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  7. Curcumin pretreatment attenuates inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in experimental stroke: The possible role of Sirt1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yanping; Zhao, Sheng; Gao, Yang; Wang, Ruijun; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Hui; Luo, Tianyou

    2016-03-01

    The effects of curcumin (CCM) on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CCM attenuates inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and whether Sirt1 is involved in these potential protective effects. Sirtinol, a Sirt1 inhibitor, was used to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Rats were subjected to 2h of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), followed by reperfusion for 24h. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to detect infarct volumes. Neurological scores and brain water content were also assessed. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the brain were detected using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Expression of SIRT1, acetylated p53 (Ac-p53), Bcl-2, and Bax was measured by western blotting. Our results suggested that CCM exerted a neuroprotective effect, as shown by reduced infarct volumes and brain edema and improved neurological scores. CCM also exerted anti-inflammatory effects, as indicated by decreased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the brain. CCM elevated mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial complex I activity, and mitochondrial cytochrome c levels, but reduced cytosolic cytochrome c levels. Moreover, CCM upregulated SIRT1 and Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Ac-p53 and Bax expression. These effects of CCM were abolished by sirtinol. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CCM treatment attenuates ischemic stroke-induced brain injury via activation of SIRT1. PMID:26639783

  8. Investigating the role of acute mental stress on endothelial dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi-Tao; Tan, Qi-Wen; Li, Ping; Mou, Shan-Fang; Liu, Shu-Juan; Bao, Yue; Jiao, Hua-Chen; Su, Wen-Ge

    2015-04-01

    Chronic stress is a known risk factor for both endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), but less is known of how acute mental stress affects the vasculature. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we analyzed the impact of acute mental stress on flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an indicator of endothelial function. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases through May 2014, to identify publications in English-language journals. The primary outcome was the change in FMD from baseline to the time of measurement. We also assessed the risk of bias and the heterogeneity of included studies. Our search identified eight prospective studies, which displayed significant heterogeneity. Four studies measured FMD while the subject was performing the task; six measured FMD after the task had been completed. The total number of participants was 164. The pooled results indicate that FMD did not change significantly while the task was being performed (pooled difference in means: -0.853; 95 % confidence interval (CI), -3.926/2.220; P = 0.586); however, FMD measured after the task was completed was significantly less than baseline (pooled difference in means: -2.450; 95 %CI, -3.925/-0.975; P = 0.001). In conclusions, our findings provide evidence that an acute stressful experience has a delayed, negative impact on the function of the endothelium. Repeated exposure to short-term stress may lead to permanent injury of the vasculature. Therefore, assessment of patients' exposure to both repeated acute mental stress and chronic stress may be useful in determining their risk of developing CVD. PMID:25391292

  9. Significance of upper airway influence among patients of vocal cord dysfunction for its diagnosis: Role of impulse oscillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hira H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To identify the patients of bronchial asthma (suspected or proven, not responding to optimal therapy, for the presence of vocal cord dysfunction (VCD and to compare the diagnostic ability of flow volume (FV loop and impulse oscillometry (IOS. Materials and Methods: Fifty one patients of suspected/proven bronchial asthma not responding to optimal therapy were included for the study. Each patient was subjected to both FV loop and IOS studies. Direct visualization of the vocal cords with flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope for the presence of inspiratory vocal cord adduction during quiet respiration, with speech, and while performing provocative maneuvers was carried out. All patients were subjected to simple pulmonary function tests and recording of FV loop. IOS was performed on each patient to look for the site of obstruction and upper airway influence. The observations of both FV loop and IO studies were compared. Results: Among 51 patients participated, 12 (23.53% had bronchoscopical evidence of VCD and were labeled as VCD-positive group and rest 39 were designated VCD negative. No statistically significant difference in pulmonary function test (prereversibility results between the VCD-positive and VCD-negative patients was found. Reversible airway obstruction was observed in 75% of the patients of VCD-positive group and 67.65% of the patients in the VCD-negative group. Only one patient in the VCD-positive and none in VCD-negative group had inspiratory limb flattening of FV loop. Upper airway influence was evident by IOS in 58.3% of patients in the VCD-positive group and in 15.4% of patients in the VCD-negative group. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.005. Conclusion: VCD was a common finding in patients with symptoms suggestive of asthma and frequently coexists with asthma. IOS was found to be a useful screening test for VCD and was more sensitive than FV loop.

  10. FoxO proteins' nuclear retention and BH3-only protein Bim induction evoke mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated apoptosis in berberine-treated HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shatrunajay; Rizvi, Fatima; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Mammalian forkhead-box family members belonging to the 'O' category (FoxO) manipulate a plethora of genes modulating a wide array of cellular functions including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage repair, and energy metabolism. FoxO overexpression and nuclear accumulation have been reported to show correlation with hindered tumor growth in vitro and size in vivo, while FoxO's downregulation via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway has been linked with tumor promotion. In this study, we have explored for the first time intervention of berberine, a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid, with FoxO family proteins in hepatoma cells. We observed that berberine significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of both FoxO1 and FoxO3a. Their phosphorylation-mediated cytoplasmic sequestration followed by degradation was prevented by berberine-induced downmodulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway which promoted FoxO nuclear retention. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene and negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt axis, was upregulated while phosphorylation of its Ser380 residue (possible mechanism of PTEN degradation) was significantly decreased in treated HepG2 cells. Exposure to berberine induced a significant increase in transcriptional activity of FoxO, as shown by GFP reporter assay. FoxO transcription factors effectively heightened BH3-only protein Bim expression, which in turn, being a direct activator of proapoptotic protein Bax, altered Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, culminating into mitochondrial dysfunction, caspases activation, and DNA fragmentation. The pivotal role of Bim in berberine-mediated cytotoxicity was further corroborated by knockdown experiments where Bim-silencing partially restored HepG2 cell viability during berberine exposure. In addition, a correlation between oxidative overload and FoxO's nuclear accumulation via JNK activation was evident as berberine treatment led to a pronounced increase in JNK phosphorylation together with enhanced

  11. Dysfunctional voiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiozza, M L

    2002-01-01

    Wetting may be considered the Cinderella of paediatric medicine. Before discussing dysfunctional voiding, the milestones of the normal development of continence in the child and the definitions used to describe this topic are presented. Bladder storage requires (1): accommodation of increasing volumes of urine at low intravesical pressure and with appropriate sensation; (2): a bladder outlet that is closed and not modified during increase in intra-abdominal pressure; (3): absence of involuntary bladder contractions. Development of continence in the child involves three independent factors maturing concomitantly: (1) development of normal bladder capacity; (2) maturation of urethral sphincter function; (3) development of neural control over bladder-sphincter function. All these processes are discussed. Abnormalities of any of these maturational sequences, which run parallel and overlapping, may result in clinically evident abnormalities of bladder sphincter control. Although dysfunctional voiding (DV) in children is very common its prevalence has not been well studied and, to date, and its origin is not well known. In a correct evaluation of functional voiding we must take into account different elements: the bladder capacity (that increases during the first 8 years of life roughly 30 ml per year), the micturition frequency, post-void residual volumes, bladder dynamics, urinary flow rates. Thus the correct assessment of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction should include a detailed history. Signs of DV range from urge syndrome to complex incontinence patterns during the day and the night. In addition to incontinence problems, children may have frequency, urgency, straining to void, weak or interrupted urinary stream, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and chronic constipation with or without encopresis. DV are also referred in enuretic children who wet the bed more than one time per night and have a functional bladder capacity lower than attended for age

  12. Prohibitin( PHB) roles in granulosa cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Indrajit; Thomas, Kelwyn; Thompson, Winston E

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian granulosa cells (GC) play an important role in the growth and development of the follicle in the process known as folliculogenesis. In the present review, we focus on recent developments in prohibitin (PHB) research in relation to GC physiological functions. PHB is a member of a highly conserved eukaryotic protein family containing the repressor of estrogen activity (REA)/stomatin/PHB/flotillin/HflK/C (SPFH) domain (also known as the PHB domain) found in diverse species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. PHB is ubiquitously expressed in a circulating free form or is present in multiple cellular compartments including mitochondria, nucleus and plasma membrane. In mitochondria, PHB is anchored to the mitochondrial inner membrane and forms complexes with the ATPases associated with proteases having diverse cellular activities. PHB continuously shuttles between the mitochondria, cytosol and nucleus. In the nucleus, PHB interacts with various transcription factors and modulates transcriptional activity directly or through interactions with chromatin remodeling proteins. Many functions have been attributed to the mitochondrial and nuclear PHB complexes such as cellular differentiation, anti-proliferation, morphogenesis and maintenance of the functional integrity of the mitochondria. However, to date, the regulation of PHB expression patterns and GC physiological functions are not completely understood. PMID:26496733

  13. Defective Resensitization in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Evokes β-Adrenergic Receptor Dysfunction in Severe Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manveen K Gupta

    Full Text Available β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR agonists (β2-agonist are the most commonly used therapy for acute relief in asthma, but chronic use of these bronchodilators paradoxically exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness. Activation of βARs by β-agonist leads to desensitization (inactivation by phosphorylation through G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs which mediate β-arrestin binding and βAR internalization. Resensitization occurs by dephosphorylation of the endosomal βARs which recycle back to the plasma membrane as agonist-ready receptors. To determine whether the loss in β-agonist response in asthma is due to altered βAR desensitization and/or resensitization, we used primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs isolated from the lungs of non-asthmatic and fatal-asthmatic subjects. Asthmatic HASMCs have diminished adenylyl cyclase activity and cAMP response to β-agonist as compared to non-asthmatic HASMCs. Confocal microscopy showed significant accumulation of phosphorylated β2ARs in asthmatic HASMCs. Systematic analysis of desensitization components including GRKs and β-arrestin showed no appreciable differences between asthmatic and non-asthmatic HASMCs. However, asthmatic HASMC showed significant increase in PI3Kγ activity and was associated with reduction in PP2A activity. Since reduction in PP2A activity could alter receptor resensitization, endosomal fractions were isolated to assess the agonist ready β2ARs as a measure of resensitization. Despite significant accumulation of β2ARs in the endosomes of asthmatic HASMCs, endosomal β2ARs cannot robustly activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, endosomes from asthmatic HASMCs are associated with significant increase in PI3Kγ and reduced PP2A activity that inhibits β2AR resensitization. Our study shows that resensitization, a process considered to be a homeostasis maintaining passive process is inhibited in asthmatic HASMCs contributing to β2AR dysfunction which may underlie

  14. Role of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Ceren; Severcan, Feride

    2012-01-01

    Recent researches have mainly displayed the significant role of stem cells in tissue renewal and homeostasis with their unique capacity to develop different cell types. These findings have clarified the importance of stem cells to improve the effectiveness of any cell therapy for regenerative medicine. Identification of purity and differentiation stages of stem cells are the greatest challenges of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. The existing methods to carefully monitor and chara...

  15. Role of the Vasa Vasorum and Vascular Resident Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an “inside-out” response, that begins with the dysfunction of intimal endothelial cells and leads to neointimal plaque formation. The adventitia of large blood vessels has been recognized as an active part of the vessel wall that is involved in the process of atherosclerosis. There are characteristic changes in the adventitial vasa vasorum that are associated with the development of atheromatous plaques. However, whether vasa vasorum plays a causative or merely reactive role in the atherosclerotic process is not completely clear. Recent studies report that the vascular wall contains a number of stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to vascular remodeling. Microvessels serve as the vascular niche that maintains the resident stem/progenitor cells of the tissue. Therefore, the vasa vasorum may contribute to vascular remodeling through not only its conventional function as a blood conducting tube, but also its new conceptual function as a stem cell reservoir. This brief review highlights the recent advances contributing to our understanding of the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum in the atherosclerosis and discusses new concept that involves vascular-resident factors, the vasa vasorum and its associated vascular-resident stem cells, in the atherosclerotic process.

  16. Cell-based optical assay for amyloid β-induced neuronal cell dysfunction using femtosecond-pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghee; Yoon, Jonghee; Choi, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is known as a key molecule related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Over time, the amyloid cascade disrupts essential function of mitochondria including Ca2+ homeostasis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulation, and eventually leads to neuronal cell death. However, there have been no methods that analyze and measure neuronal dysfuction in pathologic conditions quantitatively. Here, we suggest a cell-based optical assay to investigate neuronal function in AD using femtosecond-pulsed laser stimulation. We observed that laser stimulation on primary rat hippocampal neurons for a few microseconds induced intracellular Ca2+ level increases or produced intracellular ROS which was a primary cause of neuronal cell death depending on delivered energy. Although Aβ treatment alone had little effect on the neuronal morphologies and networks in a few hours, Aβ-treated neurons showed delayed Ca2+ increasing pattern and were more vulnerable to laser-induced cell death compared to normal neurons. Our results collectively indicate that femtosecond laser stimulation can be a useful tool to study neuronal dysfuction related to AD pathologies. We anticipate this optical method to enable studies in the early progression of neuronal impairments and the quantitative evaluation of drug effects on neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, including AD and Parkinson's disease in a preclinical study.

  17. Serum insulin, insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and gallstone disease among type 2 diabetics in Chinese population: A community-based study in Kinmen, Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Ming Liu; Chung-Te Hsu; Hui-Chuan Shih; De-Chuan Chan; Pesus Chou; Tao-Hsin Tung; Shih-Tzer Tsai; Jorn-Hon Liu; Yeh-Kuang Tsai; Victor Tze-Kai Chen; Tseng-Nip Tam; Hsu-Feng Lu; Kuang-Kuo Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the association of serum insulin, insulin resistance, and β-cell dysfunction with gallstone disease (GSD) in type 2 diabetics.METHODS: We used a community-based study conducted between 1991 and 1993 in Kinmen, Taiwan to identify type 2 diabetics. A screening program for GSD was performed in 2001 by a panel of specialists who employed real-time ultrasound sonography to examine the abdominal region after the patient had fasted for at least 8 h. Screening was conducted in 2001 on 848patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The HOMA method was used to compare the profile differences for insulin resistance (HOMA IR) and β-cell dysfunction (HOMA β-cell).RESULTS: We studied 440 type 2 diabetics who attended sonography check-ups. After excluding eight insulin-treated diabetics, the prevalence of GSD among the remaining 432 was 13.9% (26/187) among males and 14.7% (36/245) among females. After adjustment for other GSD-associated risk factors in addition to age and obesity, GSD risk increased among females with levels of serum insulin [4th vs 1st quartile odds ratios (OR)= 4.46 (95%CI: 1.71-11.66)] and HOMA IR [4th vs 1st quartile OR = 4.46 (95% CI: 1.71-11.66)]. Better HOMA β-cell function was significantly related to decreased risk of GSD [4th vs 1st quartile OR = 0.16 (95% CI: 0.03-1.70)].Among males, age and central obesity were the most significant risk factors for GSD. No association of GSD with serum insulin, HOMA IR, and HOMA β-cell was observed among males.CONCLUSION: Serum insulin, insulin resistance, and β-cell dysfunction are risk factors for GSD in females, but not males with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Protective role of cabbage extract versus cadmium-induced oxidative renal and thyroid hormones dysfunctions in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental and industrial pollutant that affects various organs in human and experimental animals. A body of evidence has accumulated implicating the free radical generation with subsequent oxidative stress in the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of Cd damage. Cabbage is economically an important cole crop grown and consumed worldwide. It belongs the Cruciferous vegetables (Brassica), which have been reported to have a wide range of pharmacological properties. Since kidney is the critical target organ of chronic Cd damage, we carried out this study to investigate the effects of cabbage extract (C.E.) on Cd-induced dysfunction in the kidney of rats. The thyroid hormones values were also determined. Male Wistar rats were provided with cadmium chloride (100 mg/ L water) as the only drinking fluid and/or cabbage extract (C.E.) (5 ml/ kg body weight /day) for 4 weeks. Oral administration of Cd significantly induced the renal damage which was evident from the significantly (p < 0.05) increased levels of serum urea, uric acid and creatinine with a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in creatinine clearance. It also significantly declined the levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine in urine. Intoxication of Cd to rats reduced serum triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) concentrations. Reduced glutathione (GSH), and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also significantly (p < 0.05) depressed with a concomitant marked enhancement in lipid peroxidation marker (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS). Co-administration of C.E. along with Cd resulted in a reversal of the Cd-induced biochemical variables in kidney accompanied by a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation and a higher levels of renal antioxidant defense system. However, incorporation of C.E. to rats whether applied alone or in combination with Cd did not reveal any change in the thyroid hormones levels, which reflect significant drop in

  19. Protein kinase C-α signals P115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiaolu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is capable of activating the small GTPase RhoA, which in turn contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC isozymes in the mechanism of RhoA activation and in signaling TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC barrier dysfunction. Methods Bend.3 cells, an immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, were exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/mL. RhoA activity was assessed by pull down assay. PKC-α activity was measured using enzyme assasy. BMEC barrier function was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. p115RhoGEF phosphorylation was detected by autoradiography followed by western blotting. F-actin organization was observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both pharmacological inhibitors and knockdown approaches were employed to investigate the role of PKC and p115RhoGEF in TNF-α-induced RhoA activation and BMEC permeability. Results We observed that TNF-α induces a rapid phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF, activation of PKC and RhoA in BMECs. Inhibition of conventional PKC by Gö6976 mitigated the TNF-α-induced p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation. Subsequently, we found that these events are regulated by PKC-α rather than PKC-β by using shRNA. In addition, P115-shRNA and n19RhoA (dominant negative mutant of RhoA transfections had no effect on mediating TNF-α-induced PKC-α activation. These data suggest that PKC-α but not PKC-β acts as an upstream regulator of p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in response to TNF-α. Moreover, depletion of PKC-α, of p115RhoGEF, and inhibition of RhoA activation also prevented TNF-α-induced stress fiber formation and a decrease in TER. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that PKC-α phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF mediates TNF

  20. STEM CELLS: Differentiated cells in a back-up role

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Tushar J.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Two independent studies show that, if push comes to shove, differentiated cells of the stomach and lung can act as adult stem cells generating various cell types of the tissue, including a pool of stem cells.

  1. Nutrition, anthropometry, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in children during stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, B. U.; Pærregaard, Anders; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Andersen, J.; Heilmann, C. J.; Muller, Klaus; Andreassen, B U; Pærregaard, A; Michaelsen, K F; Andersen, J; Heilmann, C J; Müller, K

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate anthropometry, nutrition and gastrointestinal dysfunction, and to characterize the relation between these parameters and the inflammatory activity evaluated by plasma levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I (sTNFRI) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) levels...... during stem cell transplantation (SCT) in children. Clinical assessments and blood sampling were performed on days -3, 0, +7, +15 and +31 in eight children undergoing SCT. Energy intake, anthropometry, gastrointestinal dysfunction (WHO toxicity score) and sTNFRI and IL-1Ra were evaluated. The energy...... intake was below recommended levels. There was a loss of lean body mass (arm muscle area)(median, 2031 mm(2) (day -3) vs 1477 mm(2) (day 31); p = 0.04), and of fat mass (arm fat area) (791 mm(2) (day -3) vs 648 mm(2) (day +31); p = 0.04). sTNFRI was elevated throughout the course of transplantation, and...

  2. A cluster of coregulated genes determines TGF-beta-induced regulatory T-cell (Treg) dysfunction in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alise, Anna Morena; Ergun, Ayla; Hill, Jonathan A; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2011-05-24

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) originate in the thymus, but the Treg phenotype can also be induced in peripheral lymphoid organs or in vitro by stimulation of conventional CD4(+) T cells with IL-2 and TGF-β. There have been divergent reports on the suppressive capacity of these TGF-Treg cells. We find that TGF-Tregs derived from diabetes-prone NOD mice, although expressing normal Foxp3 levels, are uniquely defective in suppressive activity, whereas TGF-Tregs from control strains (B6g7) or ex vivo Tregs from NOD mice all function normally. Most Treg-typical transcripts were shared by NOD or B6g7 TGF-Tregs, except for a small group of differentially expressed genes, including genes relevant for suppressive activity (Lrrc32, Ctla4, and Cd73). Many of these transcripts form a coregulated cluster in a broader analysis of T-cell differentiation. The defect does not map to idd3 or idd5 regions. Whereas Treg cells from NOD mice are normal in spleen and lymph nodes, the NOD defect is observed in locations that have been tied to pathogenesis of diabetes (small intestine lamina propria and pancreatic lymph node). Thus, a genetic defect uniquely affects a specific Treg subpopulation in NOD mice, in a manner consistent with a role in determining diabetes susceptibility. PMID:21543717

  3. Physiopathology of beta-adrenergic dysfunction and role of MRP4 during aging, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Carillion, Aude

    2015-01-01

    The studies presented in this report looked for a better understanding of the altered response to stimulation of the β-adrenergic receptors in several physiopathological contexts. The first study confirms the alteration of the β-adrenergic response at the cardiomyocyte level in the senescent cardiomyopathy. The role of MRP4 (multidrug resistance associated protein 4) in the reduced inotropic response to isoproterenol is emphasized. The second study evaluates the response to β-adrenoceptors st...

  4. The role of dental stem cells in regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    MAXIM, MONICA ANGELA; Soritau, Olga; BACIUT, MIHAELA; BRAN, SIMION; BACIUT, GRIGORE

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that have the capacity of rising multiple cell types. A rich source of mesenchymal stem cells is represented by the dental tissues: the periodontal ligament, the dental pulp, the apical papilla, the dental follicle and the deciduous teeth. The aim of this review is to characterize the main dental- derived mesenchymal stem cell population, and to show their important role in tissue regeneration based on their properties : the multi-potency, th...

  5. 线粒体功能异常与亨廷顿舞蹈病的病理发生机制%Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Huntington’s Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王久强; 朱姝; 朱雪霏; 郭彩霞; 唐铁山

    2012-01-01

    demonstrated in HD cells/neurons.All of these changes in HD mitochondria could cause the dysfunction of mitochondria, which in turn lead to cell death in HD cells, especially in neuron. This review will focus on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of HD and the therapeutic strategy targeted on mitochondria for the treatment of HD.

  6. Roles of imprinted genes in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anke; Daniel, Guillaume; Schmidt-Edelkraut, Udo; Spengler, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes and neural stem cells (NSC) play an important role in the developing and mature brain. A central theme of imprinted gene function in NSCs is cell survival and G1 arrest to control cell division, cell-cycle exit, migration and differentiation. Moreover, genomic imprinting can be epigenetically switched off at some genes to ensure stem cell quiescence and differentiation. At the genome scale, imprinted genes are organized in dynamic networks formed by interchromosomal interactions and transcriptional coregulation of imprinted and nonimprinted genes. Such multilayered networks may synchronize NSC activity with the demand from the niche resembling their roles in adjusting fetal size. PMID:25431944

  7. Isoorientin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HepG2 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Li; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Haifang; Xiao, Chunxia; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Xuebo, E-mail: xueboliu@yahoo.com.cn

    2012-11-15

    Isoorientin (ISO) is a flavonoid compound that can be extracted from several plant species, such as Phyllostachys pubescens, Patrinia, and Drosophyllum lusitanicum; however, its biological activity remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the effects and putative mechanism of apoptosis induced by ISO in human hepatoblastoma cancer (HepG2) cells. The results showed that ISO induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, but no toxicity in human liver cells (HL-7702) and buffalo rat liver cells (BRL-3A) treated with ISO at the indicated concentrations. ISO-induced cell death included apoptosis which characterized by the appearance of nuclear shrinkage, the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation. ISO significantly (p < 0.01) increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased the release of cytochrome c, activated caspase-3, and enhanced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In addition, ISO effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and increased FoxO4 expression. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 enhanced the apoptosis-inducing effect of ISO. However, LY294002 markedly quenched ROS and NO generation and diminished the protein expression of heme peroxidase enzyme (HO-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, the addition of a ROS inhibitor (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) or iNOS inhibitor (N-[3-(aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine, dihydrochloride, 1400W) significantly diminished the apoptosis induced by ISO and also blocked the phosphorylation of Akt. These results demonstrated for the first time that ISO induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells and indicate that this apoptosis might be mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and has no toxicity in normal liver cells, suggesting that ISO may have good potential as a therapeutic and chemopreventive agent for liver cancer. Highlights:

  8. Isoorientin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HepG2 cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoorientin (ISO) is a flavonoid compound that can be extracted from several plant species, such as Phyllostachys pubescens, Patrinia, and Drosophyllum lusitanicum; however, its biological activity remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the effects and putative mechanism of apoptosis induced by ISO in human hepatoblastoma cancer (HepG2) cells. The results showed that ISO induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, but no toxicity in human liver cells (HL-7702) and buffalo rat liver cells (BRL-3A) treated with ISO at the indicated concentrations. ISO-induced cell death included apoptosis which characterized by the appearance of nuclear shrinkage, the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation. ISO significantly (p < 0.01) increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased the release of cytochrome c, activated caspase-3, and enhanced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In addition, ISO effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and increased FoxO4 expression. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 enhanced the apoptosis-inducing effect of ISO. However, LY294002 markedly quenched ROS and NO generation and diminished the protein expression of heme peroxidase enzyme (HO-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, the addition of a ROS inhibitor (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) or iNOS inhibitor (N-[3-(aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine, dihydrochloride, 1400W) significantly diminished the apoptosis induced by ISO and also blocked the phosphorylation of Akt. These results demonstrated for the first time that ISO induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells and indicate that this apoptosis might be mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and has no toxicity in normal liver cells, suggesting that ISO may have good potential as a therapeutic and chemopreventive agent for liver cancer. Highlights:

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Trypanosoma cruzi: the role of Serratia marcescens prodigiosin in the alternative treatment of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triana Omar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chagas disease is a health threat for many people, mostly those living in Latin America. One of the most important problems in treatment is the limitation of existing drugs. Prodigiosin, produced by Serratia marcescens (Rhodnius prolixus endosymbiont, belongs to the red-pigmented bacterial prodiginine family, which displays numerous biological activities, including antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antimalarial, immunosuppressive, and anticancer properties. Here we describe its effects on Trypanosoma cruzi mitochondria belonging to Tc I and Tc II. Results Parasites exposed to prodigiosin altered the mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation could not have a normal course, probably by inhibition of complex III. Prodigiosin did not produce cytotoxic effects in lymphocytes and Vero cells and has better effects than benznidazole. Our data suggest that the action of prodigiosin on the parasites is mediated by mitochondrial structural and functional disruptions that could lead the parasites to an apoptotic-like cell death process. Conclusions Here, we propose a potentially useful trypanocidal agent derived from knowledge of an important aspect of the natural life cycle of the parasite: the vector-parasite interaction. Our results indicate that prodigiosin could be a good candidate for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  10. Proteomics analysis of cytokine-induced dysfunction and death in insulin-producing INS-1E cells: new insights into the pathways involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Hertog, Wannes; Overbergh, Lut; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Ferreira, Gabriela B.; Maris, Michael; Gysemans, Conny; Flamez, Daisy; Cardozo, Alessandra Kupper; van der Bergh, Gert; Schoofs, Liliane; Arckens, Lut; Moreau, Yves; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Eizirik, Decio Laks; Waelkens, Ettienne; Mathieu, Chantal

    endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress/defense. We investigated the interactions of these proteins and discovered a significant interaction network (p <1.27e-05) containing 42 of the identified proteins. This network analysis suggests that proteins of different pathways act coordinately in a beta......-cell attack. The aim of the present study was to analyze protein changes in insulin-producing INS-1E cells exposed to inflammatory cytokines in vitro using two-dimensional DIGE. Within two different pH ranges we observed 2214 +/- 164 (pH 4-7) and 1641 +/- 73 (pH 6-9) spots. Analysis at three different time...... in this study, is required to provide adequate insight into the mechanisms leading to beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. The present findings may open new avenues for the understanding and prevention of beta-cell loss in type 1 diabetes....

  11. Role of glutamate receptors and glial cells in the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Na, Kyoung-Sae

    2016-10-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) causes substantial socioeconomic burden. Although a consensus on the definition of TRD has not yet been reached, it is certain that classic monoaminergic antidepressants are ineffective for TRD. One decade ago, many researchers found ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, to be an alternative to classic monoaminergic antidepressants. The major mechanisms of action of ketamine rapidly induce synaptogenesis in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway. Although excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission and consequent excitotoxicity were considered a major cause of TRD, recent evidence suggests that the extrasynaptic glutamatergic receptor signal pathway mainly contributes to the detrimental effects of TRD. Glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes, early life adversity, and glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction participate in complex cross-talk. An appropriate reuptake of glutamate at the astrocyte is crucial for preventing 'spill-over' of synaptic glutamate and binding to the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor. Excessive microglial activation and the inflammatory process cause astrocyte glutamatergic dysfunction, which in turn activates microglial function. Early life adversity and glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction result in vulnerability to stress in adulthood. A maladaptive response to stress leads to increased glutamatergic release and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which then activate microglia. However, since the role of inflammatory mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines is not specific for depression, more disease-specific mechanisms should be identified. Last, although much research has focused on ketamine as an alternative antidepressant for TRD, its long-lasting effectiveness and adverse events have not been rigorously demonstrated. Additionally, evidence suggests that substantial brain abnormalities develop in ketamine abusers. Thus, more investigations for ketamine and other novel

  12. Inhibition of autophagy promotes CYP2E1-dependent toxicity in HepG2 cells via elevated oxidative stress, mitochondria dysfunction and activation of p38 and JNK MAPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defeng Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy has been shown to be protective against drug and alcohol-induced liver injury. CYP2E1 plays a role in the toxicity of ethanol, carcinogens and certain drugs. Inhibition of autophagy increased ethanol-toxicity and accumulation of fat in wild type and CYP2E1 knockin mice but not in CYP2E1 knockout mice as well as in HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 (E47 cells but not HepG2 cells lacking CYP2E1 (C34 cells. The goal of the current study was to evaluate whether modulation of autophagy can affect CYP2E1-dependent cytotoxicity in the E47 cells. The agents used to promote CYP2E1 –dependent toxicity were a polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid (AA, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, which depletes GSH, and CCl4, which is metabolized to the CCl3 radical. These three agents produced a decrease in E47 cell viability which was enhanced upon inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA or Atg 7 siRNA. Toxicity was lowered by rapamycin which increased autophagy and was much lower to the C34 cells which do not express CYP2E1. Toxicity was mainly necrotic and was associated with an increase in reactive oxygen production and oxidative stress; 3-MA increased while rapamycin blunted the oxidative stress. The enhanced toxicity and ROS formation produced when autophagy was inhibited was prevented by the antioxidant N-Acetyl cysteine. AA, BSO and CCl4 produced mitochondrial dysfunction, lowered cellular ATP levels and elevated mitochondrial production of ROS. This mitochondrial dysfunction was enhanced by inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA but decreased when autophagy was increased by rapamycin. The mitogen activated protein kinases p38 MAPK and JNK were activated by AA especially when autophagy was inhibited and chemical inhibitors of p38 MAPK and JNK lowered the elevated toxicity of AA produced by 3-MA. These results show that autophagy was protective against the toxicity produced by several agents known to be activated by CYP2E1. Since CYP2E1 plays an

  13. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  14. Role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cocaine-induced microglial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Blaise Mathias; Yao, Honghong; Yang, Lu; Buch, Shilpa

    2013-06-01

    While it has been well-documented that drugs of abuse such as cocaine can enhance progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neuropathological disorders, the underlying mechanisms mediating these effects remain poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of cocaine on microglial viability. Herein we demonstrate that exposure of microglial cell line-BV2 or rat primary microglia to exogenous cocaine resulted in decreased cell viability as determined by MTS and TUNEL assays. Microglial toxicity of cocaine was accompanied by an increase in the expression of cleaved caspase-3 as demonstrated by western blot assays. Furthermore, increased microglial toxicity was also associated with a concomitant increase in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, an effect that was ameliorated in cells pretreated with NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, thus emphasizing the role of oxidative stress in this process. A novel finding of this study was the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) signaling mediators such as PERK, Elf2α, and CHOP, which were up regulated in cells exposed to cocaine. Reciprocally, blocking CHOP expression using siRNA ameliorated cocaine-mediated cell death. In conclusion these findings underscore the importance of ER stress in modulating cocaine induced microglial toxicity. Understanding the link between ER stress, oxidative stress and apoptosis could lead to the development of therapeutic strategies targeting cocaine-mediated microglial death/dysfunction. PMID:23404095

  15. Giant Cell Tumor: Role of Conservative Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatolii Diedkov[1; Pavlo Kovalchuk[1; Marija Kukushkina[2; Sergey Bojchuk[1; Viktor Kostyuk[1

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is aggressive bone tumor. Surgical treatment is considered to be the only effective method of treatment ofthese tumors. The problem of inoperable patients with giant cell tumors is a challenge. A total of 8 patients had giant cell bone tumorsof pelvis and sacrum. 3 patients were treated by bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and embolization of tumor-nutrient arteries. 5patients received denosumab. The efficiency was assessed according to clinical data and CT scan control. Median follow up is 28months. All 8 patients had reduction of pain intensity. Treatment with denosumab demonstrated more than 30% tumor regression. Allof the patients are in remission.

  16. Adhesion in the stem cell niche: biological roles and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal is tightly controlled by the concerted action of stem cell-intrinsic factors and signals within the niche. Niche signals often function within a short range, allowing cells in the niche to self-renew while their daughters outside the niche differentiate. Thus, in order for stem cells to continuously self-renew, they are often anchored in the niche via adhesion molecules. In addition to niche anchoring, however, recent studies have revealed other important roles for adhe...

  17. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gumbleton, Matthew; Kerr, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important for host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to both prevent autoimmunity and acquire lytic capacity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the inositol ph...

  18. Serum α-hydroxybutyrate (α-HB) predicts elevated 1 h glucose levels and early-phase β-cell dysfunction during OGTT

    OpenAIRE

    Varvel, Stephen A.; Pottala, James V.; Thiselton, Dawn L.; Caffrey, Rebecca; Dall, Tara; Sasinowski, Maciek; McConnell, Joseph P; Warnick, G. Russell; Voros, Szilard; Graham, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Serum α-hydroxybutyrate (α-HB) is elevated in insulin resistance and diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that the α-HB level predicts abnormal 1 h glucose levels and β-cell dysfunction inferred from plasma insulin kinetics during a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Research design and methods This cross-sectional study included 217 patients at increased risk for diabetes. 75 g OGTTs were performed with multiple postload glucose and insulin measurements over a 30–120 min period...

  19. Human urine-derived stem cells alone or genetically-modified with FGF2 Improve type 2 diabetic erectile dysfunction in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ouyang

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of improving erectile dysfunction using cell therapy with either human urine-derived stem cells (USCs or USCs genetically-modified with FGF2 in a type 2 diabetic rat model. METHODS: Human USCs were collected from 3 healthy donors. USCs were transfected with FGF2 (USCs-FGF2. Sixty-five SD male rats were divided into five groups (G. A control group of normal rats (G1, n = 10, and four other test groups of type 2 diabetic erectile dysfunction rats: PBS as a negative control (G2, n = 10, USCs (G3, n = 15, lentivirus-FGF2 (G4, n = 15, and USCs-FGF2 (G5, n = 15. Diabetes was induced in the rats via a high fat diet for 28 days and a subsequent intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg. Erectile dysfunction was screened with apomorphine (100 μg/kg. Cell injections in the test groups (G2-G5 occurred directly into the corpora cavernosa. The implanted cells were tracked at 7 days (n = 5 animals/G and 28 days (n = 10 animals/G post injection. Mean arterial pressure (MAP, intracavernosal pressure (ICP, expression of endothelial markers (CD31, VEGF and eNOS, smooth muscle markers (desmin and smoothelin, histological changes and erectile function were assessed for each group. RESULTS: USCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers, and secreted a number of proangiogenic growth factors. USCs expressed endothelial cell markers (CD31 and vWF after transfection with FGF2. Implanted USCs or USCs-FGF2 displayed a significantly raised ICP and ICP/MAP ratio (p<0.01 28 days after intracavernous injection. Although few cell were detected within the implanted sites, histological and western blot analysis demonstrated an increased expression of endothelial and smooth muscle markers within the cavernous tissue following USC or USC-FGF2 injection. CONCLUSIONS: The paracrine effect of USCs or USCs-FGF2 induced improvement of erectile function in type 2 diabetic rats by

  20. Safety and Potential Effect of a Single Intracavernous Injection of Autologous Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells in Patients with Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Martha Kirstine; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and radical prostatectomy (RP) often results in erectile dysfunction (ED) and a substantially reduced quality of life. The efficacy of current interventions, principal treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors, is not satisfactory and this condi......BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and radical prostatectomy (RP) often results in erectile dysfunction (ED) and a substantially reduced quality of life. The efficacy of current interventions, principal treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors, is not satisfactory...... for the presence of stem cell surface markers, viability and ability to differentiate. Primary endpoint was the safety and tolerance of the cell therapy while the secondary outcome was improvement of erectile function. Any adverse events were reported and erectile function was assessed by IIEF-5 scores. The study...... is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02240823. FINDINGS: Intracavernous injection of ADRCs was well-tolerated and only minor events related to the liposuction and cell injections were reported at the one-month evaluation, but none at later time points. Overall during the study period, 8 of 17 men recovered...

  1. GABA-BZD Receptor Modulating Mechanism of Panax quinquefolius against 72-hours Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety like Behavior: Possible Roles of Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eChanana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTRationale- Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng is known for its therapeutic potential against various neurological disorders, but its plausible mechanism of action still remains undeciphered. GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid plays an important role in sleep wake cycle homeostasis. Thus there exists rationale in exploring the GABA-ergic potential of Panax quinquefolius as neuroprotective strategy in sleep deprivation induced secondary neurological problems.Objective- The present study was designed to explore the possible GABA-ergic mechanism in the neuro-protective effect of Panax quinquefolius against 72-hours sleep deprivation induced anxiety like behaviour, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, HPA-axis activation and neuroinflammation.Materials and Methods- Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72-hours by using Grid suspended over water method. Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg was administered alone and in combination with GABA modulators (GABA Cl- channel inhibitor, GABA-benzodiazepine receptor inhibitor and GABAA agonist for 8 days, starting five days prior to 72-hours sleep deprivation period. Various behavioural (locomotor activity, mirror chamber test, biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels, mitochondrial complexes, neuroinflammation marker (Tumour Necrosis Factor, TNF-alpha, serum corticosterone, and histopathological sections of brains were assessed. Results- 72-hours sleep deprivation significantly impaired locomotor activity, caused anxiety-like behaviour, conditions of oxidative stress, alterations in mitochondrial enzyme complex activities, raised serum corticosterone levels, brain TNFα levels and led to neuroinflammation like signs in discrete brain areas as compared to naive group. Panax quinquefolius (100 and 200 mg/kg treatment restored the behavioural, biochemical, mitochondrial, molecular and histopathological alterations. Pre-treatment of

  2. [THE CHARACTER OF EXPRESSION AND THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS MARKERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF PLACENTAL DYSFUNCTION IN PREGNANT WITH UROGENITAL INFECTIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbuna, N; Vygovskaya, L; Kapustnik, N

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the expression level and possibilities of apoptotic markers in realization of placental insufficiency in pregnant women with urogenital infections. The study was conducted on 250 pregnant women with urogenital infections (1-st group - 50 pregnant women with bacterial infections (Chlamydia, ureaplasma, mycoplasma), 2-nd group - 50 pregnant women with viral infections (CMV and herpes simplex virus), 3-rd group - 150 patients with mixed viral and bacterial infections) and 50 pregnant women with normal pregnancy. The content of apoptosis inducers: sFasL and TNF-α in blood serum of pregnant women was determined; the level of caspase-3 in placental sample was analyzed; sonographic examination of the placenta was performed. Maximal indices of apoptosis inducers were observed in the 3-rd group (with mixed viral and bacterial infections). Changes in the placenta according to ultrasound data were determined in all pregnant women with urogenital infections. It was suggested that increased placental cell death in apoptosis might be one of the key points, triggering the development of placental dysfunction. PMID:27001779

  3. Hippocampal Injury Induced Cognitive and Mood Dysfunction, Altered Neurogenesis and Epilepsy: Can Early Neural Stem Cell Grafting Intervention Provide Protection?

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to hippocampus can occur through many causes including head trauma, ischemia, stroke, status epilepticus and Alzheimer’s disease. Certain changes such as increased levels of neurogenesis and elevated concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors that ensue in the acute phase after injury seem beneficial for restraining hippocampal dysfunction. However, many alterations that arise in the intermediate to chronic phase after injury such as abnormal migration of newly born neurons, aberr...

  4. Programmed cell death and its role in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Ge-Ning Jiang; Peng Zhang; Jie Fan

    2015-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and may be the result of inflammation. The maintenance of tissue homeostasis necessitates both the recognition and removal of invading microbial pathogens as well as the clearance of dying cells. In the past few decades, emerging knowledge on cell death and inflammation has enriched our molecular understanding of the signaling pathways that mediate various programs of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. This review provides an overview of the major types of cell death related to inflammation. Modification of cell death pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  5. Collective Behavior of Brain Tumor Cells: the Role of Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Hopkins, Scott; Szalad, Alexandra; Zheng, Xuguang; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We consider emergent collective behavior of a multicellular biological system. Specifically we investigate the role of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) in migration of brain tumor cells. We performed two series of cell migration experiments. The first set of experiments was performed in a typical wound healing geometry: cells were placed on a substrate, and a scratch was done. In the second set of experiments, cell migration away from a tumor spheroid was investigated. Experiments show a controversy: cells under normal and hypoxic conditions have migrated the same distance in the ``spheroid'' experiment, while in the ``scratch'' experiment cells under normal conditions migrated much faster than under hypoxic conditions. To explain this paradox, we formulate a discrete stochastic model for cell dynamics. The theoretical model explains our experimental observations and suggests that hypoxia decreases both the motility of cells and the strength of cell-cell adhesion. The theoretical predictions were further verified in independent experiments.

  6. Dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation makes malignant melanoma cells addicted to glycolysis driven by the V600EBRAF oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Meyle, Kathrine Damm; Lange, Marina Krarup;

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene addiction describes how cancer cells exhibit dependence on single oncogenes to escape apoptosis and senescence. While oncogene addiction constitutes the basis for new cancer treatment strategies targeting individual kinases and pathways activated by oncogenic mutations, the biochemical...... basis for this addiction is largely unknown. Here we provide evidence for a metabolic rationale behind the addiction to V600EBRAF in two malignant melanoma cell lines. Both cell lines display a striking addiction to glycolysis due to underlying dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Notably......, even minor reductions in glycolytic activity lead to increased OXPHOS activity (reversed Warburg effect), however the mitochondria are unable to sustain ATP production. We show that V600EBRAF upholds the activity of glycolysis and therefore the addiction to glycolysis de facto becomes an addiction to V...

  7. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  8. The role of red blood cells in inflammation and remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Besides being carriers of oxygen and carbon dioxide, red blood cells (RBCs) also have a scavenger function, binding inflammatory mediators to surface receptors. Animal and experimental models have suggested a role for RBCs in inflammatory and fibrotic responses and patients with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, a disease characterized by lung hemorrhage, frequently develop fibrosis. Fibroblasts, the resident cell in the connective tissue, play an active role in tissue rem...

  9. Innate Lymphoid Cells: Roles In Tumour Genesis And Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic Ivan; Gajovic Nevena; Radosavljevic Gordana; Pantic Jelena; Pejnovic Nada; Arsenijevic Nebojsa; Lukic Miodrag L.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) represent the most recently identified members of the innate immune system. These cells play important roles in inflammation, tissue remodelling and metabolic disease. ILCs can be subdivided into three major groups according to their cytokine production. The role of ILCs in tumourigenesis and tumour progression is not completely clarified. In this review, we discuss whether and how ILCs are involved in tumour genesis, growth and metastasis.

  10. Innate Lymphoid Cells: Roles In Tumour Genesis And Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanovic Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs represent the most recently identified members of the innate immune system. These cells play important roles in inflammation, tissue remodelling and metabolic disease. ILCs can be subdivided into three major groups according to their cytokine production. The role of ILCs in tumourigenesis and tumour progression is not completely clarified. In this review, we discuss whether and how ILCs are involved in tumour genesis, growth and metastasis.

  11. Role of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SayedMehran Marashian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are identified as novel population of hematopoietic cells which protect the body by coordinating the innate immune response against a wide range of threats including infections, tissue damages and homeostatic disturbances. ILCs, particularly ILC2 cells, are found throughout the body including the brain. ILCs are morphologically similar to lymphocytes, express and release high levels of T-helper (Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines but do not express classical cell-surface markers that are associated with other immune cell lineages.Three types of ILCs (ILC1, 2 & 3 have been reported depending upon the cytokines produced. ILC1 cells encompass natural killer (NK cells and interferon (IFN-g releasing cells; ILC2 cells release the Th2 cytokines, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 in response to IL-25 and IL-33; and ILC3 cells which release IL-17 and IL-22. ILC2 cells have been implicated inmucosal reactions occurring in animal models of allergic asthma and virus-induced lung disorders resulting in the regulation of airway remodeling and tissue homeostasis.There is evidence for increased ILC2 cell numbers in allergic responses in man but little is known about the role of ILCs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Further understanding of the characteristics of ILCs such as their origin, location and phenotypes and function would help to clarify the role of these cells in the pathogenesis of various lung diseases.In this review we will focus on the role of ILC2 cells and consider their origin, function,location and possible role in the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma and COPD.   

  12. The Role of Treg Cells in the Cancer Immunological Response

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    Stephen M. Ansell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: T cell-mediated immunosuppression has been observed for decades without clarification as to which factor was responsible for this observation. The identification of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells represents a milestone in the filed of immunology and provides an explanation for T-cell-mediated immunosuppression. Although Treg cells were originally identified for their ability to prevent organ-specific autoimmune disease in mice, emerging evidence suggests that Treg cells play a pivotal role in tumor immunity and contribute to tumor growth and progression, thereby having an important impact on the outcome of cancer patients. Approach: This article reviewed the medical literature to describe how Treg cells affect anti-tumor immunity. Results: Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting the effector functions of tumor-specific T cells and NK cells. Importantly, tumor cells played an active role in recruiting and generating Treg cells and creating a suppressive tumor microenvironment. Strategies to deplete Treg cells or inhibit their function had yielded promising results by enhancing anti-tumor immunity in experimental studies as well as clinical practice. Conclusion: A better understanding of the pathophysiology of Treg cells not only increased our knowledge in a variety of aspects of immunology but also potentially benefited cancer patients.

  13. Markers of early endothelial dysfunction in intrauterine growth restriction-derived human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed by 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniuguir, Andres; Krause, Bernardo J; Hernandez, Cherie; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) associates with fetal and placental vascular dysfunction, and increased cardiovascular risk later on life. We hypothesize that endothelial cells derived from IUGR umbilical veins present significant changes in the proteome which could be involved in the endothelial dysfunction associated to this conditions. To address this the proteome profile of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) isolated from control and IUGR pregnancies was compared by 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) and further protein identification by MALDI-TOF MS. Using 2D-DIGE 124 spots were identified as differentially expressed between control and IUGR HUVEC, considering a cut-off of 2 fold change, which represented ∼10% of the total spots detected. Further identification by MALDI-TOF MS and in silico clustering of the proteins showed that those differentially expressed proteins between control and IUGR HUVEC were mainly related with cytoskeleton organization, proteasome degradation, oxidative stress response, mRNA processing, chaperones and vascular function. Finally Principal Component analysis of the identified proteins showed that differentially expressed proteins allow distinguishing between control and IUGR HUVEC based on their proteomic profile. This study demonstrates for the first time that IUGR-derived HUVEC maintained in primary culture conditions present an altered proteome profile, which could reflect an abnormal programming of endothelial function in this fetal condition. PMID:27208404

  14. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

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    Mehrnaz Nouri

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers. These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  15. Role of dendritic cells in the induction of regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwah Rahul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in initiating immune responses and maintaining immune tolerance. In addition to playing a role in thymic selection, DCs play an active role in tolerance under steady state conditions through several mechanisms which are dependent on IL-10, TGF-β, retinoic acid, indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase along with vitamin D. Several of these mechanisms are employed by DCs in induction of regulatory T cells which are comprised of Tr1 regulatory T cells, natural and inducible foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 regulatory T cells and double negative regulatory T cells. It appears that certain DC subsets are highly specialized in inducing regulatory T cell differentiation and in some tissues the local microenvironment plays a role in driving DCs towards a tolerogenic response. In this review we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DC driven regulatory T cell induction.

  16. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

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    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  17. Role of Fetal Stem Cells in Maternal Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jiang F; Weiner, Leslie P.

    2007-01-01

    Microchimerism refers to the status of harboring cells from another individual at low levels. It is well known that cells traffic bidirectionally between fetus and mother during pregnancy. This situation resembles a naturally occurring long lasting fetal stem cell transplantation. The fetus acts as the donor and the mother acts as the recipient. To study the role of microchimerism in tissue regeneration, we constructed a murine microchimerism model with wild type C57BL/6J female mice carrying...

  18. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  19. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Protects Human Islets against Cytokine-Mediated β-Cell Dysfunction and Death: A Proteomic Study of the Pathways Involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondas, Dieter; Bugliani, Marco; D’Hertog, Wannes;

    2013-01-01

    -treated human islets with GLP-1 resulted in a marked protection of β-cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis and significantly attenuated cytokine-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The cytoprotective effects of GLP-1 coincided with substantial alterations in the protein expression...... profile of cytokine-treated human islets, illustrating a counteracting effect on proteins from different functional classes such as actin cytoskeleton, chaperones, metabolic proteins, and islet regenerating proteins. In summary, GLP-1 alters in an integrated manner protein networks in cytokine......-exposed human islets while protecting them against cytokine-mediated cell death and dysfunction. These data illustrate the beneficial effects of GLP-1 on human islets under immune attack, leading to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved, a prerequisite for improving therapies for diabetic...

  20. Cell type-dependent induction of DNA damage by 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although IARC clarifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF as possible human carcinogen, the debate on its health impact continues due to the inconsistent results. Genotoxic effect has been considered as a golden standard to determine if an environmental factor is a carcinogen, but the currently available data for RF-EMF remain controversial. As an environmental stimulus, the effect of RF-EMF on cellular DNA may be subtle. Therefore, more sensitive method and systematic research strategy are warranted to evaluate its genotoxicity. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether RF-EMF does induce DNA damage and if the effect is cell-type dependent by adopting a more sensitive method γH2AX foci formation; and to investigate the biological consequences if RF-EMF does increase γH2AX foci formation. METHODS: Six different types of cells were intermittently exposed to GSM 1800 MHz RF-EMF at a specific absorption rate of 3.0 W/kg for 1 h or 24 h, then subjected to immunostaining with anti-γH2AX antibody. The biological consequences in γH2AX-elevated cell type were further explored with comet and TUNEL assays, flow cytometry, and cell growth assay. RESULTS: Exposure to RF-EMF for 24 h significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in Chinese hamster lung cells and Human skin fibroblasts (HSFs, but not the other cells. However, RF-EMF-elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells did not result in detectable DNA fragmentation, sustainable cell cycle arrest, cell proliferation or viability change. RF-EMF exposure slightly but not significantly increased the cellular ROS level. CONCLUSIONS: RF-EMF induces DNA damage in a cell type-dependent manner, but the elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

  1. Thyroid Dysfunction and its Management

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    Supriya Agnihotri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the present review article is on thyroid dysfunctions which can be hypo or hyper thyroidism. Along with the ongoing allopathic treatment options, one can go for the alternative therapies or natural cures. Various nutritional supplements including iodine, botanicals like guggul and many more play an effective role in the management of thyroid dysfunction apart from the pharmaceuticals like synthetic T3 and T4 hormones and procaine thyroid. Along with these, homeopathy and yoga are equally important. The discussion suggests and emphasizes the importance of improving the lifestyle and nutritional diet; and further providing spiritual support along with natural thyroid medication.

  2. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  3. The significant role of mast cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Blatner, Nichole R; Khan, Mohammad Wasim; Gounari, Fotini; Gounaris, Elias; Dennis, Kristen; Bonertz, Andreas; Tsai, Fu-Nien; Strouch, Matthew J; Cheon, Eric; Phillips, Joseph D; Beckhove, Philipp; Bentrem, David J

    2011-03-01

    Mast cells (MC) are a bone marrow-derived, long-lived, heterogeneous cellular population that function both as positive and negative regulators of immune responses. They are arguably the most productive chemical factory in the body and influence other cells through both soluble mediators and cell-to-cell interaction. MC are commonly seen in various tumors and have been attributed alternatively with tumor rejection or tumor promotion. Tumor-infiltrating MC are derived both from sentinel and recruited progenitor cells. MC can directly influence tumor cell proliferation and invasion but also help tumors indirectly by organizing its microenvironment and modulating immune responses to tumor cells. Best known for orchestrating inflammation and angiogenesis, the role of MC in shaping adaptive immune responses has become a focus of recent investigations. MC mobilize T cells and antigen-presenting dendritic cells. They function as intermediaries in regulatory T cells (Treg)-induced tolerance but can also modify or reverse Treg-suppressive properties. The central role of MC in the control of innate and adaptive immunity endows them with the ability to tune the nature of host responses to cancer and ultimately influence the outcome of disease and fate of the cancer patient. PMID:21287360

  4. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells of the hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring via dysfunction of cholinergic inputs by myelin vacuolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effect of maternal exposure to HCP on rat hippocampal neurogenesis was examined. • HCP induces myelin vacuolation of nerve tracts in the septal–hippocampal pathway. • Myelin changes suppress Chrnb2-mediated cholinergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. • SGZ apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway and targets type-2b cells. • Dysfunction of cholinergic inputs is related to type-2b SGZ cell apoptosis. - Abstract: Hexachlorophene (HCP) is known to induce myelin vacuolation corresponding to intramyelinic edema of nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system in animals. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 100, or 300 ppm HCP in the diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, the numbers of T box brain 2+ progenitor cells and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling+ apoptotic cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) decreased in female offspring at 300 ppm, which was accompanied by myelin vacuolation and punctate tubulin beta-3 chain staining of nerve fibers in the hippocampal fimbria. In addition, transcript levels of the cholinergic receptor, nicotinic beta 2 (Chrnb2) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP-exposure did not alter the numbers of SGZ proliferating cells and reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneuron subpopulations in the dentate hilus on PND 21 and PND 77. Although some myelin vacuolation remained, all other changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77. These results suggest that maternal HCP exposure reversibly decreases type-2b intermediate-stage progenitor cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in offspring hippocampal neurogenesis at 300 ppm HCP. Neurogenesis may be affected by dysfunction of

  5. Vascular dysfunction as a target for adjuvant therapy in cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo José de Moura Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is a life-threatening complication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria that continues to be a major global health problem. Brain vascular dysfunction is a main factor underlying the pathogenesis of CM and can be a target for the development of adjuvant therapies for the disease. Vascular occlusion by parasitised red blood cells and vasoconstriction/vascular dysfunction results in impaired cerebral blood flow, ischaemia, hypoxia, acidosis and death. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in CM and the roles of low nitric oxide bioavailability, high levels of endothelin-1 and dysfunction of the angiopoietin-Tie2 axis. We also discuss the usefulness and relevance of the murine experimental model of CM by Plasmodium berghei ANKA to identify mechanisms of disease and to screen potential therapeutic interventions.

  6. EFFECT OF FUROSTANOL GLYCOSIDES FROM CULTURED DIOSCOREA DELTOIDEA CELLS ON REGULATORY FUNCTION OF ENDOTHELIUM IN A RAT MODEL OF HYPOESTROGEN-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Artyushkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effects of furostanol glycosides from cultured Dioscorea Deltoidea cells (DM-05, Institute of Plant Physiology, RAS on physiological and biochemical markers of endothelial function in rats with hypoestrogen-induced endothelial dysfunction.Material and methods. 10 female rats of Wistar line, with body mass 200-300 g have been included in the experiment. The bilateral ovariectomy was performed in rats to produce the model of hypoestrogen-induced endothelial dysfunction. Rats were treated with the injections of DM-05 during 6 weeks. False ovariectomy was performed in rats of control group (n=10.Results. DM-05 restored the levels of stable metabolites of nitric oxide (NO which reflex endothelial NO-synthase activity. Besides DM-05 corrected blood pressure and endothelial function. Experiments on open heart showed that DM-05 protects the cardiac tissue from hypoestrogen-induced hyperadrenoreactivity.Conclusion. Treatment with plant origin substances with estrogen-like activity can be a perspective approach to the correction of endothelial function and decrease in cardiovascular risk in menopause women.

  7. Subsets of regulatory T cells and their roles in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Guo, Lianyi; Sun, Xiaoyun; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it is recognized that acquired immunity is controlled by regulatory T cell (Treg). Since fundamental pathophysiological changes of allergy are mainly caused by hyperresponsiveness of immune system to allergens that acquires after birth, Tregs likely play key roles in the pathogenesis of allergy, particularly during the sensitization phase. However, accumulated information indicate that there are several distinctive subtypes of Tregs in man, and each of them seems to play different role in controlling immune system, which complicates the involvement of Tregs in allergy. The aim of the present study is to attempt to classify subtypes of Tregs and summarize their roles in allergy. Tregs should include natural Tregs (nTreg) including inducible costimulator (ICOS)(+) Tregs, inducible/adaptive Tregs (iTreg), interleukin (IL)-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), CD8(+) Tregs and IL-17-producing Tregs. These cells share some common features including expression of Foxp3 (except for Tr1 cells), and secretion of inhibitory cytokine IL-10 and/or TGF-β. Furthermore, it is noticeable that Tregs likely contribute to allergic disorders such as dermatitis and airway inflammation, and play a crucial role in the treatment of allergy through their actions on suppression of effector T cells and inhibition of activation of mast cells and basophils. Modulation of functions of Tregs may provide a novel strategy to prevent and treat allergic diseases. PMID:24886492

  8. Management of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, C G

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction is a common complaint and is often associated with a reduced quality of life for sufferer and partner. The spectrum of ejaculatory dysfunction extends from premature ejaculation (PE) to delayed ejaculation (DE) and anejaculation. Over the past 20-30 years, the PE treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Multiple well-controlled, evidence-based studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in delaying ejaculation, confirming their role as first-line agents for the treatment of lifelong and acquired PE. More recently, there has been increased attention to the psychosocial consequences of PE, its epidemiology, its aetiology and its pathophysiology by both clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry. DE and anejaculation are probably the least common, least studied and least understood of the male sexual dysfunctions. However, their impact is significant as they may result in a lack of sexual fulfilment for both the man and his partner, an effect further compounded when procreation is among the couple's goals of sexual intercourse. The causes of DE, anejaculation and anorgasmia are manifold. Numerous psychotherapeutic treatments are described for the management of delayed or anejaculation. Although some appear to be effective, none has been properly evaluated in large-scale samples. Treatment of DE or anejaculation with pharmacotherapy has met with limited success. No drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for this purpose, and most drugs that have been identified for potential use have limited efficacy, impart significant side-effects or are yet considered experimental in nature. PMID:24528812

  9. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  10. Role of Exosome Shuttle RNA in Cell-to-Cell Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Peng, Peng; Shen, Keng

    2016-08-01

    There are several ways that transpire in cell-to-cell communication,with or without cell contact. Exosomes play an important role in cell-to-cell communication,which do not need cell contact,as that can result in a relatively long-distance influence. Exosome contains RNA components including mRNA and micro-RNA,which are protected by exosomes rigid membranes. This allows those components be passed long distance through the circulatory system. The mRNA components are far different from their donor cells,and the micro-RNA components may reflect the cell they originated. In this article we review the role of exosomes in cell-to-cell communication,with particular focus on their potentials in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:27594165

  11. Cells with dysfunctional telomeres are susceptible to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide via generation of multichromosomal fusions and chromosomal fragments bearing telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Seon Rang [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Jeong, Jaemin [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo; Yun, Hyun Jin [Division of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Park, In-Chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haekwon [Department of Biotechnology, Seoul Woman' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hoon [Department of Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under conditions of telomere erosion, cells become extremely sensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres are cleaved by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under such conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} thus causes multichromosomal fusions and generation of small chromosomal fragments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-acetylcysteine prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced chromosomal aberrations. -- Abstract: During genotoxic stress, reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) is a prime mediator of the DNA damage response. Telomeres function both to assist in DNA damage repair and to inhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion. Here, we show that telomere dysfunction renders cells susceptible to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, via generation of multichromosomal fusion and chromosomal fragments. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} caused formation of multichromosomal end-to-end fusions involving more than three chromosomes, preferentially when telomeres were erosive. Interestingly, extensive chromosomal fragmentation (yielding small-sized fragments) occurred only in cells exhibiting such multichromosomal fusions. Telomeres were absent from fusion points, being rather present in the small fragments, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cleaves chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres. Restoration of telomere function or addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented development of chromosomal aberrations and rescued the observed hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres become sensitive to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide when telomeres are dysfunctional, and are cleaved to produce multichromosomal fusions and small chromosomal fragments bearing the telomeres.

  12. Unexplained Graft Dysfunction after Heart Transplantation—Role of Novel Molecular Expression Test Score and QTc-Interval: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram Shahzad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of immunosuppressive medications there is increased observed incidence of graft dysfunction in the absence of known histological criteria of rejection after heart transplantation. A noninvasive molecular expression diagnostic test was developed and validated to rule out histological acute cellular rejection. In this paper we present for the first time, longitudinal pattern of changes in this novel diagnostic test score along with QTc-interval in a patient who was admitted with unexplained graft dysfunction. Patient presented with graft failure with negative findings on all known criteria of rejection including acute cellular rejection, antibody mediated rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. The molecular expression test score showed gradual increase and QTc-interval showed gradual prolongation with the gradual decline in graft function. This paper exemplifies that in patients presenting with unexplained graft dysfunction, GEP test score and QTc-interval correlate with the changes in the graft function.

  13. The induction of apoptosis in HepG-2 cells by ruthenium(II) complexes through an intrinsic ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Lai, Shang-Hai; Yao, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Yin, Hui; Li, Wei; Han, Bing-Jie; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2016-10-21

    Four new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(N-N)2(dhbn)](ClO4)2 (N-N = dmb: 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine 1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine 2; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline 3; dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline 4) were synthesized and characterized. The cytotoxicity in vitro of the ligand and complexes toward HepG-2, HeLa, MG-63 and A549 were assayed by MTT method. The IC50 values of the complexes against the above cells range from 17.7 ± 1.1 to 45.1 ± 2.8 μM. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes against HepG-2 cells follows the order of 4 > 2 > 3 > 1. Ligand shows no cytotoxic activity against the selected cell lines. Cellular uptake, apoptosis, comet assay, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest, and the expression of proteins involved in apoptosis pathway induced by the complexes were investigated. The results indicate that complexes 1-4 induce apoptosis in HepG-2 cells through an intrinsic ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway. PMID:27344489

  14. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. PMID:26945003

  15. Trehalose rescues glial cell dysfunction in striatal cultures from HD R6/1 mice at early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucho, Juan; Gómez, Ana; Muñoz, María Paz; de Yébenes, Justo García; Mena, María Ángeles; Casarejos, María José

    2016-07-01

    The pathological hallmark of Huntington disease (HD) is the intracellular aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) in striatal neurons and glia associated with the selective loss of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons. Up to the present, the role of glia in HD is poorly understood and has been classically considered secondary to neuronal disorder. Trehalose is a disaccharide known to possess many pharmacological properties, acting as an antioxidant, a chemical chaperone, and an inducer of autophagy. In this study, we analyzed at an early postnatal development stage the abnormalities observed in striatal glial cell cultures of postnatal R6/1 mice (HD glia), under baseline and stressing conditions and the protective effects of trehalose. Our data demonstrate that glial HD alterations already occur at early stages of postnatal development. After 20 postnatal days in vitro, striatal HD glia cultures showed more reactive astrocytes with increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) but with less replication capacity, less A2B5(+) glial progenitors and more microglia than wild-type (WT) cultures. HD glia had lower levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and was more susceptible to H2O2 and epoxomicin insults. The amount of expressed GDNF and secreted mature-BDNF by HD astrocytes were much lower than by WT astrocytes. In addition, HD glial cultures showed a deregulation of the major proteolytic systems, the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS), and the autophagic pathway. This produces a defective protein quality control, indicated by the elevated levels of ubiquitination and p62 protein. Interestingly, we show that trehalose, through its capacity to induce autophagy, inhibited p62/SQSTM1 accumulation and facilitated the degradation of cytoplasmic aggregates from mHTT and α-synuclein proteins. Trehalose also reduced microglia activation and reversed the disrupted cytoskeleton of astrocytes accompanied with an increase in the replication capacity. In

  16. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287. PMID:27081634

  17. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sexual dysfunction is a problem in a person’s sexual desire, arousal, or orgasm. Sexual dysfunction is common. It ... find they have times when they have less sexual desire and satisfaction because of emotional distress or the ...

  18. Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age. Is erectile dysfunction just a part of old age? Erectile dysfunction doesn't have to be a ... episode of impotence Feeling stressed, including stress from work or family situations Being troubled by problems in ...

  19. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  20. Roles of tRNA in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent research into various aspects of bacterial metabolism such as cell wall and antibiotic synthesis, degradation pathways, cellular stress, and amino acid biosynthesis has elucidated roles of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (aa-tRNA) outside of translation. Although the two enzyme families...... specificity of this diverse enzymatic family is necessary to aid current efforts in designing potential bactericidal agents. These two enzyme families are linked only by the substrate with which they modify the cell wall, aa-tRNA; their structure, cell wall modification processes and the physiological changes...... responsible for cell wall modifications, aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthases (aaPGSs) and Fem, were discovered some time ago, they have recently become of intense interest for their roles in the antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic microorganisms. The addition of positively charged amino acids to...

  1. Role of toll-like receptor 2 and toll-like receptor 4 in post-ischemic coronary endothelial dysfunction in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.FAVRE; P.MUSETTE; JPHENRY; C.THUILLEZ; V.RICHARD

    2004-01-01

    AIM: A growing body of evidence suggests a role of the toll-like receptors (TLR) in inflammatory processes. In addition to LPS,TLR are activated by many endogenous ligands such as heat shock proteins and oxygeil-derived free radicals which are both produced during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Among TLR,TLR-2 and TLR-4 are expressed in endothelial and myocardial cells and appear to regulate neutrophil-endothelial interactions.Since neutrophil adhesion is a critical event in endothelial injury

  2. The role of intracavernosal injection therapy and the reasons of withdrawal from therapy in patients with erectile dysfunction in the era of PDE5 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, H H; Ahn, J S; Kim, J J; Choo, S H; Han, D H; Lee, S W

    2014-01-01

    There has been little data regarding the role of intracavernosal injection (ICI) treatment, its discontinuation rate and the reasons of withdrawal in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) in the era of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of withdrawal and its associated reasons in patients undergoing ICI therapy. Patients who were prescribed with ICI treatment two times or more were included since the introduction of sildenafil in Korea in 1999. Telephone surveys were performed to evaluate intercourse rates, withdrawal rates and their associated reasons, adverse events and the patients' satisfaction with their sex lives after the ICI treatments. Two hundred and ninety-four men were contacted by telephone. The mean age was 61.8 ± 7.9 years with a follow-up duration of 25.6 ± 32.1 months. At the last follow-up, 79.9% had discontinued the treatment. Most patients had previously failed PDE5 inhibitor treatment prior to the ICI therapy, and more than half had two or more risk factors of ED. Adequate penile rigidity after ICI therapy was restored in 60.2% of patients. The reasons for discontinuation of ICI were poor response (43.1%), inconvenience of use (18.3%), switch to other treatments (10.7%), loss of libido (6.7%), adverse events (5.5%) and return of spontaneous erection (2.8%). Pain was the most common adverse event in the withdrawal group, whereas prolonged erection was most common in the continuing group. Following ICI treatment, PDE5 inhibitors were the most common therapeutic option (63.1%). The overall satisfaction rate regarding sex life was significantly high in the treatment-continuing group. In conclusion, patients on ICI treatment had severe ED and high withdrawal rates in the era of PDE5 inhibitors. The most common reason for treatment discontinuation was poor response. Before initiating ICI treatments, sufficient counselling is necessary. PMID:24194017

  3. Role of endothelin in microvascular dysfunction following percutaneous coronary intervention for non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: a single-centre randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddeti, Raviteja R; Prasad, Abhiram; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Aoki, Tatsuo; Rihal, Charanjit; Holmes, David; Best, Patricia; Lennon, Ryan J; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndromes frequently fails to restore myocardial perfusion despite establishing epicardial vessel patency. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor, and its expression is increased in atherosclerosis and after PCI. In this study, we aim to define the role of endothelin in regulating coronary microvascular blood flow and myocardial perfusion following PCI in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTACS), by assessing whether adjunctive therapy with a selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist acutely improves postprocedural coronary microvascular blood flow. Methods In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 23 NSTACS patients were enrolled to receive an intracoronary infusion of placebo (n=11) or BQ-123 (n=12) immediately before PCI. Post-PCI coronary microvascular blood flow and myocardial perfusion were assessed by measuring Doppler-derived average peak velocity (APV), and cardiac biomarker levels were quantified. Results Compared with the placebo group, APV was significantly higher in the drug group immediately after PCI (30 (20, 37) vs 19 (9, 26) cm/s; p=0.03). Hyperaemic APV, measured post-adenosine administration, was higher in the BQ-123 group, but the difference did not achieve statistical significance (56 (48, 72) vs 46 (34, 64) cm/s; p=0.090). Maximum coronary flow reserve postprocedure was not different between the two groups (2.1 (1.6, 2.3) vs 2.5 (1.8, 3.0)). Per cent change in creatine kinase isoenzyme MB from the time of PCI to 8 and 16 hours post-PCI was significantly lower in the drug group compared with the placebo group (−17 (−26, −10) vs 26 (−15, 134); p=0.02 and −17 (−38, 14) vs 107 (2, 446); p=0.007, respectively). Conclusions Endothelin is a mediator of microvascular dysfunction during PCI in NSTACS, and adjunctive selective ETA antagonist may augment myocardial perfusion during PCI. Trial registration number

  4. The role of calcium in cell injury. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, B F; Berezesky, I K; Laiho, K U; Osornio, A R; Mergner, W J; Smith, M W

    1980-01-01

    The role of calcium in cell injury is currently under investigation in many laboratories. It appears that movement of calcium between extra- to intracellular compartments and between various intracellular compartments plays a key role in determining many important reactions of cells both to lethal and sublethal injuries of diverse types as well as in adaptive new steady states. Prevention and/or modification of calcium movements has implication for the control of cell population growth, the prevention of cancer, and the retrieval of victims of shock, myocardial infarction and stroke. Regardless of what type of initial injury occurs, for example ischemia or direct cell membrane damage, the cell undergoes calcium accumulation either by impaired energy metabolism and/or plasmalemmal alterations. This elevated intracellular calcium concentration is responsible for cytoskeletal modifications which alter cell shape, the activation of phospholipases which results in perpetuation of membrane damage and finally, mitochondrial calcification. Although such changes have been partially characterized biochemically and morphologically, some obscure points continue to need clarification. The importance of determing the event(s) responsible for cell death is directly related to the potential capability of their manipulation. Therefore, this could result in the development and/or modification of pharmacologic interventions for the control and prevention of many human diseases. It is the purpose of this paper to review the present state of the art regarding the role of calcium in cell injury, to put it into perspective concerning organelle changes from the standpoint of morphology, and to indicate the present and future role of analytical microscopy in furthering the understanding of these processes. PMID:6999604

  5. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistanc...

  6. Immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-01-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP (or ERAP1), is essential for trimming peptides that are presented by MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 is inhibited by human cytomegalovirus, and ERAP1 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases. How the immune system detects ERAAP dysfunction, however, is unknown. We have shown previously that ERAAP-deficient cells present an immunogenic pMHC I repertoire, that elicits CD8+ T cell response in WT mice. Additionally, we disc...

  7. Dysfunctional stress responses in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Alain; Picard, Pascale; Dutheil, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Many dysfunctional and chronic pain conditions overlap. This review describes the different modes of chronic deregulation of the adaptive response to stress which may be a common factor for these conditions. Several types of dysfunction can be identified within the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis: basal hypercortisolism, hyper-reactivity, basal hypocortisolism and hypo-reactivity. Neuroactive steroid synthesis is another component of the adaptive response to stress. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form DHEA-S, and progesterone and its derivatives are synthetized in cutaneous, nervous, and adipose cells. They are neuroactive factors that act locally. They may have a role in the localization of the symptoms and their levels can vary both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Persistent changes in neuroactive steroid levels or precursors can induce localized neurodegeneration. The autonomic nervous system is another component of the stress response. Its dysfunction in chronic stress responses can be expressed by decreased basal parasympathethic activity, increased basal sympathetic activity or sympathetic hyporeactivity to a stressful stimulus. The immune and genetic systems also participate. The helper-T cells Th1 secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, whereas Th2 secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IGF-10, IL-13. Chronic deregulation of the Th1/Th2 balance can occur in favor of anti- or pro-inflammatory direction, locally or systemically. Individual vulnerability to stress can be due to environmental factors but can also be genetically influenced. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics are the main keys to understanding the influence of genetics on the response of individuals to constraints. PMID:27262345

  8. Impact of Cyanidin-3-Glucoside on Glycated LDL-Induced NADPH Oxidase Activation, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Viability in Cultured Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Xie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of glycated low density lipoprotein (glyLDL are frequently detected in diabetic patients. Previous studies demonstrated that glyLDL increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, activated NADPH oxidase (NOX and suppressed mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC enzyme activities in vascular endothelial cells (EC. The present study examined the effects of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G, a type of anthocyanin abundant in dark-skinned berries, on glyLDL-induced ROS production, NOX activation and mETC enzyme activity in porcine aortic EC (PAEC. Co-treatment of C3G prevented glyLDL-induced upregulation of NOX4 and intracellular superoxide production in EC. C3G normalized glyLDL-induced inhibition on the enzyme activities of mETC Complex I and III, as well as the abundances of NADH dehydrogenase 1 in Complex I and cytochrome b in Complex III in EC. Blocking antibody for the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE prevented glyLDL-induced changes in NOX and mETC enzymes. Combination of C3G and RAGE antibody did not significantly enhance glyLDL-induced inhibition of NOX or mETC enzymes. C3G reduced glyLDL-induced RAGE expression with the presence of RAGE antibody. C3G prevented prolonged incubation with the glyLDL-induced decrease in cell viability and the imbalance between key regulators for cell viability (cleaved caspase 3 and B cell Lyphoma-2 in EC. The findings suggest that RAGE plays an important role in glyLDL-induced oxidative stress in vascular EC. C3G may prevent glyLDL-induced NOX activation, the impairment of mETC enzymes and cell viability in cultured vascular EC.

  9. Muscle-derived stem/progenitor cell dysfunction in Zmpste24-deficient progeroid mice limits muscle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Minjung; Lavasani, Mitra; Thompson, Seth D.; Lu, Aiping; Ahani, Bahar; Huard, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Loss of adult stem cell function during aging contributes to impaired tissue regeneration. Here, we tested the aging-related decline in regeneration potential of adult stem cells residing in the skeletal muscle. Methods We isolated muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs) from progeroid Zmpste24-deficient mice (Zmpste24 -/-) with accelerated aging phenotypes to investigate whether mutation in lamin A has an adverse effect on muscle stem/progenitor cell function. Results Our ...

  10. DC260126: a small-molecule antagonist of GPR40 that protects against pancreatic β-Cells dysfunction in db/db mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Sun

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40 mediates both acute and chronic effects of free fatty acids (FFAs on insulin secretion. However, it remains controversial whether inhibition of GPR40 would be beneficial in prevention of type 2 diabetes. This study is designed to evaluate the potential effects of DC260126, a small molecule antagonist of GPR40, on β-cell function following administration of 10 mg/kg dose of DC260126 to obese diabetic db/db mice. Oral glucose tolerance test, glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin tolerance test were used to investigate the pharmacological effects of DC260126 on db/db mice after 21-days treatment. Immunohistochemistry and serum biochemical analysis were also performed in this study. Although no significant change of blood glucose levels was found in DC260126-treated mice, DC260126 significantly inhibited glucose stimulated insulin secretion, reduced blood insulin level and improved insulin sensitivity after 3 weeks administration in db/db mice. Moreover, DC260126 reduced the proinsulin/insulin ratio and the apoptotic rate of pancreatic β-cells remarkably in DC260126-treated db/db mice compared to vehicle-treated mice (p<0.05, n = 8. The results suggest that although DC260126 could not provide benefit for improving hyperglycemia, it could protect against pancreatic β-cells dysfunction through reducing overload of β-cells, and it increases insulin sensitivity possibly via alleviation of hyperinsulinemia in db/db mice.

  11. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  12. Role of stem/progenitor cells in reparative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretheeban Thavaneetharajah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adult stem cells are activated to proliferate and differentiate during normal tissue homeostasis as well as in disease states and injury. This activation is a vital component in the restoration of function to damaged tissue via either complete or partial regeneration. When regeneration does not fully occur, reparative processes involving an overproduction of stromal components ensure the continuity of tissue at the expense of its normal structure and function, resulting in a “reparative disorder”. Adult stem cells from multiple organs have been identified as being involved in this process and their role in tissue repair is being investigated. Evidence for the participation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs in the tissue repair process across multiple tissues is overwhelming and their role in reparative disorders is clearly demonstrated, as is the involvement of a number of specific signaling pathways. Transforming growth factor beta, bone morphogenic protein and Wnt pathways interact to form a complex signaling network that is critical in regulating the fate choices of both stromal and tissue-specific resident stem cells (TSCs, determining whether functional regeneration or the formation of scar tissue follows an injury. A growing understanding of both TSCs, MSCs and the complex cascade of signals regulating both cell populations have, therefore, emerged as potential therapeutic targets to treat reparative disorders. This review focuses on recent advances on the role of these cells in skeletal muscle, heart and lung tissues.

  13. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor methazolamide prevents amyloid beta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase activation protecting neuronal and glial cells in vitro and in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Silvia; Giannoni, Patrizia; Solesio, Maria E; Cocklin, Sarah L; Cabrera, Erwin; Ghiso, Jorge; Rostagno, Agueda

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been recognized as an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, preceding and inducing neurodegeneration and memory loss. The presence of cytochrome c (CytC) released from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm is often detected after acute or chronic neurodegenerative insults, including AD. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (CAI) methazolamide (MTZ) was identified among a library of drugs as an inhibitor of CytC release and proved to be neuroprotective in Huntington's disease and stroke models. Here, using neuronal and glial cell cultures, in addition to an acute model of amyloid beta (Aβ) toxicity, which replicates by intra-hippocampal injection the consequences of interstitial and cellular accumulation of Aβ, we analyzed the effects of MTZ on neuronal and glial degeneration induced by the Alzheimer's amyloid. MTZ prevented DNA fragmentation, CytC release and activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 induced by Aβ in neuronal and glial cells in culture through the inhibition of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of MTZ prevented neurodegeneration induced by intra-hippocampal Aβ injection in the mouse brain and was effective at reducing caspase 3 activation in neurons and microglia in the area surrounding the injection site. Our results, delineating the molecular mechanism of action of MTZ against Aβ-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase activation, and demonstrating its efficiency in a model of acute amyloid-mediated toxicity, provide the first combined in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting the potential of a new therapy employing FDA-approved CAIs in AD. PMID:26581638

  14. Role of ROS in Aβ42 Mediated Activation of Cerebral Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Tsoy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There is substantial evidence that the deposition of aggregated amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in brain parenchyma and brain vessels is the main cause of neuronal dysfunction and death in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Aβ exhibits multiple cytotoxic effects on neurons and glial cells and causes dysfunction of the blood brain barrier (BBB. In AD brains, an increased deposition of Aβ in the cerebral vasculature has been found to be correlated with increased transmigration of blood-borne inflammatory cells and neurovascular inflammation. However, regulatory mediators of these processes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the role of ROS in actin polymerization and expression of adhesion molecules (P-selectin on the surface of the cerebral endothelial cells (CECs that are activated by Aβ42.Materials and methods. Mouse BEnd3 line (ATCC was used in this research. BEnd3 cells respond to Aβ treatment similarly to human primary CECs and are a common model to investigate CECs’ function. We used immortalized bEnd3 cells as the following: controls; cells incubated with Aβ42 for 10, 30, and 60 minutes; cells incubated with 30 mM of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC for 1 hr; and, cells pre-treated with NAC followed by Aβ42 exposure. We measured DHE fluorescence to investigate intracellular ROS production. Immunofluorescent microscopy of anti-P-selectin and oregon green phalloidin was used to quantify the surface P-selectin expression and actin polymerization, and Western blot analysis was used to analyze total P-selectin expression.Results. The results of this study have demonstrated a significant time-dependent ROS accumulation after 10 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes of Aβ42 treatment, while Aβ42 stimulated ROS production in CECs was attenuated by pre-treatment with the NAC antioxidant. We also found that Aβ42 increased P-selectin fluorescence at the surface of bEnd3 cells in a time dependent manner in parallel to ROS

  15. Differential impact of telomere dysfunction on initiation and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazi, Paraskevi A; Glickman, Jonathan; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Alice; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; DePinho, Ronald A

    2003-08-15

    Telomere maintenance and telomerase reactivation are near universal features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet the shorter telomeres and highly abnormal cytogenetic profiles of HCC suggest that telomere erosion and dysfunction may be operative during the formative stages of tumorigenesis. Previous studies have established that the cancer-enhancing or suppressing impact of telomere dysfunction is highly dependent on several parameters including cell type, tumor stage, and p53 status. Here, to understand better the pathogenetic role of telomere dysfunction in the initiation and progression in human HCC, we have used three mechanistically distinct liver cancer-prone model systems (urokinase plasminogen activator transgenic mice, carbon tetrachloride exposure, and diethylnistrosamine treatment) in the context of successive generations of telomerase-deficient mice null for the telomerase RNA component, mTERC. Across all of the HCC model systems, telomere dysfunction suppressed both the incidence and growth of HCC lesions, a trend that mirrored the level of intratumoral proliferative arrest and apoptosis. On the histological level, telomere dysfunction was associated with a significant increase in the number of early stage neoplastic lesions and a reciprocal decline in the occurrence of high-grade malignancies. These genetic data in the mouse indicate that telomere dysfunction exerts an opposing role in the initiation versus progression of HCC and provide a framework for understanding the intimate link among chronic liver disease, chromosomal instability, and increased HCC in humans. PMID:12941829

  16. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathon B; Burns, Linda J; Bachanova, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    Despite a wide spectrum of treatment options, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains a challenging hematologic malignancy to manage. Advances in front-line therapy, including the monoclonal antibody rituximab and increasing use of cytarabine, have improved remission rates. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can effectively consolidate remission of MCL, leading to encouraging survival beyond 5 yr. However, nearly all patients with MCL will relapse and require salvage therapy. Novel agents such as ibrutinib, bortezomib, and lenalidomide have dramatically expanded the options for treating relapsed MCL. In this review, we summarize the clinical evidence supporting the use of allogeneic donor HCT in MCL and make recommendations on indications for its use. Data suggest that allogeneic donor HCT is the only curative therapy for patients with poor prognosis or aggressive MCL. Patient selection, timing, and optimal use remain a matter of scientific debate and given the rapidly changing therapeutic landscape of MCL, the outcomes of allogeneic HCT should be interpreted in the context of novel therapeutics. PMID:25154430

  17. Prevention of beta cell dysfunction and apoptosis by adenoviral gene transfer of rat insulin-like growth factor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-hong; LI Tang; CHEN Zong-bo; LUO Bing; SUN Ruo-peng

    2009-01-01

    Background Islet β-cells are almost completely destroyed when patients with type 1 diabete are diagnosed. To date, insulin substitute therapy is still one of the main treatments. The cure of type 1 diabetes requires β-cell regeneration from islet cell precursors and prevention of recurring autoimmunity, Therefore, β-cell regeneration and proliferation emerge as a new research focus on therapy for type 1 diabetes. Islet β-cell regeneration and development are controlled by many growth factors, especially insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).Methods Recombinant adenovirus encoding rat IGF-1 (rlGF-1) was constructed and transduced into rat β-cells, RINm5F cells. Western blotting analysis and ELISA were used to detect rlGF-1 protein. Streptozotocin (STZ) was used to induce RINm5F cell destruction. The level of nitric oxide (NO) was detected in cell culture supernatants by the Griess reaction. Islet cell function was evaluated by glucose-stimulated insulin production. Flow cytometry analysis was further used to investigate the apoptosis of RINm5F cells. Thiaoollyl blue viability assay was applied to determine cell viability.Results The recombined adenovirus-rlGF-1 was successfully constructed and the titer was 4.0×108pfu/ml. The rlGF-1 protein was effectively expressed in the RINm5F cells and cell culture supernatants, rlGF-1 expression remarkably inhibited STZ-induced islet cell apoptosis and significantly decreased the level of NO. Furthermore, IGF-1 expression also significantly protected insulin secretion and cell proliferation in a time-dependent manner.Conclusions Our study suggests that locally produced rlGF-1 from RINm5F cells may be beneficial in maintaining β-cell function, protecting β-cells from the destruction of apoptosis factors and promoting β-cell survival and proliferation. IGF-1 might be considered as a candidate gene in gene therapy for type 1 diabetes. In addition, it appears that the apoptosis induced by STZ may be NO-dependent.

  18. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid, induces autophagy via ROS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of ATP involving BNIP3 in human MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Wang, Wei; Jin, Xin; Wang, Zhaoyang; Ji, Zhiwei; Meng, Guanmin

    2015-06-01

    Silibinin, derived from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum), has anticancer and chemopreventive properties. Silibinin has been reported to inhibit the growth of various types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms by which silibinin exerts an anticancer effect are poorly defined. The present study aimed to investigate whether silibinin-induced cell death might be attributed to autophagy and the underlying mechanisms in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that silibinin-induced cell death was greatly abrogated by two specific autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and bafilomycin-A1 (Baf-A1). In addition, silibinin triggered the conversion of light chain 3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II, promoted the upregulation of Atg12-Atg5 formation, increased Beclin-1 expression, and decreased the Bcl-2 level. Moreover, we noted elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, concomitant with the dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and a drastic decline in ATP levels following silibinin treatment, which were effectively prevented by the antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid. Silibinin stimulated the expression of Bcl-2 adenovirus E1B 19-kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), a pro-death Bcl-2 family member, and silencing of BNIP3 greatly inhibited silibinin-induced cell death, decreased ROS production, and sustained ΔΨm and ATP levels. Taken together, these findings revealed that silibinin induced autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion involving BNIP3 in MCF7 cells. PMID:25891311

  19. Role of NAD(PH oxidase in superoxide generation and endothelial dysfunction in Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats as a model of nonobese NIDDM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Gupte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in diabetics, and it has a complex etiology that operates on several levels. Endothelial dysfunction and increased generation of reactive oxygen species are believed to be an underlying cause of vascular dysfunction and coronary artery disease in diabetes. This impairment is likely the result of decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO within the vasculature. However, it is unclear whether hyperglycemia per se stimulates NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide generation in vascular tissue. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study focused on whether NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide is elevated in vasculature tissue evoking endothelial/smooth muscle dysfunction in the hyperglycemic (169+/-4 mg% Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat. By dihydroethidine fluorescence staining, we determined that aorta superoxide levels were significantly elevated in 9 month-old GK compared with age matched Wistar (GK; 195+/-6%, Wistar; 100+/-3.5%. Consistent with these findings, 10(-6 mol/L acetylcholine-induced relaxation of the carotid artery was significantly reduced in GK rats compared with age matched Wistar (GK; 41+/-7%, Wistar; 100+/-5% and measurements in the aorta showed a similar trend (p = .08. In contrast, relaxation to the NO donor SNAP was unaltered in GK compared to Wistar. Endothelial dysfunction was reversed by lowering of superoxide with apocynin, a specific Nox inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS: The major findings from this study are that chronic hyperglycemia induces significant vascular dysfunction in both the aorta and small arteries. Hyperglycemic induced increases in NAD(PH oxidase activity that did not come from an increase in the expression of the NAD(PH oxidase subunits, but more likely as a result of chronic activation via intracellular signaling pathways.

  20. Genetic polymorphism in FOXP3 gene: imbalance in regulatory T-cell role and development of human diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Julie Massayo Maeda Oda; Bruna Karina Banin Hirata; Roberta Losi Guembarovski; Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2013-04-01

    The FOXP3 gene encodes a transcription factor thought to be important for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). These cells are involved in the regulation of T cell activation and therefore are essential for normal immune homeostasis. Signals from microenvironment have a profound influence on the maintenance or progression of diseases. Thus, Tregs have an important marker protein, FOXP3, though it does not necessarily confer a Treg phenotype when expressed. FOXP3 polymorphisms that occur with high frequency in the general populations have been studied in common multifactorial human diseases. Dysfunction of FOXP3 gene product could result in lack of Treg cells and subsequently chronically activated CD4+ T cells which express increased levels of several activation markers and cytokines, resulting in some autoimmune diseases. In contrast, high Treg levels have been reported in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, and tumour specimens from patients with different types of cancer. The present study discusses the polymorphisms located in intron, exon and promoter regions of FOXP3 which have already been investigated by many researchers. FOXP3 has received considerable attention in attempts to understand the molecular aspect of Treg cells. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of FOXP3 in Treg-cell role and in disease development are reviewed considering the interactive effect of genetic factors.

  1. Severe pneumococcal disease and temporary splenic dysfunction.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelly, M. D.; Huo, Z.; Henderson, D. C.; Soni, N.

    1997-01-01

    We report a patient presenting with pneumonia in whom temporary splenic dysfunction was diagnosed by counting pitted red blood cells. This under-recognised condition caused a transient immunosuppression which may have had serious implications for our patient's recovery.

  2. Role of Rutin on Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Ugusman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, is a major antiatherogenic factor in the blood vessel. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Decreased availability of endothelial NO promotes the progression of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Rutin is a flavonoid with multiple cardiovascular protective effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of rutin on eNOS and NO production in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. HUVEC were divided into four groups: control; oxidative stress induction with 180 μM H2O2; treatment with 300 μM rutin; and concomitant induction with rutin and H2O2 for 24 hours. HUVEC treated with rutin produced higher amount of NO compared to control (P<0.01. In the oxidative stress-induced HUVEC, rutin successfully induced cells’ NO production (P<0.01. Rutin promoted NO production in HUVEC by inducing eNOS gene expression (P<0.05, eNOS protein synthesis (P<0.01, and eNOS activity (P<0.05. Treatment with rutin also led to increased gene and protein expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in HUVEC. Therefore, upregulation of eNOS expression by rutin may be mediated by bFGF. The results showed that rutin may improve endothelial function by augmenting NO production in human endothelial cells.

  3. Inflammatory role of the acinar cells during acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabel; De; Dios

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are secretory cells whose main function is to synthesize, store and f inally release digestive enzymes into the duodenum. However, in response to noxious stimuli, acinar cells behave like real inflammatory cells because of their ability to activate signalling transduction pathways involved in the expression of inflammatory mediators. Mediated by the kinase cascade, activation of Nuclear factor-κB, Activating factor-1 and Signal transducers and activators of transcription transcription factors has been demonstrated in acinar cells, resulting in overexpression of inflammatory genes. In turn, kinase activity is down-regulated by protein phosphatases and the f inal balance between kinase and phosphatase activity will determine the capability of the acinar cells to produce inflammatory factors. The kinase/ phosphatase pair is a redox-sensitive system in which kinase activation overwhelms phosphatase activity under oxidant conditions. Thus, the oxidative stress developed within acinar cells at early stages of acute pancreatitis triggers the activation of signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In this way, acinar cells trigger the release of the f irst inflammatory signals which can mediate the activation and recruitment of circulating inflammatorycells into the injured pancreas. Accordingly, the role of acinar cells as promoters of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis may be considered. This concept leads to amplifying the focus from leukocyte to acinar cells themselves, to explain the local inflammation in early pancreatitis.

  4. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Maazi, Hadi; Lam, Jonathan; Lombardi, Vincent; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are major type-I interferon producing cells that play important roles in antiviral immunity and tolerance induction. These cells share a common DC progenitor with conventional DCs and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand is essential for their development. Several subsets of pDCs have been identified to date including CCR9+, CD9+ and CD2+ pDCs. Recently, three subsets of pDCs were described namely, CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ subsets. Interestingly, CD8α+β− a...

  5. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  6. The Role of Plant Hormones in Nematode Feeding Cell Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Bird, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this Chapter, we discuss recent advances in the role of plant hormones in the molecular mechanisms underlying feeding cell formation both by cyst (CN) and root-knot nematodes (RKN). Phytohormones are small signalling molecules that regulate plant growth and development, including the formation of

  7. The role of EBNA binding proteins in cell transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Darekar, Suhas

    2013-01-01

    Epstein - Barr virus (EBV) infects m ajority of the human population and maintains sub - cl inical infection . However , under certain conditions it is associated with several B - cell malignancies , such as Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma etc. Moreover , EBV also plays a causative role in a cquired immunodeficiency syndrome ( AIDS ) associated lymph omas and post - transplant l...

  8. The putative role of mast cells in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungraithmayr, W

    2015-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were primarily recognized as effector cells of allergy. These cells are acting predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment, such as skin, gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract. Only recently, MCs have gained increased recognition as cells of functional plasticity with immune-regulatory properties that influence both the innate and the adaptive immune response in inflammatory disorders, cancer and transplantation. Through the secretion of both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, MCs can either ameliorate or deteriorate the course and outcome in lung transplantation. Recent research from other models recognized the immune-protective activity of MCs including its role as an important source of IL-10 and TGF-β for the modulation of alloreactive T cell responses or assistance in Treg activity. This paper summarizes the current understanding of MCs in lung transplantation and discusses MC-mediated immune-mechanisms by which the outcome of the engrafted organ is modulated. PMID:25693471

  9. Role of topology in complex functional networks of beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta; Gizzi, Alessio; Loppini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    The activity of pancreatic β cells can be described by biological networks of coupled nonlinear oscillators that, via electrochemical synchronization, release insulin in response to augmented glucose levels. In this work, we analyze the emergent behavior of regular and percolated β-cells clusters through a stochastic mathematical model where "functional" networks arise. We show that the emergence and robustness of the synchronized dynamics depend both on intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. In particular, cellular noise level, glucose concentration, network spatial architecture, and cell-to-cell coupling strength are the key factors for the generation of a rhythmic and robust activity. Their role in the functional network topology associated with β-cells clusters is analyzed and discussed. PMID:26565267

  10. Glycoprotein 130 receptor signaling mediates α-cell dysfunction in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Samuel Z; Speck, Madeleine; Yoganathan, Piriya;

    2014-01-01

    knockout (αgp130KO) mice showed no differences in glycemic control, α-cell function, or α-cell mass. However, when subjected to streptozotocin plus high-fat diet to induce islet inflammation and pathophysiology modeling type 2 diabetes, αgp130KO mice had reduced fasting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance......, reduced fasting insulin, and improved α-cell function. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps revealed no differences in insulin sensitivity. We conclude that in a setting of islet inflammation and pathophysiology modeling type 2 diabetes, activation of α-cell gp130 receptor signaling has deleterious effects...... on α-cell function, promoting hyperglycemia. Antagonism of α-cell gp130 receptor signaling may be useful for the treatment of type 2 diabetes....

  11. Role of calcium in differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDAN; NONGGAOHE; 等

    1993-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in the normal and abnomal cell metabolism.The role of calcium in the differentiation process of murine erythroleukemia cells(MELC)remains controversial.Here,based upon quantitative measurement of fluorescence in single cells,a method was developed to investigate the intracellular free calcium[Ca2+]i concentration and DNA contents simultaneously,by employing the fluorescent probe,fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester and DNA dye Hoechst 33342.During MELC differentiation.[Ca2+]i concentration incresed.We also demonstrated that calcium ionophore,A23187,enhanced the HMB-induced MELC differentiation,while verapamil,an inhibitor of calcuim uptake,slightly reduced differentiation.These results suggested that an increase in the [Ca2+]i level was an essential step in HMBA-induced MELC differentiation.

  12. Endothelial dysfunction: EDCF revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAUL M Vanhoutte

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cells can initiate contraction (constriction) of the vascular smooth muscle cells that surround them. Such endothelium-dependent, acute increases in contractile tone can be due to the withdrawal of the production of nitric oxide, to the production of vasoconstrictor peptides (angiotensin Ⅱ, endothelin-1), to the formation of oxygen-derived free radicals(superoxide anions) and/or the release of vasoconstrictor metabolites of arachidonic acid. The latter have been termed endothelium-derived contracting factor (EDCF) as they can contribute to moment-to-moment changes in contractile activity of the underlying vascular smooth muscle cells. To judge from animal experiments, EDCF-mediated responses are exacerbated when the production of nitric oxide is impaired as well as by aging, spontaneous hypertension and diabetes. To judge from human studies, they contribute to the blunting of endothelium-dependent vasodilatations in aged subjects and essential hypertensive patients. Since EDCF causes vasoconstriction by activation of the TP-receptors on the vascular smooth muscle cells, selective antagonists at these receptors prevent endothelium-dependent contractions, and curtail the endothelial dysfunction in hypertension and diabetes.

  13. Expression and activity of carbonic anhydrase IX is associated with metabolic dysfunction in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ying; Wang, H.; Oosterwijk, E.; Tu, C.; Shiverick, K.T.; Silverman, D.N.; Frost, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a marker for hypoxic tumors, is correlate